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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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teopan, and alcaldia mayor of Zaqualpa. 11 con-tains 204 families of Indians.

CAOTEPEC, Santa Maria, another (settlement), with the dedicatory title of Santa Maria, of the alcaldia mayor of Tacuba.It is very poor and much reduced.

Same name, another (settlement), the capital of the alcaldiamayor of the same kingdom ; the jurisdiction ofwhich comprehends three head settlements of thedistrict. It is of a moderate temperature, abound-ing in seeds and grain, which are cultivated inmany estates of its territoiy ; and in these somecattle also are bred. It contains 340 families ofIndians, 15 of Spaniards, and Mulattoes,with a good convent of monks of St. Domingo.Nine leagues to the no. of Mexico.

Same name , another (settlement), of the head settlement ofAmatepec, and alcaldia mayor of Zultepec, in thesame kingdom. It contains 20 families of Indians,who maintain themselves by breeding large cattle,and in sow ing some fruits and maize. Four leaguesto the n. of its head settlement.

COATEPEQUE, S. Paulo de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Zitaquaro, of the alcaldiamayor of Maravatio, in the bishopric of Mechoa-can. It contains 179 families of Indians, and isone eighth of a league’s distance from its headsettlement towards the s.

COATETELCO, S. Juan de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Mazatepec, and alcaldiaof Cuernavaca, in Nueva Espafia ; situatein a valley of a hot temperature. It contains 94families of Mexican Indians, who pride them-selves on their nobility, and suffer no other peopleto come and dwell among them. Here is a lakeformed by the winter rains, in which are caughtmojarras^ a fish much esteemed in Mexico.

COATINCHAN, a head settlement of the al-caldia mayor of the Puebla de los Angeles inNueva Espana. It has, besides the parish church,a convent of monks of St. Francis, 324 families ofIndians, and 50 of Spaniards, Mustees^ and Mu-lattoes, with those of the wards of its vicinity.Two leagues s. e. of its capital.

COATININGA, a river of tlie country of LasAmazonas, in the Portuguese possessions. It runsn. n. w. and enters the Madera.

COATLAN, a settlement of the head settlementof Metlatlan, and alcaldia mayor of Papantla, inNueva Espana. It contains 25 families of In-dians, and is little more than three leagues to thes. w. of its head settlement.

COATLAN, San Pablo, another (settlement), with the dedicatory title of San Pablo, the head settlement of the district ofthe alcaldia mayor of Miahuatlau in the samekingdom, being of a mild temperature. It con-

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tains 532 families of Indians, with those of itsimmediate wards, all of them employing thenn-selves in the cultivation of maize and other fruitsofthis region. It lies 12 leagues between the e.and s. of its capital.

Same name, another (settlement), the head settlement of thedistrict of the alcaldia mayor of Nexapa a in thesame kingdom. It has a convent of monks of St.Dcmiingo, and contains 114 families of Indians,employed in the cultivation and sale of grain and

cotton garments.

It lies 12 leagues to the n. of

the capital.

Same name, another (settlement), of the head settlement ofCozcatlan, and alcaldia mayor of Tasco, in thesame kingdom. It contains 130 families of In-dians, and lies three leagues to thee, of its capital.

Same name, a river of the province and alcaldiamayor of Soconusco in the kingdom of Guatemala,which runs into the S. sea, to the e. ofthe capital.

COATLINCHAN, San Miguel de, a settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Tezcuco in NuevaEspana. It contains 218 families of Indians, in-cluding those of its immediate wards, and is oneleague to the s. of its capital.

COAUCAZINTLA, a settlement of the dis-trict and head settlement of Tlacolula, and al-caldia mayor of Xalapa, in Nueva Espana ;situate between three lofty mountains, and in themidst of others with which its territory is covered.It is of a mild temperature, the soil is tortile, butproduces only maize and French beans, in whichconsists the commerce of the inhabitants. Theseare composed of 44 families of Indians. Oneleague to the n. e. of its head settlement.

COAUTITLAN, the district and alcaldiamayor of Nueva España ; being one of the mostfertile and rich territories, however inconsiderablein size, covered with cultivated grounds andestates, which produce quantities of maize, wheatbarley, and other grain. It is a grand plainjwatered by the river of its name, which traversesit, and runs from s. to n. It has a lake called Zum-pango, close to the settlement of Coyotepecwhich filling itself from the waters of the river*empties itself into the lake Ecatepec. This juris-diction contains the following settlements :

The capital of the same San Miguel de los Xa«

name.

queyes,

Teoloyuca,

Tepozotlan,

Xaltocan.

Coyotepec,

Santa Barbara,

Tultepec,

Huehuetoca,

The capital, which is the residence of the alcaldiamayor., lies in the direct road from Mexico to theinterior of the provinces, and upon this account3 Q

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which is above 100 leagues distant, and thatthrough a desert country.]

COBITU, a river of the province and mis-sions of the Gran Paititi. It rises in themountains of the infidel Indians, which serveas a boundary to the province of Larecaja ;runs nearly due n. collecting the waters of manyothers, and enters theMarmore w ith the name of Mato.

COBLER’S Rock, a rock or isle of the North sea,very close upon the e. coast of the island of Bar-badoes.

[COBLESKILL, a new town in the county ofSchoharie, New York, incorporated March 1797.]

COBO, a river of the province and governmentof Neiva in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. Itrises in a llanura^ or plain, runs w, and enters theriver Magdalena, opposite the city of La Plata.

COBORCA, a large and capacious bay of theprovince of Pimeria in Nueva Espana.

COBOS, a fortress of the province and govern-ment of Tucuman in Peru ; of the district and ju-risdiction of the city of Salta, from whence it isnine leagues distant ; having been founded in 1693at the foot of a declivity, to serve as an outworkor defence against the Indians of Chaco, it is atpresent destroyed and abandoned, and serves as acountry-house on the estate of an individual.

COBRE, Santa Clara de, a settlement ofthe alcald'ia mayor of Valladolid, in the provincennd bishopric of Mechoacan. It contains 100 fa-milies of Spaniards, bO oi Mustees, 38 of Mulat-toes, and 135 of Indians ; some of whom speculatein working the mines of copper which are closeby, others in the cultivation of maize, and othersgain their livelihood as muleteers. Three leaguess. of the city of Pasquaro.

COBRE, another settlement in the island of Cuba,on the s. coast.

Same name, a river of the province and governmentof Veragua in the kingdom of Tierra Firrae. Ithas its origin in the sierras of Guanico to the s.and enters the Pacific sea.

Same name, a mountain on the coast of the provinceand corregimiento of Coquimbo in the kingdom ofChile. It derives its name from some very abun-dant copper mines. Great quantities of this metalare carried from hence to Spain for founding artil-lery, and for different purposes.

COBULCO, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Los Zacatepeques in the king-dom of Guatemala.

COCA, a large river of the kingdom of Quito.It rises from different streams which flow downfrom the cordillera oi t\\e paramo, or mountain de-sert, of Cotopaxi. It continually follows the course

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of the large river Napo, and at last becomes in-corporated with the same.

COCAGNE, a small river of NovaScotia. It runs e. and enters the sea in the gulf ofSt. Lawrence, and in the strait formed by the islandof St. John, opposite the island of its own name.

[COCALICO, a township in Lancaster county,Pennsylvania.]

COCAMA, a great lake in the midst of thethick woods which lie in the country of Las Amazonas, to the s. and w. of tlie river Ucayale. It is10 leagues long from n. to s. and six wide from e.to w. On the e. it flows out, through a littlecanal, into the river Ucayale, and on the w. itforms the river Cassavatay, which running n. andthen e. enters also the Ucayale. Its shores areconstantly covered with alligators and tortoises.

COCAMAS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe country of Las Amazonas, who inhabit thew'oods to the s. of the river Maraiion, and in thevicinities of Ucayale. It takes its name from theformer lake, called La Gran Cocama. Theyare a barbarous and cruel race, wandering over theforests in quest of birds and wild beasts for meresustenance. Their arms are the macana, and theIndian cimeter, or club of chonia, a very strongebony.

COCANIGUAS, a settlement of the provinceand government of Esmeraldas in the kingdom ofQuito.

COCAS, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Castro Vireyna in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Uuachos.

Same name, another settlement, in the province andcorregimienito of Vilcas Huaiman, of the samekingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Tofos.

COCATLAN, San Luis de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Coatlan, and alcadia mayorof Nexapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains 160 fa-milies of Indians, employed in the trade in cochi-neal and cotton stuffs. It is four leagues to the n.of its head settlement.

COCAYA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Maynas in the kingdom of Quito. Itunites itself with the Ibinelo, and then takes thename of Unquizia, and enters the Putumayo.

COCHA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdomof Quito.

Same name, another settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cotabambas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Llaaquas.

COCHA, another (settlement), of the province and corregimi-ento of Vilcas Huaiman in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Vilcas.

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Same name, another (settlement), of the province and govern-ment of Tucuman, of the jurisdiction of the cityof Cordoba ; situate on the shore of the river Se-gundo.

COCHABAMBA, a province and corregUmiento of Peru ; bounded n. by the cordillera of theAndes, e. by the heiglits of Intimuyo, e. by theprovince of Misque, s. by that of Chayanta orCharcas, s. w. by the corregimiento of Oruro, w.and n. w. by that of Cicasica. It is 40 leagues inlength from n. to s. and 32 in width. This pro-vince may with justice -be called the granary ofPeru, since it produces an abundance of every kindof seed, through the mildness of its climate. Inthe higher parts are bred a tolerable quantity oflarge and small kinds of cattle. It is watered byseveral small rivers of sweet water, which fertilizethe valleys ; and in these are some magnificentestates. Almost all these small rivers becomeunited in the curacy of Capinota ; and their wa-ters, passing through the provinces of Misque andCharcas, become incorporated in the large riverwhich passes on the e. side of Santa Cruz de laSierra. In former times some mines were workedhere, and from 1747, forward, great quantities ofgold have been extracted from the lavaderos, orwashing-places, upon the heights of Choqueca-mata, although this metal is not now found therein the same abundance. Some veins of it are, how-ever, to be seen in the cordillera, although theserender but little emolument. The greatest com-merce carried on in this province depends upon itsown productions ; and the market-place of thevalley of Arque is so stocked with articles as tohave the appearance of a continual fair. It hasalso some glass kilns, as it abounds greatly in glass-wort ; likewise many sugar estates, and streams ofhot waters. Its repartirniento used to amount to186,675 dollars, and its alcavala to 1493 dollarsper annum. Its inhabitants may amount to 70,000;and these are divided into 17 curacies, two othersbeing annexed. The capital is the town of Oro-pcsa, and the rest are,

Sacaba, Carasa,

Choquecamata, Calliri,

Yani, Zipezipe,

Machacamarca, Quillacollo,

Tapacari, Passo,

Berenguela, Tiquipaya,

Coloha, Colcapirhua,

Arque, Punata,

(Japinota, Tarata.

Sipaya,

I Inhabited by a hardy, sober, and active race,Cochabamba (as Azara observes) has risen of late

years to a considerable state of prosperity in themanufactory of glass, cotton, &c. with which, du-ring the late war, it has supplied the whole inte-rior. Blessed with fertility and a moderate cli-mate, it bids fair to be the Manchester of Peru, for1,000,000 pounds of cotton are already annuallyconsumed in its manufactures. Its surface aboundsin a variety of salts and mineral productions, andits forests teem with woods and roots for dyeing.To these Haenke has particularly turned his atten-tion, and has pointed out, besides several new ma-terials for manufacture, other processes for dyeing,worthy of our adoption in Europe. This pro-vince joined the new government of Buenos Ayresin September 1810. See La Pcata.]

Same name, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cuaylas in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Llautan in the province of Santa.

Same name, an extensive valley, watered bythe pleasant streams of the river Condorillo, of theprovince of this name (Condorillo) ; in which was founded theprincipal settlement of the Indians, now calledOropesa.

Same name, a river of the same province,which rises close to the settlement of Tapacari.It runs s. s. e. and enters the Plata, after traversingmany leagues.

COCHACAJAS, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Andahuailas in Peru. It is35 leagues from Cuzco, and 44 from Huamanga.

COCHACALLA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Tarma in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Parianchacra.

COCHACASA, an ancient settlement of Indians, in the province of Chinchasuyu in Peru.It was one of the celebrated conquests of the here-ditary prince of the Incas, Yahuar Huacae, son ofthe Emperor Inca Roca, sixth in the series ofthese inonarcbs.

COCHACASCO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Chorillo.

COCHAIMA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Luya and Chillaos in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Cheto.

COCHAMARCA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru.

COCHANGARA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Xauxa in Peru .

COCHAPETI, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huailas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Cotoparazo.

COCHARCAS, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Andahuailas in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Chincheros ; in which is

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venerated an image of Oar L idy, the most cele-brated for miracles of any in the whole kingdom.The wonderful things, indeed, that have beenwrought here, have caused it to be the object ofgreat devotion ; accordingly an handsome templehas been erected, and the riches and ornamentswhich adorn the same are exceedingly valuable.People conse here from all the distant provinces tooffer up their prayers, to implore the protection ofthe Holy Virgin, and to thank her for benefits re-ceived. The festival here celebrated is on the 8thof September, when the quantity of people as-sembled is so large as to give the place, for thespace of 12 days, t!ie‘ appearance of a fair.

COCHAS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru.

COCHE, an island of the North sea, near the coastof Nueva Andalucia, and belonging to the islandof Margarita. It is nine miles in circumference,and its territory is low and barren. It was cele-brated for the pearl-fishery formerly carried onhere. It is four leagues to the e. of Cubagiia.

COCHEARI, a river of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas. It runs w. and enters theMadera opposite the Yamari.

[COCHECHO, a n.w. branch of Piscataquariver in New Hampshire. It rises in the Bluehills in Strafford county, and its mouth is fivemiles above Hilton’s point. See Piscat.xqua.J

COCHEIRA, Cumplida, a river of the coun-try of Brazil. It rises to the n. of the gold minesof La Navidad, runs w. and enters the Tocantineson the e. side, between the Salto de Ties Leguasand the settlement of the Portal de San Luis.

COCHIMATLAN, a settlement of the headsettlement of Almololoyan, and alcald'ia mayor ofColima, in Nueva Espana. It contains 100 fami-lies of Indians, whose trade consists in the manu-facturing of salt, and the cultivation of their gar-dens, which produce various kinds of fruits. Twoleagues to the w. of its head settlement.

COCHINOCA, a settlement of the provinceand governmeist of Tucuman, in the jurisdictionof the city of Xnjui. It has an hermitage, withthe dedicatory title of Santa Barbara, which is achapel of ease, and three other chapels in the set-tlement of Casivindo. The Indians of this placemanufacture gunpowder equal to that of Europe,and in its district are some gold mines.

COCHINOS, Ensenada de, a bay on the s.coast of the island of Cuba, between the pointGorda and the bay of Xagua, opposite the falls ofi)iego Perez.

COCHITI, a settlement of the kingdom ofNuevo Mexico ; situate at the source of a riverwhich enters the large river Uel Norte, or of theNorth.

COCHOAPA, a settlement of the alcaldia mayorof Tlapa in Nueva Espana; situate upon a dryand barren plain. It contains 150 families of In-dians, who are busied in the cultivation of cotton,the only production of the place.

COCHON, a small isle of the North sea,near the island of Guadalupe, in the bay ofthe Cul de Sac Petit, or Cala Angosta.

COCHUTA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Sonora in Nueva Espana.

COCHUY, a province of the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, to the n. e. ; bounded by the provinceof Chita. It has now the name of Laches, fromhaving been inhabited by this nation of Indians.It is very thinly peopled, of a hot climate, andabounding in Avoods.

COCKAHISPEN, a small river of Canada,which runs n. e. and enters Hudson’s bay.

[COCKBCRNE, a township in the n. part ofNew Hampshire, Grafton county, on the e. bankof Connecticut river, s, of Colebrooke.]

[COCKERMOUTH, a town in Grafton county,New Hampshire, about 15 miles n. e. of Dart-mouth college. It was incorporated in 1766, andin 1775 contained 118 inhabitants ; and in 1790,373.]

[COCKSAKIE. See Coxakie.]

COCLE, a large river of the province and go-vernment of Panama in the kingdom of TierraFirmc. It is formed by the union of the Penomeand the Nata, which run to the right and left ofthe mountain of Toabre, becoming navigable fromthat part to their entrance into the sea. A contra-band trade was in former times constantly carriedon through this river into the S. sea ; for whichreason Don Dionisio de Alcedo (the father of theauthor of this Dictionary) built a fort which de-fended its entrance, as likewise a rvatch-tower orsignal-house, to give notice of any strange vesselswhich might enter the river for the above pur-poses. The English took this tower, and built an-other fort by it in 1746, having been assisted by acompany of at least 200 smugglers. These w eredislodged in their turn by the aforesaid president,who inflicted condign punishment upon the headsof all the offenders.

COCMONOMAS, a barbarous nation of Indians of Peru, who inhabit the mountains ol' theprovince of Guanuco. They are docile, of a noblespirit, and in continual warfare with the Callisecasand Mazupes.

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COD

COCO, a river of the province and governmentof Darien in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. Itrises in the mountains of the n. and enters the seaopposite the island of Las Palmas, and gives itsname to the territory of a Cacique, thus called.

Same name, a point of the coast of the South sea,and kingdom of Tierra Firme, in the bay ofPanama.

COCOLI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Honduras. It runs e. and enters the seain the gulf of this name.

COCOLI, a point of the coast, in the same pro-vince and kingdom (Honduras).

COCOLOT, a city, which some liave supposedto be in the province of Chaco in Peru, but of theexistence of which no proofs are at present to befound.

COCOMERACHI, a settlement of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits, in the province of Taraumara, andkingdom of Nueva Vizcaya. It is 40 leagues tothe w. s.zo. of the town 'And real of the mines ofChiguaga.

COCOMICO, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Popayan in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada,

COCONUCO, See Cucunuco.

COCORALE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Venezuela in the kingdom ofTierra Firme; situate at the w. of the town of SanFelipe.

COCORIN, a settlement of the province ofOstimuri in Nueva Espana; situate on the shoreof the river Hiagui, between the settlements ofBacun and Comoriopa.

COCOROTE, some copper mines in the pro-vince and government of Venezuela, much cele-brated.

COCOS, some small islands of the Pacific orS. sea, lying close together, and divided by somenarrow channels. They abound in cocoa-trees,and from thence take their name. They are alsocalled Santa Cruz, from having been discoveredon the day of the invention of the cross. Theclimate here is pleasant, but the isles are unculti-vated and desert. Lat. 5° n.

Same name, a point of the island of Trinidad, on thee. coast.

COCOSPERA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Sonora in Nueva Espana ; situateat the source of a river,

COCOTA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tunja, in the jurisdiction of thecity of Pamplona, of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada.

COCOTZINGO, S. Geronimo de, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor ofCuernavaca in Nueva Espana.

COCUI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Tunja in the NueVo Reyno de Gra-nada ; situate at the foot of the sierra Nevada. Itis of a cold temperature, but abounds in all kindsof productions, and particularly in wheat, maize,barley, &c. It contains 700 white inhabitants,and 150 Indians. Thirty-two leagues from Tunja,and eight from the settlement of Chita.

COCUISAS, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cumana in the kingdom of TierraFirme, It lies to the s. of the city of Cariaco.

Same name, a river of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela, being one of those whichenter the Gamaiotal, before this runs into that ofLa Portuguesa.

COCULA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Tlajomulco in Nueva Es-pana. It contains a convent of the religious orderof St. Francis, and is six leagues to the w. of itscapital.

COCUPAC, a city and headsettlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofValladolid in Nueva Espana, and of the bishopricof Mechoaean. Its situation is in a nook to the n.of the great lake. On the e. and ze. are two loftymountains, which form so many other entrances,the one to the 5. and the other to the n. Its tem-perature is rather cold than w'arm ; and althoughit does not want for fruits, it is but ill supplied withwater, the only stream it has not running morethan the distance of a stone’s throw before it entersa lake. The inhabitants are thus under the ne-cessity of supplying themselves by wells. Thepopulation of this city consists in 45 families ofSpaniards, 52 of Mustees and Mulattoes, and 150of Indians. They occupy themselves in the mak-ing of tiles or flags ; and the inferior order aremuleteers. It has a convent of the religious orderof St. Francis.

COCUS, Punta de, a point on the e. coast ofthe island of Newfoundland, between cape Spearand the bay of Tor.

COD, a cape of the coast of New England andprovince of Massachusetts. It runs for many leaguestowards the sea, forming a large semicircle, andafterwards returning, forms the bay of Barnstable.[See Cape Cod, Barnstable, &c.]

CODDINGTON, a settlement of the island ofBarbadoes, in the district of the parish of SanJuan.

CODEBORE, a small river of New Britain,

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