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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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into tlie Banos, and which, after the great cascade, is known by the name of Pastaza. To the n. rises the Padregal, afterwards called Pita, as it passes through the llanura of Chillo ; and at the skirt of the mountain of Guangopolo, where the plain terminates, it unites itself with the Amag^uaiia, and then turning w. takes the names of Tumbaco and Huallabamba, to enter the Esmeraldas, which disembogues itself into the S. sea. At the skirt of this great mountain are the estates of Sinipu, Pongo, Pucaguaita, and Papaurca, It is distant from the settlement of Mula-halo half a league, and five leagues from its capital. In lat. 40° IPs. (The height of this volcano was discovered, in 1802, to be only 260 feet lower than the crater of Antisana, which is 19,130 feet above the level of the sea.)

COTOPASSA, a river of the province of Canela in the kingdom of Quito, towards the s. e. It runs s. e. and enters the n. side of the river Pastaza, which, from that point, begins to be navigable.

COTOPAXI. See Cotopacsi.

COTUA, a settlement of the province and government of Cumaná ; situate on the shore of a river near the coast of the gulf of Cariaco, between the city of this name and thatof Cumanagoto.

COTUE, a small island of the N. sea; siPiate near the n. coast of the island of Cuba.

COTUI, a town of St. Domingo ; founded, in 1504, by Rodrigo Mexia deTruxillo, by the order of the cometidador mayor of Alca.ntara, Nicolas de Obando, 16 leagues to the n. of the capital, St. Domingo, on the skirt of some mountains which are 12 leagues in height, and at the distance of two leagues from the river Yauna. It is a small and poor town. Its commerce depends upon the salting of meats, and in preparing tallow and hides to carry to St. Domingo, and in the chase of wild goats, which are sold to the French. In its mountains is a copper mine, two leagues to the s. e. of the town. The Bucaniers, a French people of the island of Tortuga, commanded by Mr. Pouancy, their governor, took and sacked it in 1676. (In

1505, the gold mines were worked here. The copper mine above alluded to is in the mountain of Meymon, whence comes the river of the same name, and is so rich, that the metal, when refined, will produce eight per cent, of gold. Here are also found excellent lapis lazuli, a streaked chalk, that some painters prefer to bole for gilding, loadstone, emeralds, and iron. The iron is of the best quality, and might be conveyed from the chain of Sevico by means of the river Yuna. The soil here is excellent, and the plantains produced here are of such superior quality, that this manna of the

Antilles is called, at St. Domingo, Sunday plantains. The people cultivate tobacco, but are chiefly employed in breeding swine. The inhabitants are called clownish, and of an unsociable character. The town is situated half a league from the s. w. bank of the Yuna, which becomes unnavigable near this place, about 13 leagues from its mouth, in the bay of Samana. It contains 160 scattered houses, in the middle of a little savana, and surrounded Avith woods, SO leagues n. of St. Domingo, and 15 s.e. of St. Yago.)

COUCHSAGE, a settlement of Indians of the province and colony of New York ; situate on the shore of the river Hudson.

(COUDRAS, a small island in St. Lawrence river, about 45 miles n. e. of Quebec.)

COUECHI, a settlement of Indians of N. Carolina, in the territory of the Cheroquees.

COUICAN, a settlement of the head settlement of Guiméo, and alcald'ia mayor of Cirindaro, in Nueva Espafia. It contains 93 families of Indians.

COUL, Bay of, on the e. coast of the cape Breton, in Spanish bay, and at the entrance of the lake Labrador.

COULEURE, a bay of the island of Martinique, one of the Antilles, on the n. w. coast, near Pearl island.

Couleure, a small river of this island, which runs «. w. and enters the sea in the bay of its name.

CORUCO. Sec Cabo.

(COUNTRY Harbour, so called, is about 20 leagues to the e. of Halifax, in Nova Scotia.)

COUPEE, a point of the coast and shore of the Mississippi in Canada, [it is also called Cut Point, and is a short turn in the river Mississippi, about 35 miles above Mantchac fort, at the gut of Ibberville, and 259 from the mouth of the river. Charlevoix relates that the river formerly made a great turn here, and some Canadians, by deepening the channel of a small brook, diverted the waters of the river into if, in the year 1722. The impetuosity of the stream was such, and the soil of so rich and loose a quality, that in a short time the point was entirely cut through, and the old channel left dry, except in inundations ; by which travellers save 14 feagues of their voyage. The new channel has been sounded Avith a line of SO fathoms, without finding bottom. The Spanish settlements of Point Coupee extend 20 miles on the w. side of the Mississippi, and there are some plantations back on the side of La Fause Riviere, through Avhich the Mississippi passed about 70 years ago. The fort at Point Coupee is a square

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Oaxaca. It contains only 20 families of Indians, wbo live by the cultivation of the cochineal plant and seeds.

COZCATLAN, a settlement and head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Tasco in Nueva Espana. It contains 200 families of Indians, and is five leagues c. of its capital.

COZEL, a settlement of the jurisdiction and aknld'ia mayor of Culiacan in Nueva Espaila.

COZINAS, a bay of the coast of the province and government of Yucatán.

COZINERA, a shoal of rocks on the coast of the S. sea, of the province and government of Tierra Firme, very near the point of Paytilla, in the bay of Panama.

COZOCOZONQUE, a settlement of the head settlement of Puxmecatan, and alcaldia mayor of ViUalta, in Nueva Espana. It is of a hot temperature, contains 85 families of Indians, and is 29 leagues to the e. of its capital.

COZTLA, San Miguel de, a settlement of the head settlement of Coronango, and alcaldia mayor of Cholula, in Nueva Espana. It contains 48 families of Indians, and is two leagues to the n. of the capital.

COZUMEL, an island of the N. sea, opposite the e. coast of Yucatan, to the province and government of which it belongs. It is 10 leagues long n. w.f s. w. and from four to five wide. It is fertile, and abounds in fruit and cattle, and is covered with shady trees. The Indians call it Cuzamel, which in their language signifies the island of swallows. Here was the most renowned sanctuary of any belonging to the Indians in this province, and a noted pilgrimage, and the remains of some causeways over which the pilgrims used to pass. It was discovered by the Captain Juan de Grijalba in 1518, and the Spaniards gave it the name of Santa Cruz, from a cross that was deposited in it by Hernan Cortes, when he demolished the idols, and when at the same time the first mass ever said in this kingdom of Nueva Espana, was celebrated by the Fray Bartolome de Olrnedo, of the order of La Merced, At present it is inhabited by Indians only. It is three leagues distant from the coast of Tierra Firme.

(CRAB-ORCHARD, a post-town on Dick’s river, in Kentucky, eight miles from Cumberland river, and 25 miles s. e. of Danville. The road to Virginia passes through this place.)

CRABS, or Boriquen, an island of the N. sea ; situate on the s. side of the island of St. Domingo, first called so by the Bucaniers, from the abundance of crabs found upon its coast. It is large and beautiful, and its mountains and plains arc covered

with trees. The English established themselves here in 1718, but they were attacked and driven out by the Spaniards of St. Domingo in 17^0, who could not suffer a colony of strangers to settle so near them. The women and children were, however, taken prisoners, and carried to the capital and Portobelo. See Boriquen.

CRAMBERRI, a small river of the province and colony of N. Carolina. It runs s. and enters the source of the Conhaway.

CRAMBROOK, a river of the province and colony of Pennsylvania in N. America.

(CRANBERRY, a thriving town in Middlesex county. New Jersey, nine miles e. of Princeton, and 16 s. s. w. of Brunswick. It contains a handsome Presbyterian church, and a variety of manufactures are carried on by its industrious inhabitants. The stage from New York to Philadelphia passes through Amboy, this town, and thence to Bordentown.)

(Cranberry Islands, on the coast of the district of Maine. See Mount Desert Island.)

(CRANEY, a small island on the s. side of James river, in Virginia, at the mouth of Elizabeth river, and five miles 5. w. of fort George, on point Comfort. It commands the entrance of both rivers.)

(CRANSTON is the s. easternmost township of Providence county, Rhode Island, situated on the w. bank of Providence river, five miles s. of the town of Providence. The corajiact part of the town contains 50 or 60 houses, a Baptist meeting house, handsome school-house, a distillery, and a number of saw and grist mills^and is called Pawtuxet, from the river, on both sides of whose mouth it stands, and over which is a bridge connecting the two parts of the town. It makes a pretty appearance as you pass it on the river. The whole township contains 1877 inhabitants.)

CRAVEN, a county of the province and colony of Carolina in N. America, situate on the shore of the river Congaree, which divides the province into South and North. It is filled with English and F'rench protestants. The latter of these disembarked here to establish themselves in 1706, but were routed, and the greater part put to death by the hands of the former. The river Sewee waters this county, and its first establishment was owing to some families wlio had come hither from New England. It has no large city nor any considerable town, but has two forts upon the river Saute, the one called Sheuinirigh fort, which is 45 miles from tlie entrance or mouth of the river, and the other called Congaree, 65 miles from the other. [It contains 10,469 inhabitants, of whom S658are slaves.}

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moiily called Acklin’s island), and Long Kej, (or Fortune island), are tlie principal, Castle island (a very small one) is the most s. and is situated at the s. end of Acklin’s island, which is the largest of the group, and extends about 50 miles in length ; atthew. extremity it is seven miles in breadth, but grows narrow towards the s. N. Crooked island is upwards of 20 miles long, and from two to six broad; Long Key, about two miles in length, l)ut very narrow : on this latter island is a valuable salt pond. Near Bird rock, which is the most w, extremity of the group, and at the w. point of N. Crooked island, is a reef harbour, and a good anchorage ; a settlement has been lately established there, called Pitt’s Town, and this is the place where the Jamaica packet, on her return to Europe through the Crooked island passage, leaves once every month the Bahama mail from England, and takes on board the mail for Europe ; a port of entry is now established there. There is likewise very good anchorage, and plenty of fresh water at the French w'ells, which lie at the bottom of the bay, about half-way between Bird rock and thes. end of Long Key. There is also a good harbour, (called Atwood’s harbour) at the w. end of Acklin’s island, but fit only for small vessels, and another at Major’s Keys, on the n. side of N, Crooked island, for vessels drawing eight or nine feet water. The population in ISOtf amounted to about 40 whites, and 950 Negroes, men, women, and children; and previous to May 1803, lands were granted by the crown, (o the amount oi 24,2 18 acres, for the purpose of cultivation. The middle of the island lies in lat. 22^ 30' «. ; long. 74° tii). See Bahamas.)

(Crooked Lake, in the Genessee country, communicates in an e, by n. diiection with Seneca lake.)

(Crooked Lake, one of tlie chain of small lakes which connects the lake of tiie Woods with lake Superior, on the boundary line between the United States and Upper Canada, remarkable for its rugged cliff, in the cxacks of which are a number of arrow's sticking.)

(Crooked River, in Camden county, Georgia, empties into the sea, opposite Cumberland island, 12 or 14 miles n. from the mouth of St. Mary’s. Its banks are well timbered, and its course is e. by ??.)

(CROSS-CREEK, a township in Washington county, Pennsylvania.)

(Cross-Creeks. See Fayettevilee.)

(Cross-Roads, the name of a place in N. Carolina. near Duplin court-house, 23 miles from

Sampson court-house, and 23 from S. Washington.)

(Cross-Roads, a village in Kent county, Maryland, situated two miles s. of Georgetown, on Sassafras river, and is thus named from four roads which meet and cross each other iu the village.)

(Cross-Roads, a village in Chester county, Pennsylvania, where six ditferent roads meet. It is 27 miles s. e. of Lancaster, 11 n. by w. of Elkton in Maryland, and about 18 w.n.w. of Wilmington iu Delaware.)

CROSSING, a settlement of the island of Barbadoes, in the district of the parish of San Juan.

(CROSSWICKS, a village in Burlington county, New Jersey; through which the line of stages passes from New York to Philadelphia. It has a respectable Quaker meeting-house, four miles 5. ti;. of Allen town, eight s. e. of Trenton, and 14 s. w. of Burlington.)

(CROTON River, a n. e. water of Hudson river, rises in the town of New Fairfield in Connecticut, and running through Dutchess county, empties into Tappan bay. Croton bridge is thrown over this river three miles from its mouth, on the great road to Albany ; this is a solid, substantial bridge, 1400 feet long, the road narrow, piercing through a slate hill; it is supported by 16 stone pillars. Here is an admirable view of Croton falls, where the water precipitates itself between 60 and 70 feet perpendicular, and over high slate banks, in some places 100 feet, the river spreading into three streams as it enters the Hudson.)

(CROW Creek falls into the Tennessee, from the n. w. opposite the Crow town, 15 miles below Nickajack town.)

(Crow Indians, a people of N. America, divided into four bands, called by themselves Ahah'ar-ro-pir-no-pah, No6-ta, Pa-rees-car, and Eliart'-sar. They annually visit the Mandans, Menetares, and Ahwahhaways, to whom they barter liorses, mules, leather lodges, and many articles of Indian apparel, for which they receive in return guns, ammunition, axes, kettles, awls, and other European manufactures. When they return to their country, they are in turn visited by the Paunch and Snake Indians, to whom they barter most of the articles they have obtained from the nations on the Missouri, for horses and mules, of which those rrations have a greater abundance than themselves. They also obtain of the Snake Indians bridle-bits and blankets, and some other articles, which those Indians purchase from the Spaniards. Their country is fertile, and well watered, and in many parts well timbered.

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CURUCAG, a small river of the province and government of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia. It rises to the w. of the settlement Murucuri, runs w. and afterwards turning; n. enters the Orinoco opposite the mouth of the Curusama. CURUCAY, a river of the province and captains/u'p of San Vicente in Brazil. It rises near the coast, and runs to the w. CURUCUANES, a barbarous nation of Indians but little known, who inhabit the shores of the river Paraguay towards the w. CURUGUATI, a settlement of the province and government of Paraguay ; situate on the shore of the river Xexuy. It was in former times very considerable, but at present reduced to a scanty population of people of colour, who live in a miserable way. [About 39 leagues n. e. of Asuncion. Lat. 24° 28' 10". Long. 55° 54' 25" a>.] CURULAUA, a valley or llanura of the kingdom of Chile, in the country and territory of the Araucanos Indians ; celebrated for their having here surprised the Spaniards, and having at the same time put to death the governor Don Martin Garcia Ofiez de Loyola, with 50 others who accompanied him. CURUMA, a settlement of the province and government of Valparaiso in the kingdom of Chile; situate on the coast and at the point of its name. Curtima, a river of the province and government of Cutnana. It rises in the serrania of Ymataca, runs 5. and unites itself with the Tucupu to enter the Cuyuni.

CURUME, an ancient and large province of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, to the w. of the river Cauca : discovered by the Marshal George Robledo. The Indians who inhabited it, and who were called Curumenes, have become extinct, notwithstanding that they were in great numbers at the time of the entrance of the Spaniards in 1542. Some believe that they have retired within the woods, and to the mountains of Darien. This province, which is bounded by that of Popayan, and is at the present day contained in the same, is mountainous, rough, barren, and of an unhealthy climate ; and although rich in gold mines, these are not worked. Curume, a small town of the same province ; situate in an extensive valley, which also takes this denomination, near the river Tonusco.

GURUPA==, or ==Coropa, a settlement of the province and captainship of Para in Brazil « situate "on the shore of the river Maranon. CurupAj a river of the province and govern- cus ment of Buenos Ayres, which runs e. and enters the Aguapey.

CURUPARER, a small river of the province and government of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia. It rises in the country of the Parecas Indians, near the settlement of San Joseph de Otomacos, runs n. and enters the Orinoco to the w. of the settlement of Encaramada. CURUPI, a river of the province and government of San Juan de los Llanos, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It rises near the Curaseni, runs e. and nearly parallel to the same river, and enters the Orinoco. CURUPUTUBA, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, or part of Guayana possessed by the Portuguese. It rises in the sierra of Tumucuraque, runs s. many leagues, between the rivers Ubuquara to the e. and Tombetas to the w. and enters the Maranon on the n. side, in lat. 1°52' s. The infidel Curuputubas Indians live more than 40 leagues to the n. of the river, near the mouth of the Topajocos. Curuptjtuba, a settlement of the Portuguese, being a reduction of Indians of this name; situate on the shore of the above river, after which it is called.

CURURU, a small river of the province and captainship of Pernambuco in Brazil. It rises near the coast, runs s. s. e. and enters the sea between the Ypoba and the Yquen. CURUTUTE, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, which, according to Mr. Bellin, runs s. s. e. and enters the Maranon, between the rivers Uruparate and Putumayo.

CURUZICARIS== or ==Yumaguaris, which signifies Founder of Metals, a barbarous and numerous nation of Indians, who inhabit the woods near the river Maranon, towards the y. and extending as far as the mountains to the w. of the kingdom of Brazil. The same extract from the mines great quantities of gold. They have some sort of civil government, are industrious, and fond of labour. CUSABATAY, a river of the province and government of Mainas in the king- e. for many leagues, and dorn of Quito, runs enters the Ucayale. CUSAHUAYA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Ambana. [CUSCO==. ==See Cuzco.]

CUSCOPANG==, a river of the province and colony of N. Carolina. It runs n. and enters the sea in the strait of Albemarle. [CUSCOWILLA, in E. Florida, is the capital of the Aluchua tribe of Indians, and stands in

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the most pleasant situation that could be desired, in an inland country, upon a high swelling ridge of sand hills, within 3 or 400 yards of a large and beautiful lake, abounding with fish and fowl. The lake is terminated on one side by extensive forests, consisting of orange groves, overtopped with grand magnolias, palms, poplar, tilia, liveoaks, &c. ; on the other side by extensive green plains and meadows. The town consists of 30 habitations, each of which consists of two houses, nearly of the same size, large, and convenient, and covered close with the bark of the cypress tree. Each has a little garden spot, containing corn, beans, tobacco, and other vegetables. In the great Alachua savannah, about two miles distant, is an inclosed plantation, which is worked and tended by the whole community, yet every family has its particular part. Each family gathers and deposits in its granary its proper share, setting apart a small contribution for the public granary, which stands in the midst of the plantation.]

CUSE, a river of the kingdom of Peru. It rises in the mountains of the province of Moxos, and runs e. w. from the river and lake of Sara to the river Ubay. It follows its course to the n. and enters the last mentioned river. [CUSHAI, a small river which empties into Albemarle sound, between Chowan and the Roanoke, in N. Carolina.] [CUSHETUNK Mountains, in Hunterdon county, New Jersey.]

[CUSHING, a township in Lincoln county, district of Maine, separated from Warren and Thoraaston by St. George's river. It was incorporated in 1789, contains 942 inhabitants, and lies 216 miles w. by n. of Boston.] CUSHNOE, a waterfal of the river Kenebec, in the province of Sagadahoc, opposite fort Wertern. CUSI, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Yauyos in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Pampas. CUSIANA, a settlement of the jurisdiction of Santiago de las Atalayas, and government of San Juan de los Llanos, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; annexed to the curacy of Santiago. It is much reduced and very poor, of a hot temperature, and producing only maize, yucas, plantains, &c. Cusiana, a river of the same province (San Juan de los Llanos). It rises from a small lake near the settlement of Gameza, in the jurisdiction and corregimiento of Tunja, and there enters the Mcta.

CUSIBAMBA, a river of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru. It rises in the cordillera of the Andes, runs w. and en- e u t iers the Apurimac, opposite the settlement of Curaguasi. Cusibamba, a valley of this province.

CUSICAS, a barbarous nation of Indians, who dwell to the e. of the nation of the Chiquitos, and to the n. of the settlement of San Juan Bautista de los Xamoros. All that is known of them is, that they are numerous and ferocious. CUSITAS, a settlement of Indians of the province and colony of Georgia ; situate on the shore of the river Apalachicola. CUSMO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Santa in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Guarmey. [CUSSENS, a small river in Cumberland county, Maine, which runs a s. e. course to Casco bay, between the towns of Freeport and N. Yarmouth.] [CUSSEWAGA, a settlement in Pennsylvania.] CUSSIA, a settlement of the Salivas Indians, forming the greater part of this nation, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; situate near the river Sinaruco, in the llanuras or plains of the Orinoco. The Caribes destroyed and burnt it in 1684. CUSSIQUINA, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, which laves the territory of the Mayorunas Indians, who live upon its borders to the s. This river, after running many leagues to the n, e. enters the said territory, in lat. 3° 20' *.

[CUSSITAH, an Indian town in the w. part of Georgia, 12 miles above the Broken Arrow, on Chattahoosee river.] CUSTODIO, a river of the kingdom of Brazil. It runs n. n. w. is small, and enters the Tocantines, between that of San Elias and the river Preto or De la Palma. CUSUMPE, a small lake of the province of Hampshire; one of those of New England, between the rivers Pennycook and Pygwaket. CUTACO, a river in a narrow vale of the Andes, the bed of which was ascertained by Humboldt, in 1802, to be at the vast depth of 4200 feet. On its banks are many plantations of sugarcanes. CUTAGOCHI, a settlement of Cherokees Indians, in the province, and colony of S. Carolina ; situate at the source of the river Eu phase, where the English have a commercial establishment. CUTAWA, or Catawba, a river of N. Carolina. It runs n. and enters the Ohio ;. its waters are always full of coal.

CUTERUO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed to' the curacy of Huambos.

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