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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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Chuquibamba, and the other settlements of its jurisdiction, -which comprehend nine curacies, are the following :

Chuquibamba,

San Pedro de Illotnas, Andaray, Yanaquihua, Chorunga,

Alpacaj,

Llanca,

Cayaraiii,

Areata,

Salamanca,

Chichas,

Quechalla,

Belinga,

Andaliua,

Cliilca and Marca, Viraco,

Pampacolca, Umachulco,

H uancarama, Orcopampa,

Chachas,

Ayo,

San J nan Crisostomo de Choco,

Ucuchacas, Machahuay,

Arirahua, Tipan.

CONDIRAS, an arm of the river Jamunda, in the country of Las Amazonas, and in the Portuguese possessions. It runs from the lake Maripava, and enters the Maranon.

CONDOCONDO, a settlement of the province and corre^imiento of Pariá in Peru.

CONDONOMA, a mine, celebrated for its abundance of silver, of the province and corregimiento of Tinta in Peru.

CONDORGUASI, a settlement of the province and government of Tucumán in Peru ; belonging to the jurisdiction of Jujui, situate on the shore of the river Laquiaca.

CONDOROMA, a settlement and asiento of the silver mines of the province of Canes and Canches or Tinta in Peru, -where, during tempests of thunder and lightning, is experienced a singular phenomenon ; namely, a certain prickly sensation upon the hands and face, -which they called moscas, (flies), though none of these insects are ever seen. It is indeed attributed to the air, which is at that time highly charged with electric fluid ; the effects of which may be observed on the handles of sticks, buckles, lace, and other metal trinkets ; the same effects ceasing as soon as the tempest is over. It is observed, that in no other parts is the same phenomenon known to exist.

CONDOROMA, another settlement, of the province and government of Chucuito in the same kingdom ; situate on the shore of the lake.

CONDUITE, or CoNDUITA, a small river of the province and country of the Iroquees Indians. It runs w. forming a curve, and enters the lake Oswego.

(CONDUSKEEG, a settlement in the district of Maine, in Hancock county, containing 567 inhabitants.)

CONEUAGUANET, a small river of the pro-

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vince and colony of Pennsylvania and counfy of Cumberland. It runs c. and enters the Susquehanna.

CONEGA, a small island of the s. coast of the island of Newfoundland, between the isle of Despair and port Bartran.

CONEGHTA, a small river of S. Carolina. It rises in the territory of the Tuscaroras Indians, runs s. e. and enters the Neus.

(CONEGOCHEAGUE Creek rises near Mercersburg, Franklin county, Pensylvania, runs s. in a -winding course, and after supplying a number of mills, empties into the Potowmack, at William port, in W ashington county, Maryland ; 19 miles s. e. of Hancock, and eight miles s, of the Pennsylvania line.)

CONEGOGEE, a small river of the province and colony of Maryland. It runs s. and enters the Potowmack.

CONEIUAGA, a small river of the province and colony of Pennsylvania, in the county of York, It runs e. and enters the Susquehanna.

(CONEMAUGH River, and Little Cor emaugh, are the head waters of Kiskemanitas, in Pennsylvania : after passing through Laurel hill and Chesnut ridge, Conemaugh takes that name, and empties into the Alleghany, 29 miles n. e. of Pittsburg. It is navigable for boats, and there is -a portage of 18 miles between it and the Frankstown branch of Juniata river.)

(CONENTES, Las, a city of La Plata or Paraguay in S. America, in the diocese of Buenos Ayres.)

(CONESTEO, a w. w. branch of Tioga river in New York. See Canjcodeo Creek.)

CONESTOGA, a settlement of Indians of the same province and colony as the former river ; situate between the e. and w. arms of the river Susquehanna, where the English have a fort and establishment for its defence.

Conestoga, a river of this province, whichruns w. then turns s. and enters the Susquehanna.

(CONESUS, a small lake in the Genessee country. New York, which sends its waters n. w, to Genessee river.)

CONETLA, a settlement of the province and alcaldia mayor of Comitlan in the kingdom of Guatemala.

CONFINES. See Villanueva de los Infantes.

CONFUSO. See Togones.

CONG, a small river of the province and c^piainship of Rio Grande in Brazil. It rises near the coast, runs e. and enters the sea between the river Goyana and the settlement of Gonzalo.

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COR

CORIXAS, a river of the kingdom of Brazil, It rises in the sierra Bermeja, runs n. forming a curve, and eaters the Tocantines near that of Los Monges, according to tl>e account given by the Portuguese.

CORIXAS, some sierras of the same kingdom, which run s. s. e. and are a continuation of the sierra Bermeja ; they then run e. forming a curve, as far as the river Tocantines, and extend their course on as far as the shore of the Araguaya.

CORK, a large bay in the e. coast of the island of Newfoundland, between the cape Gull and the island Tuliquet.

CORKAM, a fort of the English, in the province and colony of Connecticut, one of the four which composQ New England ; situate near the coast.

CORMA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Quispicanchi in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Papres.

CORMO, a settlement of the province and government of Canta in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Atabillos Altos.

CORNE, an island of the N. sea, near the coast of Florida, between the islands Vaisseaux and Massacre.

CORNEJO, an island of the S. sea, near the coast of the province and corregimiento of Arequipa, opposite the port of Arantae.

(CORNISH, a township in Cheshire county, New Hampshire, on the e. bank of Connecticut river, between Claremont and Plainfield, about 15 miles n. of Charlestown, and 16 s. of Dartmouth college. It was incorporated in 1763. In 1775 it contained 309, and in 1790, 982 inhabitants.

(CORNWALL, a township in Addison county, Vermont, e. of Bridport, on lake Champlain, containing 826 inhabitants.)

(Cornwall, NEW, atownship in Orange county, New York, of whose inhabitants 350 are dectors.)

(Cornwall, a township in Litchfield county, Connecticut, about nine miles n. of Litchfield, 11 s. of Salisbury, and about 40 w. by n. of Hartford city.)

(Cornwall, a small town in Upper Canada, on the bank of Iroquois river, near lake St. Francis, between Kingston and Quebec, containing a small church, and about 30 or 40 houses.)

(Cornwallis, a town in King’s county, in the province of New Brunswick, situated on the s. w. side of the basin of Minas ; 18 miles n. w. of Falmouth, and 55 n. w. of Annapolis.)

(Cornwallis, also a river in the »arae province, navigable for vessels of 100 tons five miles ; for vessels of 50 tons, 10 miles.

CORO, Santa Ana de, a city of the province and government of Venezuela, thus named in the time of the Indians, after the district called Coriana. It was founded by Juan de Ampues in 1529. The Weltzers, under the orders of Nicholas Federman, were the first Avho peopled it, giving it the name of Cordoba, to distinguish it from the other city of the same name which had been founded by Gonzalo de Ocampo in the province of Cumana, This name it afterwards lost, and took that of Coro, which it preserves to this day, from a small settlement of Indians thus named. It is of a dry and hot temperature, but so healthy that physicians are said here to be of no use. The territory, although sandy and lack of water, produces every kind of vegetable production ; so that it may be said to abound in every thing that luxury or con^ venience may require. Here are large breeds of cow-cattle and goats, and a considerable number of good mules. Its articles of merchandize, such as cheese, tanned hides, and cacao, meet with a ready sale in Cartagena, Caracas, and the island of St. Domingo. It has a reduced convent of the religious order of St. Francis, and an hermitage dedicated to St. Nicholas. The town is very rich. It was plundered, by the English in 1567. Its church was a cathedral, and the head of the bishopric, from the time that it was erected in 1532 until 1636, when this title was transferred to Santiago of Caracas. It is two leagues distant from the sea, where there is a port insecure, but much frequented by trading vessels.

(From the time that the governor began to reside at Caracas, in 1576, there remained no conspicuous authority at Coro but the bishop and chapter, and they did all they could to follow th« governor; and indeed, not being able to leave Coro by legal measures, they put tlieir wishes into effect by flight, in 1636. At three leagues from the city are lands where they cultivate with success, if not with abundance, all the usual produce of the country. The inhabitants, who are much addicted to indolence, glory that they are descended from the first conquerors of the country ; and there is here, generally speaking, more rank than wealth, and more idleness than industry. The little trade that is carried on here consists in mules, goats, hides, sheep-skins, cheeses, &c. which come in a great measure from the interior, and the larger part fromCarora; shipments of these articles are made for the islands. The most common intercourse is with Cura 9 oa, from whence they 2

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datorj parties against the settlements in their vicinity. The Creeks are very badly armed, having few rifles, and are mostly armed with muskets. For near 40 years past, the Creek Indians have had little intercourse with any other foreigners but those of the English nation. Their prejudice in favour of every thing English, has been carefully kept alive by tories and others to this day. Most of their towns have now in their possession British drums, with the arms of the nation and other emblems painted on them, and some of their squaws preserve the remnants of British flags. They still believe that “ the great king over the water” is able to keep the whole world in subjection. The land of the country is a common stock ; and any individual may remove from one part of it to another, and occupy vacant ground where he can find it. The country is naturally divided into three districts, viz. the Upper Creeks, Lower and Middle Creeks, and Seminoles. The upper district includes all the waters of the Tallapoosee, Coosahatchee, and Alabama rivers, and is called the Abbacoes. The lower or middle district includes all the waters of the Chattahoosee and Flint rivers, down to their junction ; and although occupied by a great number of different tribes, the whole are called Cowetaulgas or Coweta people, from the Cowetan town and tribe, the most warlike and ancient of any in the whole nation. The lower or s. district takes in the river Appalachicola, and extends to the point of E. Florida, and is called the Country of the Seminoles. Agriculture is as far advanced with the Indians as it can well be, without the proper implements of husbandry. A very large majority of the nation being devoted to hunting in the winter, and to war or idleness in summer, cultivate but small parcels of ground, barely sufficient for subsistence. But many individuals, (particularly on Flint river, among the Chehaws, who possess numbers of Negroes) have fenced fields, tolerably well cultivated. Having no ploughs, they break up the ground with hoes, and scatter the seed promiscuously over the ground in hills, but not in rows. They raise horses, cattle, fowls, and hogs. The only articles they manufacture are eartlien pots and pans, baskets, horse-ropes or halters, smoked leather, black marble pipes, wooden spoons, and oil from acorns, hickery nuts, and chesnuts.)

(Creeks, confederated nations of Indians. See Muscogulge.)

(Creeks Crossing Place, on Tennessee river, is about 40 miles e. s. e. of the mouth of Elk river, at the Muscle shoals, and 36 s.w. of Nickajack, in the Georgia w. territory.)

(CREGER’S Town, in Frederick county, Maryland, lies on the w. side of Monococy river, between Owing’s and Hunting creeks, which fall into that river ; nine miles s. of Ermmtsburg, near the Pennsylvania line, and about 11 n. of Frederick town.)

CREUSE, or River Hondo, a river of Canada, which runs s.w. and enters the St. Lawrence, in the country of the Acones Indians.

CRIPPLE, Bay of, on the s. coast of the island of Newfoundland, on the side of Race cape.

CRISIN, a small island of the N. sea, near the 71. coast of the island of St. Domingo, between the islands of Molino and Madera, opposite to port Belfin.

CRISTO. See Manta.

(CROCHE, a lake of N. America, in New South Wales, terminated by the portage La Loche, 400 paces long, and derives its name from the appearance of the water falling over a rock of upwards of 30 feet. It is about 12 miles long. Lat. 36° 40'. Long, 109° 25' w.)

CROIX, or Cross, a river of the province and government of Louisiana, the same as that which, with the name of the Ovadeba, incorporates itself with the Ynsovavudela, and takes this name, till it enters the Mississippi.

Croix, another river of Nova Scotia or Acadia. It rises in the lake Konsaki, runs s. and enters the sea in the port of Portages.

Croix, another, of the same province and colony, which rises near the coast of the city of Halifax, runs 7^. and enters the basin of the Mines of the bay of Fundy.

Croix, an island near the coast of the same province and colony, between that of Canes and the bay of Mirligueche.

Croix, a bay of the island of Guadalupe, on the s. w. coast, between the river Sence, and the port of the Petite Fontaine, or Little Fountain.

Croix, a port of the n. coast of the island of Newfoundland, in the strait of Bellisle.

Croix, a lake of Canada, in the country and territor}'’ of the Algonquins Indians, between that of St. 'I'homas and the river Bastican.

Croix, a small settlement in the island of Martinique.

(Croix, St. See Cruz, Santa.)

CRON, a small river of the province and captainship of Seara in Brazil. It rises near tlie coast, runs n. and enters the sea at the point of Tortuga.

(CROOKED Island, one of the Bahama islands, or rather a cluster of islands, of which North Crooked island, South Crooked island, (com-

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