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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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rapid current, between high banks on eacli side, and pours the whole body of its water over a perpendicular rock of about 40 (some say more) feet in height, which extends quite across the river like a mill-dam. The banks of the river, immediately below the falls, are about 100 feet high.

A bridge 1100 feet long, and 24 feet wide, resting on 13 piers, was erected, at the expence of 12,000 dollars, in 1794, a mile below the falls, from which a spectator may have a grand view of them; but they appear most romantically from Lansinburgh hill, five miles e. of them. 1

(COHONGORONTO is the name of Potowraack river before it breaks through the Blue ridge, in lat, 39° 45' n. Its whole length to the Blue ridge may be about 160 miles ; from thence it assumes the name of Potowmack, which see.)

(COHUIXCAS, a country in New Spain, in which there is a considerable mountain of loadstone, between Tcoiltylan and Chilapan.)

COIABAMBA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru; annexed to the curacy of Calpi. An earthquake was experienced in this province in 1707, Avhich desolated many settlements ; when also happened that extraordinary phenomenon which is accredited and related by Don Cosine Bueno, geographer of Lima, as having taken place ; which was, that a small estate was by this earthquake removed from one side of the river to the other, together with the house, garden, and inhabitants, without their perceiving any thing had happened ; and as the event took place at midnight, Avhen they were all asleep, that they were not a little surprised to find themselves established in the curacy of Colcha. This extraordinary occurrence, however, has its precedent in a similar circumstance which happened in the kingdom of Quito.

COIACHI, a settlement of the missions which were held at the expence of the regulars of the company of Jesuits, in the province of Taraumara, and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya, 18 leagues and an half between the s. w. and s. e. of the town and real of the mines of San Felipe de Chiguagua.

COIAIMA, a settlement and head settlement of the corregimiento of this name in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It is of an hot temperature, produces cacao, sugar-cane, maize, ^uca<!, plantains, and an infinite quantity of cattle and swine ; but it is much infested with reptiles and insects, vipers, snakes, spiders, and mosquitoes. It also abounds in gold, and the Indians to the number of 450, who go to Santa Fe to pay their tribute, proceed in companies, and are accustomed to collect

in four or five daj's, on Die shores of the river Saldana, as much gold as is necessary for the tribute they are obliged to pay in the city.

COIAME, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions. It runs n. in a serpentine course, and enters the Maranon between the rivers Tefe and Catoa.

COIBA==, a small island of the S. sea, close to the coast of the province and government of Veragua, in the kingdom of Tierra Firme, and five leagues distant from the point Blanca.

COIN, a river of the island of Guadalupe. It runs to the n. w. in the isthmus Avhich almost divides the island into two parts, and enters the sea at the bottom of the bay of Cul de Sac Petit.

COIOACAN, a district and alcaldia mayor of Nueva España. It is one of the most pleasant, and fertile in wheat, maize, barley, and other seeds. Nearly the whole of its population live in country houses, in gardens and orchards which produce quantities of fruit, such as pears of several kinds, peaches, apples, prunes, plums, damsons, pomegranates, quinces, oranges, and lemons, with which a great commerce is carried on rviththe city of Mexico. In some parts of this province cloths and baizes are fabricated. It belongs to the jurisdiction of the marquisate Del Valle de Oaxaca ; to which the tributes are paid, the king retaining the sum of four tomines, (a Spanish coin weighing the third part of a drachm.) The settlements of this district are,

San Angel, Chapultepec,

San Augustin de las Nuestra Senora de los

Culvas, Remedies.

Tacubaya,

The capital, which bears the same name, is a large, pleasant, fertile, and well peopled town. It has shady arbours, country houses, and orchards and gardens, which serve as a recreation to the people of Mexico, from whence it is distant two leagues to the s. s. e. Its population amounts to 1885 Indian families. It has a good convent of the religious order of St. Dominic, and many work-shops, in which are fabricated cloths, baizes, and serges. Long. 99° 4'. Lat. 19° 20'.

COIOMEAPA, Santa Maria de, a settlement and head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Theacan in Nueva Espana. It contains 300 families of Indians, and 20 of Mustees and Mulattoes. Twelve leagues s. e. of its capital.

COIOTEPEC, San Mateo De, a settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Yanguitlan in Nueva Espana. It contains 22 families of Indians, who subsist by the trade in cochineal. Six leagues s. c. of its capital.

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much incommoded by mosquitos ; so that its population is much reduced, and those that remain apply themselves to the cultivation of sugar-canes, maize, yucas^ and plantains.

COLONCHE, a small settlement of Indians, of the district and jurisdiction of Santa Elena, in the government of Guayaquil, and kingdom of Quito ; situate on the s. shore of a river, from whence it takes its name, in lat. 1° 56' s. The said river rises in the mountains of the district, and enters the S. sea, opposite the island of La Plata.

Colonche, a small island of the S. sea, near the coast of the province and government of Guayaquil.

COLONIES OF THE English. See the articles Virginia, Carolina, New England, New York, Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Nova Scotia ; of the J3utch, see Surinam, Berbice, Corentin, CuRAZAo ; of the Portuguese, San Gabriel; of the French, Cayenne, St. Domingo, Martinique; of the Danes, St. Thomas. (See general Tables of Dominions, &c. in the introductory matter.)

COLOPO, a large river of the province and government of Esmeraldas in the kingdom of Quito. It runs from s. e. to n. w. at an almost equal distance between the rivers Esmeraldas and Verde, and runs into the S. sea, in the bay of San Mateo, in lat. 58' n.

COLOR, Cabo de, a cape on the coast of the province and captainship of Sergipé in Brazil. It lies between the rivers Real and Ponica.

COLORADA, Punta, a point on the coast of the N. sea, and in the province and government of Venezuela, to the e. of the cape San Roman.

COLORADA, a river of tlie jurisdiction and alcaldta mayor of Penonomé, in the government of Panama, and kingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises in the mountains to the s. and enters the Pacific near the settlement of Anton.

COLORADO, a settlement of the province and government of Tucumán, in the district and jurisdiction of the city of Salta, and s. s. e. of the same.

Colorado, a settlement of the province and government of Santa Marta in the kingdom of Tierra Firme; situate on the shore of the river of its name.

Colorado, a river of the province and corre^imiento of Cuyo in the kingdom of Chile. It rises in its cordillera, to the n. runs e. and spends itself in various lakes, on account of the level of tlie country. The geographer Cruz errs in making it enter the river Maipo.

Colorado, another, a large river of the pro-: vince and government of Sonora in Nueva Espana.

Colorado, another, a small river of the province and government of Santa Marta in the kingdom of Tierra Firme, which enters the great river Magdalena before you come to the town of Tamalameque.

Colorado, another, in the province and government of Louisiana, near the road wliich leads to Mexico. It runs s. e. in a very large stream, and enters the sea in the bay of San Bernardo.

Colorado, a cape or point of land of the s. coast of St. Domingo, in the part possessed by the French, between the bays of Tondo and Puer. .

Colorado, a mountain of the province and government of Tucumán, on the shore of the river Salado, and to the s. of the settlement of Nuestra' Sefiora de Buenas Costumbres. ;

COLORADOS, a barbarous nation of Indians, of the province and corregimiento of Tacunga in the kingdom of Quito, who inhabit some moun-, tains of the same name, very craggy and rugged, abounding in animals and wild beasts, such as bears, lions, tigers, deer, squirrels, monkeys, and marmosets. These Indians, although the greater part of them are reduced to the Catholic faith by the extinguished company of the Jesuits, are given to superstition ; they are divided into two parts, the one called the Colorados of Angamarca, since tlieir principal settlement bears this title, and the other the Colorados of St. Domingo ; they now, belong to the province and government of Esmeraklas, and live retired in the woods, and upon the banks of the rivers Toachi and Quininay, where the missionaries of the religion of St. Domingo of Quito exercise their apostolical zeal. The principal settlement of this place, being situate on the w. shore, is called St. Domingo. The commerce of these Indians, and by which they subsist, is in carrying to Guayaquil, the province by which they are bounded , w dod for making canoes and rafts, sugar-canes, achiote, and agi pepper, and bringing back in exchange cattle, fish, soap, and other necessary eft'ects.

COLOSO, a settlement of the province and government ©f Cartagena ; situate on the shore of the river Pechelin, to the s. s. w. of the town of Maria, to the jurisdiction^of which it appertains.

COLOTLAN, a settlement and head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Mextitlan in Nueva Espana. It contains 240 families of Indians, and is three leagues to the w. of its capital.

COLOTLIPAN, a settlement of the head set-

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York, wliicli falls into a bay at the s. side of the island. It lies two miles to tlies. of Rockonkama pond.)

CONNESTIGUCUNE, an establisliment of tlie English, in the county of Albany, inthew. part and to the e. of Chenectady, or of (he river Mohawk, where it gives a fall from above 70 feet in lieiglit. See Arm any.

CONNETABLE, or CoN?)ESTABr^E, a small island of tire county of Cayenne, belonging to the French, between the city of Cayenne and cape Orange.

CONNETABLE, anotlier small island of tire same province, witli the addition of Petite, to distinguish it from the former.

CONOCOTO, a settlement of the kingdom of Quito, in the corregimimto of the district of the Cinco Leguasde la Ciudad, in the district of which is a rising ground called A Halo, and upon the skirts of this are many warm-water mineral streams, much frequented as baths for the curing of infirmities.

CONOMA, a lake of the province and country of the Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions. It is formed from some waste water of the river Madera, very near its shore, and at a small distance from the river of Las Amazonas.

CONOME, Cape of, a point of land of the coast of Nova Scotia, in the bay of Fundy, and in the most interior part of the same.

CONORIBO, a river of the province and capainship of Seara in Brazil. It rises near the coast, runs n. and enters that of La Concepcion or S. Francisco, and that of La Cruz, and then enters the sea.

CONOSTEE, a settlement of Indians of N. Carolina ; situate on the shore of the river Euphasee.

CONSAHATCHEE, a river of the province and colony of Georgia. It runs s. e. and enters the sea.

CONSATA, a settlement of the missions which were held by the religious order of St. Augustin, in the country of Paititi, of the province and corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

CONSETS, Point of, on the e, coast of the island of Barbadoes, on the side of the point of Bele.

CONSOLACION, Nuestra Senora de, asettlement of the government of Neiba in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; annexed to the curacy of the town of La Purificacion. It is situate on the shore of the river Pardo, is of a hot temperature, abounding in the vegetable productions of a similar

climate, and in troublesome and venomous insects. It contains more than 200 house-keepers.

CONSOLACION, a point or long strip of land called Possession, on the n. coast of the straits of Magellan ; one of those which form Possession bay, and where are to be seen the ruins of the fort named Jesus, which was founded by the Admiral Pedro de Sarin iento.

CONSTANCE, or Constancia, a small city of the English, in the island of Barbadoes.

CONSTANTINO Perez, an island of the river Valdivia, in tlie kingdom of Chile, opposite the same city, with two other small islands, the one before, the other behind it, and which, together, form the celebrated port of this name. The passage on both sides is navigable, but the channel on the s. side being the most wide, is the course uniformly taken by large ships and vessels, and in the same manner the n. channel is mostly, as it is narrower, entered by frigates and small craft.

CONTAS, Rio das, a river in the province and captainship of Ylheos in Brazil. It rises near the coast, runs e. and enters the sea in the Barra or Bar of Camamu, in the river of Ylheos.

CONTAS, a town of the above province and kingdom.

(CONTINENTAL Village was situated on North river, in New York state. Before its destruction by Sir Henry Clinton, in October 1777, there were here barracks for 2000 men.)

CONTOOK, a settlement of the English, in the province of Hampshire, one of the four of New England ; situate on the shore of the river Penny cook.

Contook, a river of the above province. It rises from a small lake, runs s. then turns e. and enters the Pennycook.

CONTOY, an island of the N. sea, near the coast of the province and government of Yucatan, close to the cape Cotoche.

CONTRE-PASTURAGE, a river of the province and colony of Virginia. It runs n. e. and enters the head of the river James.

CONTRERAS, a small island of the S. sea, close to the coast of the province and government of Veragua in the kingdom of Tierra Firme.

CONTUMAZA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru.

CONUCO, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Ytata in the kingdom of Chile ; situate near the coast, opposite the island of Quiriquina.

CONUENTOS, a settlement of the province and captainship of Rey in Brazil, at the source of the river Curitaba.

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running to unite themselves with that of Toachi. It is to the n. of the paramo of Elenisa, and is sometimes covered with snow.

CORCA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Huanoquite.

(CORCAS, or Grand Corcas, an island almost in the form of a crescent, n. of St. Domingo, in the windward passage, about seven leagues w. of Turk’s island, and about 20 e. of Little Inagua or Heneagua. Lat. 21° 45' n. Long. 71° ob' w.)

CORCHUE, a settlement of Indians of the province and government of Valdivia in the kingdom of Chile.

CORCOLA, a settlement of the Portuguese, in the territory of the Giiayazas Indians, of the kingdom of Brazil; situate at the source and on the shore of the river Tocantines.

CORCOUADO, a settlement of the missions which were held by the regulars of the company of Jesuits in the province and government of Los Llanos, of the Nuevo Reyno de Gratiada, and which is at present under the charge of the religious order of St. Francis.

CORCOUADO, a rock or island of the S. sea, opposite the port of Santa, of the province and corregimiento of this name in Peru.

CORCULLA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Parinacochas in Peru.

CORDES. See Verdf.

CORDILLERA. See Andes.

CORDILLIERS, Montagne des, a mountain of the island of Cayenne, on the skirts of avliich the French have a fort and establishment for its defence.

CORDON, PUNTA DEL, a point of the coast of the w. head of the island of St. Domingo, on the shore of the port Pimiento.

CORDOVA, a province and alcaldia mayor of Nueva España; bounded w. by the province of Orizava ; n. by that of San Juan de los Llanos ; e. by that of the ancient Vera Cruz ; and s. by the rugged mountains of Songolica. It has on the 5. e. and s.s. e. the great estate of Mataanona, 10 leagues from Taliscona, the last boundary of Vera Cruz. It is of a hot and moist temperature ; the greater part of its district is composed of broken and uneven grounds, and mountains covered with cedars, walnuts, pines, and ocotales. It has also beautiful and fertile plains, abounds in birds and animals of the chase, and no less in fish, many trout and bohos being caught out of the rivers by which this province is irrigated. In the spacious plain of Altotonga runs a rapid river, by which it is

fertilized, and rendered abundant in every kind of vegetable production. Here also breed many flocks of cattle, which are the chief commerce of the place. The capital bears the same name.

This was founded in 1618, by order of the viceroy Don Diego Fernandez de Cordova, Marquis of Gnadalcazar, who gave it his name. It is of a hot and moist temperature ; situate to the w. of some small mountains, which form an half-circle, and are surrounded by many umbrageous trees. The parish church is magnificent, of exquisite architecture, and rich ornaments. Here is a convent of the religious Descalzos (barefooted order) of St. Francis, and one of St. Hippolyte dela Caridad, in which there is an hospital for the sick Spaniards, and for the black slaves, endowed by the masters and proprietors of certain mills, in which an infinite quantity of sugar is made. It abounds in this artich', with those of tobacco, China oranges, ajonjoli, large cattle, and swine ; as also other fruits and articles of merchandize peculiar to Europe and the kingdom itself. [Hun.boldt assert.s that the environs of Cordova and Orizaba produce all the tobacco consumed in New Spain.] Its population consists of 260 families of Spaniards, 126 of Mustees, 70 of Mulattoes and Negroes, and 273 of Mexican Indians ; of many others also who are of various classes, and Avho work in the sugar-mills. Forty-eight leagues to the e. «. c. of Mexico, in lat. 18° 50' ; long. 96° 56'. Theother settlements of this jurisdiction are,

Santa Ana de Zacan, San Diego,

Chocaman,

Yxhuatlan,

Coscomatepec,

Sta. Maria Magdalena, Calcahualco,

S. Antonio Huatuzco, Amatlan de los Reyes,

San Bartolome, Totutla,

Copan,

Zentla,

San Diego Huatuzco, San J uan de la Punta, San Lorenzo.

Cordova, another city, the capital of the provinco and government of Tucumán in Peru ; founded by the governor of that province, Geronimo Cabrera, in 1573, and not by Juan Nuilezde Prado, in 1549, according to the erroneous account of the Exjesuit Coleti. It was in the territory of the Comichingones Indians, and part which they called Kisliisacate, on the shore of the river Piicani ; but removed from thence to the x. part of the same river ; the parish being dedicated to Nuestra Senora de la Pena of France, and being under the obligation of celebrating its festival on the day of the conception, when it was also usual to display the spectacle of a bull-fight. It is situate in a narrow bay, close to which is a lotty n'ountain. It is much exposed to inundations in the rainy

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CORIXAS, a river of the kingdom of Brazil, It rises in the sierra Bermeja, runs n. forming a curve, and eaters the Tocantines near that of Los Monges, according to tl>e account given by the Portuguese.

CORIXAS, some sierras of the same kingdom, which run s. s. e. and are a continuation of the sierra Bermeja ; they then run e. forming a curve, as far as the river Tocantines, and extend their course on as far as the shore of the Araguaya.

CORK, a large bay in the e. coast of the island of Newfoundland, between the cape Gull and the island Tuliquet.

CORKAM, a fort of the English, in the province and colony of Connecticut, one of the four which composQ New England ; situate near the coast.

CORMA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Quispicanchi in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Papres.

CORMO, a settlement of the province and government of Canta in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Atabillos Altos.

CORNE, an island of the N. sea, near the coast of Florida, between the islands Vaisseaux and Massacre.

CORNEJO, an island of the S. sea, near the coast of the province and corregimiento of Arequipa, opposite the port of Arantae.

(CORNISH, a township in Cheshire county, New Hampshire, on the e. bank of Connecticut river, between Claremont and Plainfield, about 15 miles n. of Charlestown, and 16 s. of Dartmouth college. It was incorporated in 1763. In 1775 it contained 309, and in 1790, 982 inhabitants.

(CORNWALL, a township in Addison county, Vermont, e. of Bridport, on lake Champlain, containing 826 inhabitants.)

(Cornwall, NEW, atownship in Orange county, New York, of whose inhabitants 350 are dectors.)

(Cornwall, a township in Litchfield county, Connecticut, about nine miles n. of Litchfield, 11 s. of Salisbury, and about 40 w. by n. of Hartford city.)

(Cornwall, a small town in Upper Canada, on the bank of Iroquois river, near lake St. Francis, between Kingston and Quebec, containing a small church, and about 30 or 40 houses.)

(Cornwallis, a town in King’s county, in the province of New Brunswick, situated on the s. w. side of the basin of Minas ; 18 miles n. w. of Falmouth, and 55 n. w. of Annapolis.)

(Cornwallis, also a river in the »arae province, navigable for vessels of 100 tons five miles ; for vessels of 50 tons, 10 miles.

CORO, Santa Ana de, a city of the province and government of Venezuela, thus named in the time of the Indians, after the district called Coriana. It was founded by Juan de Ampues in 1529. The Weltzers, under the orders of Nicholas Federman, were the first Avho peopled it, giving it the name of Cordoba, to distinguish it from the other city of the same name which had been founded by Gonzalo de Ocampo in the province of Cumana, This name it afterwards lost, and took that of Coro, which it preserves to this day, from a small settlement of Indians thus named. It is of a dry and hot temperature, but so healthy that physicians are said here to be of no use. The territory, although sandy and lack of water, produces every kind of vegetable production ; so that it may be said to abound in every thing that luxury or con^ venience may require. Here are large breeds of cow-cattle and goats, and a considerable number of good mules. Its articles of merchandize, such as cheese, tanned hides, and cacao, meet with a ready sale in Cartagena, Caracas, and the island of St. Domingo. It has a reduced convent of the religious order of St. Francis, and an hermitage dedicated to St. Nicholas. The town is very rich. It was plundered, by the English in 1567. Its church was a cathedral, and the head of the bishopric, from the time that it was erected in 1532 until 1636, when this title was transferred to Santiago of Caracas. It is two leagues distant from the sea, where there is a port insecure, but much frequented by trading vessels.

(From the time that the governor began to reside at Caracas, in 1576, there remained no conspicuous authority at Coro but the bishop and chapter, and they did all they could to follow th« governor; and indeed, not being able to leave Coro by legal measures, they put tlieir wishes into effect by flight, in 1636. At three leagues from the city are lands where they cultivate with success, if not with abundance, all the usual produce of the country. The inhabitants, who are much addicted to indolence, glory that they are descended from the first conquerors of the country ; and there is here, generally speaking, more rank than wealth, and more idleness than industry. The little trade that is carried on here consists in mules, goats, hides, sheep-skins, cheeses, &c. which come in a great measure from the interior, and the larger part fromCarora; shipments of these articles are made for the islands. The most common intercourse is with Cura 9 oa, from whence they 2

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