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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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manufactures peculiar to the country, such as coarse trowsers, baizes, and blankets. Although it is some years since this province has received any mischief from the infidels who inhabit the mountains of the Andes, yet it has regular advanced detachments or guards stationed for the defence of the frontiers, prepared against a recurrence of the evils experienced in former times. As we have before said, it is the largest province, so also it is the best peopled, since it contains upAvards of 50,000 souls and 33 settlements, the capital of Avhich has the same name. Its repartimiento, or tribute, used to amount to 226,730 dollars, and it used to pay an alcavala of 1814 dollars per annum. The settlements are,

Cicasica, Mecapaca,

Coroico, Pasca,

Yanacache, Ynquisive,

Chulumani, Quimi,

Caza, Collana,

Suri, Huayrapaya,

Cabari, Coripaya,

Mohosa, Chupe,

Capinata, Milluhuay,

Ychoca, Taxma,

Coani, Choxlla,

Yaco, Chirca,

Luribay, Yrupana,

Haichayo, Colqui,

Calamarca, Plaraca,

Zapanqui, Ocavaya.

Caracato,

CICAYARI, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions. It rises in the territory of the Chappoanas Indians, runs n. n. w. and enters the Rio Negro.

[CICERO, a military township in New York, on the s. tv. side of Oneida lake, and between it, the Salt lake, and the Salt springs.]

CICLADAS Grandes, islands of the South sea, discovered by Mr. De Bouganville in 1763.

CICOBASA, a river of the province and government of Quixos y Macas in the kingdom of Quito, and of the district of the latter. It rises in the cordillera of the province of Cuenca, runs s. and enters the river Santiago.

CIENEGA, a settlement and real of the silver mines of the province of Tepeguana, and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya ; situate near the settlement of Parral.

Same name, another settlement, of the province and government of Santa Marta in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It is situate on the sea-coast, and on the bank of the cknega or marsh which

VOL. I.

lies close to it, and which gives it its name. It wag a reduccton of the monks of St. Domingo.

CIENEGA of Oro, another (settlement), with the surname of Oro, in the province and government of Cartagena, of the same kingdom, it is of the district of Tolu, and formed by the re- union of other settlements in the year 1776, effected by the Governor Don Juan Pimienta.

Same name, another (settlement), of the island of Cuba; situate on the n. coast.

CIMA, a valley of the province and govornraent of Antioquia ; bounded by that of Paucura, from which it is divided by the river Cauca just at its source.

CINACANTLAN, a settlement of the province and alcaldia mayor of Chiapa in the kingdom of Guatemala.

==CINAGUA Y GUACANA, the alcaldia mayor and jurisdiction of the province and bishopric of Mechoacán in Nueva Espana. It is 80 leagues long from e. to w. and 60 wide from n. to s. Its territory is for the most part mountainous and uneven, and its temperature bad. Its productions are large cattle, wax, maize, and fruits. Tire capital is the settlement of the same name, of a hot temperature, and inhabited by 25 families of Indians, who cultivate maize and melons, upon which this scanty population consists, though it was formerly of some consideration. It has suffered, no doubt, from the iinkindness of the temperature, and from the wantof water. The jurisdiction is 80 leagues to the w. with a slight inclination to the s. of Mexico. The other settlements are, Guacana, Paraquaro,

Ario, Nocupetajo,

Etuquarillo, Acuiyo,

Santa Ana Turicato. Punguco.

CINALOA, a province and government of Nueva España. It is between the w. and «. of Mexico, from whence it is distant 300 leagues. It extends in length as far as proselytes have been made to the gospel, viz. to 140° ; and it extends to 40° in width. On the e. of it are the loftiest sierras of Topia, running towards the n. and on the w. it is embraced by the arm of the sea of California. On the s. it has the town of Culiacan, and to the n. the innumerable nations of Indians, the boundaries of which are unknown. This province lies between lat. 27° and 32° n . ; this being the extent to Avhich the inissonaries have penetrated. The temperature is extremely hot, although the cold is intense during the months of December and January. It rains here very little, especially upon the coast ; and seldom more than 3 p

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four or five times in the year ; which causes the ground to be so parched, that it would be entirely uninhabitable, were it not for the multitude of streams with which it is intersected, and which render the temperature mild and healthy. The country for the most part consists of levels, covered with green shrubs and trees, forming shady woods of three or four leagues in extent. In these are found the Brazil-wood, ebony, &c. which serve as an asylum for wild beasts, leopards and wild boars, deer and rabbits, a variety of mountain cats, coyotes, serpents and vipers. In the valleys are found a multitude of quails, turtle-doves, pheasants, cranes, parrots, macaws, much esteemed for the beauty of their plumage, and with which the Indians adorn themselves, and an infinite variety of other birds. The rivers, all of which descend from the sierras of Topia, in the rainy season increase to such a degree as to inundate the country for the space of three or four leagues ; and generally remaining out for eight days at least, the Indians are under the necessity of forming for themselves a kind of terrace upon the branches of trees, by means of planks and sods, where they make fires and dress their food. There are many salt ponds, also mines of silver, which are not worked for want of labourers. This province was peopled by several nations of Indians, who had their villages and huts on the sides of rivers. They used to maintain themselves on maize, which they cultivated, afso on calabashes, which are very sweet and savoury, French beans, and a species of wild caroh plant, called by them mesqnites, and which being ground, they used to drink in water, after the manner of chocolate. They had also another delicacy in the plant called mezcalj which resembles the savila ; of this there are several sorts, of which they make wine, sweets, and vinegar ; of its tendrils thread, and of its prickles needles. This country also abounds in nopales, pitahayas, and other plants, including many which are native to Europe. Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca was the first who discovered this extensive province in his perigrination, after he had suffered shipwreck in going from Florida to Mexico ; and from his report of it, the viceroy Bon Antonio de Mendoza was induced to send into it some persons to discover more concerning it. In 1590 it was visited by the regulars of the company of Jesuits, who came hither to preach the gospel. They succeeded in making proselytes amongst the natives, and established a regular mission, which was patronized by the Queen Dona Margarita of Austria, wife of Philip III. ; she having sent, for the promotion of the interests of

this* great object, and for the decorations of the altars, &c. several valuable presents of jewels, ornaments, and other precious articles. The capital is the town of San Felipe and Santiago, and the other settlements are,

Montes Claros, Toro,

Real de Alamos, Concepcion,

Bocaverito, Loreto,

Noguera, Navajoa,

Camoa, Tecia,

Guarabe, Tepehue,

Ocosconi, Real de los Fra-

Mocorito, yeles,

San Ignacio, Vaca,

Santa Ana, Toriz,

Achogoa, Cuytes,

Caurimpo, Temoris,

Mocoyaguy, Chinipas,

Chiguaguilla, Valle Umbroso,

Tegueco, Guazapares,

Sivirijoa, Jatebo,

Charay, Guadalupe,

Mochicarui, Mayo,

San Miguel, Canamoas,

Haome, Batacosa.

Santa Maria,

Same name, a river of this province (Cinaloa), which runs to enter the sea in the gulf of CaJiforna, or Mar Roxo de 'Cortes, between the rivers Culiacan and Del Fuerte.

CINAMIN, a river of the province and cap^ tainship of Rio Grande in Brazil. It rises near the coast, and runs into the sea close to the cape of San Roque.

[CINCINNATI, a flourishing town in the territory of the United States, n. w. of the Ohio, and the present seat of government. It stands on the n. bank of the Ohio, opposite the mouth of Licking river, two miles and a half s. w. of fort Washington, and about eight miles w. of Columbia. Both these towns lie between Great and Little Miami rivers. Cincinnati contains about 200 houses ; and is 82 miles n. bye. of Frankfort; 90 n. w. of Lexington, and 779 w. by s. of Philadelphia. Lat. 38° 42' n. Long. 84° IP w.']

[CINCINNATUS is the s. easternmost of the military townships of New York state. It has Virgil on the and Salem, in Herkemer county, on the

e. and lies on two branches of Tioughnioga river, a n. w. branch of the Chenango. The centre of the town lies 53 miles s. w. by w. of Cooperstown, and 39 s. e. by s. of the 5. e, end of Salt lake. Lat. 42° 27'

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CINCOS, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Xauxa in Peru.

CINCO-SEÑORES, a settlement of the province of Tepeguana, and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya ; one of the missions of the Babosariganes Indians, held there by the regulars of the company of Jesuits. Within eight leagues to the s. of its district is a great unpeopled tract, called De las Manos, (Of the Hands), from the infidel Indians having nailed up against some temples in those parts many hands of some unfortunate Spaniards •whom they had killed, when the latter had entered the country under the idea of making proselytes.

CINGACUCHUSCAS, a barbarous nation of Indians, who inhabit the woods to the s. of the river Marañon. In 1652 they were united to the Pandabeques, and established themselves in the settlement of Xibaros of the missions of Maynas, with the exception of some few, who still remain in their idolatry, and lead a wandering life through the woods.

CINIO, a settlement of the province and colony of Maryland, in the county of Kent ; situate on the shore, and at the extremity of the bay of Chesapeak.

CIÑOQUIPA, a settlement of the province and government of La Sonora in Nueva Espana.

CINTENELA, Isla de, one of the islands which lie between the s. point of the Caico Grande and the Paiiuelo Quadrado.

CINTO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Castro Vireyna in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of its capital.

CINTORI, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Caxamarquilla in Peru.

CINTU, a spacious llanura or plain, of the ancient province of Chimu, now Truxillo, on the coast of the S. sea. It was taken possession of by Huaina Capac, thirteenth Emperor of the Incas. It is very fertile, and of a good and healthy climate ; but it is but little inhabited.

CINTY, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Pilaya or Paspaya in Peru.

Same name, a river of the province and government of Tucuman. It runs s. and enters the river San Juan.

CIPOYAY, a country and territory of the province and government of Paraguay, called also the province of Vera, towards the e. and where the nation of the Guaranis Indians dwell. It is of a hot climate, but very fertile, abounding in woods, and well watered by many rivers ; some of which run from e. to w. and enter the Uruguay, and others from s. to n. and enter the Plata.

CIPRE, a river of the province and government of Esmeraldas in the kingdom of Quito. It takes its course from e. to w. and opposite tlie river Sola, empties itself into that of Esmeraldas, on the w. side, in lat. 28' n.

CIRANDIRO, a settlement and the capital of the alcaldia mayor of Guimeo in the province and bishopric of Mechoacan. It is of a hot temperature, and inliabited by 90 families of Tarascos Indians. In its vicinity is the estate of Quichandio, in which eight families of Spaniards, and 15 of Mustees and Mulattoes, are employed in making sugar. Also in the estate of Santa Maria are five families of the former. It is 75 leagues to the w. and one-fourth to the s. w. of Mexico.

[CIRENCESTER. See Marcus Hook.]

CIRICHE, a settlement of the province and government of Antioquia in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; situate on the shore of a small river which enters that of Cauca.

CIRIGH. Sergipe.

CIRII, a small river of the province and captainship of Sergipe in Brazil. It rises near the coast, runs s. s. e. and enters the river Sirugipa, a little before this river enters the sea.

CIRIONES, a barbarous nation of Indians, of the province and government of Moxos in Peru. It is a wandering nation, savage, and but little known.

CISNE, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Loxa in the kingdom ot Quito.

CITRONIERS, mountains in the island of Guadalupe. They are in the large tract of land, and on the s. coast, lying between the settlements of Santa Ana and San Francisco.

CITY Point, in Virginia. See Bermuda Hundred.

CIUAPA, a river of the province and corregimiento of Coquimbo in the kingdom of Chile, towards the «. It is notorious from a species of fish caught in it, called tache, of an extrem.ely delicate flavour. It runs into the S. or Pacific sea, terming a small port of little depth.

CIUDAD REAL, a city of the province and government of Paraguay ; founded in 1557. by Rui Diaz Melgarejo, on the shore of the river Piquiri, three leagues from Parana. It Was destroyed by the Mamalukos Indians of San Pablo of Brazil, in 1630, and in its place was substituted the rich town of Espiritu Santo, the territory of which abounds in fruits, vines, and mines of copper. In the vicinity of the present town is a great waterfall, formed by the above river, upwards »f 3p 2

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Same name, another (settlement), of the province and government of Venezuela ; situate on the shore of a river to the n, n. w. of the city of Nirua.

Same name, another (settlement), of the province and government of Yucatan ; situate on the coast between the settlements of Silan and Sisal.

Same name, another (settlement), of the missions belonging to the religious of St. Francis, in the kingdom of Nuevo Mexico.

Same name, another (settlement), of the island of Cuba ; situate on the n. coast.

[CLARE, a township on St. Mary’s bay, in Annapolis county, Nova Scotia. It has about 50 families, and is composed of woodland and salt marsh.]

CLARE, a small island of the South sea, close to the port of Guayaquil. It is desert, and two leagues in length. It is commonly called Amorta~ jado, since, being looked upon from any part, it bears the resemblance to a dead man. Twentyfive leagues from Cape Blanco.

[Clare, a very lofty mountain of the province and government of Sonora in Nueva Espaila, near the coast of the gulf of California, and in the most interior part. It was discovered in 1698.]

Same name, a small lake of New France, which is formed by the strait of Misisagues, between lake Huron and that of Erie.

Same name, a bay on the coast of the country and land of Labrador, in the strait of Belle-isle.

[CLAREMONT, a township in Cheshire county, New Hampshire, on the e. side of Connecticut river, opposite Ascutney mountain, in Vermont, and on the n. side of Sugar river ; 24; miles i. of Dartmouth college, and 121 s.w. hy w. of Portsmouth. It was incorporated in 1764, and contains 1435 inhabitants.]

[Claremont County, in Camden district, S. Carolina, contains 2479 white inhabitants, and 2110 slaves. Statesburg is the county town.]

CLARENDON, a county of South Carolina, [the southernmost in Camden district, about SO miles long and SO broad, and in 1792 contained 1790 whites and 602 slaves.]

Same name, a settlement of the island of Jamaica ; situate on the s. coast.

[Clarendon, a township near the centre of Rutland county, Vermont, watered by Otter creek and its tributary streams; 14 or 15 miles e. of Fairbaven, and 44 «. e. of Bennington. It contains 1478 inhabitants. On the s. e. side of a mountain in the w. part of Clarendon, or in the edge of Tinmouth, is a curious cave, the mouth of which is not more than two feet and a half in diameter ; in its descent the passage makes an angle with the horizon of 35° or 40°; but continues of nearly the same diameter through its whole length, which is 31^ feet. At that distance from the mouth, it opens into a spacious room, 20 feet long, 12| wide, and 18 or 20 feet high ; every part of the floor, sides, and roof of this room appear to be a solid rock, but very rough and uneven. The water is continually percolating through the top, and has formed stalactites of various forms ; many of which are conical, and some have the appearance of massive columns ; from this room there is a communication by a narrow passage to others equally curious.]

CLARINES, a settlement of the province of Barcelona, and government of Cumana, in the kingdom of Tierra Firme; lying to the e. of the city of Barcelona, and on the shore of the river Unare.

CLARKE, a settlement of the island of Barbadoes, in the district of the parish of St. Joseph, and on the e. coast.

Same name, another (settlement), of the same island (Barbadoes), on the 5 .. coast.

[Clarke, a new county of Kentucky, between the head waters of Kentucky and Licking riversIts chief town is Winchester.]

[CLARKSBURG, the chief town of Harrison county, Virginia. It contains about 40 houses, a court-house, and gaol ; and stands on the e. side of Monongahela river, 40 miles s. w. of Morgantown.]

[CLARKSTOWN, in Orange county. New York, lies on the w. side of the Tappan sea, two miles distant, n. from Tappan township six miles, and from New York city 29 miles. By the state census of 1796, 224 of its inhabitants are electors.]

[CLARKSVILLE, the chief town of what was till lately called Tennessee county, in the state of Tennessee, is pleasantly situated on the e. bank of Cumberland river, and at the mouth of Red river, opposite the mouth of Muddy creek. It contains about SO houses, a court-house, and gaol, 45, miles w. w. of Nashville, 220 n. w. by w. of Knoxville, and 940 zso. by s. of Philadelphia. Lat. 36° 25' n. Long. 87° 23' a).]

[Clarksville, a small settlement in the n, w. territory, which contained in 1791 about 60 souks. It is situate on the n. bank of the Ohio, opposite Louisville, a mile below the rapids, and 100 miles s. e. of post Vincent. It is frequently flooded when the river is high, and inhabited by people who cannot at present find a better situation.]

CLARO, a river of the district of Rexe in the

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kingdom of Chile. It rises from one of the lakes of Avendafio, runs w. and then turning s. enters the river Laxa. On its shore the Spaniards have a fort, called Yumbel, or Don Carlos de Austria, to restrain the Araucanos Indians.

Same name, another river in the province and corregimiento of Maule of the same kingdom. It runs w. and enters the Maule.

Same name, another river of the province and government of Mariquita in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It rises in the valley of Corpus Christi, and running through it, enters the great river Magdalena.

Same name, another, a small river of the province and government of Paraguay. It runs w. and enters the Mbotetei.

Same name, another small river of the kingdom of Brazil, which also runs w. and enters the Preto or Palma, opposite the Benito.

Same name, another (river) of the same kingdom of Brazil, distinct from the former. It rises in the country of the Araes Indians, runs n. n. e. and enters the Parcuipasa, to the w. of the toM'n Boa.

Same name, a port of the coast of the South sea, in the province and government of Choco in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. It lies between the port Quemado and the bay of San Francisco Solano.

CLAUCAC, a settlement of the head settlement of Xonacatepec, and alcaldia mayor of Cuernavaca, in Nueva Espana.

CLAUDIO, San, a small island of the North sea, near the e. coast of Nova Scotia in N. America, in the strait which this coast forms with the island of San Juan.

[CLAVERACK, a post-town in Columbia county. New York, pleasantly situated on a large plain, about two miles and a half e. of Hudson city, near a creek of its own name. It contains about 60 houses, a Dutch church, a court-house, and a goal. The township, by the census of 1791, contained 3262 inhabitants, including 340 slaves. By the state census of 1796 tkere appears to be 412 electors. It is 231 miles from Philadelphia. 1

CLAYCAYAC, a head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Zultepec in Nueva Espana ; annexed to the curacy of Teraascaltepec. It contains 84 families of Indians, and is four leagues s. of its capital.

CLEAUER, a settlement of the island of Barbadoes, in the district of the parish of San Juan.

CLERC, Ensenada de, a bay of the n. coast and w. head of the island of St. Domingo, in the French possessions, between the bay of Los Cairaitos and the Agujero or Trou of Jeremias.

[CLERK’S Isles lie s, w. from, and at the entrance of Behring’s straits, which separate Asia from America. They rather belong to Asia, being very near, and s. s. w. from the head-land which lies between the straits and the gulf of Anadir in Asia. They have their name in honour of that able navigator, Captain Clerk, the companion of Captain Cook. In other maps they are called St. Andrea isles.]

[CLERMONT, a post-town in Columbia county, New York, six miles from Red hook, 15 from Hudson, 117 miles n. of New York, and 212 from Philadelphia. The township contains 867 inhabitants, inclusive of 113 slaves.]

[Clermont, a village 13 miles from Camden, S. Carolina. In the late war, here was a block-house encompassed by an abbatis; it was taken from Colonel Rugely of the British militia, in December 1781, by an ingenious stratagem of Lieutenant-colonel W ashington.]

CLEYALI, a settlement of Indians of South Carolina ; situate on the shore of the river Alabama.

[CLIE, Lake Le, in Upper Canada, about 38 miles long and 30 broad; its waters communicate with those of lake Huron,]

[CLINCH Mountain divides the waters of Holston and Clinch rivers, in the state of Tennessee. In this mountain Burk’s Garden and Morrises Nob might be described as curiosities.]

[Clinch, or Peleson, a navigable branch of Tennessee river, which is equal in length to Holston river, its chief branch, but less in width. It rises in Virginia, and after it enters into the state of Tennessee, it receives Powel’s and Poplar’s creek, and Emery’s river, besides other streams. The course of the Clinch is s. w. and s. w. by w . ; its mouth, 150 yards wide, lies 35 miles below Knoxville, and 60 above the mouth of the Hiwasse. It is beatable for upwards of 200 miles, and Powel’s river, nearly as large as the main river, is navigable for boats 100 miles.]

[CLINTON, the most n. county of the state of New York, is bounded n. by Canada, e. by the deepest waters of lake Champlain, which line separates it from Vermont, and s. by the county of Washington. By the census of 1791, it contained 16 14 inhabitants, including 17 slaves. It is divided into five townships, viz. Plattsburgh, the capital. Crown Point, Willsborough, Champlain, and Peru. The length from n. to s. is about 96 miles, and the breadth from e. to w. including the line upon the lake, is 36 miles. The number of souls was, in 1796, estimated to be 6000. By the state census, in Jan. 1796, there were 624 persons entitled to be electors. A great proportion of the lands are of an excellent quality, and produce

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Santiaijo de la Monclava, and the other settlements arc as follows :

J>an Buenaventura, Catano,

Villa del Saltillo,

Las Juntas,

La Hacienda del Alamo, Los Ranchos,

San Pedro de Boca Leo-

San Francisco Aguayo,

San Miguel,

El Presidio del Sacramento,

San Juan Bautista de

Rio Grande,

Petoyes,

San Francisco de Bizar. nes,

ron, Monte Rey.

Nra. Sra. de la Victoria,

COAHUITLAN, Santiago de, a settlement of the head settlement of Amuzgos, alcaldia ynayoT of Xicayan, of Nueva Espana. It is composed of 10 families of Indians, who are busied in cultivating cochineal, cotton, and hainilla. Twenty -two leagues to the w. of its head settlement.

COAI, a small river of the province and government of Paraguay. It runs e. and enters the Parana close to the settlement of the mission of St. Thomas.

COAILLO, a settlement of the province and 4torreeimiento of Cañete in Peru.

COAJUSCO, San Francisco de, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Zultepec in Nueva Espana. It contains S6 families of Indians, and is three leagues to the s. of its capital.

COALAQUE, a settlement of the province and torregimiento of Moquehua in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Puguina.

COANDA, a province uncultivated and little known, s. t of that of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdom of Quito. It is full of forests, rivers, lakes, and pools ; the climate is hot, moist, and unhealthy.

COAPA, a settlement of the head settlement of San Luis, of the coast and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in Nueva Espafia. It is of a hot temperature, and contains 86 families of Indians.

Same name, another settlement in the alcaldia mayor of Comitlan, of the kingdom of Guatemala.

COAPAN, San Pablo de, a settlement of the head settlement of Tlacolula, and alcaldia mayor of Xalapa, in Nueva Espana. It is very close on the s. w. side of its head settlement.

COAPETENGO, San Martin de, a settlement of the head settlement of Zitepec, and alcaldia mayor of Tenango del Valle, in Nueva Espana. It belonged formerly to the jurisdiction of Tancuba, and was united to this of Tenango, on account of being closer to it than to its former jurisdiction. It contains 35 families of Indians.

COAPILLA, a settlement of the province and alcaldia mayor of Zoques in the kingdom of Guatemala.

COARI, a large river of the kingdom of Peru, the head and course of which are unknown, save that it runs through countries belonging to the infidel Indians till it enters the Maranon : according to the map of Don Juan de la Cruz, it has its source from the large ri vers of Cuchivara or Purus, and of Tefe. It runs $. e. then «. and then turning to a s. e. course, enters with a large body of water into the Maranon, through the territory of the Zurinas Indians.

Same name, a settlement of the province and country of Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions. It is upon the shore of the Maranon, and at the mouth of the fornn;er river.

COATA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Paucarcolla. in Peru. In its vicinity are three eminences of 20 yards in height, and wrought by the hand ; there being a tradition amongst the Indians, that in one of them is inclosed a certain great treasure taken at the time that the Incas conquered this country : in its church is venerated an image of Nuestra Senora de la Presentacion, which is a subject of devotion to all the faithful of the neighbouring provinces. It is situate on the bank of the great lake Titicaca.

COATE, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Combaya.

COATEPEC, San Geeonimo de, a head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Xalapa in Nueva Espana. Its district is eight leagues in length, and its own situation is very pleasant, and its productions are many, such as maize, French beans, and tobacco, the latter being its chief article of commerce. Its inhabitants are composed of 12 families of Spaniards, 214 of Mustees and Mulattoes, and 138 of Indians ; of the latter, some employ themselves as drovers, and others in fattening pigs for the supply of Vera Cruz ; land being very deficient, and the Avhole of the territory allotted to them not exceeding 600 yards. Two leagues s.e. of Xalcomulco.

COATEPEC, another settlement, in the head settlement of Teutalpan, and alcaldia mayor of Zacatlan, in the same kingdom. It contains 120 families of Indians, and is three leagues from its head settlement.

Same name, another (settlement), which is the head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Zaqualpa in the same kingdom. It contains 150 families of Indians.

Same name, another (settlement), with the dedicatory title of San Francisco, of the head settlement of Esca

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teopan, and alcaldia mayor of Zaqualpa. 11 contains 204 families of Indians.

CAOTEPEC, Santa Maria, another (settlement), with the dedicatory title of Santa Maria, of the alcaldia mayor of Tacuba. It is very poor and much reduced.

Same name, another (settlement), the capital of the alcaldia mayor of the same kingdom ; the jurisdiction of which comprehends three head settlements of the district. It is of a moderate temperature, abounding in seeds and grain, which are cultivated in many estates of its territoiy ; and in these some cattle also are bred. It contains 340 families of Indians, 15 of Spaniards, and Mulattoes, with a good convent of monks of St. Domingo. Nine leagues to the no. of Mexico.

Same name , another (settlement), of the head settlement of Amatepec, and alcaldia mayor of Zultepec, in the same kingdom. It contains 20 families of Indians, who maintain themselves by breeding large cattle, and in sow ing some fruits and maize. Four leagues to the n. of its head settlement.

COATEPEQUE, S. Paulo de, a settlement of the head settlement of Zitaquaro, of the alcaldia mayor of Maravatio, in the bishopric of Mechoacan. It contains 179 families of Indians, and is one eighth of a league’s distance from its head settlement towards the s.

COATETELCO, S. Juan de, a settlement of the head settlement of Mazatepec, and alcaldia of Cuernavaca, in Nueva Espafia ; situate in a valley of a hot temperature. It contains 94 families of Mexican Indians, who pride themselves on their nobility, and suffer no other people to come and dwell among them. Here is a lake formed by the winter rains, in which are caught mojarras^ a fish much esteemed in Mexico.

COATINCHAN, a head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of the Puebla de los Angeles in Nueva Espana. It has, besides the parish church, a convent of monks of St. Francis, 324 families of Indians, and 50 of Spaniards, Mustees^ and Mulattoes, with those of the wards of its vicinity. Two leagues s. e. of its capital.

COATININGA, a river of tlie country of Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions. It runs n. n. w. and enters the Madera.

COATLAN, a settlement of the head settlement of Metlatlan, and alcaldia mayor of Papantla, in Nueva Espana. It contains 25 families of Indians, and is little more than three leagues to the s. w. of its head settlement.

COATLAN, San Pablo, another (settlement), with the dedicatory title of San Pablo, the head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Miahuatlau in the same kingdom, being of a mild temperature. It con-

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tains 532 families of Indians, with those of its immediate wards, all of them employing thennselves in the cultivation of maize and other fruits ofthis region. It lies 12 leagues between the e. and s. of its capital.

Same name, another (settlement), the head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Nexapa a in the same kingdom. It has a convent of monks of St. Dcmiingo, and contains 114 families of Indians, employed in the cultivation and sale of grain and

cotton garments.

It lies 12 leagues to the n. of

the capital.

Same name, another (settlement), of the head settlement of Cozcatlan, and alcaldia mayor of Tasco, in the same kingdom. It contains 130 families of Indians, and lies three leagues to thee, of its capital.

Same name, a river of the province and alcaldia mayor of Soconusco in the kingdom of Guatemala, which runs into the S. sea, to the e. ofthe capital.

COATLINCHAN, San Miguel de, a settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Tezcuco in Nueva Espana. It contains 218 families of Indians, including those of its immediate wards, and is one league to the s. of its capital.

COAUCAZINTLA, a settlement of the district and head settlement of Tlacolula, and alcaldia mayor of Xalapa, in Nueva Espana ; situate between three lofty mountains, and in the midst of others with which its territory is covered. It is of a mild temperature, the soil is tortile, but produces only maize and French beans, in which consists the commerce of the inhabitants. These are composed of 44 families of Indians. One league to the n. e. of its head settlement.

COAUTITLAN, the district and alcaldia mayor of Nueva España ; being one of the most fertile and rich territories, however inconsiderable in size, covered with cultivated grounds and estates, which produce quantities of maize, wheat barley, and other grain. It is a grand plainj watered by the river of its name, which traverses it, and runs from s. to n. It has a lake called Zumpango, close to the settlement of Coyotepec which filling itself from the waters of the river* empties itself into the lake Ecatepec. This jurisdiction contains the following settlements :

The capital of the same San Miguel de los Xa«

name.

queyes,

Teoloyuca,

Tepozotlan,

Xaltocan.

Coyotepec,

Santa Barbara,

Tultepec,

Huehuetoca,

The capital, which is the residence of the alcaldia mayor., lies in the direct road from Mexico to the interior of the provinces, and upon this account 3 Q

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it has a large proportion of families of Spaniards, Mustees^ and Mulalloes ; besides which, it contains 387 of Indians, and a convent of monks of St. Francis. Seven leagues to the n. n. w. of Mexico, although the distance is commonly counted at only six. Long. 274° 12'. Lat. 19° 50'.

COAUTLA, a province and alcaldia mayor oi Nueva España ; bounded s. by the corregimiento of Mexico. It is also called. Of Amilpas. Its jurisdiction extends 25 leagues ; it is of a warm and moist temperature, but is fertile, and abounds in wheat, maize, French beans, lentils, barley, and tares, as also in other productions, which serve as a commerce to its natives. Great quantities of sugar are also manufactured in various mills and machines for the purpose. This province is watered by two rivers, the one very large, called the Amazinaquc, which runs e. and the other, somewhat less, to the e . ; in both of them are caught many bagres and trout, which, being much esteemed in the neighbouring provinces, afford also another considerable branch of commerce. It has silver mines which produce tolerably well, and from one, which is vulgarly called La Peregrina, much riches were formerly extracted. The jurisdiction consists of the following settlements ;

The capital of the sarne Xamiltepec,

name, Tlacotepec,

Tetelzingo, Zacoalpan,

Tlamimilulpa, Temoaque,

Cacoyoc, Ancuilco.

Ocuituco,

The capital forms three streets, of regular proportion and symmetry in the buildings, with two elegant edifices, one of the monks of St. Domingo,' and the other of the barefooted monks, or Descalzos, of St. Francis. It contains 36 families of Spaniards, 70 of 40 of Mulattoes, and 200

of Indians ; the part of the city inhabited by the latter is never visited by the Spaniards but as a walk, or place of recreation, and the Indians never attempt to encroach upon the part not appropriated to them. Twenty-five leagues 5. of Mexico. Long. 274° 10'. Lat. 19° 5'.

Same name, another settlement and real of the silver mines of this province, in which are two sugar mills, and some engines for grinding metal. It contains 56 families of Spaniards, Mustees, and Mulattoes, and lies 12 leagues to the s. w. of its capital.

COAUTLACO, a settlement of the head settlement of the district and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in Nueva Espana. It contains 35 families of Indians, and is two leagues to the n. e. of that place.

COAZA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru; annexed to the curacy of Combaya.

COBAN, a settlement and capital of the province and alcaldia mayor of Vera Paz in the kingdom of Guatemala. It contains a good convent of the order of St. Domingo, and is 30 leagues from Guatemala.

[COBBESECONTE, or Copsecook, which in the Indian language signifies the land where sturgeons are taken, is a small river which rises from ponds in the town of Winthorp, in the district of Maine, and falls into the Kennebeck within three miles of Nahunkeag island, and 15 from Moose island.]

COBEQUIT, a large settlement of the province and colony of Nova Scotia; situate on the side of the basin of Minas, on the innermost shore of the bay of Fundy.

[Cobequit or Colchester River, in Nova Scotia, rises within 20 miles of Tatamogouche, on the n. e. coast of Nova Scotia ; from thence it runs s. ; then s. w. and w. info the e. end of the basin of Minas. At its mouth there is a short bank, but there is a good channel on each side, which vessels of 60 tons burden may pass, and go 40 miles .up the river. There are some scattered settlements on its banks.]

[COBESEY, in the district of Maine. See

PiTTSTO.V.]

[COBHAM, a small town in Virginia, on the s. bank of James river, opposite James town ; 20 miles n. w. of Suffolk, and eight or nine 5. w. of Williamsburg.]

[Cobh AM Isle, mentioned by Captain Middleton, in the journal of his voyage for finding a 71, e. passage. Its two extremities bear n. by e. and e. by n. in lat. 63° «. long. 3° 50' from Churchill, which he takes to be the Brook Cobham of Fox.]

COBIJA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Atacama in Peru, and archbishopric of Charcas; annexed to the curacy of Chinchin. It is founded on the sea-shore, has a good port, where the inhabitants are busied in the fishing for congers ; and these being called charqnecillos, or salted, are carried in abundance for sale to the neighbouring provinces, to the sierra, and other parts. In lat. 23° 20' s. according to Don Cosme Bueno ; and according to the ex-jesuit Coleti, in lat. 22° 25' s.

[COBEZA. See Cobija. This obscure port and village is inhabited by about 50 Indian families, and is the most barren spot on the coast. This is, however, the nearest port to Lipei^ where there are silver mines, and also to Potosi, 2

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which is above 100 leagues distant, and that through a desert country.]

COBITU, a river of the province and missions of the Gran Paititi. It rises in the mountains of the infidel Indians, which serve as a boundary to the province of Larecaja ; runs nearly due n. collecting the waters of many others, and enters theMarmore w ith the name of Mato.

COBLER’S Rock, a rock or isle of the North sea, very close upon the e. coast of the island of Barbadoes.

[COBLESKILL, a new town in the county of Schoharie, New York, incorporated March 1797.]

COBO, a river of the province and government of Neiva in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It rises in a llanura^ or plain, runs w, and enters the river Magdalena, opposite the city of La Plata.

COBORCA, a large and capacious bay of the province of Pimeria in Nueva Espana.

COBOS, a fortress of the province and government of Tucuman in Peru ; of the district and jurisdiction of the city of Salta, from whence it is nine leagues distant ; having been founded in 1693 at the foot of a declivity, to serve as an outwork or defence against the Indians of Chaco, it is at present destroyed and abandoned, and serves as a country-house on the estate of an individual.

COBRE, Santa Clara de, a settlement of the alcald'ia mayor of Valladolid, in the province nnd bishopric of Mechoacan. It contains 100 families of Spaniards, bO oi Mustees, 38 of Mulattoes, and 135 of Indians ; some of whom speculate in working the mines of copper which are close by, others in the cultivation of maize, and others gain their livelihood as muleteers. Three leagues s. of the city of Pasquaro.

COBRE, another settlement in the island of Cuba, on the s. coast.

Same name, a river of the province and government of Veragua in the kingdom of Tierra Firrae. It has its origin in the sierras of Guanico to the s. and enters the Pacific sea.

Same name, a mountain on the coast of the province and corregimiento of Coquimbo in the kingdom of Chile. It derives its name from some very abundant copper mines. Great quantities of this metal are carried from hence to Spain for founding artillery, and for different purposes.

COBULCO, a settlement of the province and alcaldia mayor of Los Zacatepeques in the kingdom of Guatemala.

COCA, a large river of the kingdom of Quito. It rises from different streams which flow down from the cordillera oi t\\e paramo, or mountain desert, of Cotopaxi. It continually follows the course

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of the large river Napo, and at last becomes incorporated with the same.

COCAGNE, a small river of Nova Scotia. It runs e. and enters the sea in the gulf of St. Lawrence, and in the strait formed by the island of St. John, opposite the island of its own name.

[COCALICO, a township in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania.]

COCAMA, a great lake in the midst of the thick woods which lie in the country of Las Amazonas, to the s. and w. of tlie river Ucayale. It is 10 leagues long from n. to s. and six wide from e. to w. On the e. it flows out, through a little canal, into the river Ucayale, and on the w. it forms the river Cassavatay, which running n. and then e. enters also the Ucayale. Its shores are constantly covered with alligators and tortoises.

COCAMAS, a barbarous nation of Indians of the country of Las Amazonas, who inhabit the w'oods to the s. of the river Maraiion, and in the vicinities of Ucayale. It takes its name from the former lake, called La Gran Cocama. They are a barbarous and cruel race, wandering over the forests in quest of birds and wild beasts for mere sustenance. Their arms are the macana, and the Indian cimeter, or club of chonia, a very strong ebony.

COCANIGUAS, a settlement of the province and government of Esmeraldas in the kingdom of Quito.

COCAS, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Castro Vireyna in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Uuachos.

Same name, another settlement, in the province and corregimienito of Vilcas Huaiman, of the same kingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Tofos.

COCATLAN, San Luis de, a settlement of the head settlement of Coatlan, and alcadia mayor of Nexapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains 160 families of Indians, employed in the trade in cochineal and cotton stuffs. It is four leagues to the n. of its head settlement.

COCAYA, a river of the province and government of Maynas in the kingdom of Quito. It unites itself with the Ibinelo, and then takes the name of Unquizia, and enters the Putumayo.

COCHA, a settlement of the province and government of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdom of Quito.

Same name, another settlement of the province and corregimiento of Cotabambas in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Llaaquas.

COCHA, another (settlement), of the province and corregimiento of Vilcas Huaiman in the same kingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Vilcas.

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Same name, another (settlement), of the province and government of Tucuman, of the jurisdiction of the city of Cordoba ; situate on the shore of the river Segundo.

COCHABAMBA, a province and corregU miento of Peru ; bounded n. by the cordillera of the Andes, e. by the heiglits of Intimuyo, e. by the province of Misque, s. by that of Chayanta or Charcas, s. w. by the corregimiento of Oruro, w. and n. w. by that of Cicasica. It is 40 leagues in length from n. to s. and 32 in width. This province may with justice -be called the granary of Peru, since it produces an abundance of every kind of seed, through the mildness of its climate. In the higher parts are bred a tolerable quantity of large and small kinds of cattle. It is watered by several small rivers of sweet water, which fertilize the valleys ; and in these are some magnificent estates. Almost all these small rivers become united in the curacy of Capinota ; and their waters, passing through the provinces of Misque and Charcas, become incorporated in the large river which passes on the e. side of Santa Cruz de la Sierra. In former times some mines were worked here, and from 1747, forward, great quantities of gold have been extracted from the lavaderos, or washing-places, upon the heights of Choquecamata, although this metal is not now found there in the same abundance. Some veins of it are, however, to be seen in the cordillera, although these render but little emolument. The greatest commerce carried on in this province depends upon its own productions ; and the market-place of the valley of Arque is so stocked with articles as to have the appearance of a continual fair. It has also some glass kilns, as it abounds greatly in glasswort ; likewise many sugar estates, and streams of hot waters. Its repartirniento used to amount to 186,675 dollars, and its alcavala to 1493 dollars per annum. Its inhabitants may amount to 70,000; and these are divided into 17 curacies, two others being annexed. The capital is the town of Oropcsa, and the rest are,

Sacaba, Carasa,

Choquecamata, Calliri,

Yani, Zipezipe,

Machacamarca, Quillacollo,

Tapacari, Passo,

Berenguela, Tiquipaya,

Coloha, Colcapirhua,

Arque, Punata,

(Japinota, Tarata.

Sipaya,

I Inhabited by a hardy, sober, and active race, Cochabamba (as Azara observes) has risen of late

years to a considerable state of prosperity in the manufactory of glass, cotton, &c. with which, during the late war, it has supplied the whole interior. Blessed with fertility and a moderate climate, it bids fair to be the Manchester of Peru, for 1,000,000 pounds of cotton are already annually consumed in its manufactures. Its surface abounds in a variety of salts and mineral productions, and its forests teem with woods and roots for dyeing. To these Haenke has particularly turned his attention, and has pointed out, besides several new materials for manufacture, other processes for dyeing, worthy of our adoption in Europe. This province joined the new government of Buenos Ayres in September 1810. See La Pcata.]

Same name, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Cuaylas in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Llautan in the province of Santa.

Same name, an extensive valley, watered by the pleasant streams of the river Condorillo, of the province of this name (Condorillo) ; in which was founded the principal settlement of the Indians, now called Oropesa.

Same name, a river of the same province, which rises close to the settlement of Tapacari. It runs s. s. e. and enters the Plata, after traversing many leagues.

COCHACAJAS, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Andahuailas in Peru. It is 35 leagues from Cuzco, and 44 from Huamanga.

COCHACALLA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Tarma in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Parianchacra.

COCHACASA, an ancient settlement of Indians, in the province of Chinchasuyu in Peru. It was one of the celebrated conquests of the hereditary prince of the Incas, Yahuar Huacae, son of the Emperor Inca Roca, sixth in the series of these inonarcbs.

COCHACASCO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Chorillo.

COCHAIMA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Luya and Chillaos in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Cheto.

COCHAMARCA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru.

COCHANGARA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Xauxa in Peru .

COCHAPETI, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Huailas in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Cotoparazo.

COCHARCAS, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Andahuailas in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Chincheros ; in which is

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