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Werner Stangl at Jul 24, 2018 10:23 AM

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A B I

A B I

3

finger, but of so hard a texture, that, when split,
they cut exactly like a knife. These Indians speak
the Tchicachan language, and with the other na-
tions are in alliance against the Iroquees.

ABERCORN, a town of the province and co-
lony of Nerv Georgia, on the shore of the river
Savannah, near wliere it enters the sea, and at a
league’s distance from the city of this name. [It is
about SO miles from the sea, 5 miles from Ebenezer,
and 13 n. w. of Savannah.]

ABIDE, mountains, or serrania, of the pro-
vince and government of Cartagena. They run
from w. to n. e. from near the large river of Mag-
dalena to the province of Choco, and the S. Sea.
Their limits and extent are not known, but they
are 20 leagues wide, and were discovered by Capt.
Francisco Cesar in 1536; he being the first Avho
penetrated into them, after a labour of 10 months,
in which time he had to undergo the most extreme
privations and excessive perils ; not that these ex-
ceeded the hardships which were endured by the
licentiate Badillo, who entered upon its conquest
with a fine array,

ABIGIRAS, a settlement of Indians, one of the
missions, or a reduccion, which belonged to the
regular order of the Jesuits, in the province and
government ofMainas, of the kingdom of Quito ;
founded in the year 1665, by the father Lorenzo
Lucero, on the shore of the river Curarari, SO
leagues from its mouth, and 240 from Quito.

[ABINEAU Port, on the n. side of lake Erie,
is about 13 miles w. s. w. from fort Erie. Lat.
42° 6' n. Long. 79° 15' t».]

[ABINGDON, a town at the head of the tide
waters of Bush river, Harford county, Maryland,
12 miles s. w. from Havre-de-Grace, and 20 n. e.
from Baltimore. — Cokesbury college, instituted by
the methodists in 1785, is in this town. Lat.
39° 27' 30" n. Long. 76° 20' 35" ? 0 .]

[Abingdon, the chief town of V'Fashington
county, Virginia, contained but about 20 houses
in 1788, and in 1796 upwards of 150. It is about
145 miles from Campbell’s station, near Holston ;
260 from Richmond in Virginia, in a direct line,
and 310 as the road runs, bearing a little to the s.
of w. Lat, 36° 41' 30" n. Long."81° 59' ? 0 .]
[ABINGTON, a township in Plymouth coun-
ty, Massachusetts; 22 miles s. e. from Boston, and
contains 1453 inhabitants. Lat. 42° 4' 30".]

TAbington, a parish in the town of Pom-
fret in Connecticut. Lat. 42° 4' 30". Lono-. 70° 51'
30".]

[Abington, a village in Pennsylvania, 12
miles n. of Philadelphia,^

ABIPi, a small settlement of the jurisdiction of

Muzo, and corregimiento of Tunja, in the Nuevo
Reyno de Granada. It is of a hot temperature,
producing some whesat, maize, yucas^ plantains,
and canes ; it has been celebrated for its rich mines
of emeralds, ivhich are, however, at present aban-
doned from want of water ; it is nearly three
leagues distant from the large mine of Itoco.

ABIPONES, a nation of barbarous Indians, of
the province and government of Tucuman, in-
habiting the s. shores of the river Berraejo. Their
number once exceeded 100,000 ; but they are cer-
tainly at present much reduced. They go naked,
except that the women cover themselves with little'
skins, prettily ornamented, which they call quey-
api. They are very good swimmers, of a lofty
and robust stature, and well featured : but they
paint their faces and the rest of their body, and are
very much given to Avar, which they carry on
chiefly against such as come either to hunt or to
fish upon their territory. Their victims they have
a custom of sticking upon lofty poles, as a land-
mark, or by way of intimidation to their enemies.
From their infancy they cut and scarify their
bodies, to make themselves hardy. When their
country is inundated, which happens in the five
winter months, they retire to live in the islands, or
upon the tops of trees : they have some slight no-
tion of agriculture, but they live by fishing, and
the produce of the chase, holding in the highest
estimation the flesh of tigers, which they divide
among their relations, as a sort of precious relic or
dainty ; also asserting that it has the properties of
infusing strength and valour. They have no know-
ledge either of God, of law, or of policy ; bat they
believe in the immortality of the soul, and that
there is a land of consummate bliss, where they
shall dance and divert themselves after their death.
When a man dies, his Avidow observes a state of
celibacy, and fasts a year, which consists in an ab-
stinence from fish ; this period being fulfilled, an
assembly run out to meet her, and inform her that
her husband has given her leave to marry. The
Avomen occupy themselves in spinning and sevi'ing
hides ; the men are idlers, and the boys run about
thcAvholeday in exercisingtheirstrength. The men
are much addicted to drunkenness, and then the
women are accustomed to conceal their husband’s
Aveapons, for fear of being killed. They do not rear
more than tivo or three children, killing all above
this number.

ABISCA, an extensive province of the ki?ig-
domof Peru, to the e. of the Cordillera of the
Andes, betAveen the rivers Yetau and Amarumago,
ami to the of Cuzco, It is little knOAAUi, con-
sisting entirely of woods, rivers, and lakes ; and
B 2


Translation

3

A B I

A B I

3

finger, but of so hard a texture, that, when split,
they cut exactly like a knife. These Indians speak
the Tchicachan language, and with the other na-
tions are in alliance against the Iroquees.

ABERCORN, a town of the province and co-
lony of Nerv Georgia, on the shore of the river
Savannah, near wliere it enters the sea, and at a
league’s distance from the city of this name. [It is
about SO miles from the sea, 5 miles from Ebenezer,
and 13 n. w. of Savannah.]

ABIDE, mountains, or serrania, of the pro-
vince and government of Cartagena. They run
from w. to n. e. from near the large river of Mag-
dalena to the province of Choco, and the S. Sea.
Their limits and extent are not known, but they
are 20 leagues wide, and were discovered by Capt.
Francisco Cesar in 1536; he being the first Avho
penetrated into them, after a labour of 10 months,
in which time he had to undergo the most extreme
privations and excessive perils ; not that these ex-
ceeded the hardships which were endured by the
licentiate Badillo, who entered upon its conquest
with a fine array,

ABIGIRAS, a settlement of Indians, one of the
missions, or a reduccion, which belonged to the
regular order of the Jesuits, in the province and
government ofMainas, of the kingdom of Quito ;
founded in the year 1665, by the father Lorenzo
Lucero, on the shore of the river Curarari, SO
leagues from its mouth, and 240 from Quito.

[ABINEAU Port, on the n. side of lake Erie,
is about 13 miles w. s. w. from fort Erie. Lat.
42° 6' n. Long. 79° 15' t».]

[ABINGDON, a town at the head of the tide
waters of Bush river, Harford county, Maryland,
12 miles s. w. from Havre-de-Grace, and 20 n. e.
from Baltimore. — Cokesbury college, instituted by
the methodists in 1785, is in this town. Lat.
39° 27' 30" n. Long. 76° 20' 35" ? 0 .]

[Abingdon, the chief town of V'Fashington
county, Virginia, contained but about 20 houses
in 1788, and in 1796 upwards of 150. It is about
145 miles from Campbell’s station, near Holston ;
260 from Richmond in Virginia, in a direct line,
and 310 as the road runs, bearing a little to the s.
of w. Lat, 36° 41' 30" n. Long."81° 59' ? 0 .]
[ABINGTON, a township in Plymouth coun-
ty, Massachusetts; 22 miles s. e. from Boston, and
contains 1453 inhabitants. Lat. 42° 4' 30".]

TAbington, a parish in the town of Pom-
fret in Connecticut. Lat. 42° 4' 30". Lono-. 70° 51'
30".]

[Abington, a village in Pennsylvania, 12
miles n. of Philadelphia,^

ABIPi, a small settlement of the jurisdiction of

Muzo, and corregimiento of Tunja, in the Nuevo
Reyno de Granada. It is of a hot temperature,
producing some whesat, maize, yucas^ plantains,
and canes ; it has been celebrated for its rich mines
of emeralds, ivhich are, however, at present aban-
doned from want of water ; it is nearly three
leagues distant from the large mine of Itoco.

ABIPONES, a nation of barbarous Indians, of
the province and government of Tucuman, in-
habiting the s. shores of the river Berraejo. Their
number once exceeded 100,000 ; but they are cer-
tainly at present much reduced. They go naked,
except that the women cover themselves with little'
skins, prettily ornamented, which they call quey-
api. They are very good swimmers, of a lofty
and robust stature, and well featured : but they
paint their faces and the rest of their body, and are
very much given to Avar, which they carry on
chiefly against such as come either to hunt or to
fish upon their territory. Their victims they have
a custom of sticking upon lofty poles, as a land-
mark, or by way of intimidation to their enemies.
From their infancy they cut and scarify their
bodies, to make themselves hardy. When their
country is inundated, which happens in the five
winter months, they retire to live in the islands, or
upon the tops of trees : they have some slight no-
tion of agriculture, but they live by fishing, and
the produce of the chase, holding in the highest
estimation the flesh of tigers, which they divide
among their relations, as a sort of precious relic or
dainty ; also asserting that it has the properties of
infusing strength and valour. They have no know-
ledge either of God, of law, or of policy ; bat they
believe in the immortality of the soul, and that
there is a land of consummate bliss, where they
shall dance and divert themselves after their death.
When a man dies, his Avidow observes a state of
celibacy, and fasts a year, which consists in an ab-
stinence from fish ; this period being fulfilled, an
assembly run out to meet her, and inform her that
her husband has given her leave to marry. The
Avomen occupy themselves in spinning and sevi'ing
hides ; the men are idlers, and the boys run about
thcAvholeday in exercisingtheirstrength. The men
are much addicted to drunkenness, and then the
women are accustomed to conceal their husband’s
Aveapons, for fear of being killed. They do not rear
more than tivo or three children, killing all above
this number.

ABISCA, an extensive province of the ki?ig-
domof Peru, to the e. of the Cordillera of the
Andes, betAveen the rivers Yetau and Amarumago,
ami to the of Cuzco, It is little knOAAUi, con-
sisting entirely of woods, rivers, and lakes ; and
B 2


Translation