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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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raense advantage to the neighbouring states, parti-cularly to Virginia. Of that state it has been ob-served, with some little exaggeration, however,that “ every planter has a river at his door.”)

(CHESHIRE county, in New Hampshire, lies inthe s. w. part of the state, on the e. bank of Con-necticut river. It has the state of Massachusettson the s. Grafton county on the n. and Hillsbo-rough county e. It lias 34 townships, of whichCharlestown and Keene are the chief, and 28,772inhabitants, including 16 slaves.)

(Cheshire, a township in Berkshire county,Massachusetts ; famous for its good cheese ; 140miles fi. w. from Boston.)

(Cheshire, a township in New-Haven county,Connecticut, 15 miles n. of New-Haven city, and26 s.to. of Hartford. It contains an Episcopalchurch and academy, and three Conffreffationalchurches.)

(CHESNUT HILL, a township in Northamptoncounty, Pennsylvania.)

(Chesnut Creek, a branch of the Great Kanha-way, in Virginia, where it crosses the Carolinaline. Here, it is said, are iron mines.)

(Chesnut Ridge. Part of the Alleghanymountains, in Pennsylvania, are thus called, s. e.of Greensborough.)

CHESSOT, a town of the province and colonyof North Carolina ; situate on the shore of theriver Euphasee.

(CHESTER, a township in Lunenburg county,Nova Scotia, on Mali one bay, settled originallyby a few families from New England. Fromhence to Windsor is a road, the distance of 25miles.)

(Chester, a small plantation in Lincoln county,Maine, nine miles from Titcomb. It has eight ornine families.)

(Chester, a township in Hampshire county,Massachusetts, adjoining Westfield on the e. andabout 20 miles n. w. of Springfield. It contains177 houses, and 1119 inhabitants.)

(Chester, a large, pleasant, and elegant town-ship in Rockingham county. New Hampshire.It is 21 miles in length ; and on the w. side is apretty large lake, which sends its waters to Merri-mack river. It was incorporated in 1722, andcontains 1902 inhabitants, who are chiefly farmers.It is situated on the e. side of Merrimack river,14 miles n. w. of Haverhill, as far w. of Exeter,35 tflTby s. of Portsmouth, six n. of Londonderry,and 306 from Philadelphia. From the compactpart of this town there is a gentle descent to thesea, which, in a clear day, may be seen fromthence. It is a post-town, and contains about 60

houses and a Congregational church. Rattlesnakehill, in this township, is a great curiosity; it ishalf a mile in diameter, of a circular form, and400 feet high. On the side, 10 yards from itsbase, is the entrance of a cave, called the Devil’sDen, which is a room 15 or 20 feet square, andfour feet high, floored and circled by a regularrock, from the upper part of which are depend-ent many excrescences, nearly in the form andsize of a pear, which, when approached by a torch,throw out a sparkling lustre of almost every hue;It is a cold, dreary place, of which many fright-ful stories are told by those who delight in themarvellous.)

(Chester, a township in Windsor county, Ver-mont, w. of Springfield, and II miles w. by s. ofCharlestown, in New Hampshire, and contains981 inhabitants.)

(Chester, a borough and post-town in Penn-sylvania, and the capital of Delaware county;pleasantly situated on the w. side of Delaware ri-ver, near Marcus hook, and 13 miles n. e. of Wil-mington. It contains about 60 houses, built on aregular plan, a court-house, and a gaol. FromCliester to Philadelphia is 20 miles by water, and15 n. e. by land ; here the river is narrowed byislands of marsh, which are generally banked,and turned into rich and immensely valuable mea-dows. The first colonial assembly was convenedhere, the 4th of December 1682. The place af-fords genteel inns and good entertainment, and isthe resort of much company from the metropolisduringthe summer season. It was incorporated inDecember 1795, and is governed by two bur-gesses, a constable, a town-clerk, and three assist-ants ; whose power is limited to preserve the peaceand order of the place.)

(Chester County, in Pennsylvania, w. of Dela-ware county, and s. w. of Philadelphia ; about 45miles in length, and 30 in breadth. It contains33 townships, of which West Chester is the shiretown, and 27,937 inhabitants, of whom 145 areslaves. Iron ore is found in the n. parts, whichemploys six forges : these manufacture 'about1000 tons of bar-iron annually.)

(Chester Court-House, in South Carolina, 22miles s. of Pinckney court-house, and 58 n. w. ofColumbia. A post-office is kept here.)

(Chester River, a navigable water of thee. side of Maryland, which rises two miles withinthe line of Delaware state, by two sources, Cyprusand Andover creeks, which unite at Bridgetown ;runs nearly s. w. ; after passing Chester it runs s.nearly three miles, when it receives South-Easterncreek ; and 15 miles farther, in a s. w. direction, it

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far as the confines of the akaldia mayof of Tepi-que. It is of an hot temperature, abounding’ inmaize, cotton, cocoa-trees, and other fruits pecu-liar to the climate : and particularly in large andsmall cattle, which breed in numberless wards andcountry estates. It has silver mines, which areworked to tolerable profit. It is but thinlypeopled, and the greater part of its inhabitants arcMustees and Negro slaves. It is watered by theriver Canas, which rises in the jurisdiction ofAcaponeta. The capital is of the same name.This was founded by Nufio de Guzman in 1531,and is the capital of the kingdom, and where thetribunal of royal audience and episcopal see wereerected ; these being afterwards removed to thecity of Guadalaxara. This latter city was at thesame time made the capital, from its proximity tothe shore of the S. sea, its distance from the samebeing only 12 leagues. It was at that time verywealthy, but it afterwards fell to decay ; the pri-macy was also taken from it, and it is nothing nowbut a miserable village. Its natives are the mostpolite and best affected to the Spaniards of any inthe whole kingdom. (To the n. w. of Compos-tela, as well as in the districts of Autlan, Ahux-catlan, and Acaponeta, a tobacco of a superiorquality was formerly cultivated.) Lat. 21° 10' w.Long. 104° 40' w. The settlements of this juris-diction are,

Matanchel, Sapotan,

San Pedro, Mazatlan,

Cali may a, Xaltocan.

Compostela, another city, in the island of St.Domingo. See Azua.

COMPTON, a settlement of the English, in theprovince and colony of Massachusetts ; situate onthe coast, at the entrance of the bay of Buzard.

COMUATO, a small island of the lake or seaof Chalapa, in the district of the alcaldia mayorof Zamora, and kingdom of Nueva Espana. Itis of a hot and moist temperature, surrounded bythick reeds and Indian fig-trees. In the dry sea-son it communicates with the mainland. Its po-pulation is scanty, and consists of 20 families ofSpaniards, and in its plains various herds of largecattle graze. Nine leagues from the capital.

COMUTA, a city of the province and captain-ship of Pará in Brazil, founded in 1581 by JuanPedro de Olivciro, on the e. shore of the riverPaeaxa. It is at present destroyed, and somesmall houses alone remain, where, for the conve-nienee of its situation, a small garrison of Portu-guese resides.

CONAHASET, a rocky shoal of the coast of

the province and colony of New England, at theentrance of port Boston.

CONAICA, a settlement of tlie province andcorrep;imiento of Angaraez in Peru.

(CONAJOHARY, a post-town on the s. side ofMohawk river, New York, very large, 36 milesabove Schenectady, and 318 from Philadelphia.See Canajoiiary.)

CONANAMA, a bay of the province and go-venment of Guayana.

CONANAMA, a river of the same name, in thisprovince.

CONARDO-TUBA, a river of the provincecaptainship o^ Los Ilheos in Brazil. It risesnear the coast, and runs e. between those of theDuna and Ilheos.

(CONAWANGO, a n. branch of Alleghanyriver, in Pennsylvania, which rises from Cha-taughque lake.)

CONCARY, a river of the province and cor-regimiento of Cuyo in the kingdom of Chile. Itrises from a small lake to the e. of the mountain ofthe Pie de Palo, and running s, e. returns, form-ing a curve to the w. when it divides itself into se-veral branches.

CONCEPCION, or Penco, a city of the king-dom of Chile, the capital of the province andcorregimiento of its name, founded in 1550 byPedro de Valdivia. Its situation is upon a barrenand uneven territory, somewhat elevated, on thesea-shore, and on the side of a large, noble, andconvenient bay. On the n. side it is crossed by arivulet, and on the s. it is watered by the riverAndalien, and lies not far from the Biobio. It isa small city, and its houses and buildings arepoor and much reduced. It has, besides the ca-thedral church, convents of the religious orders ofSt. Francis, St. Domingo, La Merced, St. Au-gustin, an hospital of San Juan de Dios, and acollege w hich belonged to the regulars of the com-pany of the Jesuits, and which is the best build-ing in it. Its climate is moderately warm, al-though in the winter the cold is great. It abouiidsgreatly in all kinds of grain, cattle, and deliciousfruits, and these are cultivated in gardens whichare found attached to almost every house. It liesopen on all sides, being commanded by six emi-nences ; amongst the which the most prominent isthat which is called Del Romitorio, and extendsas far as the city. Its only defence is a batteryon a level with the water, which defends the an-choring ground of the bay. The natives resemblethe rest of tliis kingdom : they are strong, robust,valorous, and well made, most dexterous in the3 s 2

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bounded ??. and 71 . w. by Mifiiin ; e. and n.e. bySusqiiehaiinah river, which divides it from Dau-phin ; i-. by York, and s.w. by Franklin county.It is 47 miles in length, and 42 in breadth, and has10 townships, of which Carlisle is the chief. Thecounty is generally mountainous; lies between^North and Soutli mountain ; on each side of Cone-dogwinet creek, there is an extensive, rich, andwell cultivated valley. It contains 18,243 inhabi-tants, of whom 223 are slaves.]

[Cumberland, a township in York county,Pennsylvania. Also the name of a township inWashington county, in the same state.]

[Cumberland County, in Fayette district, N.Carolina, contains 8671 inhabitants, of whom 2181are slaves. Chief town Fayetteville.]

rCUMBERLAND, a township of the above county (Cumberland),in N. Carolina,]

[Cumberland, a post-town and the chieftownship of Alleghany county, Maryland, lies onthe «. bank of a great bend of Potowmack river,and on both sides of the mouth of Will’s creek.It is 148 miles w. by n. of Baltimore, 109 mea-sured miles above Georgetown, and about 105». w. of Washington City. Fort Cumberlandstood formerly at the w. side of the mouth of Will’screek.]

[Cumberland County, in Virginia, on the«, side of Appamatox river, which divides it fromPrince Edward. It contains 8153 inhabitants, ofwhom 4434 are slaves. The court-house is 28miles from Pawhatan court-house, and 52 fromRichmond.]

[Cumberland Mountain occupies a part ofthe uninhabited country of the state of Tennessee,between the districts of Washington and Hamiltonand Mero district, and between the two firstnamed districts and the state of Kentucky. Theridge is about SO miles broad, and extends fromCrow creek, on Tennessee river, from s. w. ion. e.The place where the Tennessee breaks through theGreat ridge, called the Whirl or Suck, is 250miles above the Muscle shoals. Limestone isfound on both sides the mountain. The moun-tain consists of the most stupendous piles of craggyrocks of any mountain in the w. country ; inseveral parts of it, it is inaccessible for miles, evento the Indians on foot. In one place particularly,near the summit of the mountain, there is a mostremarkable ledge of rocks, of about SO miles inlength, and 200 feet thick, shewing a perpen-dicular face to the s. e. more noble and grand thanany artificial fortification in the known world, andapparently equal in point of regularity.]

[Cumberland River, called by the Indians“ Shawanee,” and by the French “ Shavanon,”falls into the Ohio 10 miles above the mouth ofTennessee river, and about 24 miles due e. fromfort Massac, and 1113 below Pittsburg. It isnavigable for large vessels to Nashville in Ten-nessee, and from thence to the mouth of Obed’s orObas river. The Caney-fork, Harpeth, Stones,Red, and Obed’s, are its chief branches ; some ofthem are navigable to a great distance. TheCumberland mountains in Virginia separate thehead waters of this river from those of Clinchriver ; it runs s. w. till it comes near the s. line ofKentucky, when its course is w. in general,through Lincoln county, receiving many streamsfrom each side ; thence it flows s. w. into the stateof Tennessee, where it takes a winding course, in-closing Sumner, Davidson, and Tennessee coun-ties ; afterwards it takes a n. w. direction, and re-enters the state of Kentucky ; and from thence itpreserves nearly an uniform distance from Tennes-see river to its mouth, where it is 300 yards wide.It is 200 yards broad at Nashville, and its wholelength is computed to be above 450 miles.]

[Cumberland-River, a place so called, wherea post-office is kept, in Tennessee, 13 miles fromCumberland mountain, and 80 from the Crab-Orchard in Kentucky.]

CUMBICOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Piura in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Trias.

CUMBINAMA. See Loyola.

CUMINACA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Asangaro in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Combaya.

[CUMMASHAWAS, or Cummasuawaa, asound and village on the e. side of Washingtonisland, on the n. w. coast of N. America. Theport is capacious and safe. In this port CaptainIngraham remained some time, and he observes,in his journal, that here, in direct opposition tomost other parts of the world, the women main-tained a precedency to the men in every point ;insomuch that a man dares not trade without theconcurrence of his wife, and that he has often beenwitness to men’s being abused for parting withskins before their approbation was obtained ; andthis precedency often occasioned much disturbance.

[CUMMINGTON, a township in Hampshirecounty, Massachusetts, having 873 inhabitants;lying about 20 miles n. w. of Northampton, and120 n. w. by zjj. of Boston. It was incorporatedin 1779.1

CUMPAYO, a settlement of the province of

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