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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

371
Indexed

C H A

C H A

371

CHATACANCHA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Olleros.

(CHATA-HATCHI, or Hatchi, is the largest river which falls into St. Rose’s bay in W. Florida. It is also called Pea river, and runs from n. e. entering the bottom of the bay through several mouths, but so shoal that only a small boat or canoe can pass them. Mr. Hutchins ascended this river about 25 leagues, where there was a small settlement of Coussac Indians. The soil and timber on the banks of the river resemble very much those of Escambia.)

CHATAHOUCHI, a settlement of Indians of Georgia, in which the English have an establishment. It is situate on the shore of the river Apalachicola.

CHATAS, some islands of the N. sea, which are very small and desert, and lie to the n. of the island of Ynagua.

(CHATAUCHE, or Chatahuthe, a river in Georgia. The n. part of Apalachiola river bears this name. It is about SO rods wide, very rapid, and full of shoals. The lands on its banks are light and sandy, and the clay of a bright red. The lower creeks are settled in scattering clans and villages from the head to the mouth of this river. Their huts and cabins, from the high colour of the clay, resemble clusters of new-burned brick kilns. The distance from this river to the Talapose river, is about 70 miles, by the war-path, which crosses at the falls, just above the town of the Tuckabatches.)

(CHATAUGHQUE Lake, in Ontario county. New York, is about 18 miles long, and three broad. Conewango river, which runs a s. s. e. course, connects it with Alleghany river. Tliis lake is conveniently situated fora communication between lake Erie and the Ohio ; there being water enough for boats from fort Franklin on the Alleghany to the n. w. corner of this lake ; from thence there is a portage of nine miles to Cliatanghque harbour on lake Erie, over ground capable of being made a good waggon road. This communication was once used by the French.)

CHATEAU, a settlement of New France, in which the French have a castle and establishment, on the shore of the river St. Lawrence.

CHATEAUX, a small river of the country and land of Labrador. It runs s. and enters the sea in the strait of Belleisle.

(CHATHAM, a maritime township in Barnstaple county, Massachusetts ; situate on the exterior extremity of the elbow of cape Cod, conve-

niently for the fishery ; in which they have usually about 40 vessels employed. It has 1140 inhabitants, and lies 95 miles s. e. of Boston. See Cape Cod.)

(Chatham, a township in Grafton county, New Hampshire, it Avas incorporated in 1767, and in 1790 contained 58 inhabitants.)

(Chatham, a flourishing township in Middlesex county, Connecticut, on the e. bank of Connecticut river, and opposite Middleton city, it was a part of the township of Middleton till 1767.)

(Chatham, a township in Essex county, N. Jersey, is situated on Passaic river, 13 miles zd. of Elizabethtown, and nearly the same from Newark.)

(Chatham, a township of Columbia county, New York. By the state census of 1796, 380 of its inhabitants were electors.)

(Chatham County, in Hillsborough district, N. Carolina, about the centre of the state. It contains 9221 inhabitants, of whom 1632 are slaves. Chief town, Pittsburg. The court-house is a few miles w. of Raleigh, on a branch of Cape Fear river.)

(Chatham, a town of S. Carolina, in Cheraws district ; situate in Chesterfield county, on the w. side of Great Pedee river. Its situation, in a highly cultivated and rich country, and at the head of a navigable river, bids fair to render it a place of great importance. At present it has only about 30 houses, lately built.)

(Chatham County, in the lower district of Georgia, lies in the n. e. corner of the state, having the Atlantic ocean e. and Savannah river n. e. It contains 10,769 inhabitants., including 8201 slaves. The chief toAvn is Savannah, tlie former capital of the state.)

(Chatham or Punjo Bay, a large bay on the w. side of the s. end of the promontory of E. Florida. It receives North and Delaware rivers.)

(Chatham House, in the territory of the Hudson bay company. Lat. 55° 28' n. Long. 97* 32' w. from Greenwich.)

CHAUCA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Guarochiri in Peru; annexed to the curacy of Casta.

Chauca, another settlement, in the province and corregimiento of Canta ; annexed to the curacy of Pari.

CHAUCAIAN, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Huailas in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Caxacai, in the province of Caxatambo.

CHAUCHILLOS, a settlement of the province

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COL

COL

401

Cold spring is 4200 feet above the level of the sea ; and few or none of the tropical fruits will flourish in so cold a climate. The general state of the thermometer is from 55° to 63° ; and even sometimes so low as 44° : so that a fire there, even at noon-day, is not only comfortable, but necessary, a great part of the year. Many of the English fruits, as the apple, the peach, and the strawberry, flourish there in great perfection, with several other valuable exotics, as the tea-tree and other oriental productions.)

(Cold Spring Cove, near Burlington, New Jersey, is remarkable for its sand and clay, used in the manufacture of glass ; from whence the glass works at Hamilton, 10 miles w. of Albany, are supplied with these articles.)

COLE, a settlement of the island of Barbadoes, in the district of the parish of St. George, distinct from the other of its name in the same parish.

COLEA, a river of the province and government of Maynas in the kingdom of Quito. It runs s. and enters the Tigre.

(COLEBROOKE, in the «. part of New Hampshire, in Grafton county, lies on the e. bank of Connecticut river, opposite the Great Monadnock, in Canaan, state of Vermont ; joining Cockburne on the s. and Stuartstown on the n. ; 126 miles n. w. by «. from Portsmouth.)

(COLEBROOKE, a Tougb, hilly township on the n. line of Connecticut, in Litchfield county, 30 miles n. w. of Hartford city. It was settled in 1736. Here are two iron works, and several mills, on Still river, a n. w. water of Farmington river. In digging a cellar in this town, at the close of the year 1796, belonging to Mr. John Hulburt, the workmen, at the depth of about 9 or 10 feet, found three large tusks and two thigh-bones of an animal, the latter of which measured each about four feet four inches in length, and 12|; inches in circumference. When first discovered they were entire, but as soon as they were exposed to the air they mouldered to dust. This adds another to the manj^ facts which prove that a race of enormous animals, now extinct, once inhabited the United States.)

(COLERAIN, a township in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania.]

(COLERAIN, a town on the». bank of St. Mary’s river, Camden county, Georgia, 40 or 50 miles from its mouth. On the 29th of June 1796, a treaty of peace and friendship was made and concluded at this place, between the president of the United States, on the one part, in behalf of the United States, and the king’s chiefs and warriors of the Creek nation of Indians, on the other. By

this treaty, the line between the white people and the Indians was established to run from the Currahee mountain to the head or source of the main s. branch of the Oconee river, called by the white people Appalatohee, and by the Indians Tulapoeka, and down the middle of the same.” Liberty was also given by the Indians to the president of the United Stutes to “ establish a trading or military post on the s. side of Alatamaha, about one mile from Beard’s bluff', or any where from thence down the river, on the lands of the Indians and the Indians agreed to “ annex to said post a tract of land of five miles square ; and in return for this and other tokens of friendship on the part of the Indians, the United States stipulated to give them goods to the value of 6000 dollars, and to furnish them with two blacksmiths with tools.)

COLGUE, a settlement of the island of Laxa in the kingdom of Chile ; situate on the shore of the river Tolpan.

COLIMA, the alcaldia mayor and jurisdiction of the province and bishopric of Mechoacán in Nueva Espana. It is bounded e. by the jurisdiction of Zapotlan, s. by that of Mortincs, n. by that of Tuzcacuesco, and w. by that of Autlan, and the port of La Navidad in the kingdom of Nueva Galicia. It carries on a great trade in salt, collected on the coasts of the S. sea, where there are wells and salt grounds, from which great emolument is derived, supplying, as they do, the inland provinces with this article. Formerly the best

cocoa wine of any in the kingdom was made here, from the abundance of this fruit found in all the palm estates ; but the art of bringing it to perfection was lost, and this branch of commerce died away, from the additional cause, that the making of this liquor was prohibited by the viceroy, the Duke of Albuquerque, as being a drink calculated to produce great inebriety. The capital is of the same name ; and the settlements of this district are, Almoloioyan, Zinacantepec,

Comala, Totolmoloyan,

Zaqualpa, Caxitlan,

Xulua. Tecoman,

Xilotlan, Ixtlahuaca,

Guezalapa, Tomala,

Nagualapa, Cuatlan. ,

Cochimatlan,

The capital is a town sitimteupon the coast of the S. sea, near the frontiers ofXalisco, in the most fertile and pleasant valley of Nueva Espaiia. It abounds in cacao and other vegetable productions ; is of a hot temperature, and the air is very pure. Its buildings are regular and handsome, 3 R 2

I

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COW

cox

figure, with four bastions, built wfili stockades. There were, some years since, about 2000 white inhabitants and 7000 slaves. They cultivate Indian corn, tobacco, and indigo; raise vast quantities of poultry, wliich they send to New Orleans. They also send to that city squared timber, staves, &c.]

COUQUECURA, a settlement of Indians of the province and corregimiento of Itata in the kingdom of Chile; situate on the coast.

COURIPI, a river of the province of Guayana==, in the F rench possessions.

COUSSA, a settlement of the English, in S. Carolina ; situate on the shore of the river of its name.

Coussa, another settlement, in the same province and colony, on the shore of a river of the same denomination. This river runs n. w. and enters the Albama.

COUSSARIE, a river of the province of Guayana, in the part possessed by the French. It enters the Aprouac,

COUSSATI, a settlement of Indians of S. Carolina ; situate on the shore of the river Albama.

COUUACHITOUU, a settlement of Indians of S. Carolina, in which the English have an establishment and fort for its defence.

COUUANCHI, a river of the province and colonj'^ of Georgia, which runs e, and enters the Ogeclii.

COUUANAIUUINI, a river of the province of Guayana, in the part which the French possess.

(COVENTRY, a township in Tolland county, Connecticut, 20 miles e. of Hartford city. ’’ It was settled in 1709, being purchased by a number of Hartford gentlemen of one Joshua, an Indian.)

(Coventry, in Rhode Island state, is the n. easternmost township in Kent county. It contains 2477 inhabitants.)

(Coventry, a township in the n. part of New Hampshire, in Grafton county. It was incorporated in 1764, and contains 80 inhabitants.)

(Coventry, a township in Orleans county, Vermont. It lies in the n. part of the state, at the s. end of lake Memphremagog. Black river passes through this town in its course to Memphremagog.)

(Coventry, a township in Chester county, Pennsylvania.)

(COW AND Calf Pasture Rivers are head branches of Rivanna river, in Virginia.)

(COWE is the capital town of the Cherokee Indians ; situated on the foot of the hills on both sides of the river Tennessee. Here terminates the

great vale of Cowe, exhibiting one of the most charming, natural, mountainous landscapes that can be seen. The vale is closed at Cowe by a ridge of hills, called the Jore mountains. The town contains about 100 habitations. In the constitution of the state of Tennessee, Cowe is described as near the line which separates Tennessee from Virginia, and is divided from Old Chota, another Indian town, by that part of the Great Iron or Smoaky mountain, called Unicoi or Unaca mountain).

COWETAS, a city of the province and colony of Georgia in N. America. It is 500 miles distant from Frederick, belongs to the Creek Indians, and in it General Oglethorp held his conferences with the caciques or chiefs of the various tribes composing this nation, as also with the deputies from the Chactaws and the Chicasaws, who inhabit the parts lying between the English and French establishments. He here made some new treaties with the natives, and to a greater extent than those formerly executed. Lat. 32° 12' n. Long. 85° 52' w. (See Apalachichola Town.)

(COWS Island. See Vache.)

(COWTENS, a place so called, in S. Carolina, between the Pacolet river and the head branch of Broad river. This is the spot where General Morgan gained a complete victory over Lieutenant-colonel Tarleton, January 11, 1781, having only 12 men killed and 60 wounded. The British had 39 commissioned officers killed, wounded, and taken prisoners ; 100 rank and file killed, 200 wounded, and 500 prisoners. They left behind two pieces of artillery, two standards, 800 muskets, 35 baggage waggons, and 100 drago"on horses, which fell into the hands of the Americans. The field of battle was in an open wood.)

COX, a settlement of the island of Barbadoes, in the district of the parish of San Joseph, near the e. coast.

Cox, another settlement in the same island, distinct from the former, and not far distant from it.

COXCATLAN, S. Juan Bautista de, a settlement and head settlement of the district of the a/caMa mayor of Valles in Nueva Espana ; situate on the bank of a stream which runs through a glen bordered with mountains and woods. It contans 1131 families of Mexican Indians, SO of Spaniards, and various others of Mulattoes and Jlfustees, all of whom subsist by agriculture, and in raising various sorts of seeds, sugar-canes, and cotton. Fifteen leagues from the capital.

Coxcatlan, another settlement and head settlement of the alcddia mayor of Thehuacan in the

fr

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