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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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rdistinguished for being very sure-footed and active. The horned cattle have, through the favourable temperature of the climate, acquired a larger size, while their flesh has become better and more nutritive ; the sheep imported from Spain retain a wool as beautiful as that of the best Spanish sheep, each sheep yielding annually from 10 to 15 lbs. of wool ; they breed twice a-year, and have generally two at a birth. The common price of cattle throughout the country is from three to four filippi (fifteen or twenty francs), but in the seaports the price is fixed by an ancient regulation, at 10 crowns ; of which the commandant of the port receives four, and the owner six.

The different kinds of trees known in Chile amount to 97, and of these only 13 shed their leaves : amongst the plants, there are 3000 not mentioned in botanical works. _The melons here are, according to Molina, three feet long, and the only fruits unknown are medlars, service apples, three-grained medlar, and the jujubre. Of the indigenous worms, insects, &c. are 36 species, andthetunicated cuttle-fish found here is of 150 lbs. weight. There are 13 species of crabs and crawfish found on the sea-coast, and four species in the fresh waters. There are 135 species ofland-birds, and of quadrupeds 36, without those imported. The various kinds of esculent fish found upon the coast are computed by the fishermen at 76, the most of them differing from those of the n. hemisphere, and appearing to be peculiar to that sea.

Amongst the earths of this country is a clay thought to be very analogous to kaolin of the Chinese ; another kind called roro, producing an excellent black dye, and represented by Feuille and Frazier as superior to the best European blacks. The membraneous mica^ otherwise Muscovy grass, is also found here in the greatest perfection, both as respects its transparency and the size of its laminae ; of this substance the country people manufacture artificial flowers, and like the Russians, make use of it for glazing their houses. The thin plates which are used for windows are by many preferred to glass, from their being pliable and less fragile, and possessing what appears to be a peculiar property, of freely admitting the light and a view of external objects to those within, while persons without are prevented from seeing any thing in the house.

22. Present revolution. — In Chile, the authority of the mother country has been superseded by the aristocracy of the colony. The government has fallen, peaceably and without resistance, into the hands of the great Creole families, who seem hitherto to have used their power with temper and moderation. See La PijAta.]

Same name, a river of the former kingdom (Chile), in the district of Tolten Baxo. It runs w. and enters the sea between the rivers Tolten and Budi.

Same name, a point of the coast of the province and corregimienio of Arequipa,

Same name, a small island of the S. sea, in the same province and corregimiento.

CHILENO, Paso del, a ford of the river Jazegua, in the province and government of Buenos Ayres, close to the river Cordobes.

CHILERIOS, a river of the province and government of Buenos Aires. It runs North Carolinan and cnler§ the river Negro.

CHILES, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Pasto in the kingdom of Quito.

[CHILHOWEE, mountain, in the s. e. part of the state of Tennessee, and between it and the Cherokee country.]

CHILIA, a settlement of the province and |corregimiento of Caxaraarquilla and Collay in Peru.

CHILINTOMO, a mountain of the province and government of Guayaquil in the kingdom of Quito ; inhabited by some Indians, who, although reduced to the Catholic faith, are nevertheless of such vile habits as constantly to manifest how deeply idolatry is rooted in them.

CHILIPUIN, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chachapoyas in Peru.

[CHILISQUAQUE, a township on Susquehannah river, in Pennsylvania.]

CHILLAHUA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Carangas in Peru, and of the archbishopric of Charcas.

[CHILLAKOTHE, an Indian town]on the Great Miami, which was destroyed in 1782 by a body of militia from Kentucky. General Harmar supposes this to be the “ English Tawixtwi,” in H utchins’s map. Here are the ruins of an old fort, and on both sides of the river are extensive meadows. This name is applied to many different places, in honour of an influential chief who formerly headed the Shawanoes. See Tawixtwi.]

[Chillakothe, Old, is an Indian town destroyed by the forces of the United States in 1780. It lies about three miles s. of Little Mimia river j the country in its vicinity is of a rich soil, and is beautifully chequered with meadows.]

CHILLAN, a city, the capital of the district and corregimiento of this name (Chillan) in the kingdom of Chile. It is very small and poor, although it contains some families of distinction. It consists.

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at the most, of 360 houses : for having been destroyed by tlie Araucanians, in 1599, it as never sine e been able to reach its former degree of splendour. Jt lies between the river Nuble to the n. and the Itala to the s. in lat. 35° 56' s.

another, a mountain or volcano of the same province and corregimiento (Chillan), at a little distance from the former city. On its skirts are the Indian nations of the Puclches, Pehuenches, and Chiquillanes, who have an outlet by the navigation ot the river Demante.

another, a small river of the same province (Chillan).

CHILLAOS, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of this name in Peru. It is of a hot temperature, and produces some tobacco and almonds.

CHILLOA, a llanura of the kingdom of Quito, near this capital, between two chains of mountains, one very lofty towards the e. and the other lower towards the s. It is watered by two principal rivers, the Pita and the Amaguana, which at the end of the llanura unite themselves at the foot of the mountain called Guangapolo, in the territory of the settlement of Alangasi, and at the spot called Las Juntas. In this plain lie the settlements of Amaguana, Sangolqui, Alangasi, and Conocoto, all of which are curacies of the jurisdiction of Quito. It is of a mild and pleasant temperature, although sometimes rather cold, from its proximity to the mountains or paramos of Pintac, Antisana, Rurainavi, and Sincholagua. Here was formerly celebrated the cavalgata, by the collegians of the head- college and seminary of San Luis dc Quito, during the vacations. The soil produces abundance of wheat and maize. It is much resorted to by the gentlemen of Quito as a place of recreation, it is eight or nine leagues in length, and six in width.

CHILLOGALLO, a settlement of the kingdomof Quito, in the district of Las Cinco Leguas de su Capital.

[CHILMARK, a township on Martha’s Vineyard island, Duke’s county, Massachusetts, containing 771 inhabitants. It lies 99 miles s. by e. of Boston. See Maktha’s Vineyard.]

CHILOE, a large island of the Archipelago or Ancud of the kingdom of Chile, being one of the 18 provinces or corregimientos which compose it. It is 58 leagues in length, and nine in width at the broadest part ; and varies until it reaches only two leagues across, which is its narrowest part. It is of a cold temperature, being very subject to heavy rains and fresh winds ; notwithstanding '

which its climate is healthy. Around it are four other islands ; and the number of settlements in these are 25, which are,

Achau,

Quehuy,

Lin-lin,

Chelin,

Llinua,

Limuy,

Qnenac,

Tanqui,

Meulin,

Chiduapi,

Cahuac,

Abtau,

Alau,

Tabor,

Apiau,

Quenu,

Chanlinec,

Llaycha,

Anihue,

Huar,

Chegniau,

Calbuco,

VAita-Chauquis,

Caucahue,

Isla Grande.

All of these are mountainous, little cultivatad, and produce only a small proportion of wheat, barley, flax, and papas ^ esteemed the best of any in America ; besides some swine, of which hams are made, which they cure by frost, and are of so delicate a flavour as not only to be highly esteemed here, but in all other parts, both in and out of the kingdom, and are in fact a very large branch of commerce. The principal trade, however, consists in planks of several exquisite woods, the trees of which are so thick, that from each of them ars cut in general 600 planks, of 20 feet in length, and of 1| foot in width. Some of these trees have measured 24 yards in circumference. The natives make various kinds of woollen garments, such as ponchos f quilts, coverlids, baizes, and bor~ dillos. The whole of this province is for the most part poor ; its natives live very frugally, and with little communication with any other part of the world, save with those who are accustomed to come hither in the fleet once a-year. Altliough it has some small settlements on the continent, in Valdivia, yet these are more than 20 or 30 leagues distant from this place, and are inhabited by infidel Indians. These islands abound in delicate shellfish of various kinds, and in a variety of other fish ; in the taking of which the inhabitants are much occupied, and on which they chiefly subsist. This jurisdiction is bounded on the n. by the territory of the ancient city of Osorno, which was destroyed by the Araucanian Indians, by the extensive Archipelagoes of Huayaneco and Huaytecas, and others which reach as far as the straits of Magellan and the Terra del Fuego, e. by the cordilleras and the Patagonian country, and w. by the Pacific or S. sea. On its mountains are found amber, and something resembling gold dust, which is washed up by the rains, although no

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mines have as yet been discovered here. These islands have some ports, but such as are small, insecure, and without any defence, with the exception of that of Chacao. The inhabitants should amount to 22,000 souls, and these are divided into 4 1 settlements or parishes, being formed by the reducciones of the missionaries of St. Francis, and consisting at the present day, for the most part, of Spaniards and Creoles. The capital is the city of Santiago de Castro, in the large island of Chiloe. [For further account, see index to additional history of Chile, chap. lY. § 35.]

CHILON, a settlement of the province and government of Santa Cruz de la Sierra in Peru ; situate in a valley which is beautiful and fertile, and which abounds in wheat. Twenty-eight leagues from the settlement of Samaypata.

CHILOSTUTA, a settlement of the province and alcaldia mayor of Zedales in the kingdom of Guatemala.

CHILPANSINGO, a settlement of the intendancy of Mexico, surrounded with fertile fields of wheat. Elevation 1080 metres, or 3542 feet.

CHILQUES Y MASQUES, a province and corregimiento of Peru, bounded by the province of Quispicanchi; s.e. by that of Churabivilcas ; s. and s. w. by that of Cotabambas ; w. by that of Abancay; and n. t®. by Cuzco. Its temperature is various, the proportion of heat and cold being regulated by its different degrees of elevation ; so that in the quebradas or deep glens, it is warm, and in the sierras or mountains, cold. It is 13 leagues in length, and 25 in width ; is watered by three rivers, which are the Cusibamba, passing through the valley of this name, the Velille, and the Santo Tomas ; over these rivers are extended seven bridges, which form a communication with the other provinces. It has likewise eight small lakes, and in some of these are found water-fowl. The hot parts abound in all kinds of fruits ; in wheat, maize, pulse, potatoes, and are well stocked with some sorts of cattle, and great herds of deer. Its natives fabricate the manufactures of the country ; such as cloths, baizes, and coarse frieze, by means of chorillos, or running streams, as they have no mills for fulling, since a royal licence is necessary for the making use of the same. Although the appearance of mines has in many places been discovered amongst the mountains, yet no mines have as yet been worked, and two only have been known to have been opened in former times. This province has suffered much from earthquakes ; and the greatest of these happened in 1707, when many settlements were made desolate. It is composed of 27 settlements, and these contain 16,000 inhabitants. The capital is Paruro ; and the repariimiento of the corregimiento used to amount to 84,550 dollars, and the alcamla The other settlements are.

to 676 dollars per ann. Colcha,

Araipalpa,

San Lorenzo, Parapacucho,

Ceapa,

Cuchirihuay,

Tucuyachi,

Coron,

Pacopata,

Aicha-Urinzaba,

Pilpinto,

Huayaconga,

Accha-Amansaia,

Parco,

Pocoray,

Hanoquite,

Corea,

Paucartarnbo,

Amacha,

Antapalpa,

Quilli,

Acca,

Vilque,

Capi,

Cavabamba,

Huancahuanca,

Yaurisque.

Same name, another settlement of the province and corregimiento of Lucanas in the same kingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Pucquin.

CHILTAL, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Atacames or Esmeraldas in the kingdom of Quito ; situate in the valley of Chota, on the shore of the river Mira.

CHILTEPEC, a settlement of the head settlement of Tepalcatepcec in Nueva Espana. Its temperature is the mildest of any part of its jurisdiction. It is situate in the middle of a plain, extending over the top of a hill, on two sides of which are large chasms, so immensely deep, that it is really astonishing to observe how the Indians contrive to cultivate the impoleras on their edges. It contains 67 families of Indians, and is five leagues to thes. of its head settlement.

Same name, a river of the province and alcaldiamayor of Tabasco, which runs into the sea.

CHILUA, San Marcos de, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Huanta in Peru ; annexed to the Curacy of Huamanguilla.

CHIMA, a mountain of the kingdom of Quito, in the government and corregimiento of Chirnbo or Guaranda, to tire zo. of the settlement of Asancoto. It is entirely covered with woods and with streams, which flow down from the heights into the plains of Babahoyo. The river named De la Chima runs from e. tow. until it joins the Caracol. A way has been opened through this mountain which leads to Guaranda or Guayaquil ; but it is passable in the summer only. There is also another pass equally difficult and dangerous, called Angas. The cold is great at the top of the mountain, and at the skirts the heat is excessive, it i.s in lat. 44' s.

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CHIMALAPA, Santa Maria de a settlement of the head settlement of the district and alcaldia mayor of Tehuantepec in Nueva Espana. It is of a cold temperature, and the whole of its district is covered with very large trees, especially firs fit for ship-building. Twenty-five leagues n.w. of its capital,

CHIAMLHUACAN, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Coatepec in Nueva Espana. It contains a good convent of the religious order of St. Domingo, 300 families of Spaniards, il/wsfees, and Mulattoes, who employ themselves in labour, and in the commerce of seeds and large and small cattle, which are bred in the estates contiguous ; but the latter in no great degree, owing to the scarcity of water and pasture which prevails here.

Same name, another settlement and head settlement of the district in the alcaldia mayor of Chaleo, of the same kingdom. It contains 166 families of Indians, and a convent of the religious order of St. Domingo. Five leagues n. of its capital.

CHIMALTENANGO, a province and corregimiento of the kingdom of Guatemala ; situate in the valley of this capital. It is very pleasant and fertile, and peopled with Indians.

CHIMALTEPEC, a settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in Nueva Espana. It contains 29 families of Indians, and is two leagues from the real of the mines of Cairo.

Same name, another small settlement of the head settlement of Malcatepec, and alcaldia mayor of Nexapa, very near its head settlement.

CHIMAN, a settlement of the province and government of Darien, in the kingdom of Tierra Firme ; situate near the coast of the S. sea, and on the shore of the river of its name, having a small port, which is garrisoned by a detachment from Panama, for the purpose of restraining the invasions which are continually made by the Indians.

Same name, a river of this province, and government, which rises in the mountains on the s. coast, and runs into the sea opposite the island of Narranjal,

CHIMBA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Coquimbo in the kingdom of Chile. It has the celebrated talc gold-mine which was discovered 36 years ago by a fisherman, who pulling up a plant of large and prickly leaves, called cordon, or fuller’s thistle, for the purpose of fuel for his fire, observed that particles of gold dropped from its roots; and having more narrowly inspected it, found pieces amidst the mould of considerable size and of very fine quality. Thus

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a mine became established here, and when it was first dug it yielded from 300 to 500 dollars each caxon.

Same name, another settlement of the province and corregimienio of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Andajes.

CHIMBACALLE a settlement of the kingdom of Quito, in the corregimienio of the district of Las Cinco Leguasde la Capital, (ofthe Five Leagues from the Capital), of which this is looked upon as a suburb from its proximity.

CHIMBARONGO, a river of the kingdom of Chile. It rises in the mountains of its cordillera^ and unites itself with that of Tinguiragua to enter the Napel. This river waters and fertilizes some very pleasant and delightful valleys, abounding in pastures, whereon breed and fatten an infinite number of cattle. On its shores are two convents, one ofthe religious order of Nuestra Senora de la Merced, for the instruction of the Indians in the Christian faith ; and another a house for novices, which belonged to the regulars of the society of Jesuits ; and also within a league’s distance from the latter, is a convent of the order of St. Domingo.

Same name, a settlement of the province and corregimienio of Colchagua in the same kingdom ; situate in the Former valley, between the rivers Tinguiririca and Teno. There is also another small settlement annexed, with a chapel of ease. In its district is a convent of the religious order of La Merced.

[CHIMBO, a jurisdiction in the province of Zinto in South America, in the torrid zone. The capital is also called by the same name.]

CHIMBO Y ALAUSI, a province and corregimiento of the kingdom of Quito ; bounded n. oy the serrania of the asiento of Ambato ; s, by the government and jurisdiction of Guayaquil ; e. by the district of the point of Santa Elena of this government; and ro. by the province of Riobamba. Its district is barren and poor, and the country being mountainous, the inhabitants have no resource for getting their livelihood other than by acting as carriers between the provinces of Riobamba and Tacunga on the one hand, and the warehouses of Babahoyo on the other, where also are the royal magazines ; and thus they bring back goods from the provinces of Peru, having for this traffic a number of requas, or droves of mules, amounting in the whole to 1500 head. This commerce can only be carried on in the summer, the roads being impassable in the winter through the mountains, when they say that these are shut up : at the same season the rivers become swollen to such a degree

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CHIMOR, a settlement of the province and forregimiento of Paucartambo in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Challabamba.

CHINA, a small river of the province and government of Santa Marta in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; one of those which enter the great cienega, or quagmire, on the e.

Same name, a point of land of the coast of Peru, in the province and corregimienlo of Cañete.

Same name, a settlement of Indians of the province and colony of Georgia ; situate on the shore of the river Apalachicola.

CHINACATES, a settlement of the province of Tepeguana, and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya.

CHINACOTA, a small settlement of the jurisdiction and government of Pamplona in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It is of a hot temperature, produces sugar-cane, plantains, maize, and is extremely fertile in wheat ; but this not without cultivation. The natives amount to about 90 poor families, and as many Indians. It is situate in an extensive valley, from whence it derives its title, and which is also called. Of Meer Ambrosio, from the Indians having killed here the German General Ambrosio de Alfinger, by whom it w^as discovered in 1531. Four leagues n. e. of Pamplona.

CHINANTLA, a settlement and head settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Cozamaloapan in Nueva Espaha. It contains 40 families of Chinantecas Indians, and is very fertile, and abounding in maize and cotton. Eighty leagues s. of Mexico.

CHINANTEPEC, Santa Catalina, a settlement and head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Guayacocotla in Nueva Espana. Its territory is somewhat extensive, and the settlements or wards belonging to it are far removed from each other, the greater part of them being situate within the deep glens, or on the heights, so that the roads to them are very difficult. It contains, in all, 1340 families of Indians.

CHINAPA, a settlement of the province and government of La Sonora ; situate on the shore of the river of its name, between the settlements of Arispo and Bacuachi.

CHINAS, a settlement of the province and government of Popayan.

CHINATAGUAS, a barbarous nation of Indians of Peru ; situate to the n. of the city of Guanuco. They are descendants of the Panataguas, of whom few remain at the present day, and of whom but little is known.

CHINATECA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; situate on the skirt of a mountain.

CHINATOS, a barbarous nation of Indians of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, who inhabit the forests to the n. e. 1 to the e. of the city of Pamplona. They are relics of the Chitareros, who have been always found very troublesome, from their proximity to the aforesaid city.

CHINAUTLA, a settlement and head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Teuzitlan in Nueva Espana ; annexed to the curacy of this capital. It contains 108 families of Indians, and lies a league and an halPs distance from the same capital.

CHINCHA, Santo Domingo, el Real de a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Canete in Peru ; situate on the sea-coast.

Same name, an island of the S. sea, near the coast, in the same province and corregimiento, opposite the port of Sangallo.

Same name, formerly the name of the province or district now called Chunchasuyu in Peru, to the is. of Cuzco. Its natives were valorous, and resisted for eight months the Emperor Pachacutec, who subjected it to his controul. The country is pleasant, fertile, and abounding in cattle. Here are to be seen vestiges and ruins of some magnificent fabrics, which belonged to the Incas, and which strike the imagination with wonder and surprise, at viewing the immense stones used in their architecture, and when it is considered that the Indians knew not the use of engines, whereby they might raise them.

CHINCHAIPUCQUIO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Abancay in Peru.

CHINCHAN, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Tarma in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Huariaca.

CHINCHAO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Huanuco in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Santa Maria del Valle; situate on the confines of the infidel Pataguas Indians.

CHINCHAYCOCHA, a large lake of the province and corregimiento of Tarma in Peru. It is more than nine leagues in length and three in width ; and from it rises the river Pari or Paria, also called Xauxa, towards the n. side. This river runs s. dividing the province of Xauxa, and giving it its name, both in Xauxa Alta, or High, and Baxa, or Low ; it then turns e. and after running for more than 40 leagues, flows back to the n. until it enters the Maranon on the s. side. M. De la Martiniere, with his accustomed error, says that

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