Texas State Association of Architects Minutes and Proceedings

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had been received and required the committee's attention.

Mr. Haggart, a member on a special committee for rules governing competitions read his report.

Mr. Wahrenberger wished to know whether the members would adopt the report, or wished to discuss the same. Question.

Mr. Gordon wished to know whether members of the T. S. A of A. would enter into competition with every arch't whether members of the association or not. He would suggest, as a resolution, the appointment by the President of the association of three architects, who would be paid for their services by the owners or board of directors of such buildings, who would adjudicate on the merits of the drawing, and further that the successful competing architect should be paid six percent for full fees on account of the labor incurred in the original submitted drawing, as well as the new sets of drawings rendered necessary as working plans, elevation sections, etc. The latter would be of necessity an entirely new set.

Mr. Dickey thought that the architects could not well dictate to proprietors what they should do, but that those whose business is alone [that of an?] architect should have the preference at all times over builders in the matter of designl also that members of a chartered association should be preferred to outsiders who look upon

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themselves as clever and important enough without becoming members of a corporate body. Members of an order consult one another and derive benefit from the intercourse, and that the bond of friendship is strength.

Mr Haggart said that his paper was not a motion, only suggestions, as a basis to work on. Mr. McQuirk, his associate on the committee, had done nothing in the matter, and he thought that a new appointment should be made. Mr Wahrenberger recommended that the report be referred back to the Committee, and he would nominate Mr. Dickey as a fit member to detail the requirements, in conjunction with Mr Haggart. Approved.

Mr. Dickey wished to know whether they would enter into competitions without compensation, or on the ideas advanced by Mr Gordon.

Motion - That the report submitted by Haggart on formulating rules under which members will take part in competitions be referred to the executive committee, with addition of Dickey, added for special purpose, and report at this convention. Moved by J. J. Kane seconded by J. R. Gordon. Carried.

Mr. Haggart on special committee said that badges had been made and were in the hands of the secretary. He did the best he could and hoped they were satisfactory. He had consulted Kane, Sanguinet + Stewart in the matter

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The President wished the badge to be the official badge of the assn. Their adoption was moved by Dickey, seconded by Herbert. Carried.

Gordon wished a clause about the [?] law as to whether an architect is an artisan and can claim protection under that law. An architect is first on the building and the last off it, and should be defended.

Mr. Dickey spoke of the new [?] law and its effect and required the use of the word "architect" mentioned in the bill in conjunction with artist, artisan, etc. Does the term "architect" coincide with and mean the same as artist?

Mr. Gordon moved that a committee of one member of the T. S. A. A be appointed to [lurge?] the insertion of the word "architect" in the present [lien?] law. Seconded by Mr. Rabitt. Adopted. Mr. Dickey moved that Mr. Wahrenberger be the member on the aboved Committee. Carried.

The bill before the legislature, viz; an act to regulate the practice of architecture in the state of Tex. Came up for discussion and a motion was made that Mr. Wahrenberger be authorized to use his endeavors to promote the welfare of the present bill before the house, and that he be allowed the necessary means to obtain that end. He could look after it in connection

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with the lien law, and on the same visit. Unanimously adopted

Mr. Gordon spoke of the trouble that is encountered [owing?] to proprietors using architects plans, sometimes without alterations, but generally with slight modifications, paying the contractor to erect such house without employing the arch't or even informing him of the action Mr. J. J. Kane spoke of a case in which the city of Fort Worth wishes to build a fire hall similar in every respect to one already erected in the city, and did not intend paying the architect for using his design.

Mr. Gill cited a similar case in Dallas. The plans were originally prepared by Mr. Bristol and the board thought that they could use them again but at the suggestion of Mr. Gill, who saw the injustice of such a move, the board will either employ Mr. Bristol to prepare a new set at the usual fees or pay him for the presented set.

The meeting adjourned to meet at 3 o'clock.

Afternoon session

Mr. Wahrenberger called the members to order at 3 o'clock

The resolution of the competition committee was presented as follows:

Resolved that no member

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of this associaiton shall offer plans in competition for buildings, unless the building committee or commissioners are fully competent to read correctly the plans or that they employ a disinterested expert.

No member of the association shall offer plans for any building with a contractor or builder or architects outside of the association

The resolution of the competition committee was laid on the table after animated discussion by Gill, Rabitt and Gordon. When Mr Gordon presented an amended resolution to the original resolution as follows: Be it reserved by the T. S. A. A. hereby recommended to all committees contemplating the erection of public buildings the advisability of having one or more professional architects to assist them in the selection of designed therefor.

Be it further resolved that it is beneath the dignity of any practicing architect to compete with builders or other non-professionals for buildings of any character

Question

Mr. Gill inquired what was meant by the word "architect"? Every village carpenter calls himself an architect the building committee would perhaps consider a stone mason more practical than an architect, or a carpenter's knowledge of more importance than either a mason or brick-layer, or even an architect

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