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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

Untitled Page 573

CUZCO.

571

tlie small river Guatanay ; the same being nearlydry, save in the months of January, February,and March ; though the little water found in itjust serves to irrigate the neighbouring plains.The grandeur and magnificence of the edifices,of the fortress, and of the temple of the sun, struckthe Spaniards with astonishment, when, at the con-quest, they first beiield them, and upon their en-tering the city.j in 1534, when the same was takenpossession of by Don Francisco Pizarrro, forCharles V^. It was then the capital of the wholeempire of Peru, and the residence of the empe-rors. Its streets were large, wide, and straight ;though at the present day Lima stands in compe-tition with it in regard to grandeur. The housesare almost all builtofstone, and of fine proportions.The cathedral, which has the title of La Asun-cion, is large, beautiful, rich, and of very goodarchitecture, and some even prefer it to the cathe-dral of Lima. Here are three curacies in thechapel of the Sagrario, two for the Spaniards, andanother for the Indians and Negroes ; and the pa-rishes are Nuestra Senora de Belen, San Christo-yal, Santa Ana, San Bias, S:intiago, and the hos-pital ; besides two others, which are without thecity, called San Geronirno and San Sebastian.Here are nine convents of the following religiousorders ; one of St. Dominic, founded on the spotwhere the Indians had their celebrat^sd temple ofthe sun ; two of St. Francis, one of the Observers,and another of the Recoletans, one of St. Au-gustiti, one of La Merced, two colleges whichbelonged to the regulars of the extinguished com-pany of Jesuits, the principal, in the part lyingtowards the c. being destined, at the present time,for an armoury ; and the other at the back of thesame, in which was the house for noviciates andstudents, serving now as barracks for the troops ;add to these the chapel of ease to the cathedral.Here are four hospitals ; the first and most ancientis that of the Espiritu Santo, in which are receivedIndians of both sexes, subject to the patronageof the secular cabildo, and governed by a junta ofS3 persons, the president of whom, the alcalde,has the first vote, and after him the administratoror first brother. It has two chaplains and veryample revenues ; one of the sources being the du-ties paid upon all effects passing over the bridgeof Yipuriraac, the which droits belonged to theroyal exchequer until the year 1763, at whichtime, at the instance of the king’s ensign, DonGabriel de Ugarte, they were conceded by theking to the hospital, together with the right andproperty of the bridge, in redemption of somecrown grants which were left to the hospital by

Rodrigo de Leon, in Seville ; and it was by thismeans that the hospital, having become so wellendowed, has now no less than 250 beds. A jubi-lee has been granted by the apostolical see to itschapel; and this is celebrated at the octave ofPentecost with much solemnity, and by an unusu-ally great concourse of people, and was once the bestobserved jubilee of any in America. The se-cond hospital, being of the religious order of SanJuan de Dios, is for the men, and has 50 beds;the third, called. Of Nuestra Senora de la Almu-dena, is for all descriptions of individuals, andhas also 50 beds ; the tburih, called San rlndres,has 30 beds for Spanish women. Here are threemonasteries of nuns ; the first of Santa Catalina dcSena, founded where the Incas kept the virginsdedicated to the sun ; and the others are of SantaClara and the bare-tboted Carmelites. Here arealso four other religious houses, which are that^ofthe Nazarenes, thatof Nuestra Senora del Carmen,that of Santiago, and that of San Bias ; three col-leges, which are, that of San Bernardo, whereinare taught grammar, philosophy, and theology,and was founded by a Aizcayan for the sons of theconquerors, having been formerly under thecharge of the regulars of the company of Jesuits,and at present under an ecclesiastical rector ; thatof San Borja, for the sons of the Indian caciques,where they are initiated in their letters, and in therudiments of music, at least as many of them asshow any disposition to this science, (this accom-plishment having been formerly taught by thesame regulars of the company) ; and that of SanAntonio Abad, which is a seminary and univer-sity, and is a very sumptuous piece of architec-ture. This city preserves many monuments of itsancient grandeur ; and amongst the rest, thegreat fortress built for its defence, which, althoughinjured by time, bears testimony to the powers ofthe Incas, and excites astonishment in the mindof every beholder, since the stones, so vast andshapeless, and of so irregular a superficies, areknit together, and laid one to fit into the other withsuch nicety as to want no mortar or other materialwhereby to fill up the interstices ; and it is indeeddifficult to imagine how they could work them inthis manner, when it is considered that they knewnot the use of iron, steel, or machinery for thepurpose. The other notable things are the baths ;the one of warm and the other of cold water ; theruins of a large stone-way, which was built by or-der of the Incas, and which reached as far aswhere Lima now stands ; the vestiges of some sub-terraneous passages which led to the fortress fromthe houses or palaces of the Inca, and in which pass-4 n ?

Last edit over 2 years ago by JoshuaOB

The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 4]

Untitled Page 1

THE

GEOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL

DICTIONARY

OF

AMERICA AND THE WEST INDIES.

PAR

PABLILLO, a settlement of the Nuevo Reyno de Leon in N. America ; situate w. of the garri- son of Santa Engracia.

PABLO, S. or Sao Paulo. See Paulo.

Pablo, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Lipes in Peru, of the arch- bishopric of Charcas. It was also called Santa Isabel de Esmoruco, and was the residence of the curate.

Pablo, another, of the province and corregi- miento of Otavalo in the kingdom of Quito, at the foot of a small mountain, from which issues a stream of^ water abounding in very small fish, called prenadillas, so delicate and salutary even for the sick, that they are potted and carried to all parts of the kingdom.

Pablo, another, of the head settlement of the district of S. Juan del Rio, and alcaldia mai/or of Queretaro, in Nueva Espana; containing 46 families of Indians.

Pablo, another, of the province and corregi- miento of Tinta in Peru; annexed to the curacy of Cacha.

Pablo, another settlement or ward, of the head settlement of the district of Zumpahuacan, and alcaldia mayor of Marinalco in Nueva Es- pana.

Pablo, another, of the head settlement of the district, and alcaldia mayor of Toluca in the same kingdom, containing 161 families of Indians ; at a small distance n. of its capital.

Pablo, another, a small settlement or ward

VOL. IV.

P A B of the alcaldia mayor of Guanchinango, in the same kingdom ; annexed to the curacy of the settlement of Pahuatlan.

Pablo, another, and head settlement of the district, of the alcaldia mayor of Villalta, in the same kingdom ; of a cold temperature, and con- taining 51 Indian families.

Pablo, another, of the missions which were held by the Jesuits, in the province of Topia and kingdom of Nueva Tizcaya; situate in the middle of the S 2 >rra of Topia, on the shore of the river Piastla.

Pablo, another, of the province of Barcelona, and government of Cumana ; situate on the skirt of a mountain of the serrania, and on the shore of the river Sacaguar, s. of the settlement of Piritu.

Pablo, another, a small settlement of the head settlement of the district of Texmelucan, and alcaldia mayor of Guajozinco in N ueva Es- pana.

Pablo, another, of the district of Chiriqui, in the province and government of Veragua, and kingdom of TierraFirme; a league and an half from its head settlement, in the high road.

Pablo, another, of the missions held by the Portuguese Carmelites, in the country of Las Amazonas, and on the shore of this river.

Pablo, another, of the missions which were held by the French Jesuits, in the province and government of French Guayana; founded in 1735, on the shore of the river Oyapoco, and

Last edit almost 3 years ago by MJG

The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 5]

Untitled Page 1

THE

GEOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL

DICTIONARY

OF

AMERICA AND THE WEST INDIES.

U B A U B A

UBAQUE, a head settlement of the district ofthe corresimiento of this name, in the new king-dom of Granada ; it was, during the Pagan-ism of the Indians, one of the most powerfulprincipalities belonging to the caciques : at pre-sent it contains 200 inhabitants and as manyIndians. In its church is venerated with parti-cular devotion an image of our Lady painted oncanvass, and which after undergoing much injuryfrom time, appeared all at once miraculously re-novated. By a rugged spot, called De Zaname,close to the valley in which this settlement stands,there is a stone with the impression of a humanfoot, which, by the tradition of the Indians, is onvarious authority that of the apostle St. Bartho-lomew. It is seven leagues from Santa Fe.

UBARANA, Ensennada de, a bay on thecoast of the province and captainship of Seara,in the kingdom of Brazil : it is between therivers Lagaribe and Riobara.

Ubarana, a point of land of this name, whichis one of those that form the afore-mentionedbay.

L BATE, a head settlement of the district ofthe corresimiento of that name, in the new king-dom of Granada. Its climate is cold, but not toexcess, and produces in abundance the fruits pe-culiar to such a temperature ; especially wheat,potatoes, maize, apples and barley. In thechurch is worshipped a miraculous image ofChrist on the cross, to the sanctuary of whichthe people are impelled by devotion to come

VOL. v.

from the other provinces. It contains more than10,000 inhabitants, and was one of the first set-tlements of the kingdom which was converted bythe missionaries of the order of St. Francis, ofwhom it was for many years a doctrinal curacy.It is 29 miles n. n. w. of Santa Fe.

UBATUBA, a town of the province and cap-tainship of San Vicente in Brazil; situated onthe coast on a neck of land opposite the Isle ofPuercos.

Ubatuba, a lake of this name, in the sameprovince and kingdom, by the coast, on theshores of which the Portuguese have constructeda fort.

UBAY, a large and copious river of Peru. Ittakes its source from a lake which is formed bythe river Parapiti, or Apere, in the country andterritory of Isoso, and runs to the n. always in-clining to the n.n.w. more than 70 leagues. Itcrosses the country of the Chiquitos Indians andthe province of Los Moxos in the kingdom ofQuito, in which it enters much encreased by thewaters it has received from that of Itenes, oppo-site the entrenchment of Santa Rosa. This riveris also called Magdalena San Miguel, and for-merly Los Chiquitos. Its mouth is in lat. 11°57 / s.

UBAZA, a large settlement, in the time of theIndians, of the province and corregimvento of Ve-lez in the new kingdom of Granada ; it was con-quered by Gonzalo Ximenez Quesada in 1537,but is at present entirely ruined.

Last edit 2 months ago by ShaneT
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