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Search for Popayan* Popayán* "Po<lb break='no'/>payán"

The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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ABACU, a point of land on the S coast of the island of St. Domingo.

ABADES, a settlement of the province and government of Popayan, in the district and jurisdiction of San Juan de Pasto.

ABANCAY, a province and corregimiento of Peru, bounded on the E by the large city of Cuzco, (its jurisdiction beginning at the parish of Santa Ana of that city), and on the W by the province of Andahuailas; N by that of Calcaylares, forming, in this part, an extended chain of snowcovered mountains ; S by the provinces of Cotabamba and Aimaraez; S W by Chilques and Masques. It extends 26 leagues from E to W and is 14 broad. Its most considerable river is the Apurimac, which is separated from it at the N W and bends its course, united with other streams, towards the mountains of the Andes. This river is crossed by a wooden bridge of 80 yards long and 3 broad, which is in the high road from Lima to Cuzco, and other provinces of the sierra. The toll collected here is four rials of silver for every load of goods of the produce of the country, and twelve for those of the produce of Europe. The temperature of this province is mild, and for the most part salubrious, with the exception of a few vallies, where, on account of the excessive heat and humidity, tertian agues are not uncommon. It produces wheat, maize, and other grain in great abundance, and its breed of horned cattle is by no means inconsiderable; but its principal production is sugar, which they refine so well, that it may challenge the finest European sugars for whiteness : this is carried for sale to Cuzco and other provinces, and is held in great estimation. It also produces hemp, cloth manufactures of the country ; and in its territories mines of silver are not wanting, especially in the mountain which they call Jalcanta, although the natives avail themselves not of the advantages so liberally held out to them. Its jurisdiction comprehends 17 settlements. The repartimento, quota of tribute, amounted to 108,750 dollars, and it rendered yearly 870 for the alcabala. The following are the 17 settlements : The capital, Limatambo, Huanicapa, Mollepata, Curahuasi, Pantipata, Cachora, Pibil, Antilla, Chonta, Anta, Pocquiura, Ibin, Surite, Chachaypucquio, Huaracondo. Sumata,

Abancay, the capital of the above province, founded in a spacious valley, which gives it its title: it is also so called from a river, over which has been thrown one of the largest bridges in the kingdom, being the first that was built there, and looked upon as a monument of skill. In the above valley the jurisdiction of this province, and that of Andahuailas, becomes divided. It is also memorable for the victories gained in its vicinity by the king's troops against Gonzalo Pizarro, in the years 1542 and 1548. It has a convent of the religious order of St. Dominic ; this order being the first of those which established themselves in Peru. 20 leagues distant from the city of Cuzco. Lat. 13° 31' 30" S Long. 72° 26' W.7

Abancay, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Cuenca, in the kingdom of Quito, situate on the shore of the river Paute.

ABANES, a barbarous nation of Indians, of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, in the plains of San Juan, to the N of the Orinoco. They inhabit the woods on the shores of this river, as well as other small woods ; and are bounded, E by the Salivas, and W by the Caberres and Andaquies. They are docile, of good dispositions, and are easily converted to the Catholic faith.

ABANGOUI, a large settlement of the province and government of Paraguay. It is composed of Indians of the Guarani nation, and situate on the shore of the river Taquani. It was discovered by Alvar Nuñez Cabezade Vaca, in 1541.

ABARANQUEN, a small river of the province and government of Guayana, or Nueva Andalusia. It rises in the country of the Quiriquipas Indians, runs from S to N and enters the Aruy.

ABARY, a small river of Guayana, between the Berbice and the Demerary. See Mahaica.

ABBEVILLE County, in Ninetysix district, S. Carolina, bounded on the N E by the Saluda, and on the SW by the Savannah, is 35 miles in length and 21 in breadth ; contains 9197 inhabitants, including 1665 slaves.

ABBOTS, a small river of N. Carolina, which runs S W and enters the Pedi, at a little distance from the source of this river, in the territory of the Granville limits.

ABECOCHI, a settlement of Indians of S. Carolina, situate on the shore of the river Cousa. The English have a settlement here, with a fort for its defence.

ABEICAS, a nation of Indians of New France, bounded on the N by the Alibamis, and E by the Cheraquis. They live at a distance from the large rivers, and the only produce of their territory is some canes, which are not thicker than a finger, but of so hard a texture, that, when split, they cut exactly like a knife. These Indians speak the Tchicachan language, and with the other nations are in alliance against the Iroquees.

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from s. to e. between 'the rivers Mechicor and St.John, and entering the sea at the mouth of thebay of Fundy.

AGRATUMATI, a river of the province andgovernment of Darien, in the kingdom of TierraFirme. It rises in the mountains of the ». andefiters the sea by the Little Beech, opposite Cali-donia.

AGREDA, or NUEVA MA'LAGA, a city of theprovince and government of Popayan, in the king-dom of Quito, founded by Geronimo Aguado in1541. It is small, and of a hot temperature, butabounds in gold mines. Forty-five leagues s. w.of its capital, 42 from Quito, and 37 to the e. ofthe S, sea.

AGRESINAS, a settlement founded by thePortuguese fathers of the Carmelite. order, in thecountry of the Amazonas, situate on the shores ofthe river Amazonas.

AGRIAS, a nation of Indians of the provinceand government of Santa Marta, to the w. of theCienega Grande. It was formerly very numerous,but at present considerably reduced.

AGUA, Port of, on the n. coast of the islandof St. Domingo, between Point Rabeland the Bayof Marques-

Agua, a small island, situate near the k. coastof the island of Vaca, in the channel formed by theisland of St. Domingo, in front of the bay ofMesle.

Agua, also Ojos de Agua, two springs orfountains of the province and corregimi'ento ofCuyo, in the kingdom of Chile, near the lake ofInca, from whence the river Quillota takes itssource.

Agua Blanca, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela, situate between therivers Sarare and Acarigua, to the e. of the town ofAraure.

Agua Buena y Dulce, or Fresh Water,a bay of the strait of Magellan, near the bayof La Gente.

Agua-Caliente, a settlement of the kingdomof Guatemala.

Agua-Clara, a river of the province andgovernment of Paraguay. It runs e. and entersthe Parana on the w. side.

Agua Colorada, a river of the same provinceand government as the former(Paraguay), which runs e. andenters also the large river of Parana.

==Agua de Culebra, SAN FRANCISCO XA-VIER DE LA==, 'a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela, a reduccionof Indians ofthe Capuchin fathers ; but the place is also inha-bited by some Spanish families. It belongs to the

district and jurisdiction of the city of San Felipe ;and in its vicinity dwell a great number of peoplein the estates belonging to it, and which produceabundance of cacao, plantains, yucas, and othervegetable productions.

Agua-Dulce, Caleta de, or Creek of, onthe s. coast of the strait of Magellan, on the sideof the bay of San Martin.

Agua Escondida, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Sonora in Nueva Espana,situate at the foot of a mountain, and to the n. ofSanta Clara.

Agua-Verde, an island of the gulph ofCalifornia, or Red sea of Cortes, situate near thecoast, between the islands of Carmen and Mon-serrat.

AGUACAGUA, a settlement of the provinceof Guayana, and government of Cumana, one ofthose belonging to the missions of the CatalanianCapuchin fathers. It is on the shore of the riverCaroni, near the mouth, through which this en-ters the Orinoco. Lat. 8° 22' n. Long. 62^42' w.

AGUACATAL, a settlement of the provinceand government of Antioquia, situate in the val-ley of Peneo, on the shore of the river Cauca.Lat. 8° n. Long. 75° 28' w.

AGUACATENANGO, a settlement of the pro-vince and alceddia mayor of Chiapa in the king-dom of Guatemala. [Lat. 16° 18' n. Long.91° 57' a).]

AGUACATLAN, the head settlement of thedistrict of the alcaldia mayor of Xala in N uevaEspana. In 1745 it contained 80 families of In-dians, who employed themselves in the culture ofmaize and French beans. It has a convent of thereligious order of St. Francis, and lies two leaguess. e. of its capital.

AGUACHAPA, a settlement of the provinceand government of Nicaragua in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

AGUADA, a settlement of the island of Porto-rico ; situate in the bay of its name (Aguda), between thecapes Boriquen and St. Francis. It serves as aninlet for ships going to Tierra Firme and NuevaEspana to take in water. [Lat. 18° 23' «. Long.67° 6' a;.]

Aguada (Bay), the aforesaid bay (Aguda) in the above island (Porto rico).

Aguada (point), the point on the coast and at the headof the above island, 27 leagues distant from thecape of San Rafael, of the island of St. Domingo.

Aguada (river), a river near the cape (San Rafael) or former point (Aguada),and in the same island (St. Domingo), being a place where shipsare accustomed to take in water.

Aguada (Small river), a small river of the province and

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Villas. It contains 34 families of Indians, whocultivate and trade in grain, pulse, coal, and thebark of trees. A little more than two leagues tothe w. with a slight inclination to the s. of its headsettlement.

Agustin, San, another setttlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucuman in Peru ; si-tuate on the shore of the river Tercero (third river.)

Agustin, San, another settlement of the pro-vince and alcaldia mayor of Vera Paz in the king-dom of Guatemala.

Agustin, San, another of the province andgovernment of Popayan in the kingdom of Quito.

Agustin, San, another of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres in Peru, on the shoreof the river Ibiquay.

Agustin, San, another of the province andalcaldia mayor of Culiacan in Nueva España,situate near the town of Rosario.

Agustin, San, a point or cape of the coast ofBrazil, in the province and captainship of Per-nambuco, between the port Antonio Vaz and theriver Tapado. One hundred leagues from thebay of Los Miiertos ; [300 miles n. e. from the bayof All Souls. Lat. 8° 38' s. Long. 35° 11' tc.]

Agustin, San, another point or cape of thecoast of the province and government of Rio deHacha, and kingdom of Tierra Firme, close to thelake of San Juan, on the e. side.

Agustin, San, a river of the province andgovernment of Antioquia, in the new kingdom ofGranada. It runs from s. to n. and afterwards,with a slight inclination to the w. enters the riverS. Juan, of the province of Choco.

Agustin, San, a small island of the gulph ofCalifornia, or Red Sea of Cortes ; situate in themost interior part of it, and near upon the coast ofNueva España, opposite the bay of San JuanBaptista.

[ AGWORTH, a township in Cheshire county.New Hampshire, incorporated in 1766, and con-tains 704 inhabitants ; eight miles e. by n. fromCharlestown, and 73n. w. by a), from Portsmouth.]

AHOME, a nation of Indians, who inhabit theshores of the river Zuaque, in the province ofCinaloa, and who are distant four leagues fromthe sea of California : they were converted to theCatholic faith by father Andres de Rivas, a Jesuit.Their country consists of some extensive and fer-tile plains, and they are by nature superior to theother Indians of Nueva España. Moreover, theirHeathenish customs do not partake so much of thespirit of barbarism. They abhorred polygamy,and held virginity in the highest estimation : andthus, by way of distinction, unmarried girls wore

a small shell suspended to their neck, until the dayof their nuptials, when it was taken off by the bride-groom. Their clothes were decent, composed ofwove cotton, and'they had a custom of bewailingtheir dead for a whole year, night and morning,with an apparently excessive grief. They aregentle and faithful towards the Spaniards, withwhom they have continued in peace and unityfrom the time of their first subjection. The prin-cipal settlement is of the same name, and lies atthe mouth of the river Fuerte, on the coast of thegulph of California,* having a good, convenient,and well sheltered port.

AHORCADOS, Point of the, on the shore ofthe large lake of Los Patos, of the province andcaptainship of Rey in Brazil.

Ahorcados, some small islands or points onthe coast of the S. sea, in the district of SantaElena, of the province and government of Guay-aquil, close to the mouth of the river Colonche.

AHUACATEPEC, San Nicolas de, anothersettlement of the above head settlement and alcal-dia mayor.

AHUACATES, Santa Maria de, a branchof the head settlement of the district and alcaldiamayor of Cuernavaca in Nueva España.

AHUACATLAN, Santa Maria de, a set-tlement of the head settlement of the district ofSan Francisco del Talle, and alcaldia mayor ofZultepec, in Nueva España. It is of a cold tem-perature, inhabited by 51 families of Indians, anddistant three leagues s. of its head settlement.

Ahuacatlan (Zochicoatlan), another settlement of’the headsettlement and alcaldia mayor of Zochicoatlan inNueva España. It is of a cold temperature, si-tuate on a small level plain, surrounded by hillsand mountains. It contains 13 families of In-dians, and is seven leagues to the n. of its capital.

Ahuacatlan, with the dedicatory title of SanJuan, the head settlement of the district of thealcaldia mayor of Zacatlan in Nueva España.Its inhabitants are composed of 450 families ofIndians, and 60 of Spaniards, Mustees, and Mu-lattoes, including the settlements of the district.Five leagues from its capital, and separated by amountainous and rugged road, as also by a verybroad river, whose waters, in the winter time, in-crease to such a degree as to render all communi-cation between the above places impracticable.

Ahuacatlan, another, of the head settlementof the district of Olinala, and alcaldia mayor ofTlapa, in the above kingdom. It contains 160families of Indians, who trade in chia^ (a whitemedicinal earth), and grain, with which its territoryabounds. It lies n, w. of its head settlement.

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[1803 amounted to 5,500,000, and the exports con-sisted of produce to the value of 4,000,000 dollars.He also states the population in 1808 at 900,000souls. The receipts of Caracas, Guatemala, andChile, are consumed within the country. Thepopulation of some of the chief cities is thus stated ;Caracas 40,000, La Guaira 6000, Puerto Cabello7600, Coro 10,000. The harbour, or La Vela deCoro, as it is commonly called, and its environs, aresupposed to contain not less than 2000. In 1797three state prisoners were sent from Spain to Ca-racas, on account of their revolutionary propensi-ties. Being treated with great indulgence by theofficers and soldiers to whose care they were com-mitted, they formed the project of a conspiracyagainst the government. They engaged a numberof persons, some of them of consequence, in theirparty. After gaining their first converts, the spiritdid not spread. The coldness and apathy of thepeople did not admit of the effervescene they de-sired. After the plot had been kept a secret formany months it was disclosed to the government.Some of the ringleaders escaped, and others weretaken. It was found that seventy-two had enteredinto the conspiracy; six were executed. Therest either escaped, or were sent to the galleys orbanished from the country. For an account of therecent revolution in Caracas, see Venezuela.]

Caracas, some islands of the N. sea near thecoast of the kingdom of Tierra Firme, in the pro-vince and government of Cumana. They are sixin number, all small and desert, serving as placesof shelter to the Dutch traders, who carry on anillicit commerce on that coast.

Caracas, a small port of the coast of TierraFirme, in the province and government of Vene-;zuela, between the capital and cape Codera.

CARACHE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Maracaibo, situate n. of the city ofTruxillo, on the shore of a small river which entersthe Matazan.

CARACHIS, San Carlos de a settlement ofthe province and country of the Amazonas ; a re-duccion of the missions which belonged to the abo-lished order of the Jesuits. It is at the mouth ofthe river Huerari, where this enters the Maranon.

CARACOA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Parinacoche in Peru, where thereis a spring of warm medicinal water.

CARACOL, Port, on the coast of the S. sea,and of the province and government of Panamá ;it is near the point of Garachine, behind mount Zapo.

CARACOLI, a port of the coast of the kingdomof Tierra Firme, and of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela, to the w., of cape Codera.

Caracoli, a bay formed by the s. coast, in theprovince and government of Darien, of the kingdomof Tierra Firme ; it lies at the back of point Gara-chine.

Caracoli, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cartagena, situate on the shore ofthe Rio Grande de la Magdalena, and on the n, ofthe town of Maria.

CARACOLLO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Oruro in Peru, eight leagues dis-tant from its capital.

=CARACOTO== a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Lampa in Peru.

Caracoto, another, in the province and corregi-mienlo of Sicasica in the same kingdom.

==CARAGAIAS, a town of the island of Cuba,situate on the n. coast between Cadiz and Nizao,

CARAGUATAI, a river of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres ; it runs s. s. w. andenters the Ayum or Yumeri.

CARAGUET, a small river of Nova Scotia orAcadia ; it runs e. and enters the sea in the gulfof St. Lawrence, opposite the island of its name.

CARAHUACRA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru; annexedto the curacy ofYauli.

CARAIBAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Chalvanca.

CARAIMA Alta, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Quillota in the kingdom ofChile ; situate on the coast between point Caraimiliaand point Pena Blanca.

CARAIMILLA, a settlement on the coast ofthe province and corregimiento aforementioned,between point Caraima Alta, and the isle of Obispo.

CARAMA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Antioquia in the new kingdom ofGranada.

CARAMANTA, a city of the province and go-vernment of Antioquia in the new kingdom ofGratiada ; founded by Sebastian de Benalcazar in1543, near the river Cauca. Its temperature ishot and unhealthy, but it is fertile in maize, vege-tables, grain, and abounds with herds of swine : nearit are many small rivers which enter the Cauca,and some salt pits of the whitest salt. On themountains within its jurisdiction, are some settle-ments of barbarian Indians very little known. Thiscity is indifferently peopled, and is 65 leagues dis-tant to the n. e. of Popayan, and 50 from Antio-quia. Long. 75° 33' w. Lat. 5° 58' «.

CARAMATIBA, a settlement of the provinceand captainship of Rio Grande in Brazil ; situateon the shore of the river Carabatang.

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CARAMBABA, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Para in Brazil; situate at the mouthof the river Tocantines.

CARAMPANGUE, a river of the province andcorregimiento of Quillota in the kingdom of Chile ;it runs n. n. w. near the coast, and enters the seabetween the rivers Laraquite and Tibiil. At itsentrance the Spaniards have the fort of Arauco.

CARAMPOMA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru.

CARANDAITI, a river of the province and go-yernment of Paraguay ; it enters the head of theUruguay, between the Pirati and Uruguaypita,

CARANGAS, a province and corregimiento ofPeru, bounded on the n. by the province of Pa-cages, e. by Paria, s. by Lipes, and w. by Arica ;it is 36 leagues in length, n. to s. and 30 in widthat the most. Its climate is extremely cold andsubject to winds, so that it produces no other fruitsthan such as are found upon the sierra. It hasconsiderable breeds of cattle both of the large andsmall kind, huacanos^ sheep peculiar to the country,called llamas, and no small quantity of vicunas ;also in that part which borders upon the provinceof Pacages are some herds of swine. Its silvermines are much worked, and of these the mostesteemed is that called Turco, in which is foundthe metal mazizo. Towards the w. are some un-peopled sandy plains, in which pieces of silver arefrequently found, commonly called of these,

lumps have been picked of such a size as to weigh150 marks. It is watered by some streams, but byno considerable rivers ; the corregidor used hereto have a repartimiento of 340,526 dollars, and itused to pay annually 436 dollars for alcavala. Theinhabitants, who are almost all Indians, amount• to 1100, ajid they are divided into 25 settlements.The capital is Tarapaca, and the others are.

Turco,

Cosapa,

Turquiri,

Chillahua,

Carahuara,

Totora,

Huaillamarca,

Llanquera,

Chuquicota,

Chuquichambi,

Undavi,

Cortfuemar,

San Miguel,

Carangas, Asiento

Coro,

Tunquiri,

Chipaya,

Andamarca,

Orinoca,

Belen,

Huachacalla,

Iscara,

Sabaya,

Asiento de Carangas,Ribera de Todos Santos.Negrillo.

Carangas, Asiento de, belonging to thebishopric of Charcas, and a settlement of the afore-said province, having formerly been its capital,where were kept the royal coffers, and where the

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corregidor used to reside, until they were removedto Tarapaca, at 30 leagues distance. It thus be-came reduced to a scanty population of Indians,annexed to the curacy of Huachacalla.

CARANGUES, formerly a barbarous nation ofIndians, to the n. of the kingdom of Quito ; thedistrict of which at present belongs to the corregi~miento of the town of Ibarra, wliere, on a largeplain, are still to be seen the ruins of a magnificentpalace which belonged to the Incas : in its vici-nity is a settlement called Carangui, distant 23leagues s. of the town of Ibarra.

Carangues, with the dedicatory title of St. An.-tonio, another settlement of the same province andcorregimiento, situate in the road which leads downfrom Popayan.

CARANIA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Yauyos in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Laraos.

(CARANKOUAS, Indians of N. America, wholive on an island or peninsula in the bay of St.Bernard, in length about 10 miles, and five inbreadth ; the soil here is extremely rich and plea-sant ; on one side of which there is a high bluff, ormountain of coal, which has been on fire for manyyears, affording always a light at night, and astrong thick smoke by day, by which vessels aresometimes deceived and lost on the shoally coast,which shoals are said to extend nearly out of sightof land. From this burning coal, there is emitteda gummy substance the Spaniards call cheta, whichis thrown on the shore by the surf, and collected bythem in considerable quantities, which they arefond of chewing; it has the appearance and con-sistence of pitch, of a strong, aromatic, and notdisagreeable smell. These Indians are irreconcile-able enemies to the Spaniards, always at war withthem, and kill them whenever they can. TheSpaniards call them cannibals, but the French givethem a different character, who have always beentreated kindly by them since Mons. de Salle andhis party were in their neighbourhood. They aresaid to be 500 men strong, but we have not beenable to estimate their numbers from any very accu-rate information. They speak the Attakapo lan-guage ; are friendly and kind to all other Indians,and, we presume, are much like all others, notwith-standing what the Spaniards say of them.)

CARANQUE, an ancient province of the In-dians, in the kingdom ofQuito, towards the «. Fromthe same race is at the present day composed thetown of St. Miguel de Ibarra. The natives roseagainst the Inca Huaina Capac, but he succeededin reducing them to obedience by force of arms,causing the authors and accomplices of the insur-

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he was at length persuaded to accept it by the ac-clamations and remonstrances of all parties, andespecially of the vicar-general of his order; hebegan to preside without being consecrated ; butbeing yet full of scruples, he renounced the office,and without permission returned to Spain ; h^ thenwent to Koine, but being desired by his holiness toreturn to his diocese, he was said to have been somuch affected as not to have been able to prevailupon himself to enter the city : he returned, there-fore, immediately to the coast, and embarked forFlorida, with a view of converting some of theinfidels ; and with this object he again set off forSpain, in order to obtain his renunciation ; whenbeing at length tired with his wanderings, andAvorn out Avith age, he died in his convent of To-ledo in 1562.

5. Don Juan de Simancas, native of Cordova,collegian of San Clemente de Bolonia ; he enteredin 1560, went to be consecrated at Santa Fe, andupon his return, had the mortification to find thatthe suburbs of Xiximani had been sacked by someFrench pirates ; which disaster was again repeatedin the following year, 1561. This bishop, afterhaving governed his church for the space of 10years, and suffering much from the influence of ahot climate, left the see without a licence, andreturned to his country, where he died in1570.

6. Don Ft. Luis Zapata de Cardenas, of theorder of St. Francis, native of Llerena in Estre-madura, third commissary-general of the Indies ;elected bishop in 1570, promoted to the archbi-shopric of Santa Fe before he left Spain, and in hisplace was chosen,

7. Don Fr. Juan de Vivero, a monk of the or-der of St. Augustin, native of Valladolid ; hepassed over into America, was prior of the conventof Lima, founder of the convent of Cuzco, electedbishop, which he renounced ; nor would he ac-cept the archbishopric of Chacas, to which he waspromoted : he died in Toledo.

8. Don Fr. Dionisio de los Santos, of the orderof Santiago, prior of the convent of Granada, andprovincial of the province of Andalucia ; electedin 1573 : he died in 1578.

9. Don Fr. Juan de Montalvo, of the same orderof St. Domingo, native of Arevalo ; elected bishop,he entered Cartagena in 1579, passed over to SantaFe to the synod celebrated there by the archbishop ;and in 1583 had the mortification of seeing hiscity sacked, plundered, and destroyed by SirFrancis Drake; Avhich calamity had such a greateffect upon him, and well knowing noAV that hehad no means of relieving the necessities of the

poor, who were dependent upon him, he fell sickand died the same year.

10. Don Fr. Diego Osorio, of the same orderof St. Domingo ; he went over as a monk to Car-tagena, from thence to Lima and Nueva Espana,received the presentation to this bishopric in 1587,which he would not accept, and died in 1579, inMexico.

11. Don Fr. Antonio de Hervias, also a Domi-nican monk, collegian of San Gregorio de Valla-dolid, his native place, where he had studiedarts ; he passed over to Peru, and was the firstmorning-lecturer in the university of Lima, ma-nager of the studies, qualificator of the inquisition,vicar-general of the province of Quito, and after-wards presented to the bishopric of Arequipa,then to that of Verapaz, and lastly to that of Car-tagena, where he died in 1590.

12. Don Fr. Pedro de Arevalo, monk of the or-der of St. Gerome ; he was consecrated in Spain,and renounced the bishopric before he came totake possession of it.

13. Don Fr. Juan de Ladrada, a Dominicanmonk, native of Granada ; he A^'as curate and re-ligious instructor in the Indies, in the settlements ofSuesca and Bogota, vicar-general of his religionin the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, lecturer on thesacred scriptures and on theology in Santa Fe,'was consecrated bishop of Cartagena in 1596 : herebuilt the cathedral, established a choir of boysand chaplains, and made a present of a canopy tobe carried by the priests over the blessed sacra-ment when in procession ; he assisted at the foun-dation of the college of the regulars of the societyof Jesuits, and of that of the fathers called thebarefooted Augustins, on the mountain of LaPopa ; he had the satisfaction of having for hisprovisor the celebrated Don Bernardino de Al-mansa, a wise and virtuous man, who was after-Avards archbishop of Santa Fe ; he frequentlyvisited his bishopric, and after having governed17 years, died in 1613.

14. Don Fr. Pedro de Vega, a monk of thesame order of St. Domingo, native of Bubiercain the kingdom of Aragon, professor of theologyand of the sacred AA'ritings in the universities ofLerida and Zaragoza ; he entered Cartagena asbishop in 1614, and his short duration disappintedthe hopes he had so universally excited, for hedied in 1616.

15. Don Diego Ramirez de Zepeda, friar of theorder of Santiago, native of Lima, a renownedpreacher, and consummate theologist ; being atMadrid, he was elected, and died before he couldreach the bishopric.

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when he was promoted to the bishopric of Carta-gena in 1746, of which he took possession in thefollowing year, and governed until 1752, whenhe was promoted to the church of Truxillo.

51. Doii Bartolome Narvaez y Berrio, canon ofthis holy church of Cartagena, and native of thiscountry ; presented to this bishopric in^ 1752, andgoverned here until he died in 1754.

52. The Doctor Jacinto Aguado y Chacon, ca-non penitenciario of the holy church of Cadiz ;elected in 1754, and promoted to the bishopric ofArequipa before he embarked for this of Car-tagena.

33. Don Diego Antonio Valenzuela Faxardo,native of the city of Santa Fe of Bogota; electedin 1754 : he died in 1755.

34. The Doctor Don Manuel de Sosa Betancur,archdeacon of the holy church of Caracas ; electedin 1755 : he died in 1765.

35. Don Diego Peredo, native of the town ofLeon of Mechoacan ; elected in 1765, promotedto the bishopric of Yucatan in 1722.

36. Don Augustin de Alvarado y Castillo ; pro-moted to the bishopric of Santa Fe in 1774.

37. The Doctor t)on Bias Sobrino y Minayo ;elected in 1774, and promoted to the archbishopricof Quito in 1776.

38. Don Fr. Joseph Diaz de la Madrid, a monkof the Order of St. Francis, native of the city ofQuito ; elected in 1 777.

Governors of Cartagena.

1. Don Pedro de Heredia, founder of the city ;and its adelantado or governor, a native of Madrid,and a valorous conqueror, in 1532.

2. The Licentiate Badillo, nominated J uez deResidencia,; he exercised the government duringthe commission in 1536.

3. The, Licentiate Santa Cruz, judge of anothersecond residence, who became adelantado in 1537.

4. The Licentiate Miguel Diez de Armendariz;he entered in 1545, had for judge of his resi-dence the Licentiate Juan de Montano, oidor ofSanta F&lt;5, whom he sent to Spain.

5. Don Pedro de Heredia, who for the secondtime was provisional governor until the year 1556,when he died, being drowned in the fleet whichwas wrecked in the Gordas sands.

6. The Doctor J uan de Maldonado, Jiscal of theaudience of Santa Fe in 1556.

7. Jorge de Quintanilla, provisionally nomi-nated by the audience of Santa Fe.

8. The Brigadier Don Go'izalo Ximinez deQuesada ; nominated by the audience as residen-tiary to the three former, in the same year, 1556.

9. Antonio de Castro ; provisionally nominated.

10. Juan de Bustos Villegas, nominated by theking ; he entered in 1 557, and was promoted tothe presidency of Panama in 1563.

11. Anton Davalos de Luna, a field-officer ; heentered in 1563, and governed till 1567, whenhe died.

12. Don Lope de Orozco, as provisional gover-nor in the same year.

13. Francisco Bahamonde y Lugo ; he enteredin 1572, and died in 1573.

14. Hernan Suarez de Villalobos, nominatedprovisonally by the audience of Santa Fe in 1574.

15. Pedro Fernandez del Busto, who entered inthe above year, and was promoted to the govern-ment of Popayan in 1577.

16. Don Pedro de Lodena, in 1593.

17. Don Pedro de Acuna, knight of the orderof San Juan, field-officer, in 1601 ; he had the titleof president of the Philippines, and died the sameyear.

18. Don Geronimo Suazo Casasola, of the habitof Santiago ; he died in 1605.

19. Don Francisco Sarmientode Sotomayor, no-minated in the interim, in 1606.

20. Don Diego Fernandez de Valazco, in 1608.

21. Don Diego de Acuna, in 1614.

22. Don Garcia Giron de Loaysa, who governeduntil 1620.

23. Don Diego de Escobar, knight of the orderof Santiago, who died whilst exercising the govern-ment.

24. Don Francisco de Berrio, nominated in thein the interim, in 1628.

25. Don Francisco de Murga, knight of the or-der of Santiago, a field-officer, and celebratedengineer ; appointed to fortify the Plaza, beingat the time governor of Marmora in Africa : h«died in 1634.

26. Don Nicolas de Larraspuru, nominated inthe interim, in 1636.

27. Don Gonzalo de Herrera, Marquis of Vil-lalta, nominated in the interim, in 1637, on accountof the former not having accepted the office.

28. Don Vincente de los Reyes Villalobos, pro-visional governor in the same year, 1637, being thegovernor of Moxos.

29. Don Melchor de Aguilera, a field-officer;he entered in 1638, was suspended and called toaccount by Don Bernardino de Prado, oidor ofSanta Fe.

30. Don Ortuno de Aldape ; being governor ofMuzo, he was nominated in the interim, in 1641.

31. Don Luis Fernandez de Cordova, of the or-

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tive of Barcelana, a celebrated engineeer; also re-nowned in the constructing of the land-gate or en-trance to Cadiz : he was promoted to this govern-ment for the purpose of inspecting and repairingthe towers which had been destroyed by AdmiralVernon, which commission, after he had executed,he returned to Spain in 1755, and died director-general of the body of engineers.

61. Don Fernando Morillo Velarde, knight ofthe order of Alcantara, colonel of infantry, at thattime king’s lieutenant, when he received the go-vernment on account of the proprietor having goneto fortify the town of Portobelo.

62. Don Diego Tabares, knight of the order ofSantiago, brigadier-general ; promoted to this go-vernment from that of Camana in 1755, and go-verned till 1761, when arrived his successor,

63. Don Joseph de Sobremonte, Marquis of thisname, a brigadier, who was captain of the regimentof Spanish guards when he was nominated : he go-verned till 1770, when he died.

64. Don Gregorio de Sierra, also captain of gre-nadiers of the express regiment of Spanish guards ;he entered Cartagena in 1771, and died in 1774.

65. Don Juan Pimienta, colonel of the regi-ment of the infantry of Zamora, in rank a briga-dier, and knight of the distinguished order ofCharles III. ; he entered into the possession of thegovernment in 1774, and died in 1781.

66. Don Roque de Quiroga, king’s lieutenant ofthe fortified town, or Plaza ; promoted as provincialgovernor through the death of his antecessor, un-til arrived, under the king’s appointment, the pro-prietor,

67. Don Joseph de Carrion y Andrade, a bri-gadier, who before had been governor of thePlaza of Manilla, and had rendered himself re-nowned when it was besieged by the Emperor ofMarruecos, being nominated to this government in1774 : he died in 1785.

Cartagena, a river of the province and go-vernment of Choco : it rises in the mountains ofthis province nearthe settlement of Noanama, andenters the sea imimediately at the cape of Corri-entes.

Cartagena, a plain of the province and cor-regimiento of Maule in the kingdom of Chile,close to the port of San Antonio.

CARTAGO, a city of the province and go-vernment of Popayan, founded by the BrigadierGeorge Robledo in 1540, who gave it this name,with the dedicatory title of San Juan, his patron;the greater part of the military in it having comefrom the city of Cartagena in Europe. It did liebetween the rivers Otun and Quindio; but the

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continual invasions it has experienced from thePijaos and Pimaes Indians, who are a bold andwarlike people, determined its inhabitants to re-move it at the end of the I7th century to the spotwhere it now stands ; having bought for that pur-pose some land of Tomasa Izquierdo, on the bankof an arm of the river of La Vieja, which is alarge stream, and navigable for canoes and rafts,and which is at the distance of rather better thana quarter of a mile from the large river Cauca,into which the above river enters, forming beforethe city an island, which abounds in animals of thechase, and in cattle, and having on its banks ex-cellent fishing. This city is of a dry and healthyclimate ; and although hot, the atmosphere is al-ways clear and serene. It is situate upon a leveland somewhat elevated plain , of beautiful appear-ance ; the streets are spacious, wide and straight.It has a very large grand square. Its buildingsare solid and of good structure, and universallyroofed over with straw, having, however, the wallsof solid stone from the top to the bottom ; othersare built of brick, and others with rafters of wood,the walls being of clay, (which they call imbulidoSyor inlaid), so solid as to resist the force of the mostviolent earthquakes, as was experienced in onethat happened in 1785. At a small distance fromthe city are various lakes or pools of water, whichthey call denegas, formed by nature, assisted byart. It is the residence of the lieutenant-gover-nor of the government of Popayan, of two ordi-nary alcaldes, two of La Hermandad, two member*of an inferior court, a recorder, a procurator-gene-ral, a major domo de propiosy and six regidors^the cabildo enjoying the privilege of electing andconfirming these officers yearly. It has also a bat-talion of city militia, and two disciplined compa-nies ; also some royal cofiers, which were broughtfrom the city of Anserma. Besides the church ofMatriz, in which is venerated, as the patroness, theHoly Virgin, under the image of Nuestra Senorade la Paz, (this being the pious gift of PhilipIII.) it has five parishes, viz. Santa Ana, SantaBarbara, Llano de Buga, Naranjo, Micos, andPueblo de los Cerritos. The territory is extremelyfertile and pleasant, abounding as well in fruitsand pulse as in birds of various sorts ; and in nopart whatever are plantains so various, or of sofine a quality. Tlie coffee is good, and the cacao,which is of two sorts, is excellent, and is calledyellow and purple hayna. Of no less estimationis the tobacco, with which a great traffic wasformerly carried on at Choco. The district of thiscity abounds in trees, medicinal herbs and fruits,and in an exquisite variety of cacao plants; also

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in beautiful singing birds ; and in its rivers aremany sorts of fish of a fine flavour, particularly thepatah. It is not without mines of gold, and laba~deros or washing places, but these are not worked,save by a few day-labourers. In the church of themonks of San Francisco is venerated an image of themost Holy Mary, with the title of La Probezuypainted on a piece of cotton-stuff, adorned with twofine pieces of silver, the natives payitig great de-votion to this superb work, from the wonderfulthings that have been said to have been effectedthrough the prayers offered up to her of whom thisis the semblance. This city has been the nativeplace of,

Don Melchor de Salazar, governor of Choco,and founder of the city Toro.

Of the Doctor Don Francisco Martinez Bueno,presbyter and visitor of the bishopric of Popayan ;a man of great literature.

Of the Doctor Don Manuel de Castro y Rada ; amost exemplary curate.

Of the Father Joseph Vicuna, who, after havingbeen a celebrated Jesuit, became a monk in thecollege of missions for propagating the faith in Po-payan, and died whilst preaching to the AndaquiesIndians.

Of the Father Estevan de Rivas, who, after hav-ing filled the title of jurist with great credit, be-came a Franciscan monk, and died an exemplarypenitent in his convent at Cartagena.

Of the Doctor Don Francisco Felipe del Campo,professor de prima of canons in the university ofSanta Fe ; a celebrated orator.

Of the Doctor Don Geronirao de Rivas, trea-surer and dignitary of the holy church of Popayan,provisor and ecclesiastical governor of that bishop-ric.

Of the Doctor Don Joseph de Renteria, assessorof the viceroyalties of Santa Fe and Lima, honoraryoidor of the audience of Charcas : all of whomhave borne testimony to the clearness and acutenessof their understandings and excellence of their dis-positions. But for all the information on thesesubjects, we have to thank Don Manuel del Cara-po, the son of the last mentioned, who resides inthis court, and to whom the merits thus severallyapplied, unitedly belong.

The arms of this city are three imperial crownswith a sun, and its inhabitants amount to about 5000or 6000 : 25 leagues n. e. of Popayan, in 4° 46'n. lat.

Cartago, another capital city, of the provinceof Costa Rica, in the kingdom of Guatemala,situate 10 leagues from the coast of the N. sea, and17 from that of the S. in each of which it has agood port ; it was formerly rich and flourishing, onaccount of its commerce w ith Panama, Cartagena,Portobclo, and the Havanah ; but it is at the presentday reduced to a miserable village of very few in-habitants, and without any commerce. It has, be-sides the parish church, a convent of monks of St.Francis, and is in 9° 42' s. lat.

Cartago, a river of the same province and go-vernment as is the former city : it runs w. and en-ters the S.sea, in the port of La Herradura.

Cartago, a bay in the province and govern-ment of Honduras, inhabited by the infidel Mos-quitos Indians.

CARTAMA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Antioquia: it rises in the mountains ofChoco, traverses the valley to which it gives itsname, and running e. enters the Cauca.

CARTEL, a port of the coast of the provinceand government of Florida, opposite the castle ofSt. Augustin.

(CARTER, a new county in the state of Tennes-see, formed of a part of the county of Washing-ton.)

(CARTERET, a maritime county of New Beradistrict, N. Carolina, on Core and Pamlico sounds.It contains 3732 inhabitants, including 713 slaves.Beaufort is the chief town.)

Carteret, a district and jurisdiction of S. Caro-lina, on the sea-coast.

Carteret, a cape or extremity of the coast ofthe same province, and one of those which formLong bay. See Roman.

(CARTERSVILLE, a town in Powhatancounty, Virginia, on the s. side of James rivtr, 4fmiles above Richmond.)

CARUALLEDA, Nuestra Senora de, acity of the province and government of Venezuela,in the kingdom of Tierra Firme ; founded byFrancis Faxardo in 1568, and not in 1560, as ac-cording to Coleti : it has a small but insecure port.The town is also a miserable place, having sufferedmuch injury, a short time after its foundation, bythe violent disturbances caused in its neighbour-hood by the Governor Don Luis de Roxas : 80leagues e. of Coro.

CARUALLO, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Paraiba in Brazil, situate near thesea-coast, and on the shore of the river Camara-tuba.

CARUGAMPU, a small river of the provinceand government of Paraguay ; it runs and en-ters the Parana between the rivers Capuy andParanay.

CARUJAL, PUNTA DE, a point on the coast ofthe province and government of Cartagena, called

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CATAMARCA, S. Fernando de, a city ofthe province and government of Tucumán, found-ed by Juan Gomez Zurita, in 1538, in the fertileand extensive valley of Conando. It has a fort torepress the encroachments of the Indians. Thename of Canete was given it in honour to the vice-roy who then commanded in Peru ; this was after-wards changed to London, in honour to the queenof England, wife of Philip II. king of Spain. Theinquietudes caused amongst the inhabitants by theinfidel Indians induced Don Geronimo Luis deCabrera, son of a governor of that province, in1663, to remove it to another not less fertile val-ley, and to give it the name of San J uan de la Ri-vero ; and lastly, by the permission of the king,in 1683, it was transferred to a spot in the valleyof Catamarca ; where it still remains, under thesame title, at 80 leagues distance from its first sta-tion. It has, besides the parish church, a conventof the Recoletos monks of St. Francis, with thededicatory title of San Pedro de Alcantara ; anhospital of Merced ; aud a house of residence,which formerly belonged to the regulars of thecompany of Jesuits. On the w. side of the val-ley is a mountain in which there are gold mines ;and on the w. also from n. to s. runs a serrama^ theskirts of which are for many leagues covered withestates and cultivated grounds, and filled, fromthe abundance of fine pastures, with lage and smallcattle and with mules. A tolerably large riverruns through the valley in the rainy season, andterminates in some lakes M’hich are formed by itabout 30 leagues s. of the city. The commerce ofthis city is very small, so that there is no coin cur-rent ; and even the payments of the royal dutiesare paid in effects, and in the productions of thecountry, such as cotton, linens, pepper, brandy,and wheat. Lat. 27° s.

Catamarca, a settlement of the same provinceand government ; situate in the district of thiscity.

CATAMBUCU, a settlement of the provinceand government of Popayán in the kingdom ofQuito.

CATAN, San Francisco de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Caxamarca inPeru ; annexed to the curacy of Chetu.

CATANERA, an ancient province of Peru, inthat of Condesuyos, in which dwelt the nation ofthe Quechuas. It was subjected to the empire bythe Inca Capac Y upanqui, fifth Emperor.

CATANIAPU, a river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia. Itrises to the s. of the settlement of San Joseph de

Mapoyes, runs w. and enters the Orinoco close tothe torrent of Los Atures.

CATAPUIN, San Juan de, a settlement ofthe province and government of Quixos y Macasin the kingdom of Quito.

CATARAQUA, or Catarakui, a copiousriver of the province and country of the IroqueesIndians. It rises from the lake Ontario, runs n. e.and continues its course as far as Quebec, fromwhence it takes the name of St. Lawrence, andthen enters the sea.

Cataraqua, a bay on the n. coast of lakeOntario, in New France or Canada.

CATARUBEN, a settlement of the missions ofSan Juan de los Llanos in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; one of the seven which were held bythe regulars of the company of Jesuits, and be-longing to the nation of the Salivas Indians. TheCaribes burnt and destroyed it in 1684.

CATAROSI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Aymaraez in Peru; annexed tothe curacy of Pampamarca.

CATAS-ALTAS, a settlement or village of thePortuguese, in the province and captainship ofEspiritu Santo, and kingdom of Brazil ; situate onthe shore of the river Doce or Dulce.

CATAUBA, a river of Virginia, which runsn. e. and enters the Thames.

Catauba, another river in S. Carolina, whichruns s. e. and enters the Watery.

(CATAWESSY, a township in Northumberlandcounty, Pennsylvania ; situate on the s. e. bankof the e. branch of Susquehannah river, oppositethe mouth of Fishing creek, and about 20 milesn. e. of Sunbury.)

CATCA, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Paucartambo in Peru.

CATCH, or Boutin, a port of the coast ofNova Scotia, between the bay of Cheboucto andtbe island of Samborough.

CATEMU, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Quillota in the kingdom of Chile,on the shore of the river Quillota.

(CATHANCE, or Cathants, a small river inLincoln county, Maine, which rises in Topsham,and empties into Merry Meeting bay, and has se-veral mills upon it.)

(CATHERINE’S Isle, St, a small island inthe captainship of St. Vincent’s in Brazil, be-longing to the Portuguese, 47 leagues s. of Cana-nea island. It is about 23 miles from n. to s. in-habited by Indians, wiio assist the Portugueseagainst their enemies, the natives of Brazil. Lak27° 10' s. Long. 47° 15' w.)

X X 2

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(Catherine’s Isle, a pleasant island on theharbour of Sunburj, in the state of Georgia.)

(Cathehine’s Isle, a small productive islandon the s. coast of St. Domingo, 20 leagues e. ofthe town of St. Domingo.)

(CATHERINE's Town, in Ontario county, NewYork, lies three miles s. of the 5 . end of Senecaake.)

Catilina, a bay of tlie e. coast of the island ofNewfoundland, between the capes Santos andNuevo.

(CATO, a military township in New York state,12 miles s. e. of lake Ontario, and about 20 s. ofOswego fort.)

CATOA, a river of the province and country ofLas Amazonas. It rises in tlie mountains of theAndes, runs n. and enters the Marailon on the s.side, between the rivers Coari and Coyame.

(==CATORCE, or La Purissima ConcepcionDe Alamos de Catorce==, one of the richest minesof New Spain, and in the intendancy of San LuisPotosi. The real de Catorce, however, has onlybeen in existence since 1773, when Don SebastianCoronado and Don Bernarbe Antonio de Zepedadiscovered these celebrated seams, which yield an-nually the value of more than from 18 to ^20 mil-lions of francs, or from 730,460/. to 833,500/.sterling.)

(CATTAHUNK, one of the Elizabeth isles, inthe state of Massachusetts. See Buzzard’sBay.)

CATUARO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Cumaná in the kingdom of TierraFirme ; situate near to and s. of the city of Ca-riaco.

CAUACUAN, a river of the province and cap-tainship of Rey in Brazil. It runs e. and entersthe Uruguay, between the rivers Ipau and Pi-ricaya.

CAUAIAMA, a small river of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres. It runs e. and en-ters the Uruguay, between the rivers Guarey andBracuaenda.

CAUAILLON, a settlement and parish of theFrench, in their possessions in St. Domingo ; situ-ate on the coast and at the w. head, near the bayof its name, between the settlements of Torbec andLos Cayos.

CAUAIU, a small river of the same provinceand government as the former. It runs w. andenters the Parana, between the rivers Verde andYocare-mini.

Cauaiu, a bay of the same island, opposite theIsla Vaca or Cow island.

CAUALA, a settlement of the province and cap-iainship of Espiritu Santo in Brazil ; situate &gt; 1 . ofVillarica.

CAU-ALLERIZAS, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Yaguarsongo in the king-dom of Quito.

CAUANA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Conchucos in Peru.

CAUASAN, San Francisco Xavier de, atown of the province of Copala, and kingdom ofNueva Vizcaya ; situate in the midst of the sierraof Topia, on the coast of the S. sea, on the shoreof the river Plastin. It has a small port for lesservessels, which has oftentimes been invaded byenemies. It is a curacy administered by the cler-gy, and to which two small settlements of MexicaaIndians are annexed.

CAUCA, a large and copious river of the pro-vince and government of Popayán, which risesin the mountains of the government of Mariquita,and running 160 leagues from s. to?i. in whichcourse it collects the ’waters of many other rivers,it passes near the cities of Popaj'iin, Buga, Cali,and Anserma ; from whence it is navigable until itenters the large river of the Magdalena. It is verynarrow where it passes through the cities of Po-payan and Antioquia, and forms the letter S, tak-ing its course through rocks, which render its na-vigation very dangerous. The Indians, however,are so dexterous in guarding their canoes fromrunning against the rocks by paddles, that it isvery seldom indeed that any accident occurs tothem. They call this strait Las Mamas de Cara-manta, from a city which was here of this name.Many make this navigation for the purpose ofavoiding a round-about journey of many days, andin a bad road through the mountains ; and it issaid that some have had the good fortune to dis-cover a route by water free from all difficulties,and that this was actually made by the pontificateof the bishop of Popayan, Don Diego de Mon-toy.

Cauca, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela. It runs n. and entersthe sea at the mouth of the Golfete or Littlegulf.

CAUCAQUA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Venezuela ; situate near the riverTuy, opposite the cape of Codera.

CAUCHUPIL, a river of the kingdom of Chile;it runs to the s. s. e. and then turning s. enters theLebo.

CAUIAN, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Para in Brazil ; situate on the

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DEL PUERTO, a city of the province and go-vernment of Antioquia in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; founded by Gaspar de Kodas, on thespot of the Matanza of Valdivia, in 1676. It haschanged its place several times, on account of thebadness of.its temperature : and, lastly, in the year1588, it was removed by Francisco Redondo tothe spot where it now stands : is one league fromthe river Cauca, on a very steep declivity, whichis also of an unhealthy temperature, althoughabounding greatly in gold mines, which are,however, but little worked. Jt is the nativeplace of,

Fr. Marcos Vetancur, provincial of St. Domingoin Santa Fe:

Fr. Lorenzo de Figueroa, of the province ofSan Francisco :

Don Andres de Vetancur, elected bishop ofLa Concepcion in Chile;

Fr. Diego de Figueroa, provincial of San Augus-tin in Santa Fe : and

Don Luis de Vetancur, precentor of Quito, in-quisitor of Lima, and bishop-elect of Popayan ;all brothers, and men of singular virtue andlearning.

CEAPA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chilques and Marques in Peru; an-nexed to the curacy of Pampacucho.

CEBACO, a settlement of the province andalcaldia major of Matagalpa in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CECIL, a county, being one of the ten whichcompose the colony and province of Maryland.

(Cecil, a township in Washington county,Pennsylvania.)

CECILIA, Dona, a settlement of the provinceand government of Santa Marta in the kingdomof Tierra Firme ; situate on the shore of the largeriver Magdalena, opposite the lake Zapatosa, threeleagues from the town of Mompox.

CECONTEPEC, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldia major of San Salvador in the king-dom of Guatemala.

(CEDAR Point, a port of entry in Charlescounty, Maryland, on the e. side of Potowmacriver, about 12 miles below port Tobacco, and 96s. by w. of Baltimore. Its exports are chiefly to-bacco and Indian corn, and in 1794 amounted invalue to 18,593 dollars.)

(Cedar Point, a cape on the w. side of Dela-ware bay, in St. Mary’s county, Maryland.)

(Cedar Lick, a salt spring in the state of Ten-nessee, 19 miles from Nashville, four from Bigspring, and six from Little spring.)

Cedar, a river of the province and colony of

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Pennsylvania, which traverses New Jersey, andenters the sea.

Cedar, another small river of the province andcolony of Delaware, which runs e. and enters thesea in the bay of its name.

Cedar, a small island of South Carolina; situatewithin the strait of Parapticoe.

Cedar, another island of the province and co-lony of Maryland, between that of Chingoteagand that of Little Matompkin.

CEDAZOS, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Zapopan in Nueva Es-paña, in which dwell some Maslees, Mulattoes,and Indians, who live by cultivating seeds.

CEDROS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Paucartambo in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Challabamba.

Cedros, another settlement in the province andgovernment of Cinaloa ; situate on the shore of theriver Mayo, on the confines of the province ofAstimuri.

Cedros, a river of New France or Canada.It runs s. e. and enters the lake Erie near themouth of the strait of Misigagues.

CEGUEHUE, a small river of the provinceand government of Quijos y Macas in the king-dom of Quito. It enters, a little way from itssource, into the Azuela.

CELAYA, a town of the intendancy of Gua-naxuato in the kingdom of Nueva Espana.Sumptuous edifices have been recently constructedhere, as also at Queretaro and Guanaxuato. Thechurch of the Carmelites of Celaya has a fineappearance ; it is adorned with Corinthian andIonic columns. Its height is 1833 metres, or 6018feet.

CELEDIN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru.

CELLACACA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chichas and Tarija in Peru.

CENDRE, a cape or point of land of the coastof Acadia.

CENEGUANGA, a settlement of the provinceand government of Santa Marta in the kingdom ofTierra Firme; situate on the coast near the riverPiedras.

CENEGUETAS, a settlement of the provinceand government of Guayaquil in the kingdom ofQuito.

CENGUYO, San Pedro de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Yrimbo, and alcaldia mayorof Maravatio, in the bishopric of Mechoacan,and kingdom of Nueva Espaiia. It contains 60families of Indians, and is two leagues to the n. zo.of its head settlement.

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ters the sea between the river Rosa and the settle-ment and parisli of Cul de Sac.

CERICUNCUA, a bay of the coast of Brazil,in the province and captainship of Seara, betweenthe port of Tortuga and the settlement of NuestraSeilora del Rosario.

CERINZA, a settlement of the corregimiento ofTunja in tlie Nuevo Reyno de Granada, is of acold temperature, and abounds in cattle and theproductions peculiar to the climate. It contains300 families, and lies in a valley, from which ittakes its name.

CERMEN, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Venezuela ; situate on the side ofthe town of San Felipe, towards the e. betweenthis town and the settlement of Agua Culebras, onthe shore of the river Iraqui.

CERRALUO, a town and presidency of theNuevo Reyno de Leon, garrisoned by a squadronof 12 soldiers and a captain, who is governor ofthis district, for the'purpose of restraining the bor-dering infidel Indians. Between the e. and n. isthe large river of this name ; and from this begins atract of extensive country, inhabited by barba-rous nations, who impede the communication andcommerce Avith regard to this part and the pro-vinces of Tejas and Nuevas Felipinas. Is 35leagues to the e. of its capital.

Cerraluo, a bay of the coast and gulf of Ca-lifornia, or Mar Roxo de Cortes, opposite an islandwhich is also thus called ; the one and theother hav-ing been named out of compliment to the Marquis ofCerraluo, viceroy of Nueva Espana. TJie afore-said island is large, and lies between the formerbay and the coast of Nueva Espana.

CERRITO, a settlement of the island and go-vernment of Trinidad, near the n. coast, and to thee. of the capital of San Joseph de Oruna.

Cerrito Verde, an open and insecure port inthe bay of La Concepcion, of the kingdom ofChile, and Pacific sea.

Cerrito, another, with the surname of SantaAna. See Ctuayaquie.

CERRITOS, a small settlement of the jurisdic-tion of Orizava, and alcaldia mayor of Ixmiquil-pan, in Nueva España.

Cerritos, another settlement in the provinceand goverment of Popayán.

CERRO, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Angaraes in Peru.

Cerro, another, in the province and corregi-miento of Porco in the same kingdom.

Cerro, another, with the surname of Negro,in the province and corregimiento of Rede, and king-dom of Chile ; situate at the source of the river Itan.

==Cerro, another, called San Miguel de CerroGordo==, which is a garrison of the province of Te-peguana in the kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya. Itssituation is similar to the road which leads to it,namely, a plain level surface ; although, indeed,it is divided by a declivity, in ivhich there is apool of water, and by Avhich passengers usuallypass. This garrison is the residence of a captain,a Serjeant , and 28 soldiers, who are appointed tosuppress the sallies of the infidel Indians. In itsvicinity is a cultivated estate, having a beautifulorchard, abounding in fruit-trees and in zepas,which also produce fruit of a delicious flavour.The garrison lies 50 leagues n. w. of the capitalGuadiana.

Cerros, San Felipe de los, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Uruapa, and alcaldia mayorof Valladolid, in the province and bishopric ofMcchoacan. It contains 26 families of Indians,and lies eight leagues to the e. of its head settle-ment, and 10 from the capital.

Cerros, another, in the province and corregr-miento of Castro-Vireyna in Peru.

CESARA, a large and copious river of theNuevo Reyno de Granada, which was called bythe Indians Pompatao, meaning in their idiom,“ the lord of all rivers,” is formed of severalsmall rivers, which flow down from the snowysierras of Santa Marta. It runs s. leaving the ex-tensive llamtras of Upar until it reaches the lakeZapatosa, from whence itj issues, divided into fourarms, which afterwards unite, and so, following acourse of 70 leagues to the w, enters the Magda-lena on the &lt;?. side, and to the s. of the little settle-ment called Banco.

CESARES, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe kingdom of Chile towards the s. Of themare told many fabulous accounts, although theyare, in fact, but little known. Some believe themto be formed of Spaniards and Indians, being thoseAvho Avere lost in the straits of Magellan, and be-longed to the armada which, at the beginning ofthe conquest of America, Avas sent by the bishop ofPlacencia to discover the Malucas. Others pre-tend that the Arucanos, after they had destroyedthe city of Osonio, in 1599, took aAvay with themthe Spanish Avomen ; and that it Avas from the pro-duction of these Avomen and the Indiatis that thisnation of the Cesares arose. Certain it is, that theyare of an agreeable colour, of a pleasing aspect,and of good dispositions. They have some lightof Christianity, live without any fixed abode ; andsome have affirmed that they have heard the soundof bells in their territorj". It Avas attempted in1638, by the governor of Tucuman, Don Geronimo

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fast for a long time together : they consequentlycat frequently ; the common food on these occa-sions being cJmcolatc, and which is even handedto them whilst at church. This irreverence thebishop very properly proclaimed against ; but itis said that this execution of his duty cost him noless than his life. It is 100 leagues distant fromGuatemala. Lat. 17'^ 4'. Long. 93° 53'.

CHIAPA, another city in the same province,which, to distinguish it from the former, is calledCliiapa de los Indios; these (the Indians) being,for the most part, its inhabitants ; is the largestsettlement in the whole province, and is situate ina valley close upon the river Tabasco, being 12leagues distant from the former city. It has va-rious churches, abounds in wealth, and is the placewherein the Indian families first settled. Theyenjoy many privileges and exemptions, owing tothe zeal of the bishop, J^rtr/y Bartolorae de las Ca-sas, their procurator at court. The river aboundsgreatly in fine fish ; and is full of barks, withwhich the}" occasionally represent sea-fights. Inthe city also there are commonly balls, plays, con-certs, bull-fights, and spectacles of horsemanship ;since the inhabitants are much given to diversions,and in these grudge no expence.

Bishops of Chiapa.

1. Don Fray Juan de Arteaga y Avendano, na-tive of Estepa in Andalucia ; elected in 1541 : hedied in the same year in Mexico, before he arrivedat his church.

2. Don Fray Bartolome de las Casas, a manrenowned lor his zeal in favour of the Indians ; hewas born at Seville, where he studied, and passedover to the island of St. Domingo, where he saidthe first mass ever celebrated in that part of theworld. He returned to Spain, in 1515, to declaimagainst the tyrannies which were practised againstthe Indians. He went back the following year tojNueva Espana, where he took the habit of a monkof St. Dominic ; and returning a second time toSpain, he was presented by the Emperor to thebishopric of Chiapa, which office he did not ac-cept ; blit was afterwards prevailed upon to do soby the united entreaties of the whole of his order ;he therefore entered upon it in 1544. He then leftthe bishopric, and returned, for the third time, toSpain ; and having retired to his convent of Val-ladolid, died in 1550.

3. Don Fray Tomas Casillas, also of the orderof St. Dominic ; he was sub-prior of the conventof Salamanca, and passed over to America withFray Bartolome de las Casas. Being renownedfor the great zeal which he manifested in tlie con-version of the infidel Indians, he was nominated

to be bishop in 1560 ; which office he accepted atthe express command of its general. He made thevisitation of all his bishopric, and died full of vir-tues, in 1567.

4. Don Fray Domingo de Lara, of the order ofSt. Domingo ; he made so strong a refusal of hiselection, his renunciation of the office not havingbeen admitted, that he prayed to God that hemight die before that the bulls should arrive fromRome; and this was actually the case, since hedeparted this life in 1572, before he was conse-crated.

5. Don Fray Alonzo de Noroila, who governedthe church here seven years, and had for suc-cessor,

6. Don Fray Pedro de Feria, native of the townof this name in Estreraadura, a monk of the orderof St. Dominic; he passed over to America, wasprior of the convent of Mexico, and provincial ofthat province ; he returned to Spain, refused thegeneral visitation to which he was appointed, andretiree! to his convent of Salamanca ; was presentedwith the bishopric of Chiapa, which he also re-fused ; but being commanded by his superiors, heafterwards accepted it, and governed 14 years,until 1588, when he died.

7. Don Fray Andres de Ubilla, of the order of St.Dominic, and native of the province of Guipuzcoa ;he took the habit in Mexico, where he studied andread the arls, and was twice prior and provincialof the province ; he came to Spain on affairstouching his religion, and returning to Mexico,found himself presented to this bishopric in 1592,where he governed until 1601, when he died, hav-ing been first promoted to the archbishopric ofMechoacan.

8. Don Lucas Duran, a friar of the order ofSantiago, chaplain of honour to his Majesty ; whoimmediately tiiat he was consecrated bishop ofChiapa, renounced his power, and the see was thenvacant nine years.

9. Don Fray Juan Gonzalez de Mendoza, na-tive of Toledo, a monk of the order of St. Augus-tin ; he passed over to America, was made bishopof Lipari, and titular in the archbishopric ofToledo ; and lastly of Chiapa, in 1607 ; fromwhence he was promoted in the following year toPopayan.

10. Don Tomas Blanes, native of Valen-cia, of the order of St. Dominic ; he passed overto Peru, where he resided many years, studyingarts and theology ; he assisted in the visitation ofthe province of St. Domingo, and having come toSpain, he was presented to the bishopric in 1609,holding the government until 1612, when he died.

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11. Don Juan Zapata y Sandoval, nativeof Mexico, of the order of St. Augustin ; he cameto Spain, was regent of the college of San Gabrielde Valladolid, and elected bishop of Chiapa in1612 ; then promoted to the archbishopric of Gua-temala in' 1622.

12. Don Bernardino de Salazar y Frias, nativeof Burgos, canon of Jaen, .collegiate in the collegeof San Antonio de Portaceli de Siguenza ; pre-sented to the bishopric in 1622 : he died in 1623.

13. Don Alonzo Munoz, dean of the holy churchof Mexico, professor of theology ; he died beforehe was consecrated.

14. Don Agustin Ugarte de Saravia, elected in1628 ; he was promoted in 1630 to the arch-bishopric of Guatemala.

15. Don Fray Marcos Ramirez de Prado, of theorder of St. Francis, native of Madrid ; he studiedin Salamanca arts and theology with great credit,was guardian of the convent of Lucena, vice-com-missary general of the Indies, and guardian of theconvent of Granada, when he was elected bishopof Chiapa in 1632 ; he entered its church in 1635,and was promoted to that of Mechoacan in 1639.

16. Don Fray Christoval de Lazarraga, a monkof the order of St. Bernard, native of Madrid, wasmaster and professor in Salamanca, abbot of themonastery of that city, and qualificator of the in-quisition ; he was presented to the bishopric ofChiapa in 1639, and promoted to that of Carta-gena of the Indies in 1641.

17. Don Fray Domingo de Villaescusa, a monkof the order of St. Jerome, collegian in the col-lege of San Lorenzo el Real, prior of the monas-tery of Espeja, and of those of Parral de Segovia,of San Geronimo de Guisando of Madrid, visitorof the two Castillas, and general of his order ; waspresented to the bishopric of Chiapa in 1641, go-verned until 165 1 , when he was promoted to thechurch of Y ucatan.

18. Don JFrqy Francisco Nunez de la Vega, amonk of the order of St. Dominic.

19. Don Christoval Bernardo de Quiros, nativeof Tordelaguna, canon of the churches of Are-quipa, Quito, and of Lima, pro visor and vicar-general of the archbishopric, and judge of the in-quisition ; he was elected in 1660, and was pro-moted to the archbishopric of Popayan in 1670.

20. Don Manuel Fernandez de Santa Cruz ySahagun, a native of Palencia in Castilla deCuenca, in the university of Salamanca, first canonof Segovia, was elected in 1672, and before he ar-rived was promoted to Guadalaxara.

21. Don

22. Don

23. Don J uan Bautista Alvarez de Toledo, na-

tive of the town of San Salvador, in the provinceof G uatemala, of the religious order of St. Francis,professor in his religion, and prelate of many con-vents ; he was elected in 1708, and promoted to thearchbishopric of Guatemala in 1714. ,

24. Don

25. Don Fray Joseph Cubero Ramirez de Arel-lano, a monk of the order of Nuestra Senora de laMerced ; elected in 1734, governed 19 years, until1753, when he died.

26. Don Fray Joseph Vidal de Montezuma, ofthe order of Nuestra Senora de la Merced, a nativeof Mexico ; elected in 1753, governed till 1767,when he died.

27. Don Miguel de Cilieza y Velasco ;• electedin the above year, governed until 1768, when hedied.

28. Don Fray Lucas Ramirez, of the order ofSt. Francis ; he was promoted to the archbishopricof Santa Fe in 1769.

29. Don Fray Juan Manuel de Vargas y Ri-vera, a native of Lima, monk of the order of Nues-tra Senora de la Merced ; elected in the afore-said year of 1769, governed until 1774, when hedied.

30. Don Antonio Caballero y Gongora, untilthe following year of 1775, when he was promotedto the church of Yucatan.

31. Don Francisco Polanco, until 1785, whenhe died ; and,

32. Don Joseph Martinez Palomino Lopez deLerena, elected in 1786.

Chiapa, with the appellation of Mota, a settle-ment of the alcaldia mayor of Xilotepec in NucvaEspana. It contains 960 families of Otomies In-dians, and is seven leagues to the n. w. of its ca-pital.

CHIAPANTONGO, a settlement and headsettlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofXilotepec in Nueva Espana ; annexed to thecuracy of its capital, from whence it lies twoleaffues to the n. It contains 102 familes of In-dians.

CHIAPAS, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cinaloa.

CHIAPILLA, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Chiapa, and kingdom of Guate-mala, in the district of its capital.

CHIARA, a settlement of the province and bi-shopric of Huamanga in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of the parish of Santa Maria Magdalena inthat city, from whence it is three leagues distant.

CHIAUTLA, S. Andres De, a settlement andhead settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Tezcoco

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CHIMOR, a settlement of the province andforregimiento of Paucartambo in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Challabamba.

CHINA, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Santa Marta in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; one of those which enter the greatcienega, or quagmire, on the e.

Same name, a point of land of the coast of Peru, inthe province and corregimienlo of Cañete.

Same name, a settlement of Indians of the provinceand colony of Georgia ; situate on the shore of theriver Apalachicola.

CHINACATES, a settlement of the provinceof Tepeguana, and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya.

CHINACOTA, a small settlement of the jurisdiction and government of Pamplona in theNuevo Reyno de Granada. It is of a hot tempe-rature, produces sugar-cane, plantains, maize, andis extremely fertile in wheat ; but this not withoutcultivation. The natives amount to about 90 poorfamilies, and as many Indians. It is situate in anextensive valley, from whence it derives its title,and which is also called. Of Meer Ambrosio, fromthe Indians having killed here the GermanGeneral Ambrosio de Alfinger, by whom it w^as dis-covered in 1531. Four leagues n. e. of Pam-plona.

CHINANTLA, a settlement and head settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Cozamaloapan in Nueva Espaha. It contains 40 fami-lies of Chinantecas Indians, and is very fertile,and abounding in maize and cotton. Eightyleagues s. of Mexico.

CHINANTEPEC, Santa Catalina, asettlement and head settlement of the district ofthe alcaldia mayor of Guayacocotla in NuevaEspana. Its territory is somewhat extensive, andthe settlements or wards belonging to it are far re-moved from each other, the greater part of thembeing situate within the deep glens, or on theheights, so that the roads to them are very diffi-cult. It contains, in all, 1340 families of In-dians.

CHINAPA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of La Sonora ; situate on the shore ofthe river of its name, between the settlements ofArispo and Bacuachi.

CHINAS, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Popayan.

CHINATAGUAS, a barbarous nation ofIndians of Peru ; situate to the n. of the city of Gua-nuco. They are descendants of the Panataguas,of whom few remain at the present day, and ofwhom but little is known.

CHINATECA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reynode Granada ; situate on the skirt of a mountain.

CHINATOS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe Nuevo Reyno de Granada, who inhabit theforests to the n. e. 1 to the e. of the city of Pam-plona. They are relics of the Chitareros, whohave been always found very troublesome, fromtheir proximity to the aforesaid city.

CHINAUTLA, a settlement and head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Teuzitlan in Nueva Espana ; annexed to the curacy ofthis capital. It contains 108 families of Indians,and lies a league and an halPs distance from thesame capital.

CHINCHA, Santo Domingo, el Real de asettlement of the province and corregimiento ofCanete in Peru ; situate on the sea-coast.

Same name, an island of the S. sea, near the coast,in the same province and corregimiento, oppositethe port of Sangallo.

Same name, formerly the name of the provinceor district now called Chunchasuyu in Peru, tothe is. of Cuzco. Its natives were valorous, andresisted for eight months the Emperor Pachacutec,who subjected it to his controul. The country ispleasant, fertile, and abounding in cattle. Hereare to be seen vestiges and ruins of some magnifi-cent fabrics, which belonged to the Incas, andwhich strike the imagination with wonder and sur-prise, at viewing the immense stones used in theirarchitecture, and when it is considered that theIndians knew not the use of engines, whereby theymight raise them.

CHINCHAIPUCQUIO, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Abancay in Peru.

CHINCHAN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tarma in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Huariaca.

CHINCHAO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huanuco in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Santa Maria del Valle; situate onthe confines of the infidel Pataguas Indians.

CHINCHAYCOCHA, a large lake of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Tarma in Peru. It ismore than nine leagues in length and three inwidth ; and from it rises the river Pari or Paria,also called Xauxa, towards the n. side. Thisriver runs s. dividing the province of Xauxa, andgiving it its name, both in Xauxa Alta, or High,and Baxa, or Low ; it then turns e. and after run-ning for more than 40 leagues, flows back to the n.until it enters the Maranon on the s. side. M. Dela Martiniere, with his accustomed error, says that

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the Catholic faith, and are reduced to settlements,though the number of these is very small.

CHITEPEC, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district and alcaldia mayor of Tlapain Nueva Espaiia. It is of a cold temperature,and contains 39 families of Indians, who live bysowing maize, the only vegetable production oftheir territory. Five leagues w. n. w. of its capi-tal.

CHITO, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdomof Quito, upon the s. shore of the river Sangalla,and in the royal road of Loxa, which leads to To-mependa. In its vicinity are some gold mines,but which are not worked ; its temperature is hotand moist, and consequently unhealthy.

[CHITTENDEN County, in Vermont, lieson lake Champlain, between Franklin county onthe w. and Addison s. ; La Moille river passesthrough its n. w. corner, and Onion river dividesit nearly in the centre.' Its chief town is Burling-ton. This county contained, by the census of1791, 44 townships and 7301 inhabitants. Sincethat time the n. counties have been taken from it,so that neither its size or number of inhabitants cannow be ascertained.]

[Chittenden, a township in Rutland county,Vermont, contains 159 inhabitants. The roadover the mountain passes through this township.It lies seven miles e. from the fort on Otter creek,in Pittsford, and about 60 n. by e. from Ben-nington.]

[CHITTENENGO, or Canaserage, a con-siderable stream which runs n. into lake Oneida,in the state of New York.]

CHIUAO, a small river of theprovince and colony of Surinam, or the part ofGuayana possessed by the Dutch . It rises in themountain of Sincomay, runs n. and turning w.enters another river which is without a name, andwhere several others unite to enter the Cuyuni onthe s. side.

CHIUATA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Cumana in the kingdom of TierraFirme. It rises from some plains in this territory,runs s. collecting the waters of several otherrivers, particularly that of the Suata, and thenenters the sea, just as it becomes navigable.

Same name, another river of the same provinceand government (Cumana), which rises at the foot of theserramas of Paraguay, to the w. of the town ofSan Fernando, runs s. and enters the Orinoco.

CHIUCHA, S. Juan de, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Lipes, and arch-bishopric of Charcas, in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of San Christoval.

CHIUCHIN, a settlement of the province andcorregimienlo of Chancay in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Canchas. In its district there is amineral hot-water spring, much renowned for thecuring of various kinds of maladies.

CHIUCHIU, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Atacama, and archbishopric ofCharcas, in Peru.

CHIUGOTOS, a barbarous na-tion of Indians of the province and government ofVenezuela, bordering upon the settlement of Mara-capana. They are very few, and live retired in themountains ; they are cruel even to cannibalism.

CHIUICOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Buenos Aires ; situate to the s. ofits capital.

CHIXILA, a settlement and head settlement ofthe district of the alcaldia mayor of Villalta inNueva Espana. It is of an hot temperature, con-tains 134 families of Indians, and lies 12 leaguesto the n. of its capital.

CHOCAIA, Nueva, a settlement of the pro-vince of Chichas and Tarija in Peru ; of the dis-trict of the former, and annexed to the curacy ofTatasi.

CHOCAMAN, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district of Zacan, and alcaldia mayorof Cordoba, in Nueva Espana. It is of a coldand moist temperature, contains 103 families ofIndians, and is five leagues to the n, n. w. of thecapital.

CHOCAN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Piura in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Aabaca.

CHOCAYAS, a mountain of the province andcorregimiento of Chichas and Tarija in Peru, andjurisdiction of Chuquisaca. It is celebrated forits rich gold mines.

CHOCO, a large province and government ofthe jurisdiction of Popayan ; by the territory ofwhich it is bounded e. and s. e . ; on the w. by thePacific or S. sea; n. by the barbarous nations ofIndians, and by the province of Darien ; and s. bythat of Barbacoas. The whole of this provinceabounds in woods and mountains, and is crossedby a chain of the Andes, which run as far as theisthmus of Panama. It is watered by several riversand streams, all of which run w. and enter the S.sea. The districts of Citara and Raposo form apart of this province ; very few of their ancientinhabitants remain at the present day ; the greaterpart of them having perished in the war of the

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Spaniards, and the rest having fled, and thuspenetrating n. have confounded themselves withother nations. It abounds in maize, plantains,and cacao of an excellent quality ; its gold minesrender it rich and well peopled ; it also carries on,through this branch of revenue, a great commercewith the province of Popayan, the nativ'es of thatplace coming here to purchase gold, and leavingin exchange whatever is necessary for the comfortand convenience of life. There is no inconsider-able number of Negro slaves employed in work-ing the mines, and in 1750 they amounted to20,000, without mentioning the men of colour,such as the Mustees and Mulattoes, and even Whiteswho are engaged in this lucrative concern. Theclimate is warm, but moist from the continualrains, and consequently unhealthy. This countryabounds in tigers, wild boars, alligators, parrots,monkeys of various sorts, and a multitude of rep-tiles and insects, especially in vipers and ve-nomous snakes ; such as corales, exis, and rattle-snakes. Here are also an infinite variety of beau-tiful sorts of wood, curious balsams, herbs, fruits,and flowers. It was subject to the government ofPopayan, until it became divided in the time ofDon Fernando Guerrero. All the gold which istaken out of the mines here, and which is the cur-rent money, was formerly carried to be coined atthe mint of Santa Fe, until that the house ofValencia established another, at its own cost, in thecity of Popayan ; this privilege having been firstgranted that house by the mayoralty, though itwas afterwards taken away and added by the kingto the crown, upon the payment of a compensationof 100,000 reals per annum to the original pro-prietors. This province extends 48 leagues froms. to n. and is 39 in width from e. to w. Thecapital is the city of Nevita.

[Choco, Canal of. In the interior of the pro-vince of Choco, the small ravine (quebrada) Dela Raspadura unites the neighbouring sources ofthe Rio de Noanama, called also Rio San Juan,and the small river Quito : the latter, the RioAndageda, and the Rio Zitasa, form the Riod’Atrata, which discharges itself into the Atlanticocean, while the Rio San Juan flows into the S.sea. A monk of great activity, cure of the villageof Novita, employed his parishioners to dig asmall canal in the ravine De la Raspadura, bymeans of which, when the rains are abundant,canoes loaded with cacao pass from sea to sea.Th is interior communication has existed since1788, unknown in Europe. The small canal ofRaspadura unites, on the coasts of the two oceans,

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two points 75 leagues distant from one ano-ther.]

CHOCO, San Juan Chrisostomo de , anothersettlement of the province and corregimiento ofCondesuyos de Arequipa in Peru.

[CHOCOLATE Creek, a head-water of Tiogariver in New York, whose mouth lies 10 miless. w. of the Painted post.]

[CHOCOLOCO-CA, which the Spaniards callCastro Vireyna, a town of Peru, 60 leagues s. e.of Lima, is very famous for its silver mines,which are at the top of a great mountain alwayscovered with snow, and but two leagues from thetown. The stones of the mine are, of a dark bluecolour ; these being calcined and powdered, thensteeped in water and quicksilver, the filth is sepa-rated, and the silver melted and formed into bars.These veins are not very rich, but the metal is veryfine. They make plenty of wine here, where itattains a greater degree of perfection, owing to thepureness of the air, than it is observed to have else-where.]

CHOCONA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Paria in Peru; annexed to thecuracy of Toledo.

CHOCONTA, a settlement of the corregimientoof Guatavita in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada.It is of a cold but healthy temperature, beingsituate upon a llanura. It produces abundanceof wheat, maize, papas, barley, and garlic, of thewhole of which an abundant crop is gathered ;these indeed form the principal branches of itscommerce, as they supply all the neighbouringprovinces. It was , in the time of the Indians alarge, rich, and populous city, and the barrierof the province of Tunja; also the place wherethe zipas held a garrison of their best troops.This city was entered by Gonzalo Ximinez deQuesada in 1537, when he gave it the name ofEspiritu Santo, from this festival having beencelebrated here. After the conquest of the Spa-niards it became a became a curacy of the relio-ionof St. Domingo, and was one of those which wasconsidered the first step to the advantages to bederived from these missions. It was close to thissettlement that the sanguinary conflict took placewhich was fought between Michua, king of Tunja,and Saguanmachica, zipa or king of Bogota, inwhich both princes fell dead upon the field ; atpresent it is a small village of Indians, who amountto the number of 200, besides 400 other inhabi-tants, who consist of whites. Ten leagues n. ofSanta Fe, and as many from Tunja, just midwaybetweeen these two jurisdictions.

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villa, president of the courts of chancery of Gra-nada and Valladolid, elected bishop ; he died inLima before he took possession.

7. Don Alonso Ramirez Granero, and not Pedro,as Gil Gonzalez will have it ; a native of V illaes-cusa in the bishopric of Cuenca, a collegiate ofthis city, dean of the church of Guadix, and Jiscalof the inquisition of Mexico ; elected archbishopin 1574 ; he governed until 1578.

8. Don Frai/ Juan de Vivero, native of Valla-dolid, of the order of St. Augustin ; he passedover to Peru, was prior of his convent of Lima,presented to the archbishopric .of Cartagena of theIndies, and to this archbishopric ; but these digni-ties he would not accept ; he returned to Spain, anddied in his convent of Toledo.

9. Don Alonso Ramirez de Vergara, native ofSegura de Leon, collegiate in Malaga, Alcala, andSalamanca, professor of arts, and canon of Malaga ;he was presented to the archbishopric of Charcasin 1594, and died in 1 603.

10. Don Fra^ Luis Lopez de Solis, native ofSalamanca, of the order of St. Augustin ; he passedover into Peru, where he was master of his reli-gious order, professor of theology, prior provin-cial, and qualificator of the inquisition; he waspromoted to the church of Quito, and to this me-tropolitan see.

11. Don Fra?y Ignacio de Loyola, a monk ofthe barefooted order of St. Francis ; he was commis-sary in the province of Pilipinas, and on his returnto Spain elected archbishop of Charcas.

12. Don Alonso de Peralta, native of Arequipa,archdeacon and inquisitor of Mexico, and arch-bishop of Charcas, where he died.

13. Don Frn^ Geronimo de Tiedra, native ofSalamanca, of the order of St. Domingo ; he wasprior of his convent, and preacher to the king, andarchbishop of Charcas in 1616.

14. Don Fernando Arias de Ugarte, native ofSanta Fe of Bogota, of whom we have treated inthe catalogue of the bishops of Quito ; he passedover from the archbishopric of Santa Fe to this in1630.

15. Don Francisco de Sotomayor.

16. Don FVr/y Francisco de Borja, of the orderof San Benito, master in the university of Sala-manca, and professor of theology ; elected bishopof Charcas in 1634.

17. Don Fru7/ Pedro de Oviedo, of the order ofSan Benito, native of Madrid ; he studied arts andtheoloijy in Alcala, was abbot of the monastery ofS. Cloclio, and difinidor of his order ; he was pro-moted from the bishopric of Quito to this arch-bishopric in 1645 : he died in 1649.

18. Don Juan Alonso de Ocon, native of LaRoja, collegiate-major of San Ildefonso in Alcala,doctor and professor of theology, curate of Ele-chosa in the archbishopric of Toledo, and of theparish of Santa Cruz of Madrid ; he was promotedfrom the church of Cuzco to this of La Plata.

19. Don Fray Gaspar de Villaroel, of the orderof St. Augustin, native of Riobamba ; he studiedin the royal university of Lima, and with the re-putation of being very learned, of which, indeed,his works bear testimony ; he was promoted fromthe church of Arequipa to this in 1658.

20. Don Bernardo de Izaguirre, native of To-ledo ; he was fiscal of the inquisition of Carta-gena and of Lima, and was promoted from thechurch of Cuzco to this metropolitan see.

21. Don Fray Alonso de la Cerda, of the orderof preachers, native of Lima, provincial of hisorder, bishop of Honduras ; from whence he waspromoted to this church.

22. Don Melchor de Lilian and Cisneros, nativeof Tordelaguna, of Avhom we speak in the cata-logue of the bishops of Santa Marta ; he was re-moved from the bishopric of Popayan in 1672,governed until 1678, when he was promoted tothe metropolitan see of Lima.

23. Don Bartolome Gonzalez de Poveda, whobecame archbishop, and governed until 1692.

24. Don Fray Diego Morcillo Rubio de Aunon,of the bishopric of La Paz in 1711, where he re-mained until 1724, when he was promoted to thearchbishopric of Lima.

25. Don Francisco Luis Romero, promoted fromthe archbishopric of Quito ; he governed until1725.

26. Don Alonso del Pozo and Silva, of thebishopric of Santiago of Chile.

27. Don Agustin Delgado, in 1743 ; governeduntil 1746.

28. Don Salvador Bermudez, from the aforesaidyear ; governed until 1747.

29. Don Gregorio de Molleda y Clerque, of thebishopric of Truxillo, in 1748 ; he governed until1758, when he died.

30. Don Cayetano Marcellano y Agramont, ofthe bishopric of Buenos Ayres, in 1758 ; he go-verned until 1761, when he died.

31. Don Pedro de Argandoua, promoted in theabove year ; he governed until 1776, when hedied.

32. Don Francisco Ramon de Herboso, whogoverned from 1776 to 1784.

33. Don Arqy Joseph Antonio de San Alberto,who governed in 178.5.

CHUQUISONGO, San Pedro de, a settlement

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COCO, a river of the province and governmentof Darien in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. Itrises in the mountains of the n. and enters the seaopposite the island of Las Palmas, and gives itsname to the territory of a Cacique, thus called.

Same name, a point of the coast of the South sea,and kingdom of Tierra Firme, in the bay ofPanama.

COCOLI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Honduras. It runs e. and enters the seain the gulf of this name.

COCOLI, a point of the coast, in the same pro-vince and kingdom (Honduras).

COCOLOT, a city, which some liave supposedto be in the province of Chaco in Peru, but of theexistence of which no proofs are at present to befound.

COCOMERACHI, a settlement of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits, in the province of Taraumara, andkingdom of Nueva Vizcaya. It is 40 leagues tothe w. s.zo. of the town 'And real of the mines ofChiguaga.

COCOMICO, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Popayan in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada,

COCONUCO, See Cucunuco.

COCORALE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Venezuela in the kingdom ofTierra Firme; situate at the w. of the town of SanFelipe.

COCORIN, a settlement of the province ofOstimuri in Nueva Espana; situate on the shoreof the river Hiagui, between the settlements ofBacun and Comoriopa.

COCOROTE, some copper mines in the pro-vince and government of Venezuela, much cele-brated.

COCOS, some small islands of the Pacific orS. sea, lying close together, and divided by somenarrow channels. They abound in cocoa-trees,and from thence take their name. They are alsocalled Santa Cruz, from having been discoveredon the day of the invention of the cross. Theclimate here is pleasant, but the isles are unculti-vated and desert. Lat. 5° n.

Same name, a point of the island of Trinidad, on thee. coast.

COCOSPERA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Sonora in Nueva Espana ; situateat the source of a river,

COCOTA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tunja, in the jurisdiction of thecity of Pamplona, of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada.

COCOTZINGO, S. Geronimo de, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor ofCuernavaca in Nueva Espana.

COCUI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Tunja in the NueVo Reyno de Gra-nada ; situate at the foot of the sierra Nevada. Itis of a cold temperature, but abounds in all kindsof productions, and particularly in wheat, maize,barley, &c. It contains 700 white inhabitants,and 150 Indians. Thirty-two leagues from Tunja,and eight from the settlement of Chita.

COCUISAS, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cumana in the kingdom of TierraFirme, It lies to the s. of the city of Cariaco.

Same name, a river of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela, being one of those whichenter the Gamaiotal, before this runs into that ofLa Portuguesa.

COCULA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Tlajomulco in Nueva Es-pana. It contains a convent of the religious orderof St. Francis, and is six leagues to the w. of itscapital.

COCUPAC, a city and headsettlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofValladolid in Nueva Espana, and of the bishopricof Mechoaean. Its situation is in a nook to the n.of the great lake. On the e. and ze. are two loftymountains, which form so many other entrances,the one to the 5. and the other to the n. Its tem-perature is rather cold than w'arm ; and althoughit does not want for fruits, it is but ill supplied withwater, the only stream it has not running morethan the distance of a stone’s throw before it entersa lake. The inhabitants are thus under the ne-cessity of supplying themselves by wells. Thepopulation of this city consists in 45 families ofSpaniards, 52 of Mustees and Mulattoes, and 150of Indians. They occupy themselves in the mak-ing of tiles or flags ; and the inferior order aremuleteers. It has a convent of the religious orderof St. Francis.

COCUS, Punta de, a point on the e. coast ofthe island of Newfoundland, between cape Spearand the bay of Tor.

COD, a cape of the coast of New England andprovince of Massachusetts. It runs for many leaguestowards the sea, forming a large semicircle, andafterwards returning, forms the bay of Barnstable.[See Cape Cod, Barnstable, &c.]

CODDINGTON, a settlement of the island ofBarbadoes, in the district of the parish of SanJuan.

CODEBORE, a small river of New Britain,

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COLARIA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, in the district of thecapital, to the zo. of this province.

COLASTINA, a small river of the provinceand government of Buenos Ayres. It runs e. andenters the Parana,

COLATE, a small river of the province andalcaldta mayor of Tecoantepec in the kingdom ofGuatemala. It runs into the S. sea, between therivers Azatian and Capanerealte.

COLATPA, a settlement of the head settlementof Olinalá, and alcald'in mayor of TIapa, in NuevaEspana. It contains 29 families of Indians, whoemploy themselves in the commerce of chia, av/hite medicinal earth, and cochineal, which aboundin their territory : n. w. of its head settlement.

COLAZA, a small and ancient province, ex-tremely fertile and delightful, belonging at the pre-sent day to the province of Popayán in the NuevoReyno de Granada. It was discovered by Sebas-tian de Benalcazar in 1536. Its inhabitants, whowere a warlike and cruel race, are entirely extir-pated.

COLCA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Vilcas Huaman in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Huanacapi.

COLCA, another settlement in the province andcorregimiento of Xauja in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Chongos.

COLCA, another, in the province and corregi-miento of Aimaraez in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Pampamarca.

COLCABAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru.

COLCABAMBA, another settlement, in the pro-vince and corregimiento of Theanta in the samekingdom.

COLCAHUANCA, a settlementof the provinceand corregimiento of Huailas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Pampas.

COLCAMAR, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Luya and Chillaos in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Luya, its capital.

COLCHA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento oi Lipes, and archbishopric of Charcas,in Peru. It was formerly the capital, and pre-serves in its cluirch an image of the blessed virgin,sent thither by the Emperor Charles V. It is nowannexed to the curacy of San Christoval.

COLCHA, another settlement, of the'province andcorregimiento of Chilques and Masques in the samekingdom.

COLCHA, another, of the province and corregi-miento of Cochabamba in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Berenguela,

COLCHAGUA, a province and^ corregimientoof the kingdom of Chile ; bounded on the e. bythe cordillera Nevada ; s. by the province ofMaule, the river Teno serving as the boundary ;and w. by the sea. It is 40 leagues in length frome. to w. and 32 in width from n. to s. Here aresome gold mines, and there were several others,the working of which has been discontinued : hereare also some copper mines. It abounds in wheat,large and small cattle, horses and mules. In apart called Cauquencs are some hot baths, whicharc much frequented, from the salutary affects theyproduce, especially upon those affected with theFrench disease, leprosy, spots on the skin, orwounds. The inhabitants of this province amountto 15,000 souls, and its capital is the town of SanFernando.

COLCHAGUA, a settlement of this province andcorregimiento, which is the head of a curacy ofanother, and contains four chapels of ease.

(COLCHESTER, a township in Ulster county.New York, on the Popachton branch of Delawareriver, s. w. of Middletown, and about 50 miless. w. by s. of Cooperstown. By the state censusof 1796, 193 of its inhabitants are electors.)

(Colchester, a large township in New Londoncounty, Connecticut, seltled in 1701 ; about 15miles tc. of Norwich, 25 s. e. of Hartford, and 20n. w. of New London city. It is in contemplationto have a post-office established in this town.)

(Colchester, the chief town in Chittendencounty, Vermont, is on the e. bank of lake Cham-plain, at the mouth of Onion river, and n, of Bur-lington, on Colchester bay, which spreads n. of thetown.)

(Colchester, a post-town in Fairfax county,Virginia ; situate on the n. e. bank of Ocquoquamcreek, three or four miles from its confluence withthe Potowmack ; and is here about 100 yardswide, and navigable for boats. It contains about40 houses, and lies 16 miles s. w. of Alexandria,106 n. by e. of Richmond, and 172 from Phila-delphia.)

(Colchester River, Nova Scotia. See Cohe-QUIT.)

COLCURA, a fortress of the kingdom of Chile,built on the opposite shore of the river Biobio, torestrain the incursions of the warlike AraucanianIndians, who burnt and destroyed it in 1601.

COLD Bay, in the extremity of the n. coast ofthe island of Jamaica, between the port Antonioand the n. e. point.

(COLD Spring, in the island of Jamaica, is avilla six miles from the high lands of Liguania.The grounds are in a high state of improvement.

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particularly those of (lie parish church, the con-vent of the monks of Niiestra Sonora de la Merced,another of St. Francis, and the hospital of S. J uande Dios. Its population consists of 200 familiesof Spaniards, 122 oi Mustees, 15 Mulattoes, and22 of Indians. In its district is found and gatheredthe celebrated plant called in the country oleacazan^■which is considered as a wonderful restorer of loststrength, and a certain specific against all kinds ofpoison. The leaves of it are applied to the partaffected, and the natives are accustomed to judgeof its virtues by its degree of adhesion. One hun-dred and fifty leagues to the w. of Mexico, inlong. 103^ 20', and lat. 18° 34'.

COLIMAS, a barbarous nation of Indians informer times, but now reduced to the faith, in theprovince of its name; this being now incorporatedwith that of Muzo of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada.These Indians are also known by the name of Ca-napayes, being united to them. Its capital is thecity of La Palma de los Colimas. See articleMuzos.

COLIMBA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Popayán in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra-nada.

COLINA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Santiago in the kingdom of Chile ;in the district of which there are five chapels ofcase, in a spacious and beautiful valley.

COLINA, a river of this province and kingdom,which rises in the mountains of its cordillera, andenters the Maypo.

COLIUINA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Nicaragua in the kingdom of Guate-mala ; situate upon a long strip of land on the coastof the S. sea.

(COLLA, a parish of the province and govern-ment of Buenos Ayres ; situate on a small rivernear the sea-coast, about eight leagues e. of Coloniadel Sacramento, in lat. 34° 19' 39" s. Long. 57°21' 43" w.')

COLLADOS, Ensenada de los a bay onthe s. coast of the w. head, and in the territory ofthe French, in the island of St. Domingo. It is be-tween the rock of Bareo and the river Damasein.

COLLAHUAS, and Asiento of Mines ofCaylloma, a province and corregwiiento of Peru ;bounded n. by that of Cbumbivilcas, e. by that ofCanes and Canches or Tinta, s. e, by that ofLampa, s. by that of Arequipa, and w. by that ofCamana. It is 52 leagues in length s. e. n. w. and16 in width. Its temperature is cold, from beingsituate in the cordillera ; with the exception of thatpart which borders upon Camana, where it isvery mild, especially in the five leagues where its

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jurisdiction extends itself in the valley of Sihuas ;the other five leagues reaching to tlie sea borderingon Camana. Its productions are various : thoseof the valley are comprised in wine, brandies,wheat, maize, pulse, and fruits, especially figs,which being preserved, serve as nourishment tonumbers of poor people. The other territories ofthis province are of the same temperature, thoughcomparatively barren. It abounds in large andsmall cattle, native sheep, vicunas, and some wildanimals. The roads are dangerous, from thecountry’s being extremely unequal, and the greaterpart of it beinga craggy ravine, over which labours,rather than to say runs, a pretty large river, whichhas its rise within the province. Here are manysilver mines, from which great riches were formerlyextracted, since they yielded 80 or 100 marks eachcaxon. Atthe present day they yield but sparingly,on account of their great depth, some of them being200 fathoms in descent ; they are, nevertheless,worked with tolerable profit. The principalmountain of these mines is that of Caylloma, andit was through this mine that the capital wasfounded. There are also not wanting mines ofgold, tin, lead, copper, and sulphur; but these, onaccount of the deficiency of resources, remain un-worked. The capital, as we have before stated, isCaylloma. Its repartimmito used to amount to37,100 dollars, and its alcavala to 456 dollars perannum. The other settlements of the jurisdictionare.

Tisco,

Madrigal,

Callalli,

Tapay,

Sibayo,

A^angui,

Tuty,

Achoma,

Llauta,

Murco,

Taya,

Sihuas,

Chibay,

Maca,

Canocota,

Y chupampa,

Coperaque,

Chabanaconde,

Lary,

Pinchollo,

Huanca,

Huambo,

Yura,

Hucan.

COLLANA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cicasica in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Mccapa. Its Indian inhabitants havekept themselves unmixed from any other cast eversince the time of the conquest ; and in order to stillpreserve themselves so, they will not allow of anystrangers sleeping in the settlement, though heshould be sent by the corregidor. If any otherperson should come among them, he is put intoprison, and after a very short time dispatched.Owing to these precautions, the vicious propen-pensities observable in other settlements are en~

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(lereent of Quecliollenan^o, and nkaldia mni/orof Chilapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains 27families of Indians, and is three leagues from itshead settlement.

COLOYA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Popayán in the corregimiento ofPasto.

COLPA, a settlement of the province and cor-reghniento of Aymaraez in Peru'; annexed to thecuracy ot Pituhuanca in the province of Cocha-bamba.

COLPAPIRHUA , a settlement of the provincean^l corregimiento of Cochabamba in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Tiquipaya.

COLPES, a settlem.ent of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, in the district of its ca-pital.

COLPI, a small river of the kingdom of Chile,It runs n. and enters the Quisu.

COLQUEMARCA, a settlement of the jrro-vince and correghniento of Chumbivilcas in Peru.

COLQUEPATA, a settlement of tiie provinceand cori'egimienlo of Paucartambo in Peru; an-nexed to the curacy of its capital.

COLQUI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cicasica in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Mohosa in the province of Cocha-bamba.

COLQUIOC, a settlement of the province andcorregimienlo of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed tothe curncy ofCaxacay.

(COLRAINE, a township in Hampshire coun-ty, Massachusetts, which contains 229 houses,and 1417 inhabitants,)

COLTA, a large lake of the province andforregimiento of Riobamba in the kingdom ofQuito, near that city to the s. It is about twoleagues in length from n, to s. and is of an ovalfigure. Its banks are covered with very finerushes and eneax, or flags; but fish will not breedin it, owing to the coldness of the climate ; it hastwo very small streams, the one to the w. and pass-ing very near to Riobamba, and the other to thes. entering the n. side of the river Gamote.

(COLUMBIA, a township in Washingtoncounty, district of Maine, on Pleasant river, ad-joining Macliias on the 7i.e. and was formerlycalled Plantations No. 12 and 13. It was incor-porated in 1796. The town of Machias lies 15miles to the e. ; it is nine miles from Steuben.)

(Columbia County, in New York, is boundedn. by Rensselaer, s. by Dutchess, e. by the stateof Massachusetts, and w. by Hudson river, whichdivides it from Albany county. It is 32 miles inlength and 21 in breadth, and is divided into

eight towns, of which Hudson, Claverack, andKinderhook, are the chief. It contained in 179027,732 inhabitants, and in 1796, 3560 electors.)

(Columbia College. See New York City.)

(Columbia, Territory of. See Washington,or the Federal City.)

(Columbia, a post-town, the capital of Ker-shaw county, and the seat of government of S.Carolina. It is situated in Camden district, onthe e. side of the Congaree, just below the con-fluence of Saluda and Broad rivers ; the streets areregular, and the town contains upwards of 70houses. The public offices have, in some mea-sure, been divided, for the accomodation of theinhabitants of the lower counties, and a branchof each retained in Charlestown. It lies 115 miles«. n. u\ of Charlestown, .35 s. w. of Camden, 85from Augusta in Georgia, and 678 s. u\ of Phila-delphia. Jjat. 33° 58' n. Long. 8° 5' ay.)

(Columbia, a flourishing po.st-town in Gooch-land county, Virginia, on the «. side of Jamesriver, at the mouth of the Rivanna. It containsabout 40 houses, and a warehouse for the inspec-tion of tobacco. It lies 45 miles above Richmond,35 from Charlottesville, and 328 s. w. of Phila-delphia.)

(Columbia, atown newly laid out in Lancas-ter county, Pennsylvania, on the n. e. bank ofSusquehannah river, at Wright’s ferry, 10 milesw. of Lancaster, and 76 to. by n. of Philadel-phia.)

(Columbia County, in the upper district ofGeorgia, is bounded by Savannah e. on the n. e,and e. which separates it from the state of S. Caro-lina, w. of Richmond county. Its shape isvery irregular.)

(Columbia, a town on the «. w. territory, onthe «. bank of Ohio river, and on thezo. side of themouth of Little Miami river; about six miles s. e.by e. of fort W ashington, eight e. by s. of Cincin-nati, and 87 n. by w. of Lexington in Kentucky.Lat. 38° 44' ? 2 .)

COMACARI, a large river of the kingdom ofNuevo Mexico.

COMACHUEN, Santa Maria de, a settle-ment of the head settlement of Siguinan, and akai-dia mayor of Valladolid, in the province andbishopric of Mechoacan, with 25 families of In-dians, whose only occupation is in making saddle-trees. Two leagues from its head settlement.

COMAGRE, a very small, barren, and desertisland of the N. sea, on the coast of the provinceand government of Darien, and nearly to the s. ofthe island of Pinos.

COMALA, a settlement of the head settlement

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of a hot and moist temperature, and inhabited by107 families of Indians ; being 15 leagues n.e. ofits capital.

Copan, a river of the province and governmentof Cumaná. It rises in the serrama of Imataca,runs s. and enters the Cuyuni on the side.

COPANDARO, Santiago de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Tuzantla, and alcaldia mayorof Maravatio, in Nueva Espaha. It contains 34families of Indians, and is 10 leagues to the s. ofits head settlement. In it is a convent of the reli-gious order of St. Augustin, Avhicli is one of thebest convents in the kingdom.

COPENAME, a river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana, in the Dutch possessions orcolony of Surinam. It runs n. and unites itselfwith the Sarameca at its mouth, to form anothermouth, and enter into the sea.

COPER, a small settlement of the Nuevo Reynode Granada, in the road which leads from SantaFe to Muzo ; situate upon an height, near themountain Apari, where, upon the descent whichis called Cuesta de Macanazos, and at its skirt,runs the river Villaraisar. Near it has been founda mine of earth, esteemed an excellent antidoteagainst poisons.

COPERE, a settlement of the province and ju-risdiction of Muzo, in the corregimiento of Tunja,of the N uevo Reyno de Granada. It is of a be-nign temperature, produces maize, cotton, yucas^plantains, and the other fruits of its climate. Inthe territory of this curacy rises the river calledVillamisar, memorable for the battle fought thereby the Indians and Captain Luis Lanchero, inwhich the former were routed. It contains 150housekeepers, and 30 Indians.

COPIA, one of the ancient provinces whichwere formed by that of Popayan in the time of theIndians ; and bounded by the province of Car-tama. At present its limits are not known, sincethe Spaniards have changed both the divisions andnames.

COPIAPO, a province and corregimienlo of thekingdom of Chile ; bounded n. by the province ofAtacama, of the archbishopric of Charcas, andkingdom of Peru ; e. by the territory of the city ofRioja, of the province of Tucuman, the cordillerarunning between ; s. by the province of Coquitnbo,and w, by the Pacific ocean. Its extent is 60leagues n. s. and from 20 to three e. w. It very sel-dom rains here ; cattle is therefore scarce, althoughit nevertheless produces every sort of grain, of ex-cellent quality, and fruits of various kinds. Thetemperature is very benign throughout the year.

it has many mines of copper, most pure and richsulphur, loadstone, lapis lazuli, and gold ; some ofwliicJi are worked ; and it is not many years agothat some silver mines also were discovered. Itproduces a kind of small frees, which are plantedand cultivated upon the banks of the streams andaqueducts, called jonM/o hobo, and which distil aliquor, which, being prepared over the fire, servesinstead of pitch for lining the vessels in which thewine in that kingdom is kept. The conger eelabounds upon the coast, and there is a particulartribe of Indians, called Changes, who are devotedto this kind of fishery, living the whole year uponthe coasts, and carrying about their wives and chil-dren upon rafts, until they find out a creek likelyto afford them what they are in search of: thesefish are then bought by the natives, and carried tobe sold at the capital of the kingdom, Santiago.Here is also a trade of sulphur, since it is so finethat it needs never to be purified, and is conse-quently worth three dollars the canlaro [a cantarois about four gallons]. It abounds no less in nitre,on which account all the waters here are brackish,and there is little indeed that is sweet. This pro-vince is very thinly peopled, since it has no otherpopulation than such as is found in the capital,which is called, San Francisco de la Selva. Its in-habitants, which should amount to 5000, of allsexes and ages, are dispersed about in countryfarms. (The province of Copiapo owes its name,according to the Indian tradition, to the greatquantity of turquoises found in its mountains.Though these stones ought, with propriety, to beclassed amongst the concretions, as they arc onlythe petrified teeth or bones of animals, colouredby metallic vapours, we may place them amongstthe precious stones. The turquoises of Copiapoare usually of a greenish blue ; some, however,are found of a deep blue, which are very hard,and known by the name of the turquoises of theold rock. The amazing fertility of the soil of thisprovince has given rise to assertions, which, onthe first blush, might appear fabulous. Mr. San-son, of Abbeville, in his Geography, asserts thatits valleys frequently yield 300 for one. SeeChile.)

Copiapo, a port of the above province andcorregimiento.

Copiapo, a settlement of the same.

Copiapo, a mountain, in which there is a vol-cano, which at different times has occasionedmuch mischief, and is in lat. 26°. (This moun-tain consists entirely of a marble, striped withbands of various colours, which have a very beau-3 u 2

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c o z

c o z

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same kingdom. It contains 180 families of In-dians, and 60 of Spaniards, Mustees, and Mulattoes.Here is an hospital of the religious order of St.Francis. Seven leagues from its capital.

(COXHALL, a township in York county, dis-trict of Maine, containing 775 inhabitants.)

COXIMAR, a large plain of the coast of theisland of Cuba, close by the city of Havana, inwhich is a fortified tower. On this plain the Eng-lish drew up their troops when they besieged thatplace, in 1762.

COXIMES, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Esmeraldas in the kingdom ofQuito ; situate on the sliore of the S. sea, on thepoint formed by the port Palmar, under the equi-noctial line.

COXO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela ; situate on the sea-coast,close to the settlement of Carvalleda.

(COXSAKIE, a township in the w. part ofAlbany county, New York, containing S406 in-habitants, of whom 302 are slaves. Of the citi-zens 613 are electors.)

COXUMATLAN, a settlement of the headsettlement of Zanguio and afcaldia mayor of Za-mora in Nueva Espana ; situate on the shore of thesea of Chapala, and being backed by a large moun-tain covered with fruit-trees of various kinds, andexcellent timber and woods. It contains 17 tami-lies of Indians, who employ themselves in fishingand in agriculture. Four leagues to the w. of itshead settlement.

COYAIMAS, a barbarous and ancient nationof Indians of the province and government of Po-payán in the kingdom of Quito, and district of thetownofNeiba. Tliese Indians are valorous, ro-bust, faithful, and enemies to the Pijaos. Someof tl)ern have become converted to the Catholicfaith, and liveuniteil in settlemenis.

(COYAU, a settlement on Tennessee river, SOmiles below Knoxville.)

COYONES, a barbarous nation of Indians, whoinhabit the s. w. of Tocuyo. They are ferociousand infidels, and live upon the mountains. Theirnumbers at the present day are much reduced.

COYPO. SeeRAi.EMo.

COZAL, a settlement of the province and alcaldiamayor of Zacapula in the kingdom of Guatemala.

COZALCAQUE, San Felipe de, a settlementof the head settlement of Tenantitlan, and alcaldiamayor of Acaynca, in Nueva Espana. It contains51 families of Indians, and is 10 leagues to the e.and one-fourth to the a. e, of its head settlement.

COZAMALOAPAN, a province and alcaldiaviayor of Nueva España, the capital of which

bears the same name, with the dedicatory title ofSan Martin, and which is situate on a plain half aleague long, and somewhat less broad, surroundedby mountains so knit together, that, at the time ofits foundation, passes were obliged to be o[&gt;ened.Through this province runs a river, which flowsdown from the sferTflA of Zongolica, and whichafterwards takes the nam.e of Alvarado, it is ofa hot and moist temperature, and continually ex-posed to inundations during the rainy seasons,owing to the immense overflowings of the rivers.Its population is composed of 38 families of Spa-niards, 128 of Mulattoes, and 34 of Mexican In-dians, who maintain themselves by the gatheringof cotton and maize ; and this last in such abun-dance as to supply Vera Cruz. The Spaniardsemploy themselves in fishing in the rivers, whichabound with fish the three last months of the year,and they carry them for sale into the other juris-dictions. It has, besides the parish church, atemple of superior architecture, dedicated toNuestra Seilora de la Soledad, though it be com-monly called, Of Cozomalotipan, being of suchancient origin as to be said to liave existed 12years before the conquest of the kingdom. Thistemple was inhabited by a religious fraternity, ap-proved by his holiness Gregory XIII. he havinggranted to the same many favours and indulgences,which, through the devotion of the communily,were perpetuated, through several prodigies andmiracles which afterwards took place in the set-tlement, and in its district. One hundred andfifteen leagues s. s.xo. of Mexico, in lat. 17^ 47' ;long. 274° 50'. The jurisdiction of this alcaldiaconsists in the folloAving settlements :

A rnatlnn,Acula,

Ixmaluliacan,Chacaltiaiiguis,Texliuacaii,Tlacotalpan,

Otatitlan,

Tuxtepec,

Chinantla,

Utzila,

Uzainacin,

A^etla.

COZAQUl, Santa Maria de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Acazingo and alcaldiamayor of Tepeaca, in Nueva Espana. It containsfour families of Spaniards, 33 Aluslees and Mu-lattocs, and 51 of Indians. It is a quarter of aleague lioni its head settlement.

COZATLA, San Juan de, a settlement of thehead settlement of Axixique, and ahaldia mayor ofZayula, in the same kingdom. It contains 60familie.s of Indians,its head settlement.

COZAUTEPEC, a settlement and head settle-ment of the alcaldia mayor of Chichicapain Nu-eva Espana, of the province and bishopric of3

iid is two leagues to the w. of

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C R U

C R U

Bishops who have presided in Santa Cruz de laSierra.

1. Don Antonio Calderon, native of Vilches,dean of the holy church of Santa Fe, bisliop ofPuertorico and Panama; first bishop in 1605;died at the advanced age of upwards of 100years.

2. Don Fray Fernando de Ocampo, of the re-ligious order of St. Francis, a native of Madrid.

3. Don Juan Zapata y Figueroa, native ofVelez-Malaga ; he was canon and inquisitor ofSeville ; presented to the brishopric of Santa Cruzin 1634.

Fray Juan de Arguinao, a religiousDominican, native of Lima, was prior and provin-cial in his religion, first professor of theology andwriting in that university, qualificator of the in-quisition ; presented to the bishopric of Santa Cruzin 1646, and promoted to the archbishopric ofSanta Fe in 1661.

5. Don Fray Bernardino de Cardenas, native ofLima, of the order of St. Francis ; promoted fromParaguay to this bishopric in 1666.

6. Don Fray Juan de Rivera, of the order ofSt. Augustin, native of Pisco in Peru ; first pro-fessor of theology.

7. Don Fray Juan de Esturrizaga, of the orderof preachers, native of Lima.

8. Don Pedro de Cardenas y Arbieto, native ofLima, collegian of the royal college of San Mar-tin, canon of its holy church.

9. Hon Fray Juan de los Rios, of the order ofSt. Dominic, a native of Lima, provincial of hisreligion in the province of San Juan Bautista delPeru.

10. Don Fray Miguel Alvarez de Toledo, ofthe order of Nuestra Sexiora de la Merced, electedin 1701.

11. Don Miguel Bernardo de la Fuente, deanof the holy church of Truxillo, elected in 1727.

12. Don Andres de Vergara and Uribe, electedin 1744 ; he died in 1745.

13. Don Juan Pablo de Olmedo, native of Tu-cuman, elected in 1745, died in 1757.

14. Don Fernando Perez de Obiitas, native ofArequipa, elected in the aforesaid year, died in1760.

15. Don Francisco Ramon de Herboso, nativeof Lima, elected in 1760, promoted to the arch-bishopric of Charcas in 1766.

16. Don Juan Domingo Gonzalez de la Ri-gucra, elected the aforesaid year, and promotedto the archbishopric of the holy metropolitanchurch of Lima in 1780.

17. Don Alexandro de Ochoa, elected in 1782.

Cruz, Santa, a city of the above province,which was once the capital ; founded by Nuno deChaves in 1557, after that he had passed along theshores of the river Paraguay to discover a commu-nication with the other provinces. Its inhabitants,however, not being able to stay in it through theincessant sallies of the Indians who surroundedthem, were under the necessity of changing theirsettlement ; but disagreeing in the choice of place,some of them united together, and founded the cityof Santiago del Puerto, and others that of SanLorenzo de la Frontcra, which is to-day the capi-tal, the former city being entirely abandoned.

Cruz, Santa, a settlement of the province andcorregimunto of Yauyos in Peru; annexed to thecuracy of the settlement of Pacaran in the provinceof Canete.

Cruz, Santa, another, a conversion of Indiansof the missions which were held by tlie regulars ofthe company of Jesuits, in the province and go-vernment of Mainas of the kingdom of Quito.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and go-vernment of Cumaná in the kingdom of TierraFirme, between the cities of Cumanagoto and Ca-riaco.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and go-vernment of Popayan ; situate to the s. of the cityof Almaguer, in the limits of the jurisdiction olQuito.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlementand alca’d'ia mayor of Jochimilco in Nueva Es-pana ; situate in a mountainous and cold country,containing 46 families of Indians, who live by cut-ting timber and making fuel. It is two leagues tothe cU. of its capital.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and cor-regimiento of Chancay in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Paccho.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlement ofSt. Francisco del Valle, and akaldia mayor ofZultepec, in Nueva Espana. It contains 28 fa-milies of Indians, dedicated to the cultivation ofthe land, and cutting bark from trees. Ten leaguesfrom its head settlement.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and cor-regimiento of Caxamarca in Peru.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andcorregimiento of Lucanas in the same kingdom ;annexed to the curacy of Pucquin.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andcorregimiento of Canta in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Pari.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlementof Huehuetlan, and alcaldia mayor oi Cuicalian, inNueva Espana; situate on the middle of a raoun-

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