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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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Tlacolula, from whence it is distant a league ant a half to the N.

another, settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Xicayan, of the same kingdom. It contains 12 Indian families, and is 10 leagues distant from its head settlement.

ACATEPEQUE, S. Franciso de, a settlement of the head settlement of St. Andres de Cholula, and alcaldía mayor of this name. It contains 140 Indian families, and is half a league to the S of its capital.

another settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Igualapa, situate at a league's distance to the E of the same.

ACATIC, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Tecpatitlan, in the kingdom and bishopric of Nueva Galicia. It is four leagues to the S of its capital.

ACATICO, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Cuquio, in Nueva España.

ACATLAN, a settlement and capital of the alcaldía mayor of this name. It is of a mild temperature, and its situation is at the entrance of the Misteca Baxa. It contains 850 families of Indians, and 20 of Spaniards and Mustees. In its vicinity are some excellent saltgrounds, in which its commerce chiefly consists. The jurisdiction of this alcaldía, which contains four other head settlements of the district, is fertile and pleasant, abounding in flowers, fruits, all kinds of pulse and seeds, and is well watered. They have here large breeds of goats, which they slaughter chiefly for the skin and the fat, salting down the flesh, and sending it to La Puebla and other parts to be sold. In its district are many cultivated lands. It is 55 leagues leagues to the E S E of Mexico. Long. 275° 10' W Lat. 19° 4' N.

another settlement of the same name, with the dedicatory title of S. Andres, in the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Xalapa, in the same kingdom, situate on a clayey spot of ground, of a cold moist temperature, rendered fertile by an abundance of streams, which in a very regular manner water the lands; although,it being void of mountains and exposed to the N winds, the fruits within its neighourhood do not come to maturity. It contains 180 Indian families, including those of the new settlement, which was established at a league's distance to the S of its head settlement, and which is called San Miguel de las Aguastelas. Acatlan is a league and a half distant from its head settlement.

another settlement, having the dedicatory title of San Pedro, belonging to the head settlement of Malacatepec and alcaldía mayor of Nexapa, in the same kingdom. It contains 80 Indian families, who trade in wool and in the fish called bobo, quantities of which are found in a large river which runs close by the settlement, and which are a great source of emolument to them. It is four leagues N of its capital.

another settlement of he bead settlement of Zitlala, of the same alcaldía and kingdom. It contains 198 Indian families, and its situation is a league and an half N of its head settlement.

another settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Sentipac, of the same kingdom. It is of a cold temperature, contains 42 Indian families, and is 15 leagues N E of its capital.

another settlement of the head settlement of Atotonilco, and alcaldía mayor of Tulanzingo in the same kingdom. It contains 115 Indian families, and a convent of the religious order of St. Augustin. — Two leagues N of its head settlement.

ACATLAZINGO, Santa Maria de, a settlement of the head settlement of Xicula, and alcaldía mayor of Nexapa, situate in a plain that is surrounded on all sides by mountains. It contains 67 Indian families, who employ themselves in the culture of the cochineal plant.

ACATULA, a settlement of the province and government of Venezuela, situate on the shore of the river Guasqui, to the E of the city of Coro.

ACAXEE, a nation of Indians of the province of Topia. It is well peopled, and was converted to the Catholic faith by the father Hernando de Santaren, and others of the abolished society of the Jesuits, in 1602. They are docile, of good dispositions and abilities. In the time of their idolatry, they used to bend the heads of their dead with their bodies and knees together, and in this posture inter them in a cave, or under a rock, giving them provisions for the journey which they fancied them about to make ; also laying by them a bow and arrows for their defence. Should an Indian woman happen to have died in childbed, the infant was put to death ; for they used to say, it was the cause of her death. These Indians were once induced by a sorcerer to make an insurrection, but it was quelled by the governor of the province, Don Francisco de Ordinola, in the year 1612.

ACAXETE, Santa María de, the head, settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Tepcaca, situate on the slope of the noted sierra of Tlascala. It is of a cold and dry temperature, contains seven Spanish families, 10 of Mustees and Mulattoes, and 176 of Mexican Indians. In its vicinity is a reservoir, formed of hewn stone, which serves at once to catch the waters as they come down from the sierra, and to conduct them to Tepcaca, three leagues N N W of its capital.

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vince of Orinoco, and part of the Saliva nation,forming a separate district, and situate in theplains of San Juan, of the new kingdom of Gra-nada, near the river Sinaruco. It was destroyedby the Caribee indians in 1684.

ADORATORIO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru, situatew. of Larin.

ADSON’S Town lies near the n. e. line of NewJersey, and s. e. of the Drowned Lands; 27 milesn. of Morristown, and 24 n. w. of Patterson . ]

ADUANA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Maracaibo, situate on the shore ofthe lake of this name, on the e. side.

ADVANCE. See Forward.

AEIQUAIA, the head settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Tonala in Nueva Espana.

AERIUCTUQUEN, a mountain of the pro-vince and colony of Surinam, or part of Guayana,in the Dutch possessions. It is the beginning ofthe great sierra of Binocote, between the riversCutini and Caroni.

AFFREUX, a lake of the province and colonyof Virginia, near the coast.

AFUERA, one of the islands of Juan Fer-nandes, on the S. sea coast, in the kingdom ofChile. About 400 leagues to the n. of Cape Horn.This coast swarms with sea lions and wolves.Lat. 33° 47' s. Long. 80° 41' w.

[Aga|AGA]], a mountain of the province and captain-ship oi Rio Janeiro in Brazil. It is between therivers Irutiba and Tapoana, on the sea-coast.

AGACES, a nation of Indians, of the provinceof Paraguay, on the shore of the river of thisname, towards the e. The people are numerous,valiant, and of a lofty stature. In ancient timesthey were masters of that river, cruising about init, and being the enemies of the Guaranies ; butafter several conflicts, they were at last subjectedby Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, governor of theprovince, in 1642.

AGALTECA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Honduras, in the kingdom of Guate-mala.

AGAMENTIGUS, a river of the province andcolony of New England, of York county, dis-trict of Maine. It is indebted to the ocean for itswaters, through Pascataqua bay ; having no con-siderable aid from streams of fresh water. Itsmouth is about four miles s. from Cape Neddieriver. Small vessels can enter here.]

AGAMENTIGUS, a mountain of consider-able elevation in the district of Maine, distantabout six miles from Bald Head, and eight fromYork harbour. Lat. 43° 12' n, and Long. 70°

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43' w. from Greenwich. It is a nofed land-markfor seamen, and is a good directory for the entryof Pascataqua harbour, as it lies very nearly inthe same meridian with it and with Pigeon hill,on Cape Ann. The mountain is covered witliwood and shrubs, and affords pasture up to itssummit, where there is an enchanting prospect.The cultivated parts of the country, especially onthe s. and s. w. appear as a beautiful garden, in-tersected by the majestic river Pascataqua, itsbays and branches. The immense ranges ofmountains on the «. and n. w. afford a sublimespectacle ; and on the sea side the various in-dentings of the coast, from Cape Ann to CapeElizabeth, are plainly in view in a clear day ; andthe Atlantic stretches to the e. as far as the powerof vision extends. At this spot the bearing of thefollowing objects were taken, with a good sur-veying instrument, October 11, 1780.

Summit of the White mountains, n. 15° w.

Cape Porpoise, n. 63° e.

Rochester hill, n. 64° w,

Tuckaway South peak, s. 80° w.

Frost’s hill, Kittery, s. 57° w.

Saddle of Bonabeag, w. 14° w.

Isle of Shoals Meeting-house, s. 6° r.

Varney’s hill, in Dover, distant 10| miles bymensuration, «. 89° zo. Variation of theneedle, 6° te).]

AGAMUNTIC, or Amaguntic Pond, inthe district of Maine, sends its waters northward tothe Chaudiere, through the west branch of thatriver.]

AGCHILLA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Pilaya and Paspaya in Peru.It has in its district seven public chapels, withinfour leagues distance.]

AGENAGATENINGA, a river of the pro-vince and country of the Amazonas, in the Portu-guese territory. It rises in the country of theAnamaris Indians, runs n. and enters the abundantstream of the Madera.

AGIQUA, a river of N. Carolina, which runsn. w. and afterwards turning to the w. enters theCherokees.

AGNALOS, a nation of infidel Indians, of theNuevo Reyno de Granada, inhabiting the moun-tains w. of the river Apure.

AGNAPURAS, a chain of mountains, or acordillera of the kingdom of Peru, whicli run forleagues from n. to s. without termination, andseparate the Taucas from the Chizuitos Indians.

AGOMISO, an island of Hudson’s bay, nearits w. coast; n. n. e. from Albany fort.] &gt;

AGONICHE, a river of Nova Scotia, running

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from s. to e. between 'the rivers Mechicor and St.John, and entering the sea at the mouth of thebay of Fundy.

AGRATUMATI, a river of the province andgovernment of Darien, in the kingdom of TierraFirme. It rises in the mountains of the ». andefiters the sea by the Little Beech, opposite Cali-donia.

AGREDA, or NUEVA MA'LAGA, a city of theprovince and government of Popayan, in the king-dom of Quito, founded by Geronimo Aguado in1541. It is small, and of a hot temperature, butabounds in gold mines. Forty-five leagues s. w.of its capital, 42 from Quito, and 37 to the e. ofthe S, sea.

AGRESINAS, a settlement founded by thePortuguese fathers of the Carmelite. order, in thecountry of the Amazonas, situate on the shores ofthe river Amazonas.

AGRIAS, a nation of Indians of the provinceand government of Santa Marta, to the w. of theCienega Grande. It was formerly very numerous,but at present considerably reduced.

AGUA, Port of, on the n. coast of the islandof St. Domingo, between Point Rabeland the Bayof Marques-

Agua, a small island, situate near the k. coastof the island of Vaca, in the channel formed by theisland of St. Domingo, in front of the bay ofMesle.

Agua, also Ojos de Agua, two springs orfountains of the province and corregimi'ento ofCuyo, in the kingdom of Chile, near the lake ofInca, from whence the river Quillota takes itssource.

Agua Blanca, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela, situate between therivers Sarare and Acarigua, to the e. of the town ofAraure.

Agua Buena y Dulce, or Fresh Water,a bay of the strait of Magellan, near the bayof La Gente.

Agua-Caliente, a settlement of the kingdomof Guatemala.

Agua-Clara, a river of the province andgovernment of Paraguay. It runs e. and entersthe Parana on the w. side.

Agua Colorada, a river of the same provinceand government as the former(Paraguay), which runs e. andenters also the large river of Parana.

==Agua de Culebra, SAN FRANCISCO XA-VIER DE LA==, 'a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela, a reduccionof Indians ofthe Capuchin fathers ; but the place is also inha-bited by some Spanish families. It belongs to the

district and jurisdiction of the city of San Felipe ;and in its vicinity dwell a great number of peoplein the estates belonging to it, and which produceabundance of cacao, plantains, yucas, and othervegetable productions.

Agua-Dulce, Caleta de, or Creek of, onthe s. coast of the strait of Magellan, on the sideof the bay of San Martin.

Agua Escondida, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Sonora in Nueva Espana,situate at the foot of a mountain, and to the n. ofSanta Clara.

Agua-Verde, an island of the gulph ofCalifornia, or Red sea of Cortes, situate near thecoast, between the islands of Carmen and Mon-serrat.

AGUACAGUA, a settlement of the provinceof Guayana, and government of Cumana, one ofthose belonging to the missions of the CatalanianCapuchin fathers. It is on the shore of the riverCaroni, near the mouth, through which this en-ters the Orinoco. Lat. 8° 22' n. Long. 62^42' w.

AGUACATAL, a settlement of the provinceand government of Antioquia, situate in the val-ley of Peneo, on the shore of the river Cauca.Lat. 8° n. Long. 75° 28' w.

AGUACATENANGO, a settlement of the pro-vince and alceddia mayor of Chiapa in the king-dom of Guatemala. [Lat. 16° 18' n. Long.91° 57' a).]

AGUACATLAN, the head settlement of thedistrict of the alcaldia mayor of Xala in N uevaEspana. In 1745 it contained 80 families of In-dians, who employed themselves in the culture ofmaize and French beans. It has a convent of thereligious order of St. Francis, and lies two leaguess. e. of its capital.

AGUACHAPA, a settlement of the provinceand government of Nicaragua in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

AGUADA, a settlement of the island of Porto-rico ; situate in the bay of its name (Aguda), between thecapes Boriquen and St. Francis. It serves as aninlet for ships going to Tierra Firme and NuevaEspana to take in water. [Lat. 18° 23' «. Long.67° 6' a;.]

Aguada (Bay), the aforesaid bay (Aguda) in the above island (Porto rico).

Aguada (point), the point on the coast and at the headof the above island, 27 leagues distant from thecape of San Rafael, of the island of St. Domingo.

Aguada (river), a river near the cape (San Rafael) or former point (Aguada),and in the same island (St. Domingo), being a place where shipsare accustomed to take in water.

Aguada (Small river), a small river of the province and

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captainship of the Rio Grande in Brazil. Itrises near the coast, and runs s. s. e. entering thesea close to the cape of San Roque.

Aguada, a sharp point or small island of theS. sea, near the coast, in the province and corre-gimiento of Atacama.

Aguada (point in Cartagena), a point on the coast of Tierra Firme,in the province and government of Cartagena. Itis one of those which form the mouth of the gulphof Uraba or Darien.

AGUADILLA, a river of the province andkingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises in the moun-tains on the s. and enters the large river Chagrevery near its mouth, and the castle of this name.Here ships take in water, on account of the conve-nience of a bay, for the defence of which there is,upon the shore, a battery belonging to the samecastle, which was built under the directions ofDon Dionisio de Alcedo, in 1743.

AGUADORES, River of the, in the islandof Cuba. It runs into the sea on the s. coast ofthis island, having at its mouth a watch-tower andguard to give notice of vessels which may enter theport of Santiago de Cuba, from whence it isseven leagues distant.

AGUAIO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Sierra Gorda, in the bay of Mexico,and kingdom of Nueva España, founded in theyear 1748 by the Colonel of the militia of Quere-taro, Don Joseph de Escandon, Count of SierraGorda.

Aguaio, another settlement, with the dedicatorytitle of San Miguel, in the new kingdom of Leon,inhabited by Spaniards ; 10 leagues distant fromLa Punta.

AGUAIUS, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Quixos and Marcas in the kingdomof Quito.

AGUAGE, a settlement and real of mines of theprovince and government of Sonora in NuevaEspaña. Lat. 29°w. Long. 111° 5'

AGUAJES, a settlement of the province ofTepeguna, and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya, situ-ate on the shore of the river of Las Nasas.

AGUALEI, a small river of the province andgovernment of Guayana, which rises in the sierrasof Usupama, and enters the Caroni on the e. side.

AGUALULCO, a settlement and capital of thejurisdiction of [Izatlan]] in Nueva Galicia. It hasa convent of the religious order of St. Francis, andin 1745 it contained upwards of 100 families ofIndians, including the wards of its district; 17leagues w. of Guadalaxara. Lat. 20° 44' n.Long. 103° 33' w.

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AGUAMENA, a settlement of the jurisdictionof Santiago de las Atalayas, and government ofSan Juan de los Llanos, in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, annexed to the curacy of that city. It isof a hot temperature, and produces the same fruitsas the other settlements of this province.

AGUAMIRO, a settlement of the province andcer re gimiento of Huamalies in Peru, celebrated forsome medicinal and very salutary baths.

AGUAN, a river of the province and govern-ment of Honduras, which runs into the sea at thegulph of this name.

AGUANATO, Santa Maria de, a settlementof the head settlement of the district of Puruandiro,^.nAalcaldia mayor of Valladolid, in the provinceand bishopric of Mechoacan. It is of a cold tem-perature, situate at the foot of the sierra of Curupo,and contains 36 families of Indians, who gain theirlivelihood by trading in dressed hides. Sixteenleagues from Pasquaro or Valladolid.

AGUANO, a lake of the province and govern-ment of Mainas in the kingdom of Quito. ' It isformed by an arm or channel of the river Gualla-ga, and is very near the shore of that river.

AGUANOS, San Antonio de, a settlementof the province and government of Mainas in thekingdom of Quito ; one of those which belongedto the missions held there by the Jesuits, andthus called from the nation of Indians of whom it iscomposed. It was founded in 1670 by the fatherLorenzo Lucero.

Aguanos, another settlement, with the dedica-tory title of San Francisco, in this province, andof these missions.

AGUAPAI, a river of the province and go-vernment of Paraguay. It rises between the Pa-rana and the Uruguay, near the settleiment of SanCarlos, runs j. forming a curve, and returning c.enters the last of the above rivers not far from thesettlement of La Cruz.

Aguapai, another river of the same provinceand government, which runs w. and enters theParana close to the Juan Gazu.

AGUAPEI, a river of the same province andgovernment as the two former. It is very small,and rises in the mountains of Nuestra Senora deFe ; runs from n. to s. and enters the Parana.

AGUARAU, a river of the province and go-vernment of Paraguay, which runs w. and entersthe Parana between the Inau and Piray .

AGUARICO, San Pedro de, a settlement ofIndians, converted by the missions of the Jesuits,in the province and government of Mainas; situ-ate on the shore of the river Napo.

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Villas. It contains 34 families of Indians, whocultivate and trade in grain, pulse, coal, and thebark of trees. A little more than two leagues tothe w. with a slight inclination to the s. of its headsettlement.

Agustin, San, another setttlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucuman in Peru ; si-tuate on the shore of the river Tercero (third river.)

Agustin, San, another settlement of the pro-vince and alcaldia mayor of Vera Paz in the king-dom of Guatemala.

Agustin, San, another of the province andgovernment of Popayan in the kingdom of Quito.

Agustin, San, another of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres in Peru, on the shoreof the river Ibiquay.

Agustin, San, another of the province andalcaldia mayor of Culiacan in Nueva España,situate near the town of Rosario.

Agustin, San, a point or cape of the coast ofBrazil, in the province and captainship of Per-nambuco, between the port Antonio Vaz and theriver Tapado. One hundred leagues from thebay of Los Miiertos ; [300 miles n. e. from the bayof All Souls. Lat. 8° 38' s. Long. 35° 11' tc.]

Agustin, San, another point or cape of thecoast of the province and government of Rio deHacha, and kingdom of Tierra Firme, close to thelake of San Juan, on the e. side.

Agustin, San, a river of the province andgovernment of Antioquia, in the new kingdom ofGranada. It runs from s. to n. and afterwards,with a slight inclination to the w. enters the riverS. Juan, of the province of Choco.

Agustin, San, a small island of the gulph ofCalifornia, or Red Sea of Cortes ; situate in themost interior part of it, and near upon the coast ofNueva España, opposite the bay of San JuanBaptista.

[ AGWORTH, a township in Cheshire county.New Hampshire, incorporated in 1766, and con-tains 704 inhabitants ; eight miles e. by n. fromCharlestown, and 73n. w. by a), from Portsmouth.]

AHOME, a nation of Indians, who inhabit theshores of the river Zuaque, in the province ofCinaloa, and who are distant four leagues fromthe sea of California : they were converted to theCatholic faith by father Andres de Rivas, a Jesuit.Their country consists of some extensive and fer-tile plains, and they are by nature superior to theother Indians of Nueva España. Moreover, theirHeathenish customs do not partake so much of thespirit of barbarism. They abhorred polygamy,and held virginity in the highest estimation : andthus, by way of distinction, unmarried girls wore

a small shell suspended to their neck, until the dayof their nuptials, when it was taken off by the bride-groom. Their clothes were decent, composed ofwove cotton, and'they had a custom of bewailingtheir dead for a whole year, night and morning,with an apparently excessive grief. They aregentle and faithful towards the Spaniards, withwhom they have continued in peace and unityfrom the time of their first subjection. The prin-cipal settlement is of the same name, and lies atthe mouth of the river Fuerte, on the coast of thegulph of California,* having a good, convenient,and well sheltered port.

AHORCADOS, Point of the, on the shore ofthe large lake of Los Patos, of the province andcaptainship of Rey in Brazil.

Ahorcados, some small islands or points onthe coast of the S. sea, in the district of SantaElena, of the province and government of Guay-aquil, close to the mouth of the river Colonche.

AHUACATEPEC, San Nicolas de, anothersettlement of the above head settlement and alcal-dia mayor.

AHUACATES, Santa Maria de, a branchof the head settlement of the district and alcaldiamayor of Cuernavaca in Nueva España.

AHUACATLAN, Santa Maria de, a set-tlement of the head settlement of the district ofSan Francisco del Talle, and alcaldia mayor ofZultepec, in Nueva España. It is of a cold tem-perature, inhabited by 51 families of Indians, anddistant three leagues s. of its head settlement.

Ahuacatlan (Zochicoatlan), another settlement of’the headsettlement and alcaldia mayor of Zochicoatlan inNueva España. It is of a cold temperature, si-tuate on a small level plain, surrounded by hillsand mountains. It contains 13 families of In-dians, and is seven leagues to the n. of its capital.

Ahuacatlan, with the dedicatory title of SanJuan, the head settlement of the district of thealcaldia mayor of Zacatlan in Nueva España.Its inhabitants are composed of 450 families ofIndians, and 60 of Spaniards, Mustees, and Mu-lattoes, including the settlements of the district.Five leagues from its capital, and separated by amountainous and rugged road, as also by a verybroad river, whose waters, in the winter time, in-crease to such a degree as to render all communi-cation between the above places impracticable.

Ahuacatlan, another, of the head settlementof the district of Olinala, and alcaldia mayor ofTlapa, in the above kingdom. It contains 160families of Indians, who trade in chia^ (a whitemedicinal earth), and grain, with which its territoryabounds. It lies n, w. of its head settlement.

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which the inhabitants trade. These are composed of34 Indian families. It is a little more than threeleagues from its head settlement,

AIOZINGO, a settlement of the alcaldía mayorof Chaleo in Nueva España, situate on the shoreof the lake of Mexico, with a good port, at whichare embarked the fruits of many provinces for thesupply of that capital, (Chaleo), which is withineight or ten hours sail from hence. It has a goodconvent of S. Augustin, where a most beauti-ful image of the virgin is reverenced, and sup-posed to be wonder-working. Its inhabitants con-sist of 120 Indian families and some Spanish. Itis distant one league s, s. e. from its capital.

AIQUILE, a settlement of the province of Mizque in Peru.

AIRICOS, a nation of Indians who inhabit theplains of Cazanare and Meta, of the new kingdomof Granada, to the c. of the mountains of Bogota,on the borders of the river Ele. It is numerous,and feared by all its neighbours, on account of itsvalour and dexterity in the use of arms.

Airicos, with the dedicatory title of SanFrancisco Xavier, a settlement which belongedto the Jesuits, and founded in 1662 by father An-tonio de Monteverde, and composed of some ofthose Indians who were thus reduced to the Catho-lic faith.

AIRIHUANCA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Cotabamba in Peru.

AIRS, a small city of the province and colonyof New Jersey, in the county of Burlington.

AIUDA, Nuestra Senora be la, a villageand settlement of the Portuguese, in the provinceand captainship of Pernambuco in Brazil, situateupon the sea-coast, and on the shore of the riverS. Miguel.

Aiuda, another settlement in the province andcaptainship of Puerto Seguro, situate upon thecoast on the shore of the port.

AIUILA, a river of the province and alcaldiamayor of Soconusco, in the kingdom of Guate-mala: It runs into the S. sea between the settle-ment of Suchitepec and the river Coatlan.

AIUINOS, a nation of Indians of the provinceand government of Cinaloa in Nueva Espana,converted to the faith by father Francisco Olinano,of the abolished society of the Jesuits, in 1624.They live towards the n. of the above province,and in the times of their heathenism they dwelt inthe lofty mountains, in order that they might de-fend themselves from the other nations with whomthey were at war. They are docile, well-inclined,and of good habits.

AIUN, or luMERi, a river of the province and

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viceroyalty of Buenos Ayres. It runs s. and entersthe Rio Negro.

AIUNCHA, Pago BE, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucuman, in the districtand jurisdiction of the city of Santiago del Estero,from whence it is 22 leagues distant. It is situateon the shore of the river Dulce.

AIUTLA, the head settlement of the district ofthe alcaldia mayor of Villalta in Nueva Espana.It is of a cold temperature, containing 187 Indianfamilies, and a convent of the religious order of S.Domingo ; distant 13 leagues to the e. of its capi-tal.

Aiutla, another settlement in the head settle-ment of the district and alcaldia mayor of Autlanof the same kingdom, with 23 Indian families, whohave large stores of pulse and fruit, so rich and fer-tile is their country. It is annexed to the curacy ofTenamaztlani, from whence it lies one league s,

AlUA, a small town of the island of St. Domin-go, situate in the line which divides the Spanishterritory from the French. It was the inhabitantsof this town who chiefly contributed to ensure thevictory which was gained against the Spaniards inthe plain of Puerto Real, by the president DonFrancisco de Segura y Sandoval, in 1691.

AIX, Palmar be, a large beach on the coastof Florida, within the channel of Bahama, nearthe point of Canaveral ; memorable for the ship-wreck of 22 vessels, composing the fleet of NuevaEspana, which took place in 1715, being under thecommand of Don Antonio de Ubila ; memorablealso for the loss of two galleons from Tierra Firme,commanded by Don Antonio de Echevers ; theloss of the one and the other amounting to nearly20 million dollars.

Aix, a river of the same province, which runsinto the sea very near the Palmar.

AJOIANI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Carabaya in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Coaza.

[AJOS, a parish situate on the foot of the moun-tains which separate the rivers Paraguay and Pa-rana, about 24 leagues e. of Asuncion. Lat. 23°26' 34" s. Long. 56° 30' w.~\

AJOUES, a settlement of Indians of the pro-vince and government of Louisiana, in which theFrench held a garrison and fort for its defence, onthe shore of a lake near the Missouri.

A joues, another settlement of the same provinceand government, situate on the shore of the riverMissouri.

AKANCEAS, a nation of savage Indians of N.America, who live at the conflux of the riversMississippi, and another abundant stream of its

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Pichihua,

Yaura,

Marangani,

Tinta,

Pitumanca,

Surimana,

Langui,

Checa,

Asiento de Con-doroma,

Santuario de la Vir-gen de Huancani,

San Pedro de Cacha,

Combapata,

Pueblo Nuevo,

Santuario de Tan-gascucal,

Quehue,

Coporaque,

Candelaria.

Its repartimiento amounted to 112,500 dollars,and it paid 900 dollars yearly for alcavala. Thecapital is Tinta.

CANETE, a province and corregimiento ofPeru. Its jurisdiction begins six leagues s. ofLima, and extends as far as 35, following thecoast of the Pacific ocean. It is bounded on then. e. by the province of Huarochiri, on the e. byYauros, on the s. by Yca, on the s. e. by CastroVireyna, and on the w. by the sea. It is 31 leaguesin length from n. to s. and from eight to nine inwidth, from e. to w. It is watered by some streams,of which the most considerable are the Mala onthe n. which rises from the lake Huasca-cocha,in the province of Yauyos, and the Cañete. Onits coast are many small ports and bays, thoughvery insecure and of unequal bottom. It aboundsin wheat, maize, sugar-cane, and all sorts offruit. The lands of this province belong for themost part to noble families at Lima, with whichcapital it carries on a considerable trade in fish,(brought from the coast), in fruit and vegetables,salt procured from the salt grounds of Chielca,and in nitre brought from the town of Mala.Its corregidor used to have a repartimiento of124,000 dollars, and it paid 992 yearly for alca-vala. The settlements of this province are,

Cañete, San Pedro de Mala,

Chilca, Pacarán,

Calango, Almagro,

Chincha, Lunaguana,

Tanqui, Zuñiga.

Coillo,

Canete, a river of the same province, whichrises from the lake Tiell-cocha in Yauyos. Itruns to the w. and enters the sea near the Herbae.At its entrance are to be seen the remains of a fortwhich belonged to the Incas of Peru.

Canete, some islands near the coast of thesame province.

Canete, a port in the same province, fre-quented by small vessels. It is very confined andinsecure.

CANGREJILLOS, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucumán, and juris-

diction of Jujuy, situate on the shore of the riverLaquiaca.

CANGREJO, a large settlement of the sameprovince and government as the former, and ofthe same jurisdiction, situate likewise on the shoreof that river.

CANGREJOS, Island of the, lies at the en-trance of the river Orinoco, in its principal mouth,called Navios, on the n. side. Mr. Bellin callsit Cangray. It is small, and inhabited by CaribeeIndians.

CANI, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Huanuco in Peru, annexed to the cu-racy of Santa Maria del Valle.

(CANIADERAGO, a lake in Otsego county,New York, nearly as large as Otsego lake, andsix miles w. of it. A stream called Oaks creekissues from it, and falls into Susquehannah river,about five miles below Otsego. The best cheesein the state is said to be made on this creek.)

CANIBALES, or Caribes, a barbarous na-tion of Indians, who are, according to their name,cannibals, inhabiting the islands of the Antillesbefore they were taken and conquered by the Spa-nish, English, and French. There are few ofthese Indians at the present day inhabiting thoseislands ; the greater part are to be found in Domi-nica, which is entirely possessed by them ; theyadore a man who they affirm was uncreated, andthe first of all men, who descended from heaven,and was called Longuo, from whose navel wereborn other men , and some also from his legs, whichhe himself cleft open with a hatchet. With theManicheans, they believe in the two original causesof good and evil, and in the immortality of thesoul ; and whenever any one dies they bury withhim his slaves and servants, thinking they maybe of use to him in the other world. They arepolygamists, very cruel, but dexterous in the useof the bow and arrow ; they are to be found alsoin other parts of the continent. [See Caribes.]

(CANICODEO Creek, a s. w. head water ofTioga river in New York, which interlocks withthe head waters of Genessee river, and joins Co-nesteo creek 26 miles w. n. w. from the Paintedpost.)

CANICUARIS, a barbarous nation of Indians,who live scattered in the woods of Rio Negro tothe n. of Marañon. It is but little known.

CANIN, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chancay in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Canchas.

CANIS, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Caxatambo in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Tillos.

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also De Piedras ; at its top is, according to the ac-count of Don J nan de la Cruz, the Bugio delGato, which serves as a watch-tower, which othersmaintain is situate upon the point Canoa, just byits side.

CARUMAS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Mosquehua in Peru.

CARUPANO, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cumaná in the kingdom of TierraFirme, on the sea-shore, at the cape of Tres Pun-tas i there are in its district 25 small estates ofcacao, 35 of sugar-cane, a few of yucas and otherfruits ; some of them belonging to its inhabitants,and others to tlie inhabitants of Margareta andCumana.

CARUPARABAS, a nation of Indians but littleknown, who inhabit the woods and shores of therivers which run into the Negro.

(CARVEL OF St. Thomas, a rock between theVirgin isles e. and Porto Rico on the w. at a smalldistance it appears like a sail, as it is white andlias two points. Between it and St. Thomas, passesSir Francis Drake’s channel.)

(CARVEL, a township in Plymouth county,Massachussetts. Here is a pond with such plentyof iron ore, that 500 tons have been dragged out ofthe clear water in a year. They have a furnaceupon a stream which runs from the pond ; and theiron made of this ore is better than that made outof bog ore, and some is almost as good as refinediron.)

(Carver’s River, a branch of St. Peter’s river,which empties into the Mississippi. See St. Pierreor Peter’s River.)

CASA, a settlement of the island of Joanes orMarajo, on the coast of Brazil, near the mouth ofthe great arm of the river Amazonas, on the e. coast.

CASABAMBA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Andahuailas in Peru; annexedto the curacy of Chincheros.

CASABLANCA, San Gabriel de, a settle-ment of the head settlement of Teutitlan, andalcaldia mayor of Cuicatlan, in Nueva Espana:it contains 34 families of Indians, who live by thecommerce of salt from some saMnes which they havein their district, at about a league’s distance fromthis settlement ; here are also some crops of maize :it is of a hot temperature, and lies two leagues fromits head settlement.

Casablanca, also with the dedicatory title ofSanta Barbara, a town of the province and cor-regimiento of Quillota in the kingdom of Chile,situate on the coast : it formerly belonged to thejurisdiction of Valparaiso, from which it was se-parated.

CASACACHA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Paria in Peru; annexed to the curacyof Condocondo.

(CASACORES, a lake in Paraguay or La Platain S. America, about 100 miles long.)

CASA-GRANDE, a town of the province andgovernment of Sonora in Nueva Espana ; situate inthe country of the Apaches Indians, on the shore ofthe large river of Gila.

CASAGULA, a snowy mountain or páramo ofthe province and corregimiento of Amboto in thekingdom of Quito.

CASANARE, a large river of the province andgovernment of San Juan de los Llanos in the NuevoReyno de Granada ; on the shores of which arevarious settlements of the missions, which underthis name were held at the expence of the regularsof the society of Jesuits, and which are at presentunder the care of the monks of St. Domingo : itrises in the paramos or mountain-deserts of Chita,of the district of the city of Pamplona, and afterrunning many leagues, divides itself into twobranches : the one, named the Uruhi, enters theMeta ; and the other, named the Sirapuco, entersthe Orinoco, first receiving those of Purare andTacoragua. To the w. of this river are the reduc-ciones of the Pantos Indians, and to the n. those ofthe Pautes ; to the e. and upon a plain, is the riverSan Salvador, aftbrding an handy port for commu-nication with the Meta and the Orinoco : it is after-wards entered by the river Tame, which pours intoit in a large stream from the same sierras, and hasupon its banks the two numerous nations, the reduc-ciones of the Giraras and Botoyes Indians.

Casanare, some very extensive llanuras orplains which lie between the rivers Orinoco, Sina-ruca, and Meta.

Casanare, a settlement of Indians, of the reduc-ciones which were made by the regulars of thesociety of Jesuits, in the same province and govern-ment as the former river : it consists of the AchaguasIndians, being situate on the shore of that river,with a good and well-frequented port : it is fertile^and abounds in maize, yucas, and above all incattle : its natives, who are very numerous, employthemselves in making little trunks of cane neatlypainted of various colours, and mats and sieves^which they call manares : here are also some whiteinhabitants, and the reduccion is now under the careof the religion of St. Domingo.

CASANAY, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cumana in the kingdom of TierraFirme, situate near the coast and the city of Ca-riaco.

CASAPA, a settlement of the missions which

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shore of the river Maranon, near the port of Cu-rupa.

CAUIANA, an island of the N. sea; situate inthe middle of the mouth of the large river Ma-rañon.

CAUIJA, a lake of the province and govern-ment of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia. It is n.of that of Ipava, from whence, according to some,the river Orinoco takes its rise.

CAUINAS, an ancient and barbarous nation ofthe province of Charcas in Peru, which wasbounded by the nation of the Canches ; here wasa superb palace belonging to the Incas, builtupon the top of an high mountain, the remains ofwhich are yet to be seen near the settlement ofUrcos, and those of Querquesana and Quiquijana,these being about nine miles distant from the afore-said palace.

CAUIUSARI, a river of the province and go-vernment of San Juan de los Llanos in the NuevoReyno de Granada. It rises in the mountains ofthe country of the Guames Indians, runs e. formany leagues, and enters the Apure,

CAUJUL, a settlement of the province and cor-regimienio of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Andajes.

CAUMARES, a barbarous nation inhabitingthewoods which lie upon the banks of the river Ma-ranon towards the n. Some of them were reducedto the faith by the missionaries of the extinguishedcompany of Jesuits of the province of Mainas, andformed part of the population of the settlement ofSan Ignacio de Pevas.

CAUN, a settlement of the missions which wereheld by the regulars of the company of the Jesuits,in the province of Cinaloa.

CAUO, or Couvo, a river of the province andgovernment of Guayana. It runs towards the e.and enters the sea, at the distance of leaguesfrom the mouth of the river Aprovaca : its bankson the e. side are inhabited by some barbarous In-dians of the Yaus nation.

CAUOS, a barbarous nation of Indians who in--habit the woods to the w. of the river Putumayo.They are thought to be a branch or tribe of theAbives, and are but little known.

CAUQUE, a settlement of the kingdom andpresidency of Guatemala.

CAUQUENES, a river of the kingdom andgovernment of Chile. It rises in the mountains ofits cordillera, and enters the Maule.

CAUQUICURA, an ancient and large provinceof the kingdom of Peru, to the s. of Cuzco. Itwas conquered and united to the monarchy byMayta Capac, fourth Emperor.

CAUQUIS, a nation of Indians of the kingdomof Chile, and one of the most warlike and valorous,who resisted and put a check to the conquests ofYupanqui, eleventh Emperor of Peru, obligingliim to retreat with his army to Coqnimbo.

CAURA, a large and copious river of the pro-vince of Guayana, and government of Cumana.It rises in some very lofty sierras, and its shoresare inhabited by many Indiatis, wlio retreat hitherwhen pursued by the Caribes, who are accustonicdto kill the adults, and to ko('p as prisoners tliewomen and children, iit order to sell them to theDutch. This river is the largest of the kingdomof Tierra Firme ever discovered since that of theOrinoco. It runs 60 leagues before it enters into thislatter river, through chains of rocks, which so im-pede its navigation as to render it unsafe for anybut very small craft. On its shores are two forts,one at tlie mouth, where it enters the Orinoco ; andthe other at its mid-course. The Maranon andthe Orinoco also communicate with it by an armwhich is very considerable, and is called the RioNegro.

Caura, a settlement of the jurisdiction of thetown of San Gil, in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra.-nada.

CAURANTA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cumaná ; situate on the coast and atthe point of Paria.

CAURE, a small river of the province and go-vernment of San Juan de los Llanos in the NuevoReyno de Granada. It rises opposite that city, to-wards the s. and then enters the Ariari.

CAURI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimienlo of Tarma in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of Cayna.

CAURIMPO, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cinaloa ; situate between the fortsRio and Mayo. It is n reduccion of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the company ofJesuits.

CAUSAN, a river of the ])rovince and colonyof Georgia, is the same as that of the name ofCombahi. It runs till it enters the sea.

CAUTE, a small river of the island of Cuba,Which runs rw. and enters the sea.

CAUTEN, a large river of the kingdom ofChile, in the district and province of Repocura.It rises in the district of Maquegua, runs continu-ally from e. to vs. collecting the waiters of manyother rivers, in such a gentle and mild course, thatit has also acquired the name of Las Damns. Itpasses before the Ciudad Imperial, and enters theS. sea. It is 500 toises broad at its mouth, and ofsufficient depth to admit of a ship of the line ; at

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CENEWINI, a port of the river Poumaron, inthe part of the province and government of Cuay-ana in the possession of the Dutch.

CENIS, a settlement of Indians of the provinceand government of Louisiana, situate in the roadwhich leads to Mexico. It has a fort whicli wasbuilt by the French when they had possession ofthe province.

CENOMANAS, a barbarous nation of Indians,descended from the Naunas, who live in the woods,and without any fixed abode, along the banks ofthe great river Magdalena.

CENOS, a barbarous nation of Indians, to then. of the river Marañon, w ho inhabit the woodsnear the river Aguarico. They are at continualwar with that of the Encabellados.

CENTA, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán. It runs from the z£. to e.and enters the Bermejo. The Fathers Antonio Sa-linis and Pedro Ortiz de Zarate, of the extin-guished company, suffered martyrdom upon itsshores whilst pn'aching to the barbarian Indians.

CENTERVILLE, the chief town of QueenAnne’s county, and on the e. side of Chesapeakbay, in Maryland. It lies between the forksof Corsica creek, which runs into Chester river,and has been lately laid out; 18 miles s. of Ches-ter, S4 s. e, by e. of Baltimore, and 93 s. xso. by s.of Philadelphia. Lat. 39° 6' n,~\

CEPEE, a small river of Nova Scotia, whichruns s. and enters the Miamis.

CEPEROUX, a French fort, called also SanLouis, in Cayenne ; situate at the mouth of theriver, and on a lofty spot commanding the en-trance of the same. It was taken by the Dutch in1676 ; and in the following year it was recoveredby the French ; which date has been mistaken byMons. Martiniere, who mentions it as having beenlost the year preceding.

CEPITA, a small settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Charcas in Peru, above thechannel of the great lake Titicaca, near the fa-mous bridge that was built by the Emperor CapacYiipanqui over the channel, and which is 160yards in length. The Indians of this settlementare diligent in keeping this bridge in repair, andassist in helping and directing the cavalcades whichare continmdly passing it,

CEQUER, a small settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Pastos in the kingdom ofQuito, to the n. of this city, and on the shore ofthe river Telembi. Its temperature is cold, and itis the direct road for such as are going to the pro-vince of Barbacoas.

CEQUIN, a mountain of the province of LosCanelos in the kingdom of Quito. Its skirts arewashed by the river Puyuc, and on the other sideby the Bobonasa : from it rise the rivers Tinguisaand Paba-yacu, which run from w. to e. until theyenter the Bobonasa. It is entirely covered withthick woods, save upon the top, where there isncifher tree nor plant.

CERCADO, a province and corregimiento ofPeru, bounded n. by that of Chancay, n.e. bythat of Canta, e. by that of Huarochiri, bythat of Cañete, and w. by the S. sea; is 13 leagueslong s. and eight wide at the widest part; is ofa very mild and kind temperature, but somewhatsickly ; and is neither subject to tempests nor highAvinds, although it is often visited by earthquakes.It only rains in the winter, and this is a speciesof small sprinkling shower which they call garua;so that they have no necessity for houses with roofs,and they are covered only with clay or mortar.The whole of its territory is fertile, and aboundsin seeds and fruits. The herb alfalfa, which isgood forage for horses, is particularly cultivated,there being a great demand for it at Lima. Hereare many estates of sugar-cane, from Avhich sugaris manufactured, as Avell as honey, and a kind ofdrink called guarape. Chica is also made here;this being the common drink of the Indiansthroughout the whole kingdom. It is irrigated bythe rivers Rinac and Lurin, which run downfrom the province of Guarochiri, and by the Car-rabayilo, which runs from the province of Canta :all three of them are small ; but in the months ofDecember, January and February, which is therainy season in the sierra^ they swell greatly. Itspopulation consists of seven parochial settlements,and as many others thereunto annexed. Its repar-timiento used to amount to 10,000 dollars, and itpaid an alcaxala of 80 dollars per annum. Thecapital is of the same name, and the other 14 set-tlements are,

Lurin,

Pachacamac,

Surco,

Chorrillos,

Magdalena,

Miraflores,

Lurigancho,

Huachipa,

Late,

Rinconada,

Carabayllo,

Laucon,

San Joseph de Bel-lavista.

Cercado, San Cristoval de, a settlementto the s. of the city of Lima, to which it is as asuburb. It is inhabited only by Indians, who aregoverned by a cazique ; and until 1776, it was acure of the regulars of the company of Jesuits,who had in it a college.

CERCELLES, a river of the island of Gua-dalupe. It rises in the mountains, runs e. and en-

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ters the sea between the river Rosa and the settle-ment and parisli of Cul de Sac.

CERICUNCUA, a bay of the coast of Brazil,in the province and captainship of Seara, betweenthe port of Tortuga and the settlement of NuestraSeilora del Rosario.

CERINZA, a settlement of the corregimiento ofTunja in tlie Nuevo Reyno de Granada, is of acold temperature, and abounds in cattle and theproductions peculiar to the climate. It contains300 families, and lies in a valley, from which ittakes its name.

CERMEN, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Venezuela ; situate on the side ofthe town of San Felipe, towards the e. betweenthis town and the settlement of Agua Culebras, onthe shore of the river Iraqui.

CERRALUO, a town and presidency of theNuevo Reyno de Leon, garrisoned by a squadronof 12 soldiers and a captain, who is governor ofthis district, for the'purpose of restraining the bor-dering infidel Indians. Between the e. and n. isthe large river of this name ; and from this begins atract of extensive country, inhabited by barba-rous nations, who impede the communication andcommerce Avith regard to this part and the pro-vinces of Tejas and Nuevas Felipinas. Is 35leagues to the e. of its capital.

Cerraluo, a bay of the coast and gulf of Ca-lifornia, or Mar Roxo de Cortes, opposite an islandwhich is also thus called ; the one and theother hav-ing been named out of compliment to the Marquis ofCerraluo, viceroy of Nueva Espana. TJie afore-said island is large, and lies between the formerbay and the coast of Nueva Espana.

CERRITO, a settlement of the island and go-vernment of Trinidad, near the n. coast, and to thee. of the capital of San Joseph de Oruna.

Cerrito Verde, an open and insecure port inthe bay of La Concepcion, of the kingdom ofChile, and Pacific sea.

Cerrito, another, with the surname of SantaAna. See Ctuayaquie.

CERRITOS, a small settlement of the jurisdic-tion of Orizava, and alcaldia mayor of Ixmiquil-pan, in Nueva España.

Cerritos, another settlement in the provinceand goverment of Popayán.

CERRO, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Angaraes in Peru.

Cerro, another, in the province and corregi-miento of Porco in the same kingdom.

Cerro, another, with the surname of Negro,in the province and corregimiento of Rede, and king-dom of Chile ; situate at the source of the river Itan.

==Cerro, another, called San Miguel de CerroGordo==, which is a garrison of the province of Te-peguana in the kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya. Itssituation is similar to the road which leads to it,namely, a plain level surface ; although, indeed,it is divided by a declivity, in ivhich there is apool of water, and by Avhich passengers usuallypass. This garrison is the residence of a captain,a Serjeant , and 28 soldiers, who are appointed tosuppress the sallies of the infidel Indians. In itsvicinity is a cultivated estate, having a beautifulorchard, abounding in fruit-trees and in zepas,which also produce fruit of a delicious flavour.The garrison lies 50 leagues n. w. of the capitalGuadiana.

Cerros, San Felipe de los, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Uruapa, and alcaldia mayorof Valladolid, in the province and bishopric ofMcchoacan. It contains 26 families of Indians,and lies eight leagues to the e. of its head settle-ment, and 10 from the capital.

Cerros, another, in the province and corregr-miento of Castro-Vireyna in Peru.

CESARA, a large and copious river of theNuevo Reyno de Granada, which was called bythe Indians Pompatao, meaning in their idiom,“ the lord of all rivers,” is formed of severalsmall rivers, which flow down from the snowysierras of Santa Marta. It runs s. leaving the ex-tensive llamtras of Upar until it reaches the lakeZapatosa, from whence itj issues, divided into fourarms, which afterwards unite, and so, following acourse of 70 leagues to the w, enters the Magda-lena on the &lt;?. side, and to the s. of the little settle-ment called Banco.

CESARES, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe kingdom of Chile towards the s. Of themare told many fabulous accounts, although theyare, in fact, but little known. Some believe themto be formed of Spaniards and Indians, being thoseAvho Avere lost in the straits of Magellan, and be-longed to the armada which, at the beginning ofthe conquest of America, Avas sent by the bishop ofPlacencia to discover the Malucas. Others pre-tend that the Arucanos, after they had destroyedthe city of Osonio, in 1599, took aAvay with themthe Spanish Avomen ; and that it Avas from the pro-duction of these Avomen and the Indiatis that thisnation of the Cesares arose. Certain it is, that theyare of an agreeable colour, of a pleasing aspect,and of good dispositions. They have some lightof Christianity, live without any fixed abode ; andsome have affirmed that they have heard the soundof bells in their territorj". It Avas attempted in1638, by the governor of Tucuman, Don Geronimo

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wreck, and amongst these many valuables of goldand silver, which had grown quite discoloured, tothe amount of 40,000 dollars. Lat. 2°2l' s.

CHANEL, some islands near the coast of thecountry of Labrador, in the gulf of St. Lawrence.They are numerous and very small, one of thembeing very long and narrow ; forming a channelwith the coast, and giving its name to the rest.

CHANESES, a barbarous nation of Indians, ofthe province and government of Paraguay ; dwell-ing to the n. of the Rio de la Plata, and boundedby the Xarayes and Xacoces. They have theirhouses near the lakes, and maintain themselves byfishing.

CHANGAME, some small islands of the S. sea,and of the bay of Panamá, in the province and go-vernment of Tierra Firme. They are two in num-ber, being situate near the coast, and having be-tween them a shallow or quicksand, by which theyare communicated. They abound in a species ofbirds, from which they take their name.

CHANGO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tarma in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Chacayan.

CHANQUI, or Achanqui, a promontory orcape of the province and corregimiento of Valdiviain the kingdom of Chile ; being eight leagues tothe s. of San Marcelo. It forms and covers themouth or entrance of the gulf of Los Coronados,with the other cape, which is to thes. called De laBallena.

CHANTACO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Loxa in the kingdom of Quito,to the w. of Chuquri-bamba, and to the s. of SanPedro, consists entirely of Indians, and lies uponthe bank of a small river, being of an excellentclimate.

CHANTALI, a settlement of the province andgovernment of aen de Bracamoros in the king-dom of Quito ; situate on the shore of the river ofits name.

CHANUSSI, a river of the country of Las Ama-zonas, which runs from c. to w. through the woodslying towards the w. and enters the Guallaga onits ^ sido

CHANXEWATER, an English settlement inthe province and colony of New York ; situatenear the e. arm of the river Delaware.

CHAO, Farallones de, two small islands ofthe S. sea, near the coast of the province and cor-regimiento of Truxillo in Peru.

Chao, Morro de, a mountain of the coast ofthe same corregimiento.

CHAPA, Puerto de, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucumán, in the juris-

diction of the city of Cordoba ; situate near therivers Segundo and Tercero, at the foot of theMontana Nevada, or Snowy mountain.

CHAPACOTO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chimbo in the kingdom ofQuito ; situate at the skirt of the Gran Cuesta, ormountain of San Antonio. Through it passes asmall river, which runs down from this mountain,and empties itself in the river of Chimbo ; is of avery cold temperature, and lies in the middle of awood. Lat. l°40's.

CHAPADA, Sierra, mountains of the king-dom of Brazil, in the province and captainshipof Todos Santos. They run from e. to w. untilthey reach nearly as far as the coast.

CHAPALA, a settlement of the head settlementof the district and alcaldia mayor of Caxititlan inNueva Espana ; situate on the shore of the greatlake or sea of this name ; has a good convent ofthe monks of St. Francis, and in its valley, whichis very fertile, there is an abundance of all kinds ofseed, as wheat, maize, French beans, and many de-licious fruits.

Chapala, another settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Zaiula in the same kingdom ; situate ina plain of a mild temperature. It contains 42 fa-milies of Indians, who trade in seeds and otherfruits, since its district abounds in garden grounds.It has a convent of the religious of St. Francis ;lies 22 leagues between the e. and n. of its capital.

Chapala, a great lake of the kingdom ofNueva Galicia, called Mar de Chapala, on ac-count of its size, is navigated by many vessels,and is extremely well stocked with fish ; fromwhich the inhabitants of the immediate settlementsderive their source of commerce.

CHAPAMARCA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Loxa, in the kingdom ofQuito; situate to the s. of the capital.

CHAPANCHICA. See Madrigal.

CHAPARE, or Parati, a river of the provinceand government of Santa Cruz de la Sierra. Itrises in the serrania of the Altos or Lofts of Inti-nuyo, from two small rivers which unite ; runs inan inclined course to the e. and enters the Mar-more Grande, forming a good port.

CHAPARIPARI, a river of the province andgovernment of Cumaná, runs e. and enters thesea in the gulf of Triste.

CHAPARRA, Valle de, a valley of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Cumaná in Peru ; inthe vicinity of which is a mine abounding in ametal called chumillo.

CHAPARRAL, a small settlement of the cor-regimiento of Coyaima in the Nuevo Reyno de

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America called New South Wales. Its territoryconsists of a white dry sand, and it is covered withsmall trees and shrubs. This island has a beauti-ful appearance in the spring to those Avho discoverit after a voyage of three or four months, and afterhaving seen nothing but a multitude of mountainscovered with frost, which lie in the bay, and in thestrait of Hudson, and which are rocks petrifiedwith eternal ice. This island appears at that sea-son as though it were one heap of verdure. Theair at the bottom of the bay, although in 51“ of hit.and nearer to the sun than London, is excessivelycold for nine months, and extremely hot the remain-ing three, save when the n. w. wind prevails. Thesoil on the e. &lt;^s well as on the w. side produces allkinds of grain and fruits of fine qualities, whichare cultivated on the shore of the river Rupert.Lat. 52“ 12' n. Long. 80“ w.

CHARNACOCHA, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Pilaya and Paspaya inPeru,

CHARO, Matlazingo, the alcaldía mayorof the province and bishopric of Mechoacán inNueva España, of a mild and dry temperature,being the extremity of the sierra of Otzumatlan ;the heights of which are intersected with manyveins of metals, which manifest themselves veryplainly, although they have never yet been dugout ; and in the wet seasons the clay or mud pitsrender the roads impassable. It is watered by theriver which rises in the pool or lake of Valladolid,and by which the crops of wheat, maize, lentils, andthe fruits peculiar to the place, are rendered fertileand productive. This reduced jurisdiction belongsto the Marquises of Valle, and is subject to theDukes of Terranova. Its population is reduced tosome ranchos, or meetings for the purpose of labour,and to the capital, which has the same name, andwhich contains a convent of the religious order ofSt. Augustin, this being one of the first templesbuilt by the Spaniards in this kingdom, the presentdilapidated state of it bearing ample testimony toits great antiquity. It contains 430 families ofPirindas Indians, employed in labour and in thecultivation of the land, and in making bread, whichis carried for the supply' of Valladolid, the neigh-bouring ranchos and estates. It should also have45 or 50 families of Spaniards, Mustees^ and Mulat-toes. Is .50 leagues to the w. of Mexico, and twoto the e. of Valladolid. Long. 100° 44'. Lat.19“34'.

CHARON, a small river of Canada, which runse. and enters the lake Superior in the bay of Beau-harnois.

CHARPENTIER, Fond du, a bay of the n. e.

coast of the island of Martinique, between the townand parish of Marigot and the Pan de Azucar.

CHARPENTIER, a small river of the same islandwhich runs n. e. and enters the sea in the formerbay.

CHARQUEDA, a lake of the province andcaptainship of Rey in Brazil, near the coast whichlies between this lake and that of Los Patos.

CHARRUAS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofParaguay, who inhabit the parts lying between therivers Parana and Uruguay. These Indians arethe most idle of any in America, and it has beenattempted in vain to reduce them to any thing likea civilized state.

Charruas, a settlement of this province andgovernment.

Charruas, a river of the same province, whichruns s. s. w. and enters the Paraná.

CHARTIER, Bahia de, a bay on the s. coastof the straits of Magellan, between the bay of SanSimon and the point of Tunquichisgua.

Chartier, a settlement of Indians of the pro-vince and colony of Virginia ; situate on the shoreof a river of the same name. It runs s. and entersthe sea in the county of Hampshire.

(Chartier, a township in Washington county,Pennsylvania.)

(Chartier’s Creek. See Canonsburg andMorganza.)

(CHARTRES, a fort which was built bythe French, on the e. side of the Mississippi,three miles n. of La Prairie du Rocher, or theRock meadows, and 12 miles n. of St. Genevieve,on the w. side of that river. It was abandoned in1772, being untenable by the constant washings ofthe Mississippi in high floods. The village s. ofthe fort was very inconsiderable in 1778. A mileabove this is a village settled by 170 warriors of thePiorias and Mitchigamias tribes of Illinois Indians,who are idle and debauched.)

CHASPAIA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Aricá in Peru; annexed to thecuracy of Tarata.

CHASSES, a small river of N. Carolina, whichruns n. n. e. and enters that of Cutawba.

CHAT, Trou de, a settlement of the parish andisland of Martinique ; situate near the bay of theCul de Sac Royal, and to the n. e. of the capital.

Chat, a river of the island of Guadalupe, whichrises in the mountains of the e. coast, and runninge. enters the sea between the rivers Grand Bananierand Trou au Chien, or Hole of the Dog.

Chat, a cape or point of land on the coast ofthe river St. Lawrence, on the shore opposite tothe port of San Pacracio.

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vernment of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdomof Quito. It runs from 7i. to s, and enters tlieChinchipe on the n. side, somewhat lower thanwhere this latter is entered by the Naraballe, andnear a small settlement of Indians.

CHERNAL, a port of the coast of the kingdomof Chile, in the district of the province and ccr-regimiet7tn of Copiapó. Lat. 27° 27'.

CHEROKEE, a settlement of North Carolina,where there is a fort built by the English on theshore of the river of its name, and at the mouth ofthe Agiqua.

Cherokee, a large river of the above colonyand province, called also Hogohegee and Calla-maco. It rises in the county of Augusta, and takesits name from a numerous nation of Indians ; runsV). for many leagues, forming a curve, and entersthe Ohio near the fourches of the Mississippi. Nearto this river are some very large and fertile plains ;and according to the account rendered by the In-dians, there are, at the distance of 40 leagues fromthe Chicazas nation, four islands, called Tahogale,Kakick, Cochali, and Tali, inhabited by as manyother different nations of Indians. (Cherokee wasthe ancient name of Tennessee river. The name ofTennessee was formerly confined to the fourteenthbranch, which empties 15 mites above the mouth ofClinch river, and 18 below Knoxville.)

Cherokee, the country of the Indians of thenation of this name in North Carolina. It standsw. as far as the Mississippi, and w. as far as theconfines of the Six Nations. It was ceded to theEnglish by the treaty of Westminster, in 1729.(This celebrated Indian nation is now on the de-cline. They reside in the n. parts of Georgia,and the s. parts of the state of Tennessee ; havingthe Apalachian or Cherokee mountains on the e.which separate them from North and South Caro-lina, and Tennessee river on the n. and w. and theCreek Indians on the s. The present line betweenthem and the state of Tennessee is not yet settled.A line of experiment was drawn, in 1792, fromClinch river across Holston to Chilhove mountain ;but the Cherokee commissioners not appearing, itis called a line of experiment. The complexion ofthe Cherokees is brighter than that of the neigh-bouring Indians. They are robust and well made,and taller than many of their neighbours ; beinggenerally six feet high, a few are more, and someless. Their women are tall, slender, and delicate.The talents and morals of the Cherokees are heldin great esteem. They were formerly a powerfulnation ; but by continual wars, in which it has beentheir destiny lo be engaged with the n. In-dian tribes, and with the whites, they are now re-duced to about 1500 warriors ; and they are be-coming weak and pusillanimous. Some writersestimate their numbers at 2500 warriors. Theyhave 43 towns now inhabited.)

Cherokee, a settlement of Indians of this na-tion, in the same country as that in which the Eng-lish had a fort and establishment, at the source ofthe river Caillon ; which spot is at present aban-doned.

CHERREPE, a port of the coast of Peru, and ofthe S. sea, in the province and corregimienlo ofSaña, is open, unprotected, and shallow ; andconsequently frequented only by vessels driven toit through stress, and for the sake of convenience.It is in lat. 7° 70' s.

CHERRITON, a port of the coast of the pro-vince and colony of Maryland, within the bay ofChesapeak, behind cape Charles.

(CHERRY Valley, a post-town in Otsegocounty, New York, at the head of the creek of thesame name, about 12 miles &gt;/. e. of Coopersfown,and 18 s. of Canajohary, 61 w. of Albany,and 336 from Philadelphia. It contains about 30houses, and a Presbyterian church. There is anacademy here, which contained, in 1796, 50 or 60scholars. It is a spacious buildit)g, 60 feet by 40.The township is very large, and lies along the e.side of Otsego lake, and its outlet to Adiqnatangiecreek. By the state census of 1796, it appearsthat 629 of its inhabitants are electors. This set-tlement sutlered severely from the Indians in thelate war.)

(CHESAPEAK is one of the largest and safestbays in the United States. Its entrance is nearlye. n. e. and s. s. between cape Charles, lat. 37°13' and cape Henry, lat. 37°, in Virginia, 12 mileswide, and it extends 70 miles to the ??. dividingVirginia and Maryland. It is from 7 to IS milesbroad, and generally as much as 9 fathoms deep ;affording many commodious harbours, and a saleand easy navigation. It has many fertile islands,and these are generally along the c. side of the bay,except a few solitary ones near the xo. shore. Anumber of navigable rivers and other streamsempty into if, the chief of which are Susque-hannab, Fatapsco, Patuxent, Pofowmack, Rap-pahannock, and A^ork, which are all large and na-vigable. Chesapeak bay'- afibrds many excellentfisheries of herring and shad. There are also ex-cellent crabs and oysters. It is the resort ofswans, but is more particularly remarkable for aspecies of wild duck, called camashac/c, whoseflesh is entirely free from any fishy taste, and isadmired by epicures for its richness and delicacy.In a coinnierciul point of view, this bay is of im--

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(CHICKAMAGES, a part of the Cherokee na-tion of Indians, known by this name, inhabit fivevillages on Tennessee river. See CHICCA-MOGGA.)

CHICKAMINE, a river of the province andcolony of Virginia.

(CHICKASAW Bluff is on the e. bank of theMississippi, witiiin the territories of the UnitedStates, in lat. 35 n. The Spaniards erected herea strong stockaded fort, with cannon, and furnishedit with troops, all in the space of 24 hours, in themonth of June 1795. It has since been given up,.according to the treaty of 1796.)

(Chickasaw, a creek which falls into theWabash from the c. a little below Post St. Vin-cent.)

(Chickasaw, a river which empties into theMississippi, on the e. side, 104 miles from themouth of Margot, and 67 s. w. of Mine au Fer.Tlie lands here are of an excellent quality, andcovered with a variety of useful timber, canes, &c.This river may be ascended during high floods up-wards of SO miles with boats of several tons burden.)

(Chickasaws, a famous nation of Indians, whoinhabit the country on the e. side of the Mississippi,on the head branches of the Tombigbee, Mobile,and Yazoo rivers, in the n. zo. corner of the state ofGeorgia, and n. of the country of the Chactaws.Their country is an extensive plain, tolerably wellwatered from springs, and of a pretty good soil.They have seven towns, the central one of whichis in lat. 34° 23' «• long. 89° 30' w. The num-ber of souls in this nation has been formerlyreckoned at 1725, of which 575 were fighting men.There are some Negroes among the Chickasaws,who either were taken captive in war, or ran awayfrom their masters, and sought safety among theIndians. In 1539, Ferdinand de Soto, with 900men, besides seamen, sailed from Cuba with a de-sign to conquer Florida. He travelled n. to theChickasaw country, about lat. 35° or 36° ; and threeyears after died, and was buried on the bank ofMississipi river.)

CHICLAIO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Saña in Peru, in which there is aconvent of the religious order of St. Francis.

CHICO, Rio, a settlement and garrison of theprovince and government of Sonora ; situate onthe shore of the river Yaqui.

Chico, a river of the province and governmentof Panamá in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. Itrises in the mountains to the s. of the istmo, oristhmus, near the settlement of Chepo ; and runss. ze. and enters the sea in the bay or gulf of Pa-nama.

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Chico, another river of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán in Peru. It runs to the e.of the jurisdiction of the city ofXuxuy,

Chico, a small island, called Morro, near thecoast of the province and government of SantaMarta ; opposite this city, and not far from ano-ther island, distinguished by the name of MorroGrande.

CHICOANTEPEC, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldla mayor of Zoques in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CHICOLAPA, a settlement of the head settle-ment, and alcaldla mayor of Coatepec, in NuevaEspana ; annexed to the curacy of its capital. Itcontains 187 families of Indians, who celebrateevery Friday throughout the year a teanguis orfair, at which are sold cattle and other productionsof the country. At these times it is a place of ge-neral rendezvous for the inhabitants of all the con-tiguous provinces ; and this fair has, from the greatconcourse of people usually assembling here, ob-tained the title of the famous teanguis of S. Vi-cente de Chicolapa. It is extremely fertile and plea-sant, and surrounded by several very small settle-ments or wards.

CHICOMESUCHIL, a settlement and headsettlement of tlie alcaldia mayor of Yxtepexi ofthe province and bishopric of Oaxaca in NuevaEspana, is of a hot temperature, and contains300 families of Indians, who exercise themselves inthe making scarlet cloths and cotton garments.

CHICOMI, a settlement and head settlement ofthe district of the alcaldia mayor of Tampico inNueva Espana. It contains 45 families of Indians,and lies 10 leagues to the s. of its capital.

CHICOMOCELO, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldia mayor of Chiapa. in the kingdom ofGuatemala ; [having a cave very narrow at theentry, but spacious within, with a stagnant lake,which is, however, clear, and is two fathoms deeptowards the banks.]

CHICONAUTA, St. Tomas de, a settlementof the alcaldia mayor of Ecatepec in NuevaEspana; annexed to the curacy of its capital;from whence it is distant one league to the n. n. e.It contains 160 families of Indians.

CHICONCUAC, S. Miguel de, a settlementof the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tez-cuco in Nueva Espana. It contains 123 familiesof Indians, and six of Spaniards. It produces agood proportion of grain, seeds, and cattte, fromthe fleeces of which they derive great emolument,as also from the coarse stuffs manufactured of thesame. It is one league to the n. of its capital.

CHICONCUASO, a settlement of the head

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settlement of Naiilingo, and alcaldm mayor ofXalapa, in Nueva Espaila, the name of which sig-nifies the place of six fountains. It is situate inthe most lofty part of a rugged and mountainoussierra, on which account its temperature is everywhere cold, and subject more than any other partof its district to continual fogs and rains. Itscommerce consists in maize, which it produces inabundance, and in the breeding of swine, both ofwhich articles are carried for sale to Vera Cruz.Its inhabitants are also engaged in the mule-droveswhich pass through these parts in tlieir way tothe windward coasts, and which proceed over aroad so rough and stony that they are under thenecessity of descending and ascending precipicesby means of steps or artificial passages hewn outof the rocks ; and however difficult this might ap-pear to some, they do not experience any gleatdelay, although the animals are very heavilyloaded, and the road be rendered still more difli-cult, if, as it often happens, the journey be per-formed in the winter season. This very stonyroute is a narrow pass or defile which shortens theway leading to the province of La Guasca. Theinhabitants of this settlement are composed of 236families of Indians. It lies three short leagues tothe n. of its capital.

CHICONCUAUTLA, a settlement of the headsettlement and alcaldia mayor of Guachinango inNueva Espana. It is of a mild temperature, andcontains 270 families of Indians, including thethree other small settlements of its district. Sixleagues to the e. of its capital.

CHICONTEPEC, a settlement of the headsettlement of Tlalixcoya, and alcaldia maijor ofMizantla, in Nueva Espaila. It contains 53 fa-milies of Indians.

CHICORATO, a settlement of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the society ofJesuits, in the province and government of Ci-naloa.

CHICUAS, a nation of Indians of Peru. It isat present reduced to merely a settlement of theprovince of Condesuyos, in which is found abun-dance of cochineal, made use of by the natives indyeing of wool ; this being the branch of com-merce by which they maintain themselves.

CHIEGNETO, a settlement and fort of theEnglish, in the province and colony of NovaScotia, in the most interior part of the bay ofEundy.

Chiegneto, a small river of the above pro-vince, which rises from a lake, runs s. and entersthe Basin of the Mines.

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Chiegneto, a cape or point of the coast of thesame province, in the bay of Fundy.

CHIEN, Trou au, a river of the island ofGuadalupe. It rises in the mountains towardsthe e. runs e. and enters the sea between the pointof Petit Carbet and the river Trou or Chat.

==CHIENS, ISLA DE LOS, or Island of theDogs==, in the gulf of St. Lawrence, at the entranceof the strait of Belleisle, and on the w. coa«t of theisland of Newfoundland.

CHIETLAN, a head settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Yzucar in Nueva Espaila. It was for-merly the corregbniento, and is at present embo-died with this jurisdiction. It is of a warm andmoist temperature, but very pleasant, and coveredwith gardens full of flowers, fruits, and vegetables.The territory also abounds in wheat, maize, andother seeds, and particularly in dates, the wholeof the district being covered with palms. Its in-habitants consist of 267 families of Spaniards,Mustees, and Mulattocs, and of 356 families of In-dians, including those dwelling in the settlementswhich belong to this district. It abounds like-wise in garbanzos, or Spanish pease, anniseed, andmelons, all of which are of the best quality of anj^in the whole kingdom. It lies three leagues s. ofits capital.

The aforesaid settlements are,

Ahuehuezingo,

San Nicolas de Tenaxcalco,

Santiago de Azalan.

CHIGNAL, VOLCAN DE, a mountain of theprovince and corregimiento of Maúle in the king-dom of Chile, distinct from the other which isnear to it and of the same name.

(CHIGNECTO Channel, then. to. arm of thebay of Fundy, into which Petitcodiac river falls.The spring tides rise here 60 feet.)

CHIGUACHI, a settlement of the corregimi-ento of Ubaqué in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ;situate behind the mountains of Guadalupe andMonserrat, of the city of Santa Fe, from whence itis distant five leagues to the c. It is of a delight-ful temperature, and abounds in wheat, maize,barley, potatoes, sugar-cane, and plantains. Itsinhabitants consist of 200 families of Spaniards,and a very tew Indians.

CHIGUAGUA, San Felipe de, a town ofthe province of Taraumara, and kingdom ofNueva Viscaya ; situate near the river San Pedro.Its population consists of 2000 families of Spa-niards, and some of Mustees and Mulattoes. Thetown is large and well built, and the liouses arehandsome ; amongst otlier buildings, the most con-

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the Catholic faith, and are reduced to settlements,though the number of these is very small.

CHITEPEC, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district and alcaldia mayor of Tlapain Nueva Espaiia. It is of a cold temperature,and contains 39 families of Indians, who live bysowing maize, the only vegetable production oftheir territory. Five leagues w. n. w. of its capi-tal.

CHITO, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdomof Quito, upon the s. shore of the river Sangalla,and in the royal road of Loxa, which leads to To-mependa. In its vicinity are some gold mines,but which are not worked ; its temperature is hotand moist, and consequently unhealthy.

[CHITTENDEN County, in Vermont, lieson lake Champlain, between Franklin county onthe w. and Addison s. ; La Moille river passesthrough its n. w. corner, and Onion river dividesit nearly in the centre.' Its chief town is Burling-ton. This county contained, by the census of1791, 44 townships and 7301 inhabitants. Sincethat time the n. counties have been taken from it,so that neither its size or number of inhabitants cannow be ascertained.]

[Chittenden, a township in Rutland county,Vermont, contains 159 inhabitants. The roadover the mountain passes through this township.It lies seven miles e. from the fort on Otter creek,in Pittsford, and about 60 n. by e. from Ben-nington.]

[CHITTENENGO, or Canaserage, a con-siderable stream which runs n. into lake Oneida,in the state of New York.]

CHIUAO, a small river of theprovince and colony of Surinam, or the part ofGuayana possessed by the Dutch . It rises in themountain of Sincomay, runs n. and turning w.enters another river which is without a name, andwhere several others unite to enter the Cuyuni onthe s. side.

CHIUATA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Cumana in the kingdom of TierraFirme. It rises from some plains in this territory,runs s. collecting the waters of several otherrivers, particularly that of the Suata, and thenenters the sea, just as it becomes navigable.

Same name, another river of the same provinceand government (Cumana), which rises at the foot of theserramas of Paraguay, to the w. of the town ofSan Fernando, runs s. and enters the Orinoco.

CHIUCHA, S. Juan de, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Lipes, and arch-bishopric of Charcas, in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of San Christoval.

CHIUCHIN, a settlement of the province andcorregimienlo of Chancay in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Canchas. In its district there is amineral hot-water spring, much renowned for thecuring of various kinds of maladies.

CHIUCHIU, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Atacama, and archbishopric ofCharcas, in Peru.

CHIUGOTOS, a barbarous na-tion of Indians of the province and government ofVenezuela, bordering upon the settlement of Mara-capana. They are very few, and live retired in themountains ; they are cruel even to cannibalism.

CHIUICOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Buenos Aires ; situate to the s. ofits capital.

CHIXILA, a settlement and head settlement ofthe district of the alcaldia mayor of Villalta inNueva Espana. It is of an hot temperature, con-tains 134 families of Indians, and lies 12 leaguesto the n. of its capital.

CHOCAIA, Nueva, a settlement of the pro-vince of Chichas and Tarija in Peru ; of the dis-trict of the former, and annexed to the curacy ofTatasi.

CHOCAMAN, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district of Zacan, and alcaldia mayorof Cordoba, in Nueva Espana. It is of a coldand moist temperature, contains 103 families ofIndians, and is five leagues to the n, n. w. of thecapital.

CHOCAN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Piura in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Aabaca.

CHOCAYAS, a mountain of the province andcorregimiento of Chichas and Tarija in Peru, andjurisdiction of Chuquisaca. It is celebrated forits rich gold mines.

CHOCO, a large province and government ofthe jurisdiction of Popayan ; by the territory ofwhich it is bounded e. and s. e . ; on the w. by thePacific or S. sea; n. by the barbarous nations ofIndians, and by the province of Darien ; and s. bythat of Barbacoas. The whole of this provinceabounds in woods and mountains, and is crossedby a chain of the Andes, which run as far as theisthmus of Panama. It is watered by several riversand streams, all of which run w. and enter the S.sea. The districts of Citara and Raposo form apart of this province ; very few of their ancientinhabitants remain at the present day ; the greaterpart of them having perished in the war of the

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abundance of the various kinds of grain cultivatedin other parts of the state ; the people manufactureearthenware, pot and pearl ashes, in large quanti-ties, which they export to New York or Quebec.Their wool is excellent ; their beef and pork se-cond to none ; and the price of stall-fed beef inMontreal, 60 miles from Plattsburg, is such as toencourage the farmers to drive their cattle to thatmarket. Their forests supply them with sugarand molasses, and the soil is well adapted to theculture of hemp. The land-carriage from anypart of the country, in transporting their produceto New York, does not exceed 18 miles ; the car-rying place at Ticonderoga is one mile and a half,and from fort George, at the s. end of the lakeof that name, to fort Edward, is but 14 miles.The small obstructions after that are to be removedby the proprietors of the n. canal. From thiscountry to Quebec, are annually sent large rafts ;the rapids at St. John’s and Chamblee being theonly interruptions in the navigation, and those notso great, but that at some seasons batteaux with60 bushels of salt can ascend them ; salt is soldhere at half a dollar a bushel. Seranac, Sable, andBoquet rivers water Clinton county ; the first isremarkable for the quantity of salmon it pro-duces.]

[Clinton, a township in Dutchess county.New York, above Poughkeepsie. It is large andthriving, and contains 4607 inhabitants, including176 slaves. Six hundred and sixty-six of its in-habitants are electors.]

[Clinton, a settlement in Tioga county. NewYork, bounded by Fayette on the n. Warren onthe s. Green on the w. and Franklin in Otsegocounty on the e. Unadilla river joins the Susque-hannah at the n. e, corner, and the confluent streamruns s. zis. to Warren.]

[Clinton, a plantation in Lincoln county,district of Maine, lies 27 miles from Hallowell.]

[Clinton Parish, in the township of Paris,seven miles from Whitestown, is a wealthy, plea-sant, flourishing settlement, containing severalTiandsome houses, a newly erected Prebyterianmeeting-house, a convenient school-house, and anedifice for an academy, delightfully situated, butnot yet finished. Between this settlement and theIndian settlements at Oneida, a distance of 12 miles,(in June 1796), was wilderness without any inha-bitants, excepting a few Indians at the Old Oneidavillage.]

[Clinton’s Harbour, on the ??. w. coast of N.America, has its entrance in lat. 52° 12' n. Cap-tain Gray named it after Governor Clinton of NewYork.]

[CLIOQUOT. See Clyoquot.]

CLIPSA, a fertile and pleasant plain, or llanura,of the kingdom of Peru, in the jurisdiction ofChuquisaca, and bounded by that of Cochabamba.It is 30 miles in circumference, is well peopled,and very fertile and pleasant, and its climate ishealthy.

[CLISTINOS, a fierce nation of Indians, whoinhabit round Hudson bay. See New Britain.]

CLOS, a settlement of North Carolina, in the countyof Anson.

[CLOSTER, a village in Bergen county, NewJersey, nearly seven miles s. e. ofPeramus, and16 n. of New York city.]

[CLIOQUOT, a sound or bay on the n. w.coast of America, to. from Berkley’s sound. SeeHancock’s Harbour.]

COACALCO, San Francisco de, a settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Ecatepec in NuevaEspafia. It contains 129 families of Indians.

COACHIC, a settlement of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province of Taraumura, and kingdomof Nueva Vizca 3 &gt;^a. It is S4 leagues to the s. w.of the town and real of Mines of Chiguagua ; andabout the distance of a league and a half in thesame direction, lies an estate of the same name.

COACLAN, San Gaspar de, a settlement ofthe alcaldia mayor of Tezcoco in Nueva Espana.It contains 218 families of Indians, in which areincluded those of its six neighbouring wards. Itis oiie league s. of its capital.

COACULA, Asuncion de, a settlement ofthe head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Igualain Nueva Espana. It contains 37 families of In-dians.

COAGUILA, aprovince of Nueva España, bounded by theNuevo Reyno de Leon. It extends as far as theriver Medina ; runs 200 leagues in length towardsthe n. and is 160 wide from s. w. to n. e. All thisextensive country is as it were unpeopled, beinginhabited no otherwise than by some few settle-ments established by the missions, who consist ofthe monks of St. Francis of the city of Queretano,who have succeeded in converting some of the na-tives. There are, however, three garrisons upoathe frontiers of the sierras^ and country of the in-fidel Indians, for the purpose of checking anyirruption. This province is watered by manylarge rivers, the principal of which arc those ofNadadores and St. Domingo. There arc heresome estates, in Avhich large and small cattle breedplentifully, on account of the fineness of the pas-tures. The capital is the town and garrison of

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which is above 100 leagues distant, and thatthrough a desert country.]

COBITU, a river of the province and mis-sions of the Gran Paititi. It rises in themountains of the infidel Indians, which serveas a boundary to the province of Larecaja ;runs nearly due n. collecting the waters of manyothers, and enters theMarmore w ith the name of Mato.

COBLER’S Rock, a rock or isle of the North sea,very close upon the e. coast of the island of Bar-badoes.

[COBLESKILL, a new town in the county ofSchoharie, New York, incorporated March 1797.]

COBO, a river of the province and governmentof Neiva in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. Itrises in a llanura^ or plain, runs w, and enters theriver Magdalena, opposite the city of La Plata.

COBORCA, a large and capacious bay of theprovince of Pimeria in Nueva Espana.

COBOS, a fortress of the province and govern-ment of Tucuman in Peru ; of the district and ju-risdiction of the city of Salta, from whence it isnine leagues distant ; having been founded in 1693at the foot of a declivity, to serve as an outworkor defence against the Indians of Chaco, it is atpresent destroyed and abandoned, and serves as acountry-house on the estate of an individual.

COBRE, Santa Clara de, a settlement ofthe alcald'ia mayor of Valladolid, in the provincennd bishopric of Mechoacan. It contains 100 fa-milies of Spaniards, bO oi Mustees, 38 of Mulat-toes, and 135 of Indians ; some of whom speculatein working the mines of copper which are closeby, others in the cultivation of maize, and othersgain their livelihood as muleteers. Three leaguess. of the city of Pasquaro.

COBRE, another settlement in the island of Cuba,on the s. coast.

Same name, a river of the province and governmentof Veragua in the kingdom of Tierra Firrae. Ithas its origin in the sierras of Guanico to the s.and enters the Pacific sea.

Same name, a mountain on the coast of the provinceand corregimiento of Coquimbo in the kingdom ofChile. It derives its name from some very abun-dant copper mines. Great quantities of this metalare carried from hence to Spain for founding artil-lery, and for different purposes.

COBULCO, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Los Zacatepeques in the king-dom of Guatemala.

COCA, a large river of the kingdom of Quito.It rises from different streams which flow downfrom the cordillera oi t\\e paramo, or mountain de-sert, of Cotopaxi. It continually follows the course

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of the large river Napo, and at last becomes in-corporated with the same.

COCAGNE, a small river of NovaScotia. It runs e. and enters the sea in the gulf ofSt. Lawrence, and in the strait formed by the islandof St. John, opposite the island of its own name.

[COCALICO, a township in Lancaster county,Pennsylvania.]

COCAMA, a great lake in the midst of thethick woods which lie in the country of Las Amazonas, to the s. and w. of tlie river Ucayale. It is10 leagues long from n. to s. and six wide from e.to w. On the e. it flows out, through a littlecanal, into the river Ucayale, and on the w. itforms the river Cassavatay, which running n. andthen e. enters also the Ucayale. Its shores areconstantly covered with alligators and tortoises.

COCAMAS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe country of Las Amazonas, who inhabit thew'oods to the s. of the river Maraiion, and in thevicinities of Ucayale. It takes its name from theformer lake, called La Gran Cocama. Theyare a barbarous and cruel race, wandering over theforests in quest of birds and wild beasts for meresustenance. Their arms are the macana, and theIndian cimeter, or club of chonia, a very strongebony.

COCANIGUAS, a settlement of the provinceand government of Esmeraldas in the kingdom ofQuito.

COCAS, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Castro Vireyna in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Uuachos.

Same name, another settlement, in the province andcorregimienito of Vilcas Huaiman, of the samekingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Tofos.

COCATLAN, San Luis de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Coatlan, and alcadia mayorof Nexapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains 160 fa-milies of Indians, employed in the trade in cochi-neal and cotton stuffs. It is four leagues to the n.of its head settlement.

COCAYA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Maynas in the kingdom of Quito. Itunites itself with the Ibinelo, and then takes thename of Unquizia, and enters the Putumayo.

COCHA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdomof Quito.

Same name, another settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cotabambas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Llaaquas.

COCHA, another (settlement), of the province and corregimi-ento of Vilcas Huaiman in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Vilcas.

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Cold spring is 4200 feet above the level of the sea ;and few or none of the tropical fruits will flourishin so cold a climate. The general state of thethermometer is from 55° to 63° ; and even some-times so low as 44° : so that a fire there, even atnoon-day, is not only comfortable, but necessary,a great part of the year. Many of the Englishfruits, as the apple, the peach, and the strawberry,flourish there in great perfection, with several othervaluable exotics, as the tea-tree and other orientalproductions.)

(Cold Spring Cove, near Burlington, New Jer-sey, is remarkable for its sand and clay, used inthe manufacture of glass ; from whence the glassworks at Hamilton, 10 miles w. of Albany, are sup-plied with these articles.)

COLE, a settlement of the island of Barbadoes,in the district of the parish of St. George, distinctfrom the other of its name in the same parish.

COLEA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Maynas in the kingdom of Quito. It runss. and enters the Tigre.

(COLEBROOKE, in the «. part of New Hamp-shire, in Grafton county, lies on the e. bank ofConnecticut river, opposite the Great Monadnock,in Canaan, state of Vermont ; joining Cockburneon the s. and Stuartstown on the n. ; 126 miles n.w. by «. from Portsmouth.)

(COLEBROOKE, a Tougb, hilly township on then. line of Connecticut, in Litchfield county, 30miles n. w. of Hartford city. It was settled in1736. Here are two iron works, and several mills,on Still river, a n. w. water of Farmington river.In digging a cellar in this town, at the close of theyear 1796, belonging to Mr. John Hulburt, theworkmen, at the depth of about 9 or 10 feet, foundthree large tusks and two thigh-bones of an animal,the latter of which measured each about four feetfour inches in length, and 12|; inches in circum-ference. When first discovered they were entire,but as soon as they were exposed to the air theymouldered to dust. This adds another to themanj^ facts which prove that a race of enormousanimals, now extinct, once inhabited the UnitedStates.)

(COLERAIN, a township in Lancaster county,Pennsylvania.]

(COLERAIN, a town on the». bank of St. Mary’sriver, Camden county, Georgia, 40 or 50 milesfrom its mouth. On the 29th of June 1796, atreaty of peace and friendship was made and con-cluded at this place, between the president of theUnited States, on the one part, in behalf of theUnited States, and the king’s chiefs and warriorsof the Creek nation of Indians, on the other. By

this treaty, the line between the white people andthe Indians was established to run from theCurrahee mountain to the head or source of themain s. branch of the Oconee river, called by thewhite people Appalatohee, and by the IndiansTulapoeka, and down the middle of the same.”Liberty was also given by the Indians to the pre-sident of the United Stutes to “ establish a tradingor military post on the s. side of Alatamaha,about one mile from Beard’s bluff', or any wherefrom thence down the river, on the lands of theIndians and the Indians agreed to “ annex tosaid post a tract of land of five miles square ;and in return for this and other tokens of friendshipon the part of the Indians, the United States stipu-lated to give them goods to the value of 6000dollars, and to furnish them with two blacksmithswith tools.)

COLGUE, a settlement of the island of Laxa inthe kingdom of Chile ; situate on the shore of theriver Tolpan.

COLIMA, the alcaldia mayor and jurisdictionof the province and bishopric of Mechoacán inNueva Espana. It is bounded e. by the jurisdic-tion of Zapotlan, s. by that of Mortincs, n. by thatof Tuzcacuesco, and w. by that of Autlan, and theport of La Navidad in the kingdom of Nueva Ga-licia. It carries on a great trade in salt, collectedon the coasts of the S. sea, where there are wellsand salt grounds, from which great emolumentis derived, supplying, as they do, the inlandprovinces with this article. Formerly the best

cocoa wine of any in the kingdom was made here,from the abundance of this fruit found in all thepalm estates ; but the art of bringing it to perfec-tion was lost, and this branch of commerce diedaway, from the additional cause, that the making ofthis liquor was prohibited by the viceroy, the Dukeof Albuquerque, as being a drink calculated toproduce great inebriety. The capital is of the samename ; and the settlements of this district are,Almoloioyan, Zinacantepec,

Comala, Totolmoloyan,

Zaqualpa, Caxitlan,

Xulua. Tecoman,

Xilotlan, Ixtlahuaca,

Guezalapa, Tomala,

Nagualapa, Cuatlan. ,

Cochimatlan,

The capital is a town sitimteupon the coast ofthe S. sea, near the frontiers ofXalisco, in themost fertile and pleasant valley of Nueva Espaiia.It abounds in cacao and other vegetable produc-tions ; is of a hot temperature, and the air is verypure. Its buildings are regular and handsome,3 R 2

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particularly those of (lie parish church, the con-vent of the monks of Niiestra Sonora de la Merced,another of St. Francis, and the hospital of S. J uande Dios. Its population consists of 200 familiesof Spaniards, 122 oi Mustees, 15 Mulattoes, and22 of Indians. In its district is found and gatheredthe celebrated plant called in the country oleacazan^■which is considered as a wonderful restorer of loststrength, and a certain specific against all kinds ofpoison. The leaves of it are applied to the partaffected, and the natives are accustomed to judgeof its virtues by its degree of adhesion. One hun-dred and fifty leagues to the w. of Mexico, inlong. 103^ 20', and lat. 18° 34'.

COLIMAS, a barbarous nation of Indians informer times, but now reduced to the faith, in theprovince of its name; this being now incorporatedwith that of Muzo of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada.These Indians are also known by the name of Ca-napayes, being united to them. Its capital is thecity of La Palma de los Colimas. See articleMuzos.

COLIMBA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Popayán in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra-nada.

COLINA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Santiago in the kingdom of Chile ;in the district of which there are five chapels ofcase, in a spacious and beautiful valley.

COLINA, a river of this province and kingdom,which rises in the mountains of its cordillera, andenters the Maypo.

COLIUINA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Nicaragua in the kingdom of Guate-mala ; situate upon a long strip of land on the coastof the S. sea.

(COLLA, a parish of the province and govern-ment of Buenos Ayres ; situate on a small rivernear the sea-coast, about eight leagues e. of Coloniadel Sacramento, in lat. 34° 19' 39" s. Long. 57°21' 43" w.')

COLLADOS, Ensenada de los a bay onthe s. coast of the w. head, and in the territory ofthe French, in the island of St. Domingo. It is be-tween the rock of Bareo and the river Damasein.

COLLAHUAS, and Asiento of Mines ofCaylloma, a province and corregwiiento of Peru ;bounded n. by that of Cbumbivilcas, e. by that ofCanes and Canches or Tinta, s. e, by that ofLampa, s. by that of Arequipa, and w. by that ofCamana. It is 52 leagues in length s. e. n. w. and16 in width. Its temperature is cold, from beingsituate in the cordillera ; with the exception of thatpart which borders upon Camana, where it isvery mild, especially in the five leagues where its

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jurisdiction extends itself in the valley of Sihuas ;the other five leagues reaching to tlie sea borderingon Camana. Its productions are various : thoseof the valley are comprised in wine, brandies,wheat, maize, pulse, and fruits, especially figs,which being preserved, serve as nourishment tonumbers of poor people. The other territories ofthis province are of the same temperature, thoughcomparatively barren. It abounds in large andsmall cattle, native sheep, vicunas, and some wildanimals. The roads are dangerous, from thecountry’s being extremely unequal, and the greaterpart of it beinga craggy ravine, over which labours,rather than to say runs, a pretty large river, whichhas its rise within the province. Here are manysilver mines, from which great riches were formerlyextracted, since they yielded 80 or 100 marks eachcaxon. Atthe present day they yield but sparingly,on account of their great depth, some of them being200 fathoms in descent ; they are, nevertheless,worked with tolerable profit. The principalmountain of these mines is that of Caylloma, andit was through this mine that the capital wasfounded. There are also not wanting mines ofgold, tin, lead, copper, and sulphur; but these, onaccount of the deficiency of resources, remain un-worked. The capital, as we have before stated, isCaylloma. Its repartimmito used to amount to37,100 dollars, and its alcavala to 456 dollars perannum. The other settlements of the jurisdictionare.

Tisco,

Madrigal,

Callalli,

Tapay,

Sibayo,

A^angui,

Tuty,

Achoma,

Llauta,

Murco,

Taya,

Sihuas,

Chibay,

Maca,

Canocota,

Y chupampa,

Coperaque,

Chabanaconde,

Lary,

Pinchollo,

Huanca,

Huambo,

Yura,

Hucan.

COLLANA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cicasica in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Mccapa. Its Indian inhabitants havekept themselves unmixed from any other cast eversince the time of the conquest ; and in order to stillpreserve themselves so, they will not allow of anystrangers sleeping in the settlement, though heshould be sent by the corregidor. If any otherperson should come among them, he is put intoprison, and after a very short time dispatched.Owing to these precautions, the vicious propen-pensities observable in other settlements are en~

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much incommoded by mosquitos ; so that its po-pulation is much reduced, and those that remainapply themselves to the cultivation of sugar-canes,maize, yucas^ and plantains.

COLONCHE, a small settlement of Indians,of the district and jurisdiction of Santa Elena,in the government of Guayaquil, and kingdomof Quito ; situate on the s. shore of a river,from whence it takes its name, in lat. 1° 56' s.The said river rises in the mountains of thedistrict, and enters the S. sea, opposite the islandof La Plata.

Colonche, a small island of the S. sea, nearthe coast of the province and government of Gua-yaquil.

COLONIES OF THE English. See thearticles Virginia, Carolina, New England,New York, Jersey, Massachusetts, RhodeIsland, Pennsylvania, Nova Scotia ; of theJ3utch, see Surinam, Berbice, Corentin,CuRAZAo ; of the Portuguese, San Gabriel;of the French, Cayenne, St. Domingo, Mar-tinique; of the Danes, St. Thomas. (See gene-ral Tables of Dominions, &c. in the introductorymatter.)

COLOPO, a large river of the province andgovernment of Esmeraldas in the kingdom ofQuito. It runs from s. e. to n. w. at an almostequal distance between the rivers Esmeraldas andVerde, and runs into the S. sea, in the bay of SanMateo, in lat. 58' n.

COLOR, Cabo de, a cape on the coast of theprovince and captainship of Sergipé in Brazil. Itlies between the rivers Real and Ponica.

COLORADA, Punta, a point on the coast ofthe N. sea, and in the province and governmentof Venezuela, to the e. of the cape San Roman.

COLORADA, a river of tlie jurisdiction andalcaldta mayor of Penonomé, in the governmentof Panama, and kingdom of Tierra Firme. It risesin the mountains to the s. and enters the Pacificnear the settlement of Anton.

COLORADO, a settlement of the provinceand government of Tucumán, in the district andjurisdiction of the city of Salta, and s. s. e. of thesame.

Colorado, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Santa Marta in the kingdom of TierraFirme; situate on the shore of the river of its name.

Colorado, a river of the province and corre-^imiento of Cuyo in the kingdom of Chile. Itrises in its cordillera, to the n. runs e. and spendsitself in various lakes, on account of the level oftlie country. The geographer Cruz errs in makingit enter the river Maipo.

Colorado, another, a large river of the pro-:vince and government of Sonora in NuevaEspana.

Colorado, another, a small river of the pro-vince and government of Santa Marta in thekingdom of Tierra Firme, which enters the greatriver Magdalena before you come to the townof Tamalameque.

Colorado, another, in the province and go-vernment of Louisiana, near the road wliich leadsto Mexico. It runs s. e. in a very large stream,and enters the sea in the bay of San Bernardo.

Colorado, a cape or point of land of the s.coast of St. Domingo, in the part possessed bythe French, between the bays of Tondo and Puer. .

Colorado, a mountain of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, on the shore of the riverSalado, and to the s. of the settlement of Nuestra'Sefiora de Buenas Costumbres. ;

COLORADOS, a barbarous nation of Indians,of the province and corregimiento of Tacunga inthe kingdom of Quito, who inhabit some moun-,tains of the same name, very craggy and rugged,abounding in animals and wild beasts, such asbears, lions, tigers, deer, squirrels, monkeys, andmarmosets. These Indians, although the greaterpart of them are reduced to the Catholic faith bythe extinguished company of the Jesuits, aregiven to superstition ; they are divided into twoparts, the one called the Colorados of Angamarca,since tlieir principal settlement bears this title, andthe other the Colorados of St. Domingo ; they now,belong to the province and government of Esme-raklas, and live retired in the woods, and upon thebanks of the rivers Toachi and Quininay, wherethe missionaries of the religion of St. Domingo ofQuito exercise their apostolical zeal. The princi-pal settlement of this place, being situate on the w.shore, is called St. Domingo. The commerce ofthese Indians, and by which they subsist, is incarrying to Guayaquil, the province by whichthey are bounded , w dod for making canoes and rafts,sugar-canes, achiote, and agi pepper, and bring-ing back in exchange cattle, fish, soap, and othernecessary eft'ects.

COLOSO, a settlement of the province andgovernment ©f Cartagena ; situate on the shore ofthe river Pechelin, to the s. s. w. of the townof Maria, to the jurisdiction^of which it apper-tains.

COLOTLAN, a settlement and head settlementof the alcaldia mayor of Mextitlan in Nueva Es-pana. It contains 240 families of Indians, and isthree leagues to the w. of its capital.

COLOTLIPAN, a settlement of the head set-

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CONGACA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Angaraes in Pern ; annexed to theuracy of Yulcamarca.

CONGARI, a large river of S. Carolina. Itruns s. e. taking various names, till it enters thesea. It is first called Trente Milles, or ThirtyMiles, then Congari, and afterwards Santi.

CONGAS, a settlement of the province and ror-regimiento of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Ocros.

CONGER, Rock of, a small island or rock,close to the e. coast of the island of Barbadoes.

CONGO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Darien, and kingdom of Tierra N ueva ;situate on the shore of a river, which gives itits name, and of the coast of the S. sea, withinthe gulf of S. Miguel.

CONGOHAS, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Espiritu Santo in Brazil ; situate tothe w. of the Villa Rica.

CONGURIPO, Santiago de, a- settlement ofthe head settlement of Puruandiro, and alcaldtamayor of Valladolid, in the province and bishopricof Mechoacan ; situate on a plain or shore of theRio Grande. It is of a hot temperature, and con-tains 12 families of Spaniards and Mustees^ and 57of Indians. Twenty-six leagues from the captitalPasquaro.

CONHAWAY, a large river of N. Carolina.It runs many leagues ; first n. e. then n. and after-wards n. w. and enters the Ohio. It is called alsoWood river and New river.

CONHAWAY, another, in the province and colonyof Virginia, with the additional title of Petit, orLittle. It also runs n. w, and enters the Ohio.

(CONHOCTON Creek, in New York, is then. head water of Tioga river. Near its mouth isthe settlement called Bath.)

CONICARI, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cinaloa in Nueva Espana ; situateon the shore and at the source of the river Mayo.It is a reduccion of the missions which were heldby the regulars of the company of Jesuits.

CONIGUAS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe province and government of Tarma in Peru,who inhabit the mountains of the Andes, unitedwith the Cunchos, and of whom but little is known.

CONIL, Bocas de, entrances which the seamakes upon the coast of the province of Yucatán,between the river Lagartos, and the baxos or shoalsof Cuyo.

CONILABQUEN, a small river of the districtof Tolten Alto in the kingdom of Chile. It runs s.and enters the Token.

CONIMA, a settlement of the province and cor-

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regimiento of Paucarcolla in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Moxo.

CONNECTICUT, a county of the provinceand colony of New England in N. America. It isbounded w. by New York and the river Hudson ;is separated from the large island by an arm of thesea to the s. ; has to the e. Rhode island, with partof the colony of Massachusetts, and the other partof the same colony to the n. It is traversed by ariver of the same name, which is the largest of thewhole province, and navigable by large vessels for40 miles. This province abounds in wood, tur-pentine, and resins ; in the collecting of whichnumbers of the inhabitants are occupied, althoughthe greater part of them are employed in fishing,and in hewing timber for the building of vesselsand other useful purposes. The merchants of theprovince once sent to King Charles II. some tim-ber or trees, of so fine a growth as to serve formasts of ships of the largest burthen. The greattrade of woods and timbers carried on by meansof the river has much increased its navigation.This territory is not without its mines of metal,such as lead, iron, and copper: the first of thesehave yielded some emolument, but the othershave never yet produced any thing considerable,notwithstanding the repeated attempts which havebeen made to work them. This county is wellpeopled and flourishing, since it numbers upwardsof 40,000 souls, notwithstanding the devastationsthat it has suftered through the French, the In-dians, and the pirates, in the reign of Queen Anne,when all the fishing vessels were destroyed.When this colony was first founded, many greatprivileges were given it, which have always beenmaintained by the English governor, throughthe fidelity which it manifested in not joiningthe insurrection of the province of Massachusetts,until, in the last war, it was separated from themetropolis, as is seen in the article U n ited StatesOF America.

(Connecticut, one of the United States ofNorth America, called by the ancient nativesQunnihticut, is situated between lat. 41° and 42°2' n. and between long. 71° 20' and 7.3° 15' w. Itsgreatest breadth is 72 miles, its length 100 miles;bounded «. by Massachusetts ; e. by Rhode island ;s. by the sound which divides it from Long island ;and w. by the state of New York. This statecontains about 4674 square miles; equal to about2,640,000 acres. It is divided into eight counties,viz. Fairfield, New Haven, Middlesex, and NewLondon, which extend along the sound from w. toc. : Litchfield, Hartford, Tolland, and Windham,extend in the same direction on the border of the]3 T 2

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and lies seven leagues to the n. of its head settle-ment.

CORUTES, a small river of the province andgovernment of Paraguay. It runs n. n.'e. and en-ters the Xexuy, opposite the town of Curuguato.

CORWI, a river of the province and govern-ment of French Guinea. It enters the sea close tocape Orange.

COSACURO, a small river of the province andcolony of Surinam, or part of Guayana in theDutch possessions. It runs n. and enters theCuyuni.

COSANGA, a large river of the province ofQuixos in the kingdom of Quito. It runs s. e.then turns its course e. and as it were imperceptiblyto the n. and afterwards, in order to receive on thew. the river Bermejo, enters the s. side of the riverCoca.

COSAPA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Carangas in Peru, of the arch-bishopric of Charcas ; annexed to the curacy ofTurco.

COSCAOCOAS, a nation of Indians reducedto the Catholic faith, dwelling upon the llanura orlevel of Cumboso, of the jurisdiction of Lamas.They are few in number, and are bounded by theAmasifucines.

COSCOMATEPEC, San Juan de, a settle-ment of the head settlement of Yxhuatlan, andalcaldia mayor of Cordoba, in NuevaEspana. Itcontains 10 families of Spaniards, 35 of Mustees,75 of Mulattoes, and 196 of Indians. Seven leaguesto the n. n. w. of its head settlement ; but the roadshere are so rugged and full of steeps and precipicesthat the sight grows dizzy at looking down them.

COSCOMITLAN, a settlement of the lieadsettlement and alcaldia mayor of Caxititlas inNueva Espana, from whence it lies one league anda half to the n. w. In its vicinity is a lake.

COSELA, a settlement and real of the silvermines of the province of Copala, and kingdom ofNueva Vizcaya ; situate to the n. of that of Char-cas.

COSEREMONIANOS, a barbarous nation ofIndians, of the province and government of Moxosin the kingdom of Quito ; discovered by FatherCypriano Baraza, a Jesuit. It is, however, butlittle known.

COSIGUIRACHI, a town of the province ofTaraumara, and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya ; oneof the most wealthy towns in the kingdom, and ofa mild and healthy temperature. Its populationis composed of many families of Spaniards andMustees^ no small number of Mulattoes, and verymany Indians. It is 24 leagues to the s. k?. \ to

the s. of the real of the mines and town of SanFelipe de Chiguagua.

Cosiguirachi, a settlement and real of thesilver mines of the intendancy of Durango inNueva Espana; of a cdld temperature ; situate ina rough and uneven territory, but being fertile, andabounding in fruits and seeds. (By a very recentmemoir of the intendantof Durango, the populationof this real was made to amount to 10,700.)

COSMA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Huamalies in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Banos.

COSMA, another settlement, in the province andcorregimiento of Andahuailas, of the same king-dom ; annexed to the curacy of Moro in the pro-vince of La Santa.

COSME, San, a settlement of the head settle-ment and alcaldia mayor of Fresnillo in NuevaEspana. It contains a very large number ofSpaniards, Indians, Mustees, and Mulattoes, beingvery close to the city of Zacatecas, lying fromthence only seven leagues to the n. and being 10 tothe e. of its capital.

COSME, San, another settlement, of the provinceand government of Sonora in Nueva Espana ;situate in the country of the Sobaipuris Indians, onthe shore of a river between the settlements of SantaCatalina and San Francisco Xavier.

COSME, San, another, with the surname of Viejo,(Old), a reduccion of the missions which were heldby the regulars of the company of Jesuits, in theprovince and government of Paraguay ; situate onthe shore of the river Parana, between the settle-ments of Santa Ana and La Candelaria.

COSME, San, another, with the addition ofNuevo, (New), to distinguish it from the former inthe same province : also a reduccion of the regularsof the company of Jesuits, on the shore of theParana, and to the w. of the settlement ofJesus.

COSME, San, a small island of the gulf of Cali-fornia, or Mar Roxo de Cortes ; situate very nearthe coast, in the middle of the canal which isformed by this coast and the island of Carmen,and close to another island called San Damian.

COSPALA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Juchipila in Nueva Espana.It is five leagues to the s. of the head settlement.

COSSA, or COSAIBO, a river of the provinceand government of Guayana, in the French posses-sions.

COSSART, a town of the province and colonyof N. Carolina ; situate on the shore of the riverJadquin.

COSTA-BAXA, a part of the coast of Brazil, in

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same kingdom. It contains 180 families of In-dians, and 60 of Spaniards, Mustees, and Mulattoes.Here is an hospital of the religious order of St.Francis. Seven leagues from its capital.

(COXHALL, a township in York county, dis-trict of Maine, containing 775 inhabitants.)

COXIMAR, a large plain of the coast of theisland of Cuba, close by the city of Havana, inwhich is a fortified tower. On this plain the Eng-lish drew up their troops when they besieged thatplace, in 1762.

COXIMES, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Esmeraldas in the kingdom ofQuito ; situate on the sliore of the S. sea, on thepoint formed by the port Palmar, under the equi-noctial line.

COXO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela ; situate on the sea-coast,close to the settlement of Carvalleda.

(COXSAKIE, a township in the w. part ofAlbany county, New York, containing S406 in-habitants, of whom 302 are slaves. Of the citi-zens 613 are electors.)

COXUMATLAN, a settlement of the headsettlement of Zanguio and afcaldia mayor of Za-mora in Nueva Espana ; situate on the shore of thesea of Chapala, and being backed by a large moun-tain covered with fruit-trees of various kinds, andexcellent timber and woods. It contains 17 tami-lies of Indians, who employ themselves in fishingand in agriculture. Four leagues to the w. of itshead settlement.

COYAIMAS, a barbarous and ancient nationof Indians of the province and government of Po-payán in the kingdom of Quito, and district of thetownofNeiba. Tliese Indians are valorous, ro-bust, faithful, and enemies to the Pijaos. Someof tl)ern have become converted to the Catholicfaith, and liveuniteil in settlemenis.

(COYAU, a settlement on Tennessee river, SOmiles below Knoxville.)

COYONES, a barbarous nation of Indians, whoinhabit the s. w. of Tocuyo. They are ferociousand infidels, and live upon the mountains. Theirnumbers at the present day are much reduced.

COYPO. SeeRAi.EMo.

COZAL, a settlement of the province and alcaldiamayor of Zacapula in the kingdom of Guatemala.

COZALCAQUE, San Felipe de, a settlementof the head settlement of Tenantitlan, and alcaldiamayor of Acaynca, in Nueva Espana. It contains51 families of Indians, and is 10 leagues to the e.and one-fourth to the a. e, of its head settlement.

COZAMALOAPAN, a province and alcaldiaviayor of Nueva España, the capital of which

bears the same name, with the dedicatory title ofSan Martin, and which is situate on a plain half aleague long, and somewhat less broad, surroundedby mountains so knit together, that, at the time ofits foundation, passes were obliged to be o[&gt;ened.Through this province runs a river, which flowsdown from the sferTflA of Zongolica, and whichafterwards takes the nam.e of Alvarado, it is ofa hot and moist temperature, and continually ex-posed to inundations during the rainy seasons,owing to the immense overflowings of the rivers.Its population is composed of 38 families of Spa-niards, 128 of Mulattoes, and 34 of Mexican In-dians, who maintain themselves by the gatheringof cotton and maize ; and this last in such abun-dance as to supply Vera Cruz. The Spaniardsemploy themselves in fishing in the rivers, whichabound with fish the three last months of the year,and they carry them for sale into the other juris-dictions. It has, besides the parish church, atemple of superior architecture, dedicated toNuestra Seilora de la Soledad, though it be com-monly called, Of Cozomalotipan, being of suchancient origin as to be said to liave existed 12years before the conquest of the kingdom. Thistemple was inhabited by a religious fraternity, ap-proved by his holiness Gregory XIII. he havinggranted to the same many favours and indulgences,which, through the devotion of the communily,were perpetuated, through several prodigies andmiracles which afterwards took place in the set-tlement, and in its district. One hundred andfifteen leagues s. s.xo. of Mexico, in lat. 17^ 47' ;long. 274° 50'. The jurisdiction of this alcaldiaconsists in the folloAving settlements :

A rnatlnn,Acula,

Ixmaluliacan,Chacaltiaiiguis,Texliuacaii,Tlacotalpan,

Otatitlan,

Tuxtepec,

Chinantla,

Utzila,

Uzainacin,

A^etla.

COZAQUl, Santa Maria de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Acazingo and alcaldiamayor of Tepeaca, in Nueva Espana. It containsfour families of Spaniards, 33 Aluslees and Mu-lattocs, and 51 of Indians. It is a quarter of aleague lioni its head settlement.

COZATLA, San Juan de, a settlement of thehead settlement of Axixique, and ahaldia mayor ofZayula, in the same kingdom. It contains 60familie.s of Indians,its head settlement.

COZAUTEPEC, a settlement and head settle-ment of the alcaldia mayor of Chichicapain Nu-eva Espana, of the province and bishopric of3

iid is two leagues to the w. of

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residences here, it has fallen into decay ; and al-though it is now reduced to a small town, the-4itleof Capital has not been taken from it. Its onlyinhabitants are those who own some estates in itsdistrict, and this forms a government subordinateto that of the Havana. [The damage done by theearthquake of October 1810, to the shipping at tlieHavana, was computed at 600,000 dollars.; theinjury at St. Jago could not be correctly estimated,but the loss of the lives at both places was believedto be not fewer than 350. In long. 76° 3', andlat. 20° r.l

CUBAGUA, an island of the N. sea, near thecoast of Tierra Firme, discovered by tiie AdmiralChristopher Columbus. It is three leagues incircumference, and is barren, but has been, -informer times, celebrated for the almost incredibleabundance of beautiful pearls found upon thecoast, the riches of which caused its commerce tobe very great, and promoted the building in itthe city of New Cadiz; but at present, since thefishery is abandoned, this town has fallen entirelyinto decay, and the island has become desert. Itis a little more than a league’s distance from theisland of Margareta, in lat. 10° 42' n.

CUBAZ, a settlement of the province and cap-tainship of San Vincente in Brazil ; situate betweenthe rivers Pedroza and Recisto.

CUBIGIES, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Riobamba in the kingdom of Quito.

CUBILLI, a lake of the kingdom of Quito,in the province and corregimiento of Alausi, nearthe paramo or mountain desert of Tioloma.

CUBZIO, a settlement of the corregimientoof Bogota in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada;situate ort the shore of the river Bogota, near thefamous waterfal of Tequendama. Its climate isagreeable and fertile, and it abounds in gardensand orchards, in which are particularly cultivatedwhite lilies, these meeting with a ready sale forornamenting the churches of Santa Fe and theother neighbouring settlements.

CUCAITA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; situate in a valley which is pleasant,and of a cold and healthy temperature. It pro-duces in abundance very good wheat, maize,truffles, and other fruits of a cold climate ; hereare some fiocks of sheep, and of their wool aremade various woven articles. It is small, but never-theless contains 23 families and 50 Indians. Itis a league and an half to the s. w. of Tunja, inthe road which leads from Leiba to Chiquinquiraand Velez, between the settlements of Samaca andSora.

CUCHERO, San Antonio de, a settlementof the province and government of Guanuco inPeru ; situate at the source and head of the riverGuallaga.

CUCHIGAROS, a barbarous nation of In-dians, little known, who inhabit the shores of theriver Cuchigara, which enters the Maranon, andis one of the largest of those which are tributaryto the same. The natives call it Purus ; it is na-vigable, although in some parts abounding withlarge rocky shoals, and is filled with fish of dif-ferent kinds, as also with tortoises ; on its shoresgrow maize and other fruits : besides the nationaforesaid, it has on its borders those of the Gti-maiaris, Guaquiaris, Cuyaeiyayanes, Curucurus,Quatausis, Mutuanis, and Curigueres ; these lastare of a gigantic stature, being 16 palms high.They are very valorous, go naked, have largepieces of gold in their nostrils and ears ; their set-tlements lie two long months’ voyage from themouth of the river.

CUCHILLO, San Pedro del, a settlementof the mission which is held by the religious orderof St. Francis, in the precinct of New Mexico.

CUCHILLO, with the addition of Parado, ano-ther settlement of the missions of the province ofTaraumara, and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya ;situate on the shore of the river Conchos.

CUCHIN, a small river of the territory ofCuyaba in Brazil. It runs n. and enters theCamapoa; on its shore is a part called La Es-tancia, through which the Portuguese are accus-tomed to carry their canoes on their shoulders, inorder to pass from the navigation of this latter riverto that of the Matogroso.

CUCHIPIN, a small river of the same kingdom (Brazil)and territory as the two former. It rises in themountains of the Caypos Indians, runs n. n» w. andenters the Taquari.

CUCHIPO, a river of the kingdom of Brazil,in the same territory as the former. It rises in themountains, and runs w.

CUCHIRIHUAY, a settlementof the provinceand corregimiento of Chilques and Masques inPeru ; annexed to the curacy of Pampachucho.

CUCHIUARA, or Cuckiguara, an island ofthe province and country of Las Amazonas, in thepart possessed by the Portuguese. It is in the riverof its name, at the sama mouth by which itenters the Maranon.

CICHIUERO, a river of the province andgovernment of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia. Itrises in the sierra of Mataguaida, runs n. andenters the Ytari.

CUCHUMATLAN, a settlement of the king-

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dom of Guatemala, in the province and alcaldiamayor of Chiapa.

CUCHUNA, a large settlement of Indians, andformerly the capital of a small province of thisname in Peru, to the w. of the mountains of (heAndes. It was founded by Maita Capac, fourthEmperor of the Incas, after that he had literallystarved the country into obedience. These In-dians were treacherous, and used to give theirenemies a very deadly poison ; the said emperorcaused many to be burnt alive for having practisedthis abominable custom, and their houses to bedestroyed, together with their cattle and posses-sions.

CUCIO, a settlement of the head settlement ofPerucho, and alcaldia mayor of Guimco, in NuevaEspana. It contains 140 families of Indians, andis a quarter of a league from its head settlement.

CUCUANA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Mariquita in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; situate on the shore of the river Mag-dalena.

CUCUCHO, San Bartolome de, a settle-ment of tlie head settlement of Arantzan, and aleal-dia mayor of Valladolid, in the province andbishopric of Mechoacan. It contains 27 familiesof Indians, who employ themselves in agriculture,cutting wood, and making earthen-ware and

CUCUCHUCHAU, San Pedro de, a settle-ment of the bead settlement of the city of Cucupao,and alcaldia mayor of Valladolid, in the provinceand bishopric of Mechoacan ; situate on the shoreof the lake. It contains 18 families of Indians,and is two leagues to the s. of its head settle-ment.

CUCUISAS, a small river of the province andgovernment of Guayana. It rises to the e. of thesettlement of Encaramada, and enters the Itari.

CUCUMAYA, a river of Spanish island, or St.Domingo, which rises near the s. coast, runs s.and enters the sea between the Seco and the Bo-mana, opposite the island Cataline.

CUCUNUBA, a settlement oiihe corregimientoof Ubate in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It isof a cold temperature, and produces the fruits ofthis climate. It consists of 100 families, includingthose of its vicinity, and of 80 Indians; is nineleagues to the n. of Santa Fe.

CUCUNUCO, a mountain to the e, of the pro-vince and government of Popayan, eternallycovered with snow. From it rises the river Pu-rase, as also the river La Plata. It takes its namefrom a nation of Indians, by whom it was inhabit-

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ed, and of whom a few only, who are reduced tothe,faith, remain.

CUCURPE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Sonora in Nueva Espana; situateon the shore of the river of its name, between thesettlements of Dolores and Ticapa.

CUCURULU, a river of the kingdom of Peru,which runs through the country of the CanisiencsIndians to the e. of the Andes, it abounds in fishof a very fine quality, which serve as food to thebarbarians; runs e. and being much swelled bythe waters it collects from others, enters the riverSanta Rosa.

CUCUTA, San Joseph de, a settlement ofthe government and jurisdiction of Pamplona inthe Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It is of a hottemperature, though healthy, of great commerce,owing to the cacao with which it abounds, andwhich is brought by persons coming from variousparts, the greater portion of it being embarked onthe river Sulia for Maracaibo. It contains morethan 100 rich Indians, but is infested with snakes,lice, and other noxious insects and reptiles.

CUCUTA, an extensive valley of this province (Pamplona),between the cities of Pamplona and S. Christoval,discovered by Juan de San Martin in 1534 ; cele-brated for its fertility, and excellent breed ofmules, by which the kingdom is supplied. It iswatered by many streamlets which render it luxu-riant and fertile, and most particularly in cacaoof the finest quality. The herb on which the muleschiefly feed is wild marjoram.

CUDAJA, a lake of the province and countryof Las Amazonas, in the territory possessed by thePortuguese. It is formed by one of the arms w hichis thrown out by the river Maranon, and returnsto enter the same, in the country of ihe CabaurisIndians.

CUDIHUEL, a settlement of Indians of thedistrict of Guadalabqueu in the kingdom of Chile,on the shore of the riv'er Valdivia.

CUDUUINI, a small river of the provinceand government of Cumaná. It rises in the ser~of Irnataca, runs s. and enters the Curgunion the n. side.

CUEBAYA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Sonora in Nueva Espana ; situateat the source of the river Bezani, to the w. of thegarrison which takes this name.

CUECA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Lucanas in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Chipan.

CUELLO, a settlement of the jurisdictionof Tocayma, and government of Mariqnita, in

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found in the environs of Cumana what the Spa-niards call til spa, a species of the Jesuits’ bark ;the calaguala, a plant, the root of which isdissolvent, aperitive, and sudorific ; the pissi-phii, a species of emetic ; the caranapire, a speciesof sage ; and the tualua, a more powerful purga-tive than jalap. There arc also a great number ofspices, which are suffered to rot on the spot where 'first they grew. In lat. 10° 27'. Long. 64° IS'.]The settlements of the province of Cumana are,

San Baltasar de los Cum pa,

Arias, Rio Caribes,

San Felipe de Austria, A raja.

Those of the missions,

Cocuisas, San Francisco,

San Feliz, Santa Maria de los An-

San Lorenzo, geles,

Chacaracuan, San Antonio.

Of the doctrines {dodrinas),

Cacuar,

Unare,

Punccres,

Guanaguana,

Soro,

Caicara,

Irapa,

Yaguara,

Caripe,

Teresen,

Guayuta,

Tipirin,

Amacuro,

Paro.

Cumana, a river of the above province (Cumaná) andgovernment, which rises in the spot called Co-coyan, in the serrama. It runs n. following thiscourse continually through the sierra until itflows down to the plain near the city, from whenceit enters the gulf, first having divided itself intofour arms. In the winter time it generally over-flows ; but as the distance from the sierra to itsmouth, or where it enters the sea, is so short, itquickly subsides within its proper bed, when itleaves water enough for the navigation of a barge ;and there w ould be sufficient for large vessels, wereit not for the bar which is at its mouth and im-pedes its entrance. In the summer time, how-ever, it becomes so dry, tliat it is scarcely navi-gable for canoes.

CUMANACOA, a city lying s. e. of Cumana14 leagues ; in the middle of the valley of the samename. The population amounts to 4200 people ;the air is wholesome, the w aters have a diureticqua-lity not commonly to be met with. This city wantsnothing but hands to avail itself of the produc-tions which the richness of the land would yield,if it were cultivated. The fruits have here an un-eommonly fine savour, taste, and substance. Thegovernment gives this city the name of San Bal-tasar de los Arias, but that of Cumanacoa has somuch prevailed, that it is the only one by whichit is now known. See Cumana.

2

CUMANAGOTA, a city of the former pro-vince and government ((Cumaná), in the kingdom of TierraFirme, called also San Baltasar de los Arias. Ithas a good, convenient, and secure port ; issituate on the skirts of the most elevated part ofthe serrama, in a fertile valley, which abounds instreams, which irrigate 26 estates of yucales, somesmall plantations of cacao, and some cattle. Theproductions of all these estates are consumed in thecountry ; since, through the unevenness of theroads, it is impossible to carry^them out of it, withthe exception, however, of tobacco, with whichCumana is supplied. The soil is the most fertileof any in the province, especially to the n. of thesietTa, where there might be established some verygood cacao estates ; but this is not to be accom-plished, considering the scarcity of its inhabitants,and their great poverty. This city, just after the con-quest of these countries, was noted for its famouspearl-fisheries, which were afterwards abandoned.Its vicinity was inhabited by many gentile Indians,who were at continual enmity with the Spaniardsand the other inhabitants ; but these troublesomepeople were reduced to obedience by Don Juan deUrpin, who had held consultations for that pur-pose with the council of the Indies. The popu-lation amounts to 800 souls, including the Negroslaves and the people of colour.

CUMAPI, a large lake of the country of LasAmazonas. It is a waste water of the large riverCaqueta, in the territory of the Guayonas In-dians.

CUMARA, a river of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas, in the territory possessed bythe Portuguese, is an arm of the Cuchivara orPurus, which enters the Maranon before the otherstreams which are tributary to this river.

CUMAREBO, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela ; situate on the sea-coast, and at the point of its name, with a good,though small port, and one that is much frequentedby vessels.

CUMARU, Los Santos Angeles de, a settle-ment of the province and country of Las Amazonas,in the part possessed by the Portuguese; situateon the shore of a large river.

CUMATEN, a small river of the province andcolony of Surinam, or part of Guayana possessedby the Dutch. It rises in the mountain of Areyuc-tuquen, and runs, collecting the waters of manyothers, to enter the Cuyuni on the s. side.

CUMATl, a small river of the province andgovernment of Paraguay. It runs s. and entersthe large river of the Portuguese.

CUMAYARIS, a barbarous nation of Indians,

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Ostimiiri in Nueva Espana ; situate 45 leaguesfrom the river Chico.

CUMPLIDA, an island of Paraguay, in theprovince and government of this name. It issuesfrom an arm thrown out on the w. side of the river,and forms the lake Jayba.

CUMPLIDA, another island, of the Itenes orGuapore, in the province and country of LasAmazonas.

CUMPLIDO, Cayo, an inlet of the N. sea,near the coast of the island of Cuba, the Cayo Ro-mano, and the Cayo de Cruz.

[CUNCHES, Indians of Chile. See index toadditional history respecting that country, chap.

CUNDAUE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Antioquia in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada.

CUNDINAMARCA. See Granada.

Cundurmarca|CUNDURMARCA]], a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Caxamarquilla in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of its capital.

CUNEN, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Zacapula in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CUNGAYO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Angaraez in Peru.

CUNGIES, a barbarous nation of Indians, whoinhabit the «. of the river Napo, between therivers Tambur to the e. and the Blanco, a smallriver, to the w. These infidels are bounded n. bythe Ancuteres, and dwell near to the Abijiras andthe Icahuates.

[Cuniue|CUNIUE]], a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cuenca in the kingdom of Quito ;in the district of which are many estates, as thoseof Pillachiquir, Guanacauri, Tianorte, Pugni,Tambo de Marivina, Alparupaccha, and Chi-nan.

CUNIUOS, a barbarous and ferocious nationof the province and country of Las Amazonas, tothe c. of the river Ucayale, and to the s. of theMaranon. It is very numerous, and extends asfar as the mountain of Guanuco, and the shore ofthe river Beni. These Indians are the friends andallies of the Piros, and were first converted by theregulars of the company of Jesuits, the mission-aries of the province of Maynas ; but in 1714 theyrose against these holy fathers, and put to deaththe Father Bicter, a German, and the LicentiateVazquez, a regular priest, who accompanied thesaid mission.

[Cuntuquita|CUNTUQUITA]], a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Carabaya ; annexed to thecuracy of Coaza.

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CUNUMAL, San Geronimo de, a settle-ment of the province and corregimiento of Luyaand Chillaos in Peru ; annexed to the curacy ofOlto.

[Cunuri|CUNURI]], a settlement of the province andgovernment of Guayana, one of those belongingto the missions held there by the Capuchin fathers.It is on the shore of the river Y uruario, near thesettlement of San Joseph de Leonisa.

CUNURIS, a river of the same province as theabove settlement (Guyana). It rises in the mountain of Oro,or of Parima, and runs s. until it enters the Mara-non, in lat. 2° SO' s. It takes its name from thebarbarous nation of Indians who live in the woodsbordering upon its shores.

CUPALEN, a river of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Ayres. It runs e. and entersthe Uruguay, between the rivers Gualeguay andSaspoy.

CUPANDARO, Santiago de, a settlementof the head settlement and alcaldia mayor ofCuiceo in Nueva Espana ; situate on the shore ofthe lake. It contains 33 families of Indians, whohave the peculiarity of being very white and goodlooking ; they live by fishing in the same lake.The settlement is two leagues from its capital.

CUPE, a large and abundant river of the pro-vince and government of Darien, and kingdom ofTierra Fir me. It rises in the mountains in theinterior, runs many leagues, collecting the watersof other rivers, and enters the Tuira.

CUPENAME, a river of the province andgovernment of Guayana, or country of the Ama-zonas, in the part of the Dutch colonies.

CUPl, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Chumbivilcas in the same kingdom ;annexed to the curacy of Toro.

[CUPICA, a bay or small port to the s. e. ofPanama, following the coast of the Pacific ocean,from cape S. Miguel to cape Corientes, Thename of this bay has acquired celebrity in thekingdom of New Granada, on account of a newplan of communication between the two seas. FromCupica we cross, for five or six marine leagues, asoil quite level and proper for a canal, whichwould terminate at the Embarcadero of theRio Naipi ; this last river is navigable, and flowsbelow the village of Zatara into the great RioAtrato, which itself enters the Atlantic sea. Avery intelligent Biscayan pilot, M. Gogueneche,was the first rvho had the merit of turning theattention of government to the bay of Cupica,which ought to be for the new continent whatSuez was formerly for Asia. M. Gogueneche pro-posed to transport the cacao of Guayaquil by the4 c

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CURCURIBISA, a river of the province and government of Quijos and Macas, in the district of *he second, and in the kingdom of Quito. It rises in the country of the Xibaros Indians, runs inclining to the s. e. and enters the Santiago. CURICO, San Joseph de, a town of the province and corregimiento of Maule in the kingdom of Chile ; situate on the shore of the river Huaico. It is small, and but thinly peopled, its inhabitants being for the most part composed of people of colour. [The metal of the mine lately discovered here has obtained the name of natural avanturine, from its being filled with brilliant particles that give it a beautiful appearance. This metal is used by the goldsmiths for rings, bracelets, and other ornaments of jewellery.] CURICURARI, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, in the part possessed by the Portuguese. It runs e. between the rivers Cicayuri and Yurubechi, and enters the Negro. CURIEPE, a settlement of the province and government of Venezuela ; situate on the coast, near the point or cape of Codera, on the shore of the river of its name. Curiepe. This river rises in the mountains near the coast, runs e. and enters the sea in the bay formed by the cape Codera.

CURIES, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Yea in Peru ; annexed to one of the curacies of the Indians of its capital. CURIGUACURU, a river of Nueva Andalucia, Austral or Inferior, in the province of Guayana. It flows down from the mountains of the Caribes Indians to the n. and. running s. and increasing its waters by many other streams, enters the Maranon. CURIGUIMAR, a lake of the province and government of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia, on the shore of the river Orinoco, close to the town of Sanchez. CURIGUIRES, a barbarous nation of Indians, who inhabit the woods bordering upon the source of the river Cuchigaras, and bounded by the Indians of this name, as also by the Cumavaris. Some of these Indians are warlike, and of gigantic stature. CURIMON, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Aconcagua in the kingdom of Chile in the district of which is a convent of the religious recollects, or strict observers of the order of St. ■ Francis, bearing the title of Santa Rosa de Vfr terbo. CURINAS, a barbarous nation of Indians, who inhabit the s. part of the river Maranon. It is but little known, and all that is traced of them is, that they are in continual warfare with the Aguas ; so that their numbers are gradually diminishing. CURIPANA, a port of the coast of the N. sea, in the province and government of Cumana, to the s. of the city of Cariaco. CURIQUAXES, S. Francisco de los, a settlement of the province and government of Quixos and Macas in the kingdom of Quito. It belongs to the district of the former, and is one of those which compose the reduccion of the Sucurabos Indians, held at the charge of the regulars of the company of Jesuits. CURITI, a small settlement of the jurisdiction of the town of San Gil, and corregimiento of Tunja, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; annexed to the curacy of Guane. It is of a very wood temperature, pleasant and agreeable. Its natives, who should amount to 30 or 40 Indians, are docile, mild, and of good dispositions. CURITIMI see CorentinCURITUBA, a town of the province and captainship of Rey in Brazil ; situate near the coast. Curitcjba, a river, called also Yguazii, in the province and government of Paraguay. It runs w. collecting the waters of many other rivers, and enters with a large stream into the Parana. See Yguazu.

CURU, a river of the province and captainship of Seara in Brazil. It runs n. and enters the sea, between the coast of Los Humos and the point of Los Baxos or Arricifes. CURUA, a river of the province and captainship of Para in Brazil. It rises in the country of the Aritues Indians, runs to the n.n.e. and enters the river of Las Amazonas on the 5. side. CURUARI, a river of the kingdom of Brazil, in the territory of the Cayapos Indians. It rises in its mountains, runs s.s.e. and enters the n. side of the large river Parana. CURUAT, a small river of the province and government of Guayana. It runs nearly parallel with the river Caroni, collecting the waters of many others in its course, until it enters this river. CURUAU, an island of the N. sea ; situate at the mouth or entrance of the river of Las Amazonas, to the s. of the island of La Penitencia. CURUA-UASU, a village and settlement of the Portuguese, in the kingdom of Brazil ; situate on the shore of a small river which enters the Sono.

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