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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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Brocal de la Mina de, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Angaraes in Peru ;finnexed to the curacy of Santa Barbara.

CHACLAIA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Ambana.

CHACLIA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huarochiri in the same kingdom ;annexed to the curacy of Santa Olaya.

CHACMA, or Chamaca, a valley of the pro-vince of Cuzco and kingdom of Peru, near thecoast of the S. sea. It was well peopled in formertimes, and abounds now in sugar-cane, from whichsugar is made. It was conquered and united tothe empire by Huaina Capac, thirteenth Emperor.

CHACNA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Colcabamba.

CHACO, a province of the kingdom of Peru,called the Gran Chaco, is an extensive country ;having as its boundary to the e. the river Para-guay, and being bounded on the [n.e. by the pro-vince of the Chiquitos Indians ; on the n. by thatof Santa Cruz de la Sierra ; on the zo. it touchesupon the provinces of Mizque, Tomina, Porna-bamba, Pilaya, Paspaya, Tarija, and Tucuman.On the s. it extends as far as the jurisdiction of thegovernment of Buenos Ayres, which is its farthestlimits. Towards the n. it is 150 leagues widefrom e. to w. and 250 leagues long from n. to s. ;but to make these distances, it requires manymonths, owing to the unevenness and roughness ofthe territory. It is called Chaco, or, with morepropriety, Chacu, which, in the Quechuan lan-guage, signifies junta, or company, from the cir-cumstance of its having been formed of Indians ofseveral countries, who had fled from the conquer-ing arms of the Incas, and afterwards from thoseof the Spaniards. Towards the w. it has someserraniasj which are branches of the cordilhrn ;where, on account of their immense height, thecold is very great ; but in the low grounds, whichare for the most part plains, the temperature is hot.It is full of thick woods, and in many parts isswampy and wet ; particularly in the part lyingtowards the e. on the road to Paraguay. In thewet season, which lasts from the month of Novem-ber to April, the rivers leave their beds and formvarious lakes, some of which dry up, and someremain. This province has some rivers of note ;such are the Salado and the Bermejo ; is one of themost fertile provinces in America, and would, ifit were cultivated, afford, in the greatest abun-dance, those productions wnich are now thrownaway upon the infinite number of barbarous na-

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tions who inhabit it. It produces a great varietyof fine woods and fruit-trees; such as walnuts andnuts, although different from those of Europe, butwhich arc extremely well tasted ; beautiful cedars ;quebrachos^ thus called on account of their hard-ness ; guqyacanes, carob-trees, balsams, marias,palms, some of which are more than 30 yards inheight; almonds, cacaos, ceihas, whicli are verylarge trees, bearing in the pods a remarkable softwool, used for quilts, since it cannot be spun ; cot-ton-trees, mistoles, of the heart of which the In-dians make darts and cimeters ; myrrh, sarzafraz-trees, bark, and others, which have the interiorbark so delicate and white as occasionally to serveinstead of writing paper; others there are, whicli,at one or two yards up their stems, form a kind ofbarrel or pipe, and being of a very tough bark,are accustomed to be ripped open by the Indians,and thus serve as vessels, in which these keep theirliquor called chieha ; it is from this that theywhimsically call this plant palo borracho, ordrunken tree. In this province are found alsocanes for walking sticks, as fine as those of Asia ;and in the trunks of trees, in holes of the rocksand below the ground, are quantities of honey andwax wrought by bees, of which there are reckonedto be more than 12 sorts : some of the wax, besidesbeing transparent, is extremely fragrant and deli-cious to the taste, whilst some is so sour as to re-semble the juice of boiled lemons. One sort ofthese bees fabricate, with great skill, excellenthives of mud upon the branches of trees, and ofthe shape of a decanter, which are so hard thatthey will not break in falling down upon theground ; they, morever, are filled Avith exquisitewax and Avell-flavoured honey. The fruit-treeswhich this province produces, are oranges, cedars,lemons, apples, pears, melocotones^ (or peaches en-grafted on quinces), figs, nuts, prunes, and olives,also passion-floAvers ; all of which have beenbrought hither from the city of Santiago de Gua-dalcazar. Here are palms Avhich have cups con-taining 25 kernels each, differing only slightlyfrom the palms of Europe by having a flavour ofthe cocoa, and being somewhat larger. Here isalso a plant called chahuar, having prickles likethe savine, of which are made threads similar tohemp, for the manufacture of nets, bags, and somesorts of coarse garments : its root serves as food forthe Indians, as do also yucas, potatoes, and others.It has an innumerable quantity of birds, namely,Avild pigeons, ducks, herons, mountain-peacocks’pheasants, crows, condors, partridges, falcons,SAvans, periguanas, ostriches, parrots, and onekind of bird which exactly imitates an organ, and

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dried flesh, hung up to preserve them from corrup-tion. Their garments are a shirt without sleeves,reaching down to the middle of their legs. Themarried people wear drawers of baize with colouredpuckers for festival days, and those who enjoyoffices of state wear a baize jacket : they neitheruse hatnorshoes, and no one of them ever goes outwithout slinging round his neck some medals and arosary. The hair is worn short until they marry,and when they become old they suffer it to growlong. The women wear close gowns which reachdown to the ground, and which they call tapoyes:they never swathe or bind themselves round thewaist, but carry on their necks, on gala-days, somethreads strung with glass intermixed with beadsmade of cacao nuts, and coloured beans ; thesethreads usually amount to 20 or SO rows ; on en-tering the church they always loosen their hair.The regulars of the company of the Jesuits taughtthem offices, in which they assisted most dexte-rously ; and it really excites admiration that In-dians, acquainted only with their own barbariandialect, should be able to manage the compass ofthe notes, understand their proportions and num-bers, and apply the rules of music to its execution.At certain times of the year they go a mdear, orto hunt for honey among the woods : from thencethey bring back wax of two sorts, one which iswhite and odoriferous, Jhe other of less substance,as the wax of Europe, manufactured by a speciesof bees without stings, called opernus; also an-other kind of wax, made by a still different sort ofbees, but which are all properly denominated wildwax. This wax is delivered to the curate, whopreserves it in his house to send to the provinces ofPeru ; and from the product of this article, andfrom that of the cotton, which is made into woofs,to the amount of two pounds weight yearly byeach Indian, he procures in 3xchange whatever isnecessary for the settlement, such as baizes, colouredwools, bags, iron and steel articles, choppingknives, wedges, hatchets, scissars, pocket-knives,needles, medals, bugles, and other articles of hard-ware and little necessaries, which, being stored upby him, is distributed amongst the natives accord-ing to their necessities, and in a manner that theymay want for nothing, but live happy and con-tented. The settlements are as follows :

San Xavier, San Joseph,

La Concepcion, Santiago,

San Miguel, San Juan,

San Ignacio, El Santo,

Santa Ana, Corazon.

San Rafael,

CHIQUIZA, a settlement of the corregimientoof Sachica in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. Itis of a cold temperature, and produces wheat,maize, barley, papaSy and the other fruits peculiarto its climate. Its ijihabitants are so few as scarcelyto amount to 30 housekeepers, and about the samenumber of Indians. Four leagues to the n. w. ofTunja, and somewhat less from Velez.

CHIRA, a settlement and seat of the silver minesof the province and corregimiento of Piura in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Paita.

Same name, another settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Nicoya in the kingdomof Guate-mala.

[CHIRAGOW. See Plein River.]

CHIRAMBIRA, an island situate in the largebay of St. Juan, on the coast of the province andgovernment of Choco in the S. sea, which gives itsname to a small creek formed by this island and thecontinent.

CHIRCA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Sicasica in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Chulumani.

CHIRE, Santa Rosa de a city of the govern-ment and province of Los Llanos in the NuevoReyno de Granada ; founded by the GovernorFrancisco Anciso. It is of a very hot and un-healthy temperature, but affords the same vegetableproductions as the rest of the province. It is somean and reduced as to contain hardly 100 house-keepers, and scarcely deserves the name of a city.This settlement lies the furthest to the n. w. extre-mity of any in this kingdom, and is bounded inthat quarter by the province and bishopric of Ca-racas.

Same name a river of the aboveprovince and government. It rises at the foot ofthe lomas del Viento, runs e. and enters the Meta,traversing the country of the Betoyes Indians.

CHIRGUA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela. It rises in the mountain of Ta-cazuruma on the s. runs s. and enters the Gamalo-tal, after having collected the waters of many otherrivers.

CHIRIBIQUI, Santa Fe de a settlement ofthe province and government of Cumana in thekingdom of Tierra Firme ; situate on the coast,between the rivers Mosina and Marecapana.

CHIRICOAS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe Nuevo Reyno de Granada, to the e. of themountains of Bogota, and at the entrance of thellanos or plains of Cazanare and Meta. Theylead a wandering life through the woods in com-pany with the Guaibas ; they are crafty and verydexterous thieves, but of a docile and pacific dis-position. In 16.64; some of them were reduced into

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or country of Labrador. It runs s. e, and entersthe St. Lawrence.

CODEGO. See Tierra Bomba.

CODEHUE, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Rancagna, in the kingdom ofChile, to the e. of the town of Triana.

CODERA, Cabo de, a cape on the coast ofthe province and government of Venezuela. Lat.10° S5'. Long. 66° 10'.

[CODORUS, a township in York county,Pennsylvania.]

CODOSA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán in Peru; situate on theshore of the river Quarto, and at the head of thesierra of Campanchin.

COELCHO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Chachapoyas in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Chiliquia.

COELLO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Neiva in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra-nada ; situate on the shore of the large river Mag-dalena.

COEMAL, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Luya and Chillaos in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Luya, the capital.

COEURS, Bay of, bay in the island of Martinique, one of the Antilles. It is near the settle-ment of Carbet.

[COEYMANS, a township in Albany county.New York, 12 miles below Albany. By the statecensus of 1796, S89 of its inhabitants are electors.]

COFANES, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe kingdom of Quito, Avhich began to be con-verted to the Catholic religion in 1602, throughthe labour and zeal of the Father Rafael Ferrer,of the extinguished company of the Jesuits, andwho was killed by the same Indians. The princi-pal settlement, founded by this martyr, with thededicatory title of San Pedro, is now almost de-stroyed, though some few inhabitants still remain.The same is situate between the river of its nasneto the n. and that of Azuela to the s. The aboveriver is large and rapid, anti takes its name fromthese Indians. It rises in the sierra Nevada, orSnowy, runs from u. to c. and enters the Azuela,in lat. 13° n.

COFFIN-LAND, a small island of the coastof Georgia, and one of those which are calledGeorgican, at the entrance of the river Ashley.

COFRE, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Aires. It runs s. and entersthe sea between the rivers Favor and Del Rosario,opposite the capital.

COGUA, a settlement of the corregimiento ofZipaguira in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. Itis of a very cold temperature, and abounds in theproductions peculiar to its climate, particularlyin fire-wood, with which it supplies, for the ma-nufacturing of salt, the settlements of Nemoconand Zipaquira. To this last settlement it is verycontiguous ; and it lies nine leagues n, of SantaFe. Its population is reduced to 70 housekeepers,and as many other Indians.

COHANZY, a river of the province andcolony of New Jersey, in the county of Cumberland.It runs s. and enters the sea in the bay of Delaware.

[CoHANZY, or Casaria, a small river,which rises in Salem county. New Jersey, andrunning through Cumberland county, empties intoDelaware river, opposite the upper end of Bombayhook. It is about SO miles in length, and is na-vigable for vessels of 100 tons to Bridgetown, 20miles from its mouth.]

COHASSER, a settlement of the province andcolony of New Hampshire, to the e. of the lakeChamplain.

[COHASSET, a township in Norfolk county,Massachusetts, which was incorporated in 1770,and contains 817 inhabitants. It has a Congrega-tional church, and 126 houses, scattered on dif-ferent farms. Cohasset rocks, which have been sofatal to many vessels, lie oft' this town, about aleague from the shore. It lies 25 miles s. e. ofBoston, but in a straight line not above half thedistance.]

[COHGNAWAGA, a parish in the townshipof Johnstown, Montgomery county. New York,on the ay. side of Mohawk river, 26 miles w. ofSchenectady. This place, which had been settlednear SO years, and which was the seat of Sir Wil-liam Johnson, was mostly destroyed by the Bri-tish and Indians, under the command of Sir Wil-liam in the year 1780; in this action Johnsonevinced a want of feeling which would have dis-graced a savage. The people destroyed in thisex[)cdition were his old neighbours, with whomhe had formerly lived in the habits of friendship ;his estate was among them, and the inhabitantshad always considered him as their friend andneighbour. These unfortunate people, after see-ing their houses and property consumed to ashes,were hurried, such as could walk, into cruel cap-tivity ; those who could not Avalk fell victims tothe toraaliawk and scalping knife. See Caghna-w aga.]

[COllOEZ, or the Falls, in Mohawk river, be-tween two and three miles from its mouth, and 10miles n. of Albany, are a very great natural curio-sity. The river above the falls is about 300 yardswide, and approaches them from the n. w. in a

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upon the loftiest part of that most beautiful lltinura,from which the prospect is so enchanting ; sliew-ing on one side the sea, on another the river whichwaters tlie precincts, and on another some shadypoplar groves. It is of an extremely benign tem-perature, and enjoying throughout the year a per-petual spring, being neither incommoded by heatnor cold. It is extremely fertile, and abounds inwhatever can conduce to the comfort and conve-nience of life. The city is tolerably large ; all thestreets are drawn at straight lines ; and the housesare disjoined from each other by large gardens,which are all well supplied with water brought byaqueducts from the river. The parish church isvery beautiful, and not less so are those of the re-ligious orders of St.. Francis, St. Domingo, St.Augustin, La Merced, San Juan de Dios, and thecollege which formerly belonged to the regularsof the company of the Jesuits. It has a port,which is convenient ajid much frequented by ves-sels ; upon the shore of which are caught tunnies,abacoras, and various other kinds of fish ; alsomany delicate kinds of shell-fish. At a small dis-tance is a very abundant copper mine, from whichmuch metal is extracted and carried to Europe ;and it is of this, as well as of its excellent breedof horses, its wine, oil, tallow, cow-hides, anddried meats, that its commerce is composed ; send-ing, as it does yearly, four or five vessels loadedwith these effects to Lima. Although it has minesof the purest gold, yet these are but little worked.The whole of the town is covered with beautifulmyrtles, and of these there is a delightful grove.It was destroyed by the Araucanos Indians in1547 ; and in 1579 it was attempted to be taken byFrancis Drake, who was repulsed by the inhabi-tants, la 1680 it seemed to be rebuilt only thatit might undergo a sacking the same year by theEnglish pirate, Bartholomew Sharps. Its popula-tion consists of 500 families of Spaniards andpeople of colour, and some Indians. Fifteenleagues from the city of Concepcion, and 58 fromthe capital of the kingdom, Santiago. Lat. 30° s.Long. 71° 18'. [See Chile,]

COQUIMBO, an island of the coast of this pro-vince and corregimiento.

COQUIN, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Tarma in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Cayna.

COQUINOCA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chichas and Tarija in Peru.

CORAI, Santa Clara de Cosme, a settle-ment of the province and corregimienlo of Hu-anta in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Paucar-baraba.

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CORAJAIS, a settlement and village of th«Portuguese in the province and country of LasAmazonas ; situate on the shore of the riverNegro.

CORAL, a settlement of the province and c«/j*iainship of Rey in Brazil; situate on the sea-coast,at the mouth of the river Imbau.

(Coral River, in New Mexico, runs acourse w. by s. and empties into the head of thegulf of California, close by the mouth of Colo-rado river.)

(CORAM, a post-town in Suffolk county. Longisland. New York, It has about 60 houses, andlies 62 miles e. of New Y ork city, and 10 fromSrnithtown.)

CORANI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Carabaya in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Ayapata.

CORAS, Santiago de los, a settlement of themissions which were held by the regulars of thecompany of Jesuits in California ; situate at anequal distance from both coasts. It is composedof Indians of the nation of its name, and is theplace where the Father Lorenzo Carranza, a mis-sionary, suffered martyrdom.

Coras, some shoals, lying very little underwater, near the coast of the province and coptam-ship of Marañan in Brazil, at the mouth of a riverwhich is also thus called.

CORAZON DE Jesus, a settlement of thecorregimiento and jurisdiction of Velez in theNuevo Reyno de Granada. Its population i*small, and it is situate in a country mountainousand full of pools, being scanty in vegetable pro-ductions, with 200 inhabitants, a miserable race.It is near the settlement of Chiquinquira, and tothe s. of Velez.

CORAZON, another, called De Maria, of the mis-sions which were held by the regulars of the companyof J esLiits, in the province and government of May-nas, of the kingdom of Quito ; situate on theshore of the river Aguarico.

CORAZON, another, called De Jesus, in the pro-vince and government of the Chiquitos Indians inPeru ; situate at the foot of the cordillera of SanFernando, a reduccion of the missions which wereheld there by the regulars of the company,

CORAZON, another, of the kingdom of Quito,in the corregimiento of the district of Las CincoLeguasde esta Ciudad (the Five Leagues from thisCity), and in the road which leads down fromGuayaquil.

CORAZON, a mountain of the kingdom of Quito,on the s. s. e. part, from the ivhich on the w. flowdown the rivers of San Lorenzo and Yaraboya,

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CRUZ.

CRUZ, Santa, de la Sierra, a provinceand government of Peru, bounded n. by that ofMoxos, e. by tlie territory of the Chiquitos In-dians, s. by the infidel Chirigiianos and ChanaesIndians, s, w. by the province of Tomina, and w.by that of Mizqiie. it is an extensive plain, whichon the w. side is covered with Indian dwellingsand grazing farms, as far as the river called Grandeor Huapay. It extends 28 leagues s. as far as thesame river, 18 ra. as far as the foot of the cordillera,and 24 n. being altogether covered with various es-tates, as indeed arc the parts on the other side of thecordillera. It lies very low, and is free both fromthe extreme cold and parching heat of the serra-mas, altliough the other provinces of this bishop-ric, which lie close by this province, are muchinfested with the same variations of climate. Itis, however, of a hot aiul moist temperature, andthe country is mountainous ; on its plains arefound various kinds of wood, good for building,and amongst the rest, a sort of palm, the heart ofwhich is used for making the frame works to win-dows of temples and houses, and it is generallycut to the length of 1 1 feet ; there is another kindof palm, which is called montaqui, the leaves ofwhich serve for covering the houses of the poor,and the shoots or buds for making a very argree-able sallad ; the heart of the tree is reduced to aflour, of wliich sweet cakes are made, and eateninstead of bread, for in this province neitherwheat nor vines are cultivated, the climate beingunfavourable to both. It abounds in variousspecies of canes, which serve to bind together thetimbers of w hich the houses are constructed ; oneof these species is called huembe, with which bells,though of great w'eight, are hung. In this pro-vince are all kinds of fruits, various birds, tigers,bears, wild boars, deer, and other wild animals ;amongst the fruits of the wild trees are some w'hichgrow, not upon the branches, but upon the trunkitself; that which is called huaipuru resembles alarge cherry in colour and flavour, and this,as well as others which are equally well tasted,serve as food for an infinite variety of birds ; anequal abundance of fish is likewise found in theneighbouring rivers. Here is cultivated rice,also maize, sugar-cane, j/ucas, camotes, See. andsome wild wax is found in the trunks of trees ; be-ing furnished by various kinds of bees. At thedistazice of 20 leagues to the s. of the capital, arefour settlements of Chiriguanos Indians, governedby their own captains, but subject, in some mea-sure, to this government, from being in friendshipAvith it, and trading with the Spaniards in wax,cotton, and maize. Hitherto its natives have been

averse to embracing the Catholic religion, but inthe incursions that have been made against us bythe barbarians, they have beeiTdver ready to lendus their assistance, and in fact form for us an out-work of defence. In the aforesaid four settlementsare 500 Indians, ivho are skilled in the use of thearrow and the lance, and are divided from theother barbarians of the same nation by the riverGrande or Huapay. This river runs from Char-cas to thee, by the side of the province of Tomina,and which, after making a bend in the figure of anhalf-moon, on tlie e. side of the province of SantaCruz, enters the Marmore, first receiving anotherriver describing a similar course, and known bythe name of the Pirapiti. On the e. and on theopposite side, are some settlements of Chanaes In-dians, the territory of whom is called Isofo. Tothe s. andv. zso. towards the frontiers of Tarija, andstill further on, are very many settlements of theinfidel Chiriguanos Indians; and in the valley ofIngre alone, which is eight leagues long, we find26 ; and in some of these the religious Franciscanorder of the college of Tarija have succeeded inmaking converts, though as yet in no consider-able numbers. These Indians are the most va-lorous, perfidious, and inconstant of all the na-tions lying to the e, of the river Paraguay ; 4000of them once fled for fear of meeting chastisementfor their having traitorously put to death the Cap-tain Alexo Garcia, a Portuguese, in the time ofDon Juan III. king of Portugal; they werecannibals, and used to fatten their prisoners beforethey killed them for their banquets. Their trea-ties Avith the Spaniards, and the occasional visitsthese have been obliged to pay them in their ter-ritories, havm induced them nearly to forget thisabominable practice ; but their innate cruelty stillexists, and particularly against the neighbouringnations, upon Avhom they look down Avith thegreatest scorn ; they have increased much, and arenow one of the most numerous nations in America;they are extremely cleanly, so much so that theyAvill go down to the rivers to Avash themselves evenat midnight, and in the coldest season. The Avomenalso, immediately after parturition, plunge them-selves into the Avater, and coming home, lay them-selves down upon a liltle mound of sand, Avhich,for this purpose, they have in their houses. Theinhabitants of this province amount to 16,000, andbesides the capital, Avhich is San Lorenzo de laFrontera, there are only the following settle-ments :

Porongo, Chilon,

Samaipata, Desposorios,

Valle Grazidc, Santa Ro>a,

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vince and government of Buenos Ayres, foundedin ]629, in lat. 29° 29' 1" 5.]t])Cruz, Santa, an island oftheN. sea,^one of theAntilles, 22 leagues long and five wide. Its terri-tory is fertile, but the air unhealthy at certain sea-sons, from the low situation. It has many rivers,streams, and fountains, with three very good andconvenient ports. It was for a long while desert,until some English settled themselves in it, andbegan to cultivate it; afterwards the French pos-sessed themselves of it, in 1650, and sold it thefollowing year to the knights of Malta, from whomit was bought, in 1664, by the West India com-pany. In 1674, it was incorporated with the pos-sessions of the crown by the king of France. Itsinhabitants afterwards removed to the island of St.Domingo, demolished the forts, and sold it to acompany of Danes, of Copenhagen, who nowpossess it. It was the first of the Antilles whichwas occupied by the Spaniards ; is SO leagues

from the island of St. Christopher’s, eight fromPuertorico, six from that of Boriquen, and fivefrom that of St. Thomas. It abounds in sugarscane and tobacco, as also in fruits, which renderit very delightful. [It is said to produce SO, 000or 40,000 hhds. of sugar annually, and other W.India commodities, in tolerable plenty. It is ina high state of cultivation, and has about 3000white inhabitants and 30,000 slaves. A greatproportion of the Negroes of this island have em-braced Christianity, under the Moravian mission-aries, whose influence has been greatly promotiveof its prosperity.

The official value of the Imports and Exportsof Santa Cruz were, in

1809, imports ^^435,378, exports ^ig84,964.

1810, 422,033, 89,949.

And the quantities of the principal articles im--

ported into Great Britain were, in

Coffee.

Sugar.

Rum.

Cotton Wool.

Brit. Plant.

For. Plant.

Brit. Plant.

For. Plant.

Cwt.

Cwt.

Cwt.

Cwt.

Galls.

Lbs.

1809, 297

1479

280,211

374

181,594

610,903

1810, 31

290,933

236,307

174,294

Santa Cruz is in lat. 70° 44' n. Long. 64° 43' w.See West Indies.]

Cruz, Santa, a small island in the straits©f Magellan, opposite cape Monday. The Ad-miral Pedro Sarmiento took possession of it for thecrown of Spain, that making the tenth time of itsbeing captured.

Cruz, Santa, a small island of the coast ofBrazil, in the province and captainship of Rey,between that coast and the island of Santa Catalina.

Cruz, Santa, a sand -bank or islet near the n.coast of the island of Cuba, and close to the sand-bank of Cumplido.

Cruz, Santa, a point of the coast of the provinceand government of Honduras, called Triunfo dela Cruz, (Triumph of the Cross), between theport of La Sal and the river Tian, SO leagues fromthe gulf, in lat. 15° 40'.

Cruz, Santa, a port of the coast which lies be-tween the river La Plata and the straits of Magellan.On one side it has the Ensenada Grande, or LargeBay, and on the other the mountain of Santa Ines.Lat. 50° 10' s.

==Cruz, Santa, a river of the coastwhich lies be-tween the river La Plata and the straits of Magel-lan. It runs into the sea.

Q

Cruz, Santa, a small river of the provinceand captainship of Los Ilheos in Brazil. Itrises near the coast, runs e. and enters the sea be-tween the Grande and the Dulce, opposite theshoals ofS. Antonio.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andcaptainship of Seara in the same kingdom. It risesnear the coast, runs n. and enters the sea betweenthe point of Palmeras and that of Tortuga,

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andgovernment of Maracaybo. It rises in the sierraof Perija, runs e. and enters the great lake on thew. side.

Cruz, Santa, a lake of the province and countryof the Chiquitos Indians in Peru, formed from adrain issuing from the side of the river Para-guay, opposite the cordillera of San Fernando.

Cruz, Santa, a small island of the gulf of California, or Mar Roxo de Cortes; situate near thecoast, between the two islands of Catalana and SanJoseph.

Cruz, Santa, a small port of the island of Curacao, in the w. part, opposite the island of Oruba.

Cruz, Santa, a mountain on the coast of theMalvine or Falkland isles.

Cruz, Santa, a cape or point of the coast of thx

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