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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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It was formerly a very rich tract of land, si-tuate on the shore of the river Cazanare, a streamwhich crosses and stops the pass into the coun-try and for this reason there was a consider-able establishment formed here by persons whobelonged to tlie curacy of Santa Rosa de Chire.Its temperature is hot, but it is very fertile, andabounds in productions, which serve to provide forthe other settlements belonging to the same mis-sions : at present it is under the care of the reli-gious order of St. Domingo.

CARIBANA, a large country, at the presentday called Guayana Maritania, or Nueva Anda-iucia Austral. It extends from the mouth of theriver Orinoco to the mouth of the Marahon ; com-prehends the Dutch colonies of Esquibo, Surinam,and Berbice, and the French colony of Cayenne.It takes its name from the Caribes Indians, whoinhabit it, and who are very fierce and cruel,although upon amicable terms with the Dutch.Nearly the whole of this province is uncultivated,full of woods and mountains, but watered bymany rivers, all of which run for the most partfrom s. to e. and empty themselves into the sea ;although some flow from s. ton. and enter the Ori-noco. The climate, though warm and humid, ishealthy ; the productions, and the source of itscommerce, are sugar-cane, some cacao, wild wax,and incense. The coast, inhabited by Europeans,forms the greater part of this tract of country, ofwhich an account will be found under the respec-tive articles.

Caribana, a port on the coast of Tierra Firme,in the province and government of Darien, at theentrance of the gulf of Uraba.

CARIBE, a small port of the coast of TierraFirme, in the province and government of Vene-zuela, to the w. of cape Codera.

Caribe, Caribbee, or Charaibes, someislands close upon the shore of the province andgovernment of Cumana, near the cape of TresPuntas. [The Caribbee islands in the West In-dies extend in a semicircular form from the islandof Porto Rico, the easternmost of the Antilles, tothe coast of S. America. The sea, thus inclosedby the main land and the isles, is called the Ca-ribbean sea; and its great channel leads n. zo. tothe head of the gulf of Mexico through the sea ofHonduras. The chief of these islands are, SantaCruz, Sombuca, Anguilla, St. Martin, St. Bar-tholomew, Barbuda, Saba, St. Eustatia, St. Chris-topher, Nevis, Antigua, Montserrat, Guadalupe,Dcseada, Mariagalante, Dominica, Martinica,St. Vincent, Barbadoes, and Grenada. These areagain classed into Windward and Leeward isles bv

seamen, with regard to the usual courses of shipsfrom Old Spain or the Canaries to Cartagenaor New Spain and Porto Bello. The geographi-caltablesand maps class them into Great and LittleAntilles ; and authors vary much concerning thislast distinction. See Antilles. The Charaibesor Caribbecs were the ancient natives of the Wind-ward islands ; hence many geographers confine theterm to these isles only. Most of these were an-ciently possessed by a nation of cannibals, the ter-ror of the mild anti inotfensive inhabitants of His-paniola, who frequently expressed to Columbustheir dread of these fierce invaders. Thus, whenthese islands were afterwards discovered by thatgreat man, they were denominated Charibbeanisles. The insular Charaibs are supposed to beimmediately descended from the Galibis Indians,or Charaibes of S. America. An ingenious andlearned attempt to trace back the origin of the Ca-ribes to some emigrants from the ancient hemis-phere may be found in Bryan Edwards ; and itis to the valuable work of this author that we areindebted for the following illustrations of the man-ners and customs of this people. — The Caribesare avowedly of a fierce spirit and warlike dispo-sition. Historians have not failed to notice theseamong the most distinguishable of their qualities.Dr. Robertson, in Note X Cl II. to the first vol. ofhisHistory of America, quotes from a MS. Historyof Ferdinand and Isabella, Avrittenby Andrew Ber-naldes, the cotemporary and friend of Columbus,the folloAving instance of the bravery of the Caribes :A canoe with four men, two Avomen, and a boy, un-expectedly fell in with Columbus’s fleet. A Spanish,bark with 25 men was sent to take them; and the fleet,in the mean time, cut off their communication withthe shore. Instead of giving way to despair, theCaribes seized their arms with imdauntcd resolu-tion, and began the attack, wounding several ofthe Spaniards, although they had targets as wellas other defensive armour ; and even after thecanoe was overset, it was with no little difficultyand danger that some of them Avere secured, asthey continued to defend themselves, and to usetheir bows with great dexterity while swimmingin the sea. Herrera has recorded the same anec-dote. Restless, enterprising, and ardent, it wouldseem they considered war as the chief end of theircreation, and the rest of the human race as theirnatural prey ; for they devoured, without re-morse, the bodies of such of their enemies (themen at least) as fell into their hands. Indeed,there is no circumstance in the history of mankindbetter attested than the universal prevalence ofthese practices among them. Columbus was not]

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[only informed of it by the natives of Hispaniola,but having landed himself at Guadalupe on itsfirst discovery, he beheld in several cottagesthe head and limbs of the human body recentlyseparated, and evidently kept for occasional re-pasts. He released at the same time several ofthe natives of Porto Rico, who, having beenbrought captives from thence, were reserved asvictims for the same horrid purpose. But amongthemselves they were peaceable, and towards eachother faithful, friendly, and affectionate. Theyconsidered all strangers indeed as enemies, and ofthe people of Europe they formed a right estima-tion. The antipathy which they manifested to-wards the unoffending natives of the larger islandsappears extraordinary, but it is said to have de-scended to them from their ancestors of Guiana :they considered those islanders as a colony of Ar-rowauks, a nation of South America, with whomthe Caribes of that continent are continually at war.We can assign no cause for such hereditary andirreconcilable hostility. With regard to the peo-ple of Europe, it is allowed, that whenever anyof them had acquired their confidence, it wasgiven without reserve. Their friendship was aswarm as their enmity was implacable. The Ca-ribes of Guiana still fondly cherish the tradition ofRaleigh’s alliance, and to this day preserve theEnglish colours which he left with them at part-ing. (Bancroft, p. 259.) They painted their facesand bodies with arnotto so extravagantly, thattheir natural complexion, which was nearly thatof a Spanish olive, was not easily to be distinguish-ed under the surface of crimson. However, as thismode of painting themselves was practised by bothsexes, perhaps it was at first introduced as a de-fence against the venomous insects so common intropical climates, or possibly they considered thebrilliancy of the colour as highly ornamental. Themen disfigured their cheeks with deep incisionsand hideous scars, which they stained with black,and they painted white and black circles roundtheir eyes ; some of them perforated the cartilagethat divides the nostrils, and inserted the bone ofsome fish, a parrot’s feather, or a fragment of tor-toise-shell ; a frightful custom, practised also bythe natives of New Holland ; and they strung to-gether the teeth of such of their enemies as theyhad slain in battle, and wore them on their legsand arms as trophies of successful cruelty. Todraw the bow with unerring skill, to wield theclub with dexterity and strength, to swim withagility and boldness, to catch fish, and to build acottage, were acquirements of indispensable neces-sity, and the education of their children was well

suited to the attainment of them. One method ofmaking their boys skilful, even in infancy, in theexercise of the bow, was to suspend their food onthe branch of a tree, compelling the hardy urchinsto pierce it with their arrows before they could ob-tain permission to eat. Their arrows were com-monly poisoned, except when they made their mi-litary excursions by night : on those occasionsthey converted them into instruments of still greatermischief ; for, by ai ming the points with pledgetsof cotton dipt into oil, and set on flame, they firedwhole villages of their enemies at a distance. Thepoison which they used was a concoction of nox-ious gums and vegetable juices, and had the pro-perty of being perfectly innocent when received-inlo the stomach; but if communicated immediate-ly to the blood through the slightest wound, it wasgenerally mortal. As soon as a male child wasbrought into the world, he was sprinkled with:some drops of his father’s blood. The ceremoniesused on this occasion were sufficiently painful tothe father, but he submitted without emotion orcomplaint, fondly believing that the same degreeof courage which he had himself displayed wasby these means transmitted to his son. As theboy grew, he was soon made familiar with scenesof barbarity ; he partook of the horrid repasts ofhis nation, and he was frequently anointed withthe fat of a slaughtered Arrowauk : but he was notallowed to participate in the toils of the warrior,and to share the glories of conquest, until his for-titude had been brought to the test. The dawn ofmanhood ushered in the hour of severe trial. Hewas now to exchange the name he had receivedin his infancy for one more sounding and signifi-cant; a ceremony of high importance in the life of aCaribe, but always accompanied by a scene of fero-cious festivity and unnatural cruelty. In times ofpeace, the Caribes admitted of no supremacy but thatof nature. Having no laws, they needed no ma-gistrates. To their old men, indeed, they allowedsome kind of authority, but it was at best ill-de-fined, and must at all times have been insufficientto protect the weak against the strong. In war,experience had taught them that subordinationwas as requisite as courage ; they thereiore electedtheir captains in their general assemblies withgreat solemnity, but they put their pretensions tothe proof with circumstances of outrageous barba-rity. When success attended the measures of acandidate for command, the feast and the triumphawaited his return. He exchanged his name a se-cond time ; assuming in future that of the mostformidable Arrowauk that had fallen by his hand.He was permitted to appropriate to himself as many]

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The antidote, however, is oil taken in abundanceinternally, and applied outwardly. Neither wheatnor barley are known here, but the place aboundsin maize and rice, of which they make cakes, andwhich are the common bread of the natives, andmore particularly so that called cazave^ being asort of cake made of the root yiica^ name, or mo-niato. There are also a great number of cottontrees. The arms of this city are a green crossupon a gold ground, with a lion rampant oneach side. It was sacked in 1593 by RobertBaal, a pirate ; in 1583, by Sir Francis Drake, 23years from the time of its being fortified, and notfrom its foundation, as according to Mr. La Ma-tiniere ; again iti 1695, by Mr. Ducase, assisted bythe adventurers or fiibustiers, who completely pil-laged it : but a great sensation having been causedamongst the inhabitants at the loss of a superb se-pulchre made of silver, in which it rvas usual ona good Friday to deposit the eucharist, they hadthe good fortune to obtain its restitution throughthe interest and favour of Louis XI F. TheEnglish, under the command of Admiral Vernonand Sir Charles Ogle, besieged this city in 1740,when, although its castles were destroyed, andit was completely besieged, it would not surren-der, being gloriously defended by the viceroyDon Sebastian de Esiava, and Don Bias de Lezo,who caused the English to abandon the enterprisewith precipitancy and with great loss. [For thisconduct on the part of the English, several reasonswere assigned besides the strength of the place ;namely, the mortality among the troops, wantof skill in the commanders, and certain ditferencesbetween the admiral and the general. The forti-fications which they demolished have since beenrepaired.] It is the only part of all America wherethere is etfective coin of a fourth part of a real insilver. Its inhabitants amount to 9160 souls incommunion. It has been the native place of manycelebrated persons, such are,

Don Augustin Samiento de Sotomayor, of the or-der of Santiago, viscount of Portillo.

Don Andres de la Vega, professor at Salamanca,a famous lawyer.

Fray Carlos de Melgarejo, a religious Domini-can, an excellent preacher, and a man of unble-mished life.

Don Caspar de Cuba and Arce, head collegiateof San Marcos de Lima, oidor of Chile.

Don Gonzalo de Herrera, Marquis of Villalta,governor of Antioquia.

Don Gregorio Castellar y Mantilla, governor ofCumana, and general of the armada of the guardof the coasts of Cartagena.

Don Joseph de Paredes, captain of infantry,knight of the order of Santiago.

Fray Joseph Pacheco, of the order of St. Au-gustin, master, visitor, and vicar-general i:i his pro-vince of the Nuevo Reyno.

The Father Joseph de Urbina, of the extin-guished company, rector of the college of SantaFe.

Don.Iuan Fernandez Rosillo, dean of the churchof his country, bishop of V^erapez and of Mecho-acan .

Fray Juan Pereyra, a religious Dominican.

Don Lope Duke Estrada, kiiight of the order ofSantiago.

It is in long. 75° 24' and lat. 10° 25' n. [Foraccount of the present revolutions, see Vene-zuela.]

Bishops who have presided in Cartagena.

1. Don Fray Tomas del Toro, a monk of theorder of St. Domingo, elected the . first bishop in1532; but being at Talavera, his country, at thetime, he unfortunately died before he was conse-crated.

2. Don Fray Geronimo de Loaisa, a Dominicanmonk, renowned for his virtue and talent, and forhis experience in Indian affairs ; he was elected inthe room of the former, was consecrated at Valla-dolid, and there he erected the church into a ca-thedral in 1538, the same year in which he enteredCartagena ; from hence he was promoted to thearchbishopric of Lima in 1542.

3. Don Fray Francisco de Santa Maria y Bena-vides, of the order of St. Gerome, of the illustriousfamily of the Marquises of Fromesta ; serving atthat time the Emperor in Flanders, he took to areligious life, and was elected bishop of Cartagenain 1543. The city, in his time, was plundered bytwo pirates, lieaded by the Spanisli pilot AlonsoVexines, who cominitted thisactout of revenge fora flogging he had received ; they also ill-treatedthe venerable prelate, who had the additional griev-ance, in the year L551, of witnessing the city inflames. In 1554 he was promoted to the churchof Modonedo in Galicia, and was succeeded inCartagena by,

4. Don Fray Gregorio de Beteta, a Dominicanmonk, brought up in the convent of Salamanca, andone of the twenty who went to the Nuevo Reynode Gratiada, from whence he passed over to Mex-ico to convert the Indians, and afterwards withthe same object to the provinces of Santa Marta,Uraba, ami Cartagena ; and being teacher amicurate in one of his settlements, he received theorder of presentation to this bishopric in 1555 ;although he endeavoured to decline the dignify,

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Presurapscot river. It has a good harbour at itsmouth for small vessels, and has several mills uponit ; two miles higher a fall obstructs the navigation.Between it and Kennebeck there are no rivers ;some creeks and harbours of Casco bay throw them-selves into the main land, affording harbours forsmall vessels, and intersecting the country in variousforms.)

CASCONA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Antioquía ; situate at the mouth ofthe river Nare, at its entrance into the Mag-dalena.

CASCUEMBEC, a small island of Nova Scotia,close to the w. point of the island of San Juan.

CASIBANI, a river of the province and countryof the Amazonas : it rises in the cordillera of theMochovos and Pichambios Indians, runs in a ser-pentine course to the n. then inclining for manyleagues to the s. e. enters the Maranon or Amazonas,near the settlement of N uestra Seilora de Guada-lupe.

CASIDI, a river of the province and governmentof Guayana : it enters the Orinoco, according toBeilin, but which is afterwards contradicted by hisown map, since it is^there represented as having itssource to the e. of the city of Pamplona, and asrunning into the river Apure.

CASIGUA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Maracaibo ; situate on the coast, andnear the entrance or mouth of the great lake.

CASILDA, Ensenada de, a bay on the s. coastof the island of Cuba.

CASIMBUCO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Chayanta or Charcas in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Pocoata.

CASIMENA, a settlement of the jurisdiction ofthe city of Santiago de los Atalayas, in the govern-ment of San Juan de los Llanos, of the NuevoReyno de Granada : it is of a very hot temperature,and abounds in fruits of a similar climate. Its na-tives, who are numerous and consist of the NeolitosIndians, are very industrious, docile, and of gooddispositions, having been reduced to the faith bythe missionaries of the extinguished society of Je-suits. The settlement is at present in the charge ofthe barefooted order of St. Francis, and lies threeleagues from the settlement of Surimena, on theshore of the large river Meta.

CASIPA, a large lake of the province of NuevaAndalucía Austral or South, to the w. ofthe Vaca-ronis Indians : it is 30 leagues in length from n. to s.and 24 in width from e. to w. Four large riversflow from it, the principal of which areArous or Aroiand Caroa, the which enter the Orinoco on its e.side. Its woods are inhabited by some barbarous

nations of Caribes Indians, such as are the Canuristo the n. the Bsparagois to the e. the Aravis to thes. and the Chaguas and Lasipagotes to thezw. Inthis lake tortoises and alligators abound ; its watersare hurtful, and the climate here is unhealthy;hurricanes are frequent here, from the winds whichblow from the neighbouring mountains.

CASIPOURE, a river of the province ofGuayana, in the French possessions ; it runs fromm. to e. and enters the sea, its mouth being half aleague wide, near cape Orange, in 5° 27'.

Casipoure, a cape or point of the coast oppositethe side of cape Orange.

CASIQUIN, a river of the province and govern-ment of Mainas in the kingdom of Quito, whichruns many leagues, and enters the Maranon.

CASIRI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Parinacocha in Peru ; annexed to the.curacy of its capital : in its vicinity is an elevatedmountain, in which great Indian wealth is said tobe secreted.

CASIRIAQUI, Cano de, a large and copiousarm of the river Negro, by which this communi-cates with the Orinoco, and through that with theMaranon or Las Amazonas ; which communication,however, has been frequently doubted and con-troverted since the short time of its having beendiscovered.

CASIROUGE, a small island of the e. coast ofNewfoundland, betweea Bellisle and the portGobos.

CASIRRUENTI, a large and copious riverabounding in fine fish, of the province and govern-ment of San Juan de los Llanos : it passes throughthe llanuras of Cazanare and Meta, and, near thesettlement of San Joaquin de Atanari, enters theMeta.

CASIUINDO, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, in the jurisdiction of thecity of Xuxuy ; annexed to the curacy of Cochino-ca ; it has two hermitages, which serve as chapelsof ease, with the dedicatory title of Rinconada andRio de San Juan. The natives fabricate powderof excellent quality, and in its district are goldmines, which are not worked.

CASMA, Alta, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Santa in Peru ; situate on thecoast of the S. sea, with a moderately good port.It was sacked in 1586 by Edward David, an Eng-lish pirate.

Casma, Alta, another settlement of this pro-vince, called, for distinction’s sake, Casma Baxa.

CASMAL, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chachapoyas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Olleros.

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wliich there is a bank of fine sand, extending amile into the sea, and affording good anchorage.Lat. 1° 59' n. Long. 157° 35' w.]

[Christmas Sound, in Tien a del Fuego, S.America. Lat. 55° 21' n. Long. 69° 48' tw.]

CHRISTOVAL, San, atown of the government and jurisdiction of Maracaibo in the Nuevo Rey no de Granada; foundedby Captain Juan de Maldonado in 1560. It is of•a hot but healthy temperature, produces abundanceof sugar-canes, of which are made honey, sugar,and conserves, in immense quantities ; also a greatproportion of smoking tobacco, which is carried toMaracaibo. It has a good church and a conventt)f St. Augustin, which latter has fallen much todecay with regard to its establishment. The po-pulation of the town consists of 400 housekeepers.It lies 20 leagues n. e. of Pamplona, from the juris-diction of which it is divided by the river Pam-plonilla. It is the native place of Don Gregoriode Jaimes, archdeacon of Santa Fe, and bishop ofSanta Marta.

Same name, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Lipes, archbishopric of Char-cas in Peru ; in which took place the following ex-traordinary occurrence: The curate of this placegoing to confess a sick person in the settlement ofTahisa of the province of Paria, which was annexedto this, sunk into a spring of water in the pampasor llanos dela Sal, when he was drowned, and withthe two Indians who accompanied him on horse-back, never more appeared, nor were any vestigesever found of them : this was the reason why thelatter settlement has since been disunited from thecuracy of San Christoval.

Same name, a capital city of the provinceand captainship of Sergipé in the kingdom of Bra-zil ; being also known by that name. It is foundedon the sea-shore, and has a fine and well defendedport. It has a magnificent parish church with thetitle of Nuestra Senora de la Victoria ; two fineconvents, the one of the order of the Franciscans,and the other of the Carmelites ; also a chapel ofdevotion of the Virgin of the Rosary. The council-house is a very fine edifice, and in the suburbs isa hermitage of San Gonzalo, which is frequentedas a pilgrimage by this and other settlements of thejurisdiction. In this city resides the chief captain,who governs this province, and who is attended bya company of troops as a body-guard. In earlytimes it was filled with nobility, descended from thefirst families in Portugal; but it is now reduced to600 housekeepers. in its district, towards thepart called Coninquiva, is a parish with fourchapels, and towards the river Vaza-Barris fiveothers. It has also 25 engines, by which abundanceof sugar of an excellent quality is manufactured ;this article affords a great commerce w ith t!ic bayof Todos Santos. Lat. ll°40's. Long. ST'* SO' tw.

Same name, an island of the N. sea ; oneof the Antilles, discoverctl by Admiral Christoj)herColumbus, who gave it his name, in 149S. It isfive leagues in circumference, and is very fertile,and abounding in productions, particularly in cot-ton, tobacco, indigo, sugar, and brandy ; by allof which it carries on a great commerce. Here arcsome good salines, and in the mountains are somewoods of fine timber, well adapted for the buildingof ships. The English and the French both esta-blished themselves here in 1625, holding a dividedpossession, when they were driven out by the Spa-niards. After this the former again returned andre-established themselves in the greatest part of theisland, leaving, however, a small share to theFrench, until the year 1713, when the latter, inconjunction with the Spaniards themselves, cededit entirely to the English, who from that time haveheld it and kept it well fortified. [St. Christopher,situate in lat. 17° 21', long. 62° 48' ze. was calledby its ancient possessors, the Charibes, Liamuiga,or the Fertile Island. It was discovered in Novem-ber 1493 by Columbus himself, who was so pleasedwith its appearance, that he honoured it with hisown Christian name. But it was neither plantednor possessed by the Spaniards. It was, however,(notwithstanding that the general opinion ascribesthe honour of seniority to Barbadoes), the eldest ofall the British territories in the \V. Indies, andin truth, the common mother both of the Englishand French settlements in the Charibean islands.A Mr. Thomas Warner, an Englishman, asso-ciated himself Avith 14 other persons in the year1622, and with them took his passage on board aship bound to Virginia. From thence he and hiscompanions sailed from St. Christopher’s, wherethey arrived in January 1623, and by the monthof September following had raised a good crop oftobacco, which they proposed to make their staplecommodity. By the generality of historians whohave treated of the affairs of the W. Indies, it isasserted that a party oflhe French, under the com-mand of a person of the name of D’Esnambuc,took possession of one part of this island, on thesame day that Mr. Warner landed on the other;but the truth is, that the first landing of Warnerand his associates happened two years before thearrival of D’Esnambuc; who, it is admitted byDu Tertre, did not leave France until IG25. Un-fortunately the English settlers, in the latter end of

1623, had their plantations demolished by a dread- j

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four or five times in the year ; which causes theground to be so parched, that it would be entirelyuninhabitable, were it not for the multitude ofstreams with which it is intersected, and whichrender the temperature mild and healthy. Thecountry for the most part consists of levels, coveredwith green shrubs and trees, forming shady woodsof three or four leagues in extent. In these arefound the Brazil-wood, ebony, &c. which serve asan asylum for wild beasts, leopards and wildboars, deer and rabbits, a variety of mountain cats,coyotes, serpents and vipers. In the valleys arefound a multitude of quails, turtle-doves, pheasants,cranes, parrots, macaws, much esteemed for thebeauty of their plumage, and with which the In-dians adorn themselves, and an infinite variety ofother birds. The rivers, all of which descend fromthe sierras of Topia, in the rainy season increase tosuch a degree as to inundate the country for thespace of three or four leagues ; and generally re-maining out for eight days at least, the Indians areunder the necessity of forming for themselves akind of terrace upon the branches of trees, by meansof planks and sods, where they make fires and dresstheir food. There are many salt ponds, also minesof silver, which are not worked for want of la-bourers. This province was peopled by severalnations of Indians, who had their villages and hutson the sides of rivers. They used to maintain them-selves on maize, which they cultivated, afso on ca-labashes, which are very sweet and savoury, Frenchbeans, and a species of wild caroh plant, called bythem mesqnites, and which being ground, theyused to drink in water, after the manner of choco-late. They had also another delicacy in the plantcalled mezcalj which resembles the savila ; of thisthere are several sorts, of which they make wine,sweets, and vinegar ; of its tendrils thread, and ofits prickles needles. This country also abounds innopales, pitahayas, and other plants, includingmany which are native to Europe. Alvar NunezCabeza de Vaca was the first who discovered thisextensive province in his perigrination, after he hadsuffered shipwreck in going from Florida toMexico ; and from his report of it, the viceroyBon Antonio de Mendoza was induced to send intoit some persons to discover more concerning it. In1590 it was visited by the regulars of the com-pany of Jesuits, who came hither to preach thegospel. They succeeded in making proselytesamongst the natives, and established a regularmission, which was patronized by the Queen DonaMargarita of Austria, wife of Philip III. ; shehaving sent, for the promotion of the interests of

this* great object, and for the decorations of thealtars, &c. several valuable presents of jewels,ornaments, and other precious articles. Thecapital is the town of San Felipe and Santiago,and the other settlements are,

Montes Claros, Toro,

Real de Alamos, Concepcion,

Bocaverito, Loreto,

Noguera, Navajoa,

Camoa, Tecia,

Guarabe, Tepehue,

Ocosconi, Real de los Fra-

Mocorito, yeles,

San Ignacio, Vaca,

Santa Ana, Toriz,

Achogoa, Cuytes,

Caurimpo, Temoris,

Mocoyaguy, Chinipas,

Chiguaguilla, Valle Umbroso,

Tegueco, Guazapares,

Sivirijoa, Jatebo,

Charay, Guadalupe,

Mochicarui, Mayo,

San Miguel, Canamoas,

Haome, Batacosa.

Santa Maria,

Same name, a river of this province (Cinaloa), which runs toenter the sea in the gulf of CaJiforna, or Mar Roxode 'Cortes, between the rivers Culiacan and DelFuerte.

CINAMIN, a river of the province and cap^tainship of Rio Grande in Brazil. It rises nearthe coast, and runs into the sea close to the capeof San Roque.

[CINCINNATI, a flourishing town in the ter-ritory of the United States, n. w. of the Ohio, andthe present seat of government. It stands on then. bank of the Ohio, opposite the mouth of Lick-ing river, two miles and a half s. w. of fort Wash-ington, and about eight miles w. of Columbia.Both these towns lie between Great and LittleMiami rivers. Cincinnati contains about 200houses ; and is 82 miles n. bye. of Frankfort;90 n. w. of Lexington, and 779 w. by s. ofPhiladelphia. Lat. 38° 42' n. Long. 84° IPw.']

[CINCINNATUS is the s. easternmost of themilitary townships of New York state. It has Vir-gil on the and Salem, in Herkemer county, on the

e. and lies on two branches of Tioughnioga river,a n. w. branch of the Chenango. The centre ofthe town lies 53 miles s. w. by w. of Cooperstown,and 39 s. e. by s. of the 5. e, end of Salt lake.Lat. 42° 27'

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venerated an image of Oar L idy, the most cele-brated for miracles of any in the whole kingdom.The wonderful things, indeed, that have beenwrought here, have caused it to be the object ofgreat devotion ; accordingly an handsome templehas been erected, and the riches and ornamentswhich adorn the same are exceedingly valuable.People conse here from all the distant provinces tooffer up their prayers, to implore the protection ofthe Holy Virgin, and to thank her for benefits re-ceived. The festival here celebrated is on the 8thof September, when the quantity of people as-sembled is so large as to give the place, for thespace of 12 days, t!ie‘ appearance of a fair.

COCHAS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru.

COCHE, an island of the North sea, near the coastof Nueva Andalucia, and belonging to the islandof Margarita. It is nine miles in circumference,and its territory is low and barren. It was cele-brated for the pearl-fishery formerly carried onhere. It is four leagues to the e. of Cubagiia.

COCHEARI, a river of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas. It runs w. and enters theMadera opposite the Yamari.

[COCHECHO, a n.w. branch of Piscataquariver in New Hampshire. It rises in the Bluehills in Strafford county, and its mouth is fivemiles above Hilton’s point. See Piscat.xqua.J

COCHEIRA, Cumplida, a river of the coun-try of Brazil. It rises to the n. of the gold minesof La Navidad, runs w. and enters the Tocantineson the e. side, between the Salto de Ties Leguasand the settlement of the Portal de San Luis.

COCHIMATLAN, a settlement of the headsettlement of Almololoyan, and alcald'ia mayor ofColima, in Nueva Espana. It contains 100 fami-lies of Indians, whose trade consists in the manu-facturing of salt, and the cultivation of their gar-dens, which produce various kinds of fruits. Twoleagues to the w. of its head settlement.

COCHINOCA, a settlement of the provinceand governmeist of Tucuman, in the jurisdictionof the city of Xnjui. It has an hermitage, withthe dedicatory title of Santa Barbara, which is achapel of ease, and three other chapels in the set-tlement of Casivindo. The Indians of this placemanufacture gunpowder equal to that of Europe,and in its district are some gold mines.

COCHINOS, Ensenada de, a bay on the s.coast of the island of Cuba, between the pointGorda and the bay of Xagua, opposite the falls ofi)iego Perez.

COCHITI, a settlement of the kingdom ofNuevo Mexico ; situate at the source of a riverwhich enters the large river Uel Norte, or of theNorth.

COCHOAPA, a settlement of the alcaldia mayorof Tlapa in Nueva Espana; situate upon a dryand barren plain. It contains 150 families of In-dians, who are busied in the cultivation of cotton,the only production of the place.

COCHON, a small isle of the North sea,near the island of Guadalupe, in the bay ofthe Cul de Sac Petit, or Cala Angosta.

COCHUTA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Sonora in Nueva Espana.

COCHUY, a province of the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, to the n. e. ; bounded by the provinceof Chita. It has now the name of Laches, fromhaving been inhabited by this nation of Indians.It is very thinly peopled, of a hot climate, andabounding in Avoods.

COCKAHISPEN, a small river of Canada,which runs n. e. and enters Hudson’s bay.

[COCKBCRNE, a township in the n. part ofNew Hampshire, Grafton county, on the e. bankof Connecticut river, s, of Colebrooke.]

[COCKERMOUTH, a town in Grafton county,New Hampshire, about 15 miles n. e. of Dart-mouth college. It was incorporated in 1766, andin 1775 contained 118 inhabitants ; and in 1790,373.]

[COCKSAKIE. See Coxakie.]

COCLE, a large river of the province and go-vernment of Panama in the kingdom of TierraFirmc. It is formed by the union of the Penomeand the Nata, which run to the right and left ofthe mountain of Toabre, becoming navigable fromthat part to their entrance into the sea. A contra-band trade was in former times constantly carriedon through this river into the S. sea ; for whichreason Don Dionisio de Alcedo (the father of theauthor of this Dictionary) built a fort which de-fended its entrance, as likewise a rvatch-tower orsignal-house, to give notice of any strange vesselswhich might enter the river for the above pur-poses. The English took this tower, and built an-other fort by it in 1746, having been assisted by acompany of at least 200 smugglers. These w eredislodged in their turn by the aforesaid president,who inflicted condign punishment upon the headsof all the offenders.

COCMONOMAS, a barbarous nation of Indians of Peru, who inhabit the mountains ol' theprovince of Guanuco. They are docile, of a noblespirit, and in continual warfare with the Callisecasand Mazupes.

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3. Don Fray Geronimo de Corella, of the orderof St. Jerome, native of Valencia, descended fromtlic Connls of Cocentayna ; prior of the convent ofhis country, and afterwards of tliat of NuestraSehora del Prado, when he was elected bishop ofthis diocese in J562.

4. Don Fray Alonso de la Cerda, of the orderof preachers ; promoted to the archbishopric ofCharcas in 1577.

5. Don Fray Caspar de Andrada, a Franciscanmonk, and native of Toledo ; collegian of thecollege of San Pedro and San Pablo of Alcala deHenares, guardian of the convents of S. Juan dclos Reyes in Toledo and in Madrid, visitor of theprovinces of Arragon, a celebrated preacher, andelected to this bishopric in 1588 ; he governed 24years, and died in 1612.

6. Don Fray Alonso Galdo, a monk of theorder of St. Dominic, native of Valladolid, present-ed in 1612; he visited its bishopric, was of ex-emplary conduct, and being full of years and in-firmities, he requested that a coadjutor might benominated in 1628 ; and this was,

7. Xion Fray Luis de Canizares, a religiousminim of St. Francis of Paula, native of Madrid ;he was lecturer in his convent, and in that ofAlcala, calificador and consultor of the inquisitionin Valladolid ; nominated through the nuncio ofof his holiness; was visitor of the province of An-dalucia, bishop of Nueva Carceres in Philippines,and promoted to this see, where he died, in 1645.

8. Don Juan Merlo de la Fuente, doctoral c^Lnonof the church of the Puebla de los Angeles, electedbishop of Nuevo Segovia in the Philippines,which oflBce he did not accept, and was bishophere in 1648.

9. Don Pedro de los Reyes Rios of Madrid,native of Seville, monk of the order of San Benito,master, preacher in general, theological doctor,and poser to the cathedrals of the university ofOviedo, difinidor and abbot of the monasteries ofSan Isidro de Dueilas, San Claudio de liCon, andSan Benito de Sevilla, preacher to Charles II.elected bishop of this church, and before he wentover to it, promoted to that of Yucatan in 1700.

10. Don Fray Juan Perez Carpintero; electedin the same year, 1700.

11. Don Fray Angel Mnldonado, native ofOcaila, monk of San Bernardo, doctor and pro-fessor of theology in the university of Alcala ; hewrote in defence of the right of Philip V. to thecrown of Spain ; presented to the bishopric ofHonduras, and after taking possession, promotedto the church of Antequara in 1702.

12. Don Fray Antonio Guadalupe Lopez Por-

VOIi. I.

tillo, native of Guadalaxara in Nueva Espaha,of the order of St. Francis, a man of great learn-ing and virtue, domestic prelate of his holinessBenedict NHL; presented to the bishopric ofComayagua in 1725 ; he died in 1742.

13. Don Flay Francisco Molina, of the orderof St. Basil, master of theology, abbot of the mo-nastery of Cuellar, thrice of that of Madrid, andtwice difinidor general of Castille ; elected in1743.

14. Don Diego Rodriguez Rivas de Velasco,native of Riobamba in the kingdom of Quito, doc-tor of both laws in the university of Alcala, col-legian of the college of Los Verdes, titular arch-deacon of the holy church of Guatemala; electetlbishop in 1750, and promoted to the bishopric ofGuadalaxara in 1762.

15. Don Miguel Anselmo Alvarez de Abreu,native of Teneriffe, secretary of the bishop, of Se-govia, and canon in the church of Canarias, judgeof the apostolical chamber, and of the tribunal ofthe holy crusade, auxiliary bishop of the Puebla dclos Angeles, presented to this in 1762, and pro-moted to that of Antequera in 1767.

16. Don Isidore Rodriguez ; he died in 1767.

17. Don Antonio de Macarulla, elected in 1767,and promoted to that of Durango in 1773.

18. Don Francisco Joseph de Palencia, elected,in 1773.

19. Don Fray Antonio de San Miguel, in 1776,until 1783.

20. Don Joseph Antonio de Isabella, in 1783.

COMBAGUEN, a settlement of Indians of thedistrict of Tolten Alto in the kingdom of Chile.

(COMBAHEE, a considerable river of S.Carolina==, which enters St. Helena sound, betweenCoosa and Ashepoo rivers.)

(COMBAHEE Ferry, on the above river, is 17miles from Jacksonsborough, 15 from Pocotaglio,and 52 from Charlestown.

COMBACA a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

COMBAPATA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Tinta in Peru ; situate uponan eminence near the royal road which leads fromLa Plata to Lima. Its natives say that it has thebest and most healthy temperature of any in thekingdom, and they mention some persons whohave lived here to the age of 140 years.

COMBAPATA, a river of the above provinceand corregimiento. it rises in the cordillera nearthe settlement of Punoa, runs some distance e. andthen turning n. enters the source of the Vilco-mayo.

COMBEIMA, a large river of the province

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(bring in exchange dry goods, and this they doeither by avoiding the vigilance of the guards, orby purchasing a connivance. The population ofCoi^ is composed of 10,000 people of all colours ;few slaves are to be seen here, since the Indians,although they everywhere else have a particularpartiality for the blacks, entertain a decided aver-sion against them in this city. This antipathywas very useful in 1797 to the public tranquillity,for when the Negro slaves employed at w ork inthe fields, wished to follow the example of theblacks of St. Domingo, and selected chiefs, underwhom they committed some robberies, the In-dians of Corojoined the white people, and marchedagainst the rebels with most extraordinary cou-rage ; the revolt was thus suppressed almost assoon as it broke out ; the ring-leaders were hang-ed, and every thing was restored to order ; therebel army never amounted to more than 400blacks. All work at Coro is done by Indians,notwithstanding the wages are very low ; indeedthey li ve here with so much parsimony that a per-son cannot fetch fire from his neighbour’s withoutcarrying in exchange a piece of wood of the sizeof the firing he takes away, and even this is notalways done without difficulty. The city has nospring, and the water they drink is brought fromthe distance of half a league by asses in barrels, ofwhich two compose a load. The houses, thoughoriginally well built, bear evident marks of misery,and of the ravages of time; those belongingtothe Indians are yet more pitiful. The streets runin parallel lines, but are not paved ; the publicbuildings consist of a parish church, formerly acathedral, which title is yet given to it by the in-habitants, although for more than 160 years ithas been without a bishop or a chapter, the dutybeing performed by two curates, belonging to aconvent containing about seven or eight Francis-cans, and to a parish church in which are threemonks of the same order. The civil power isexercised by a cahildo. Since 1799, a militarycommandant has been established here, who sharesat the same time the judicatory authority, and thatof the police ; his revenue being 2000 dollars perannum. Two miles to the n. of Coro is an isthmusof about one league in breadth, which joins tlie pen-insula of Paragona to the continent ; it stretches outfrom the s. w. to n. w. about 20 leagues ; is inhabit-ed by Indians and a few whites, whose only em-ployment is the rearing of cattle, which they smug-gle over in great numbers to Cura^oa ; thebutchers’ shops of that island being always bettersupplied than those of the principal cities of TicrraFirme.

VOL. I,

This was the only city of Venezuela, exceptMaracaibo, which had not declared independenceon the 2Ist August 1811. See Venezuela.The city is in lat. 11° 24' n. and long. 69° 40'; itis a league distant from the sea, SO leagues w. ofCaracas, 33 n. of Barquisimeto, and 55 of Mara-caibo.)

Coro, a settlement of the province and coregi-miento of Pastos in the kingdom of Quito ; situateon the shore of the river Cascabeles, where thisenters the Caqueta.

Coro, another, of the province and corregi-mienlo of Carangas in Peru, and of the arch-bishopric of Charcas ; annexed to the curacy ofCorquemar.

COROA Grande, a settlement of the provinceand captainship of Pará in Brazil ; situate on theshore of the river Tocantines.

COROA, a large shoal near the coast of the pro-vince and captainship of Marañan in Brazil, atthe entrance of the river Coras.

COROAIBO. SeeCossA.

COROBAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chachapoyas in Peru, inwhich is venerated a miraculous image of NuestraSenora de Guadalupe. Near it are two caves,each capable of containing 50 horsemen with theirspears erect.

COROBAMBA, another settlement in the aboveprovince and kingdom.

COROBANA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana, which, according to Mr.Beilin, in his chart and description of the course ofa part of the Orinoco, runs continually n. andenters this river near where it runs into the sea.

COROCOTO, a settlement of Indians, of theprovince and corregimiento of Cuyo in the king-dom of Chile; situate on the shore of one of thelakes of Huanacache, distinct from the followingtown.

COROCOTO, a town of the above province andcorregimiento, a reduccion of the Pampas Indians ;situate on the shore of the river Tunuyan, nearthe high road which leads from Mendoza to BuenosAyres, in the district of which are tiie estates ofCarrizal Grande, Carvalillo, Lulunta, and Men-docinos.

COROCUBI, a river of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions.It is small, runs s. and enters the Negro, forminga dangerous torrent or whirl-pool, which bears thesame name.

COROI, a settlement of the missions wliicli be-long to the French in Guayana; situate near th«coast, and at the mouth of the river Kourrou.

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linas and that of Chirgua, in the space left bythese rivers as they run to enter the Portuguesa.

CULEBRAS, rio de, a settlement of the sameprovince and government (Venezuela) as is the former lake ;situate on the sliore of the river Yaraqui, to the e.of the town of San Felipe.

CULEBRAS, RIO DE, an island of the N. sea,near the coast of the province and government ofCartagena, at the entrance of the large river of LaMagdalena.

CULEBRILLAS, a small island of the S. sea,in the bay of Panama, of the province and go-vernment of Tierra Firme; is one of thosewhich Ibrm with that of Perico the port of thisname. .

CULIACAN, a province and alcald'm mayorof the kingdom of Nueva Galicia ; bounded n.and n. e. by the province of Cinaloa, s. by that ofCopala, s. w. by the kingdom of Niieva Fizcaya,s. by that of Chiamatlan, and w. by the gulf ofCalifornia. It is 60 leagues in length and 50 inAvidth. It is fertile, apd abounds in all sorts ofproductions; is watered by various rivers, par-ticularly the Umaya, Avhich is very large, and inwhich are caught great quantities offish. It emp-ties itself into the S. sea, in the port of Navitoos.It abounds in various earths, salt, and silvermines, and in many settlements of Mexican In-dians, reduced by the missionaries of the religionof St. Francis. The capital is of the same name.Lat.24°58'??.

CULIACAN, with the dedicatory title of San Mi-guel, a town which was founded by Nunez deGuzman in 1531 ; situate on the banks of a smallriver, Avhich afterwards unites itself Avith theUmaya. It is 160 leagues from Guadalaxara,and 260 from Mexico. The other settlements ofthis province are,

Cozela Real de Minas==, ==Binapa,Tacuchameta==, ==Baita.

Buya,

CULIACAN, a settlement of the intendancyof Sonora in Nueva Espana, celebrated in theMexican history under the name of Hueicol-huacan. The population is estimated at 10,800souls.]

CULIACAN, a river of this province (Sonora), which di-vides the jurisdiction of the same from that of Ci-naloa. It runs into the sea at the entrance of thegulf of California, or Mar Roxo de Cortes. At itsmouth or entrance are some very dangerous shoalsof the same name. See St. Michael.

CULLI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Canta in Peru j annexed to the cu-racy of Pari.

CULLOUMAS, a settlement of Indians, of thsprovince and colony of Georgia ; situate on theshore of the river Apalachicola.

CULLOUMAS, a settlement of the province andcorregirnienlo of Canta in Peru ; annexed to the-curacy of San Buenaventura.

CULLUE, a large lake of the province andcorregimiento of Tarma in Peru. From it isformed the canal Avhich empties itself into theriver Paria.

CULLURI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Paria in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Toledo.

CULLURQUI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cotabambas in Peru, in the vici-nity of which, in an estate for breeding cattle, is apoor chapel of Santa Rosa, and near to this twovery large rocks, Avhich, being touched with smallstones, send forth a sound similar to bells of thebest temper and metal.

CULPEPPER, a county in Virginia, betweenthe Blue ridge and the tide waters, which con-tains 22,105 inhabitants, of whom 8226 are slaves.The court-house of this county is 45 miles fromFredericksburg, and 95 from Charlottesville.]

CULTA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Paria in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of Condocondo.

CULTEPEQUE, a settlement of the real ofthe silver mines of the province and alcaldiamayor of Tlaxcala in Nueva Espana.

CULUACAN, San Lucas de, a settlement ofthe head settlement and alcatdia mayor of Yzucárin Nueva Espana. It contains 50 tamilies of In-dians, and Avas formerly the capital of the juris-diction. Here there still remain some baths ofwarm water, celebrated for the cure of many in-firmities. It is two leagues to the s. Avith a slightinclination to the 5. e. of its head settlement.

CUMA, San Antonio de, a town of the pro-vince and captainship of Marañan in Brazil. Itcontains a good parish-church, two convents ofmonks, one of the order of Carmen, and the otherof La Merced ; and at a short distance from thetown is a house Avhich was the residetice of the re-gulars of the company of .Jesuits. This town be-longs to the lordship of the house of Antonio Al-burquerque Coello de Carballo. It is three leaguesfrom its capital.

CUMA, San Antonio de, another settlement inthis province and kingdom (Marañan Brazil); situate near the coastand the cape of its name.

CUMA, San Antonio de. This cape is .alsoin the same captainship^ (Marañan) between a bar and thebay of Cabelo de Yelha. The aforesaid bar is a

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