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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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AIANABE, a settlement of Indians of S. Carolina, situate on the shore of the river Buffle-noir.

AIAPANGO, the head settlement of the district of the akaldia mayor of Chaleo in Nueva Espana. It contains 100 families of Indians, and is annexed to the curacy of Amecaraeca, at two leagues to the s. of its capital.

AIAPATA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Carabaya in Peru, and very opulent, on account of its silver mines. The sands on the banks of the rivers here have been known so richly impregnated with this metal, that lumps of it have been at different times picked up. It is the most considerable population in the province, and the temperature is so salutary, that it is very common to meet with persons of 90 years of age, and many also of 100.

AIAPEL, a town of the province and government of Antioquia, in the new kingdom of Granada, situate on the bank of a large lake or swamp of the same name, and which is formed from the waters of the rivers Cauca, San Jorge, and others. In its district are the lavaderos, or washing places for gold, of La Cruz, San Mateo, Thuansi, Can, Ure, Man, San Pedro, and La Soledad.

AIARANGA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chancay in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Paccho.

AIARI, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Huanta in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Mayoc.

AIATA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

AIATASTO, a large river of the province and government of Tucuman, in the district and jurisdiction of the city of Salta, on the banks of which are some pasture grounds of the same name, upon which are fed 40,000 head of neat cattle, and 6000 of horses for breeding.

AIATEPEC, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Atitlan, and alcaldia mayor of Villalta, in Nueva España. It contains 45 families of Indians, and is 17 leagues from its capital.

AIAUl, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Castro Virreyna in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Huaitara.

AIAUIRI, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Lamoa in Peru. In its vicinity are some forts, which were built by the Indians in the time of their gentilism, and now in a state of great dilapidation. There is a lake of warm water here, the bottom of which has never yet been found. The water always keeps at one height, so that it is presumed that it finds its way out through some subterraneous channel. There is also another warm

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water spring at two leagues distance, which is very noxious, and, as it runs, has the property of petrifying, in like manner as the spring of water in Guancavelica.

Aiauiri, another settlement of the province and corregimiento of Yauyos in Peru.

AIAUTLA, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Teutila in Nueva España, of a warm temperature, and inhabited by 100 Indian families, who support themselves by cultivating and selling the vaynilla plant. Nine leagues s. of its capital.

AICAROPA, a small river Of the province and government of Guayana, or Nueva Andalucia. It rises in the country of the Armocotos Indians, runs from e. to w. with a slight inclination to the s. and enters the Caura.

AICHES, a settlement of Indians of the province and government of Las Texas, in Nueva España, sitzate in the way which leads to Mexico.

AICIACHIA, a settlement of the missions which belonged to the Jesuits, in the province of Taraumara and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya, 40 leagues w. s. w. of the town and real of the mines of Chiguagua.

AIECTIPAC, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Yxteapan, and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa, in Nueva España. It contains 21 Indian families, and is three leagues e. of its head settlement.

AIENCAS, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Cuenca, in the kingdom of Quito, annexed to the curacy of Paccha.

AIGA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Huailas in Peru.

AIGAME, a settlement and real of mines of the province and government of Sonora in Nueva Espana.

==AILES, a river of the province and government of Louisiana. It runs s, e. between the rivers Canot and Noyre, and empties itself into the Mississippi.

AIMARAEZ, a province and corregimiento of Peru, bounded n. w. and w. by the province of Andahuailas, of the bishopric of Guamanga, s. by Parinacocha of the same, s. e. by Ghumbivilcas, and e. by Cotabamba. It is 40 leagues in length from «. to s. and 26 in width from e. to ti). including in its figure on the w. side the last mentioned province. It js one of the most uneven soils in the kingdom, being full of lofty sierras and snowy mountains. It is on this account that its climate is very cold, excepting, however, in some vallies, where it is more temperate, and where, on some small sloping grounds, the inhabitants sow seed and grain, and cultivate fruit trees and cane plantations,

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which the inhabitants trade. These are composed of 34 Indian families. It is a little more than three leagues from its head settlement,

AIOZINGO, a settlement of the alcaldía mayor of Chaleo in Nueva España, situate on the shore of the lake of Mexico, with a good port, at which are embarked the fruits of many provinces for the supply of that capital, (Chaleo), which is within eight or ten hours sail from hence. It has a good convent of S. Augustin, where a most beautiful image of the virgin is reverenced, and supposed to be wonder-working. Its inhabitants consist of 120 Indian families and some Spanish. It is distant one league s, s. e. from its capital.

AIQUILE, a settlement of the province of Mizque in Peru.

AIRICOS, a nation of Indians who inhabit the plains of Cazanare and Meta, of the new kingdom of Granada, to the c. of the mountains of Bogota, on the borders of the river Ele. It is numerous, and feared by all its neighbours, on account of its valour and dexterity in the use of arms.

Airicos, with the dedicatory title of San Francisco Xavier, a settlement which belonged to the Jesuits, and founded in 1662 by father Antonio de Monteverde, and composed of some of those Indians who were thus reduced to the Catholic faith.

AIRIHUANCA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Cotabamba in Peru.

AIRS, a small city of the province and colony of New Jersey, in the county of Burlington.

AIUDA, Nuestra Senora be la, a village and settlement of the Portuguese, in the province and captainship of Pernambuco in Brazil, situate upon the sea-coast, and on the shore of the river S. Miguel.

Aiuda, another settlement in the province and captainship of Puerto Seguro, situate upon the coast on the shore of the port.

AIUILA, a river of the province and alcaldia mayor of Soconusco, in the kingdom of Guatemala: It runs into the S. sea between the settlement of Suchitepec and the river Coatlan.

AIUINOS, a nation of Indians of the province and government of Cinaloa in Nueva Espana, converted to the faith by father Francisco Olinano, of the abolished society of the Jesuits, in 1624. They live towards the n. of the above province, and in the times of their heathenism they dwelt in the lofty mountains, in order that they might defend themselves from the other nations with whom they were at war. They are docile, well-inclined, and of good habits.

AIUN, or luMERi, a river of the province and

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viceroyalty of Buenos Ayres. It runs s. and enters the Rio Negro.

AIUNCHA, Pago BE, a settlement of the province and government of Tucuman, in the district and jurisdiction of the city of Santiago del Estero, from whence it is 22 leagues distant. It is situate on the shore of the river Dulce.

AIUTLA, the head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Villalta in Nueva Espana. It is of a cold temperature, containing 187 Indian families, and a convent of the religious order of S. Domingo ; distant 13 leagues to the e. of its capital.

Aiutla, another settlement in the head settlement of the district and alcaldia mayor of Autlan of the same kingdom, with 23 Indian families, who have large stores of pulse and fruit, so rich and fertile is their country. It is annexed to the curacy of Tenamaztlani, from whence it lies one league s,

AlUA, a small town of the island of St. Domingo, situate in the line which divides the Spanish territory from the French. It was the inhabitants of this town who chiefly contributed to ensure the victory which was gained against the Spaniards in the plain of Puerto Real, by the president Don Francisco de Segura y Sandoval, in 1691.

AIX, Palmar be, a large beach on the coast of Florida, within the channel of Bahama, near the point of Canaveral ; memorable for the shipwreck of 22 vessels, composing the fleet of Nueva Espana, which took place in 1715, being under the command of Don Antonio de Ubila ; memorable also for the loss of two galleons from Tierra Firme, commanded by Don Antonio de Echevers ; the loss of the one and the other amounting to nearly 20 million dollars.

Aix, a river of the same province, which runs into the sea very near the Palmar.

AJOIANI, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Carabaya in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Coaza.

[AJOS, a parish situate on the foot of the mountains which separate the rivers Paraguay and Parana, about 24 leagues e. of Asuncion. Lat. 23° 26' 34" s. Long. 56° 30' w.~\

AJOUES, a settlement of Indians of the province and government of Louisiana, in which the French held a garrison and fort for its defence, on the shore of a lake near the Missouri.

A joues, another settlement of the same province and government, situate on the shore of the river Missouri.

AKANCEAS, a nation of savage Indians of N. America, who live at the conflux of the rivers Mississippi, and another abundant stream of its

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name. Tlie religion of these idolaters is very singular, for they acknoAvledge a supreme being, who, they imagine, manifests himself to them in the figure of some animal which feeds in their fields ; and when this dies, tlvey substitute another, after having signified very great demonstrations of regret for the fate of the one whicli is lost.

AKANKIA, a river of the province and government of Louisiana. It is an arm of the Mississippi, which runs s. s. e. and enters the lake of Maurepas.

AKANSA, a settlement of Indians of the province and government of Louisiana. It has a fort built by the French, and it is near the mouth of the river of its name, where it enters the Mississippi.

Akansa, another settlement in the same province, situate also on the shore of the aforesaid river, and distinguished by the name of Petit Akansa.

Akansa (river), a river of the above province and government. It rises in the country of the Ozaques Indians, runs many leagues s. e. as far as the town of Satovis, Avhen, turning to the s. it enters by two mouths into the Mississippi, being throughout subject to large cataracts.

AKOUKA, a settlement of the province of La Guayana, in the Dutch possessions, or colony of Surinam ; situate on the shore of the river Little, just before it enters tlie Marawin.

[ALABAHA, a considerable river in E. Florida. Also said to be the name of a branch of St. Mary’s river.]

[ALABAHA, a considerable river of Georgia, which pursues a s. course to thegulph of Mexico, 100 miles w. of the head of St. Mary’s river. Its banks are low, and a trifling rain sAvells it to more than a mile in Avidth. In a freshet the current is rapid, and those Avho pass are in danger of being ^entangled in vines and briars, and droAvned ; they are also in r<'ul danger from great numbers of hungry alligators. The country for nearly iOO miles on each side of this river, that is to say, from the l)ead of St. Mary’s to Flint river, Avhicli is 90 miles w. of the Alabaha, is a continued soft, miry Avaste, affording neither water nor food for men or beasts ; and is so poor indeed, as that the common game of the Avoods are not found here. The i ountry on the of Alabaha is rather preferable to that on the e.l

[ALABAMOUS, an old French fort, in the w. part of Georgia ; situate between Coosa and Tallapoose rivers, and not far from their confluence.]

ALABAMA, an Indian village, delightfully situated on the banks of the Mississippi, on several swelling green hills, gradually ascending from the verge of the river. These Indians are the remains of the ancient Alabama nation, who inhabited the e. arm of the Great Mobile river,. Avhich still bears their name, now possessed by the Creeks, or Mnscogulges, who conquered the former.]

[Alabama River is formed by the junction of the Coosa or Coosee, or High Town river, and Tallapoosee river, at Little Tallasee, and runs in a s. w. direction, until it meets Tombigbee river from the n. w. at the great island which it there forms, 90 miles from the mouth of Mobile bay, in thegulph of Mexico. This beautiful river has a gentle current, pure waters, and excellent fish. It runs about two miles an hour, is 70 or 80 rods wide at its head, and from 15 to 18 feet deep in the driest season. The banks are about 50 feet high, and seldom, if ever, overfloAved. Travellers have gone down in large boats, in the month of May, in nine days, from Little Tallasee fo Mobile bay, Avhich is about 350 miles by water. Its banks abound Avith valuable productions in the vegetable and mineral kingdoms.

[ALABASTER, or Eleutheua, one of the Bahama or Lucayo islands, on which is a small fort and garrison. It is on the Great Bahama bank. The soil of this island and Harbour island, which lies at the n. end of it, is better tlian Providence island, and produces the greatest part of the pineapples that are exported ; the climate is very healthy. Lat. 24° 40' to 26° 30' n. Long. 76° 22' to 76° 56' W.1

[ALACHUA Savannah is a level green plain, in the country of the Indians of that name in E. Florida, situate about 75 miles w. from St. Augustine. It is about 15 miles over, and 50 in circumference ; and scarcely a tree or bush of any kind to be seen on it. It is encircled Avith high sloping hills, covered with Avaving forests, and fragrant orange groves, rising from an exuberanfly fertile soil. The ancient Alachua town stood on the borders of this savannah ; but the Indians mnoved to Cuscowilla, two miles distant, on account of the unhealthiness of the former site, occasioned by the stench of the putrid fisli and reptile.s, in the summer and autumn, driven on shore by the alligafors, and <he noxious exhulutions from the marshes of ti)e savannah. Though the horned cattle and horses bred in these meadows are large, sleek, sprightly, and faf, yet they are subject to mortal diseases; such as the water rot, or scald, occasioned by the warm Avater of the savannah ; Avhile those which, range in the high forests are clear of this (lisonler.1 °

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and tonegimknio of Atacama in Peru, situate on the coast.

ALGONQUINENSES, or Algonquins, a nation of savage Indians, who inhabit a part of Canada : they are continually at war with the Iroqiiees. Their idiom may be looked upon as the mother tongue of all the other nations of that country, and differs very slightly from the rest, so that any one speaking it would be able to travel in any other nation in these parts. They border o;i the north side of lake Huron; and although inhabiting the whole of the coast of lake Superior, their number, according to Mackenzie, does not exceed 150 families.

[ALGONQUINS, of Rainy Lake, Indians of N. America, of the precise limits of whose country we are not informed. They live very much detached in small parties. The country they inhabit is but an indifferent one ; it has been much hunted, and the game, of course, nearly exhausted. They are well-disposed towards the whites. Their number is said to decrease. They are extremely addicted to spirituous liquors, of which large quantities are annually furnished them by the n. w. traders, in return for their bark canoes. They live wretchedly poor.]

[Algonquins, of Portage de Prairie, Indians of N. America, who inhabit a low, flat, marshy country, mostly covered with timber, and well stocked with game. They are emigrants from the lake of the Woods, and the country e. of it ; who were introduced some years since by the n, tc. traders, in order to hunt the country on the lower parts of Red river, which then abounded in a variety of animals of the fur kind. They are an orderly, well-disposed people, but, like their relations on Rainy lake, addicted to spirituous liquors. Their trade is at its greatest extent.]

ALGUILGUA. See article Santa Monica;

ALllUE, a settlement of the province and corregim'iento of Rancagua in the kingdom of Chile, annexed to the curacy of San Pedro.

Aliiue, a large lake of the same province and kingdom.

[ALIATANS, Snake Indians, ofN. America, a numerous and well disposed people, inhabiting a woody and mountainous country ; they are divided into three large tribes, who wander at a considerable distance from each other, and are called by themselves So-so-na, So-s6-bubar, and I-a-kar ; these are again subdivided into smaller, though independent bands, the names of Avhich we have not yet learnt : they raise a number of horses and mules, with which they trade with the Crow Indians, or which are stolen by the nations on the e. of

them. They maintain a partial trade with the Spaniards, from whom they obtain many articles of clothing and ironmongery, but no warlike implements.]

[ALiATANs,of La Playes, Indians of N. America, who inhabit the rich plains from the head of the Arkansas, embracing the heads of Red river, and extending, with the mountains and high lands, e. as far as it is known towards the gulph of Mexico. They possess^ no fire arms, but are warlike and brave. They are, as well as the other Aliatans, a wandering people. Their country abounds in wild horses, beside great numbers which they raise themselves. These people, and the West Aliatans, might be induced to trade on the upper part of the Arkansas river. The Aliatans do not claim a country within any particular limits.]

[Aliatans, of the West, Indians of N. America, who inhabit a mountainous country, and sometimes venture in the plains e. of the rocky mountains, about the head of the Arkansas river. They have more intercourse with the Spaniards of New Mexico than the Snake Indians. They are said to be very numerous and warlike, but are badly armed. The Spaniards fear these people, and therefore take the precaution not to furnish them with any warlike implements. In their present unarmed state, they frequently commit hostilities on the Spaniards. They raise a great many horses.]

ALLANTE, a volcano of the kingdom of Chile, in the province and country of Arauco ; in 1640 it burst, the mountain opening in two places, and throwing out large shapeless masses of lava, with so great a noise as to be heard at many leagues distance: the mischief it did was very considerable.

ALIBAMONS, or Alibamis, a nation of Indians of Louisiana, dwelling «. of the Apaches. It is very numerous, and is on terms of amity with the French ; so that they never have communication with the ihiglisli, but from necessity. The former, when they first established themselves in this country, carried on a large trade here, but it afterwards declined, on account of the distance of the place. [These Indians are from West Florida, off’ the Allibami river, and came to Red river about the same time as the Boluxas and Appalaches. Part of them have lived on Red river, about sixteen miles above the Bayau Rapide, till lately, when most of this party, of about 30 men, went up Red river, and have settled themselves near the Caddoques, where, we are informed, they have lately raised good crops of corn. The Cad-

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