LatAm Digital Edition and Gazetteer

OverviewStatisticsSubjects

The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

491

COL

COL

401

Cold spring is 4200 feet above the level of the sea ;and few or none of the tropical fruits will flourishin so cold a climate. The general state of thethermometer is from 55° to 63° ; and even some-times so low as 44° : so that a fire there, even atnoon-day, is not only comfortable, but necessary,a great part of the year. Many of the Englishfruits, as the apple, the peach, and the strawberry,flourish there in great perfection, with several othervaluable exotics, as the tea-tree and other orientalproductions.)

(Cold Spring Cove, near Burlington, New Jer-sey, is remarkable for its sand and clay, used inthe manufacture of glass ; from whence the glassworks at Hamilton, 10 miles w. of Albany, are sup-plied with these articles.)

COLE, a settlement of the island of Barbadoes,in the district of the parish of St. George, distinctfrom the other of its name in the same parish.

COLEA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Maynas in the kingdom of Quito. It runss. and enters the Tigre.

(COLEBROOKE, in the «. part of New Hamp-shire, in Grafton county, lies on the e. bank ofConnecticut river, opposite the Great Monadnock,in Canaan, state of Vermont ; joining Cockburneon the s. and Stuartstown on the n. ; 126 miles n.w. by «. from Portsmouth.)

(COLEBROOKE, a Tougb, hilly township on then. line of Connecticut, in Litchfield county, 30miles n. w. of Hartford city. It was settled in1736. Here are two iron works, and several mills,on Still river, a n. w. water of Farmington river.In digging a cellar in this town, at the close of theyear 1796, belonging to Mr. John Hulburt, theworkmen, at the depth of about 9 or 10 feet, foundthree large tusks and two thigh-bones of an animal,the latter of which measured each about four feetfour inches in length, and 12|; inches in circum-ference. When first discovered they were entire,but as soon as they were exposed to the air theymouldered to dust. This adds another to themanj^ facts which prove that a race of enormousanimals, now extinct, once inhabited the UnitedStates.)

(COLERAIN, a township in Lancaster county,Pennsylvania.]

(COLERAIN, a town on the». bank of St. Mary’sriver, Camden county, Georgia, 40 or 50 milesfrom its mouth. On the 29th of June 1796, atreaty of peace and friendship was made and con-cluded at this place, between the president of theUnited States, on the one part, in behalf of theUnited States, and the king’s chiefs and warriorsof the Creek nation of Indians, on the other. By

this treaty, the line between the white people andthe Indians was established to run from theCurrahee mountain to the head or source of themain s. branch of the Oconee river, called by thewhite people Appalatohee, and by the IndiansTulapoeka, and down the middle of the same.”Liberty was also given by the Indians to the pre-sident of the United Stutes to “ establish a tradingor military post on the s. side of Alatamaha,about one mile from Beard’s bluff', or any wherefrom thence down the river, on the lands of theIndians and the Indians agreed to “ annex tosaid post a tract of land of five miles square ;and in return for this and other tokens of friendshipon the part of the Indians, the United States stipu-lated to give them goods to the value of 6000dollars, and to furnish them with two blacksmithswith tools.)

COLGUE, a settlement of the island of Laxa inthe kingdom of Chile ; situate on the shore of theriver Tolpan.

COLIMA, the alcaldia mayor and jurisdictionof the province and bishopric of Mechoacán inNueva Espana. It is bounded e. by the jurisdic-tion of Zapotlan, s. by that of Mortincs, n. by thatof Tuzcacuesco, and w. by that of Autlan, and theport of La Navidad in the kingdom of Nueva Ga-licia. It carries on a great trade in salt, collectedon the coasts of the S. sea, where there are wellsand salt grounds, from which great emolumentis derived, supplying, as they do, the inlandprovinces with this article. Formerly the best

cocoa wine of any in the kingdom was made here,from the abundance of this fruit found in all thepalm estates ; but the art of bringing it to perfec-tion was lost, and this branch of commerce diedaway, from the additional cause, that the making ofthis liquor was prohibited by the viceroy, the Dukeof Albuquerque, as being a drink calculated toproduce great inebriety. The capital is of the samename ; and the settlements of this district are,Almoloioyan, Zinacantepec,

Comala, Totolmoloyan,

Zaqualpa, Caxitlan,

Xulua. Tecoman,

Xilotlan, Ixtlahuaca,

Guezalapa, Tomala,

Nagualapa, Cuatlan. ,

Cochimatlan,

The capital is a town sitimteupon the coast ofthe S. sea, near the frontiers ofXalisco, in themost fertile and pleasant valley of Nueva Espaiia.It abounds in cacao and other vegetable produc-tions ; is of a hot temperature, and the air is verypure. Its buildings are regular and handsome,3 R 2

I

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
533

C R O

C R O 533

moiily called Acklin’s island), and Long Kej, (orFortune island), are tlie principal, Castle island(a very small one) is the most s. and is situated atthe s. end of Acklin’s island, which is the largestof the group, and extends about 50 miles in length ;atthew. extremity it is seven miles in breadth,but grows narrow towards the s. N. Crookedisland is upwards of 20 miles long, and from two tosix broad; Long Key, about two miles in length,l)ut very narrow : on this latter island is a valuablesalt pond. Near Bird rock, which is the mostw, extremity of the group, and at the w. point ofN. Crooked island, is a reef harbour, and a goodanchorage ; a settlement has been lately establishedthere, called Pitt’s Town, and this is the placewhere the Jamaica packet, on her return to Eu-rope through the Crooked island passage, leavesonce every month the Bahama mail from England,and takes on board the mail for Europe ; a port ofentry is now established there. There is likewisevery good anchorage, and plenty of fresh water atthe French w'ells, which lie at the bottom of thebay, about half-way between Bird rock and thes.end of Long Key. There is also a good harbour,(called Atwood’s harbour) at the w. end of Acklin’sisland, but fit only for small vessels, and anotherat Major’s Keys, on the n. side of N, Crookedisland, for vessels drawing eight or nine feet water.The population in ISOtf amounted to about 40whites, and 950 Negroes, men, women, andchildren; and previous to May 1803, lands weregranted by the crown, (o the amount oi 24,2 18 acres,for the purpose of cultivation. The middle of theisland lies in lat. 22^ 30' «. ; long. 74° tii). SeeBahamas.)

(Crooked Lake, in the Genessee country,communicates in an e, by n. diiection with Senecalake.)

(Crooked Lake, one of tlie chain of small lakeswhich connects the lake of tiie Woods with lakeSuperior, on the boundary line between the UnitedStates and Upper Canada, remarkable for its rug-ged cliff, in the cxacks of which are a number ofarrow's sticking.)

(Crooked River, in Camden county, Georgia,empties into the sea, opposite Cumberland island,12 or 14 miles n. from the mouth of St. Mary’s.Its banks are well timbered, and its course is e.by ??.)

(CROSS-CREEK, a township in Washingtoncounty, Pennsylvania.)

(Cross-Creeks. See Fayettevilee.)

(Cross-Roads, the name of a place in N. Caro-lina. near Duplin court-house, 23 miles from

Sampson court-house, and 23 from S. Washing-ton.)

(Cross-Roads, a village in Kent county, Mary-land, situated two miles s. of Georgetown, onSassafras river, and is thus named from four roadswhich meet and cross each other iu the village.)

(Cross-Roads, a village in Chester county,Pennsylvania, where six ditferent roads meet. Itis 27 miles s. e. of Lancaster, 11 n. by w. of Elk-ton in Maryland, and about 18 w.n.w. of Wil-mington iu Delaware.)

CROSSING, a settlement of the island of Bar-badoes, in the district of the parish of San Juan.

(CROSSWICKS, a village in Burlingtoncounty, New Jersey; through which the line ofstages passes from New York to Philadelphia.It has a respectable Quaker meeting-house, fourmiles 5. ti;. of Allen town, eight s. e. of Trenton,and 14 s. w. of Burlington.)

(CROTON River, a n. e. water of Hudsonriver, rises in the town of New Fairfield in Con-necticut, and running through Dutchess county,empties into Tappan bay. Croton bridge is thrownover this river three miles from its mouth, on thegreat road to Albany ; this is a solid, substantialbridge, 1400 feet long, the road narrow, piercingthrough a slate hill; it is supported by 16 stonepillars. Here is an admirable view of Croton falls,where the water precipitates itself between 60 and70 feet perpendicular, and over high slate banks,in some places 100 feet, the river spreading intothree streams as it enters the Hudson.)

(CROW Creek falls into the Tennessee, fromthe n. w. opposite the Crow town, 15 miles be-low Nickajack town.)

(Crow Indians, a people of N. America, di-vided into four bands, called by themselves Ahah'-ar-ro-pir-no-pah, No6-ta, Pa-rees-car, and E-liart'-sar. They annually visit the Mandans, Me-netares, and Ahwahhaways, to whom they barterliorses, mules, leather lodges, and many articlesof Indian apparel, for which they receive in re-turn guns, ammunition, axes, kettles, awls, andother European manufactures. When they re-turn to their country, they are in turn visited bythe Paunch and Snake Indians, to whom they bar-ter most of the articles they have obtained from thenations on the Missouri, for horses and mules, ofwhich those rrations have a greater abundance thanthemselves. They also obtain of the Snake In-dians bridle-bits and blankets, and some otherarticles, which those Indians purchase from theSpaniards. Their country is fertile, and wellwatered, and in many parts well timbered.

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
All 2 records