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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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(CHICKAMAGES, a part of the Cherokee na-tion of Indians, known by this name, inhabit fivevillages on Tennessee river. See CHICCA-MOGGA.)

CHICKAMINE, a river of the province andcolony of Virginia.

(CHICKASAW Bluff is on the e. bank of theMississippi, witiiin the territories of the UnitedStates, in lat. 35 n. The Spaniards erected herea strong stockaded fort, with cannon, and furnishedit with troops, all in the space of 24 hours, in themonth of June 1795. It has since been given up,.according to the treaty of 1796.)

(Chickasaw, a creek which falls into theWabash from the c. a little below Post St. Vin-cent.)

(Chickasaw, a river which empties into theMississippi, on the e. side, 104 miles from themouth of Margot, and 67 s. w. of Mine au Fer.Tlie lands here are of an excellent quality, andcovered with a variety of useful timber, canes, &c.This river may be ascended during high floods up-wards of SO miles with boats of several tons burden.)

(Chickasaws, a famous nation of Indians, whoinhabit the country on the e. side of the Mississippi,on the head branches of the Tombigbee, Mobile,and Yazoo rivers, in the n. zo. corner of the state ofGeorgia, and n. of the country of the Chactaws.Their country is an extensive plain, tolerably wellwatered from springs, and of a pretty good soil.They have seven towns, the central one of whichis in lat. 34° 23' «• long. 89° 30' w. The num-ber of souls in this nation has been formerlyreckoned at 1725, of which 575 were fighting men.There are some Negroes among the Chickasaws,who either were taken captive in war, or ran awayfrom their masters, and sought safety among theIndians. In 1539, Ferdinand de Soto, with 900men, besides seamen, sailed from Cuba with a de-sign to conquer Florida. He travelled n. to theChickasaw country, about lat. 35° or 36° ; and threeyears after died, and was buried on the bank ofMississipi river.)

CHICLAIO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Saña in Peru, in which there is aconvent of the religious order of St. Francis.

CHICO, Rio, a settlement and garrison of theprovince and government of Sonora ; situate onthe shore of the river Yaqui.

Chico, a river of the province and governmentof Panamá in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. Itrises in the mountains to the s. of the istmo, oristhmus, near the settlement of Chepo ; and runss. ze. and enters the sea in the bay or gulf of Pa-nama.

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Chico, another river of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán in Peru. It runs to the e.of the jurisdiction of the city ofXuxuy,

Chico, a small island, called Morro, near thecoast of the province and government of SantaMarta ; opposite this city, and not far from ano-ther island, distinguished by the name of MorroGrande.

CHICOANTEPEC, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldla mayor of Zoques in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CHICOLAPA, a settlement of the head settle-ment, and alcaldla mayor of Coatepec, in NuevaEspana ; annexed to the curacy of its capital. Itcontains 187 families of Indians, who celebrateevery Friday throughout the year a teanguis orfair, at which are sold cattle and other productionsof the country. At these times it is a place of ge-neral rendezvous for the inhabitants of all the con-tiguous provinces ; and this fair has, from the greatconcourse of people usually assembling here, ob-tained the title of the famous teanguis of S. Vi-cente de Chicolapa. It is extremely fertile and plea-sant, and surrounded by several very small settle-ments or wards.

CHICOMESUCHIL, a settlement and headsettlement of tlie alcaldia mayor of Yxtepexi ofthe province and bishopric of Oaxaca in NuevaEspana, is of a hot temperature, and contains300 families of Indians, who exercise themselves inthe making scarlet cloths and cotton garments.

CHICOMI, a settlement and head settlement ofthe district of the alcaldia mayor of Tampico inNueva Espana. It contains 45 families of Indians,and lies 10 leagues to the s. of its capital.

CHICOMOCELO, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldia mayor of Chiapa. in the kingdom ofGuatemala ; [having a cave very narrow at theentry, but spacious within, with a stagnant lake,which is, however, clear, and is two fathoms deeptowards the banks.]

CHICONAUTA, St. Tomas de, a settlementof the alcaldia mayor of Ecatepec in NuevaEspana; annexed to the curacy of its capital;from whence it is distant one league to the n. n. e.It contains 160 families of Indians.

CHICONCUAC, S. Miguel de, a settlementof the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tez-cuco in Nueva Espana. It contains 123 familiesof Indians, and six of Spaniards. It produces agood proportion of grain, seeds, and cattte, fromthe fleeces of which they derive great emolument,as also from the coarse stuffs manufactured of thesame. It is one league to the n. of its capital.

CHICONCUASO, a settlement of the head

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CHIMALAPA, Santa Maria de a settlement of the head settlement of the district andalcaldia mayor of Tehuantepec in Nueva Espana.It is of a cold temperature, and the whole of itsdistrict is covered with very large trees, especiallyfirs fit for ship-building. Twenty-five leaguesn.w. of its capital,

CHIAMLHUACAN, a settlement of the headsettlement and alcaldia mayor of Coatepec inNueva Espana. It contains a good convent of thereligious order of St. Domingo, 300 families ofSpaniards, il/wsfees, and Mulattoes, who employthemselves in labour, and in the commerce of seedsand large and small cattle, which are bred in theestates contiguous ; but the latter in no great de-gree, owing to the scarcity of water and pasturewhich prevails here.

Same name, another settlement and headsettlement of the district in the alcaldia mayor ofChaleo, of the same kingdom. It contains 166families of Indians, and a convent of the religiousorder of St. Domingo. Five leagues n. of itscapital.

CHIMALTENANGO, a province and corregimiento of the kingdom of Guatemala ; situatein the valley of this capital. It is very pleasantand fertile, and peopled with Indians.

CHIMALTEPEC, a settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Tlapa in Nueva Espana. It contains 29families of Indians, and is two leagues from thereal of the mines of Cairo.

Same name, another small settlement of thehead settlement of Malcatepec, and alcaldia mayorof Nexapa, very near its head settlement.

CHIMAN, a settlement of the province and government of Darien, in the kingdom of TierraFirme ; situate near the coast of the S. sea, and onthe shore of the river of its name, having a smallport, which is garrisoned by a detachment fromPanama, for the purpose of restraining the inva-sions which are continually made by the Indians.

Same name, a river of this province, and govern-ment, which rises in the mountains on the s. coast,and runs into the sea opposite the island of Nar-ranjal,

CHIMBA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Coquimbo in the kingdom ofChile. It has the celebrated talc gold-mine whichwas discovered 36 years ago by a fisherman, whopulling up a plant of large and prickly leaves,called cordon, or fuller’s thistle, for the purpose offuel for his fire, observed that particles of golddropped from its roots; and having more narrowlyinspected it, found pieces amidst the mould ofconsiderable size and of very fine quality. Thus

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a mine became established here, and when it wasfirst dug it yielded from 300 to 500 dollars eachcaxon.

Same name, another settlement of the province andcorregimienio of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Andajes.

CHIMBACALLEa settlement of the kingdom of Quito, inthe corregimienio of the district of Las CincoLeguasde la Capital, (ofthe Five Leagues from theCapital), of which this is looked upon as a suburbfrom its proximity.

CHIMBARONGO, a river of the kingdom ofChile. It rises in the mountains of its cordillera^and unites itself with that of Tinguiragua to enterthe Napel. This river waters and fertilizes somevery pleasant and delightful valleys, abounding inpastures, whereon breed and fatten an infinite num-ber of cattle. On its shores are two convents, oneofthe religious order of Nuestra Senora de la Mer-ced, for the instruction of the Indians in the Chris-tian faith ; and another a house for novices, whichbelonged to the regulars of the society of Jesuits ;and also within a league’s distance from the latter,is a convent of the order of St. Domingo.

Same name, a settlement of the provinceand corregimienio of Colchagua in the same king-dom ; situate in the Former valley, between therivers Tinguiririca and Teno. There is alsoanother small settlement annexed, with a chapelof ease. In its district is a convent of the religiousorder of La Merced.

[CHIMBO, a jurisdiction in the province ofZinto in South America, in the torrid zone. Thecapital is also called by the same name.]

CHIMBO Y ALAUSI, a province and corregimientoof the kingdom of Quito ; bounded n. oythe serrania of the asiento of Ambato ; s, by thegovernment and jurisdiction of Guayaquil ; e. bythe district of the point of Santa Elena of this govern-ment; and ro. by the province of Riobamba. Its dis-trict is barren and poor, and the country beingmountainous, the inhabitants have no resource forgetting their livelihood other than by acting ascarriers between the provinces of Riobamba andTacunga on the one hand, and the warehouses ofBabahoyo on the other, where also are the royalmagazines ; and thus they bring back goods fromthe provinces of Peru, having for this traffic anumber of requas, or droves of mules, amountingin the whole to 1500 head. This commerce canonly be carried on in the summer, the roads beingimpassable in the winter through the mountains,when they say that these are shut up : at the sameseason the rivers become swollen to such a degree

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Santiaijo de la Monclava, and the other settlementsarc as follows :

J>an Buenaventura,Catano,

Villa del Saltillo,

Las Juntas,

La Hacienda del Alamo,Los Ranchos,

San Pedro de Boca Leo-

San Francisco Aguayo,

San Miguel,

El Presidio del Sacra-mento,

San Juan Bautista de

Rio Grande,

Petoyes,

San Francisco de Bizar. nes,

ron, Monte Rey.

Nra. Sra. de la Victoria,

COAHUITLAN, Santiago de, a settlementof the head settlement of Amuzgos, alcaldiaynayoT of Xicayan, of Nueva Espana. It is com-posed of 10 families of Indians, who are busiedin cultivating cochineal, cotton, and hainilla.Twenty -two leagues to the w. of its head settlement.

COAI, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Paraguay. It runs e. and enters theParana close to the settlement of the mission ofSt. Thomas.

COAILLO, a settlement of the province and4torreeimiento of Cañete in Peru.

COAJUSCO, San Francisco de, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor ofZultepec in Nueva Espana. It contains S6 fami-lies of Indians, and is three leagues to the s. of itscapital.

COALAQUE, a settlement of the province andtorregimiento of Moquehua in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Puguina.

COANDA, a province uncultivated and littleknown, s. t of that of Jaen de Bracamoros inthe kingdom of Quito. It is full of forests, rivers,lakes, and pools ; the climate is hot, moist, andunhealthy.

COAPA, a settlement of the head settlement ofSan Luis, of the coast and alcaldia mayor ofTlapa in Nueva Espafia. It is of a hot tempera-ture, and contains 86 families of Indians.

Same name, another settlement in the alcaldia mayorof Comitlan, of the kingdom of Guatemala.

COAPAN, San Pablo de, a settlement of thehead settlement of Tlacolula, and alcaldia mayorof Xalapa, in Nueva Espana. It is very close onthe s. w. side of its head settlement.

COAPETENGO, San Martin de, a settlement of the head settlement of Zitepec, and alcaldiamayor of Tenango del Valle, in Nueva Espana.It belonged formerly to the jurisdiction of Tancuba,and was united to this of Tenango, on account ofbeing closer to it than to its former jurisdiction.It contains 35 families of Indians.

COAPILLA, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Zoques in the kingdom of Guatemala.

COARI, a large river of the kingdom of Peru,the head and course of which are unknown, savethat it runs through countries belonging to the in-fidel Indians till it enters the Maranon : accordingto the map of Don Juan de la Cruz, it has itssource from the large ri vers of Cuchivara or Purus,and of Tefe. It runs $. e. then «. and then turn-ing to a s. e. course, enters with a large body ofwater into the Maranon, through the territory ofthe Zurinas Indians.

Same name, a settlement of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese posses-sions. It is upon the shore of the Maranon, andat the mouth of the fornn;er river.

COATA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Paucarcolla. in Peru. In its vicinityare three eminences of 20 yards in height, andwrought by the hand ; there being a traditionamongst the Indians, that in one of them is incloseda certain great treasure taken at the time that theIncas conquered this country : in its church isvenerated an image of Nuestra Senora de la Pre-sentacion, which is a subject of devotion to all thefaithful of the neighbouring provinces. It is si-tuate on the bank of the great lake Titicaca.

COATE, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Combaya.

COATEPEC, San Geeonimo de, a headsettlement of the alcaldia mayor of Xalapa inNueva Espana. Its district is eight leagues inlength, and its own situation is very pleasant, andits productions are many, such as maize, Frenchbeans, and tobacco, the latter being its chief ar-ticle of commerce. Its inhabitants are composedof 12 families of Spaniards, 214 of Mustees andMulattoes, and 138 of Indians ; of the latter, someemploy themselves as drovers, and others in fatten-ing pigs for the supply of Vera Cruz ; land beingvery deficient, and the Avhole of the territory allot-ted to them not exceeding 600 yards. Two leaguess.e. of Xalcomulco.

COATEPEC, another settlement, in the head settlement of Teutalpan, and alcaldia mayor of Za-catlan, in the same kingdom. It contains 120families of Indians, and is three leagues from itshead settlement.

Same name, another (settlement), which is the head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Zaqualpa in thesame kingdom. It contains 150 families of In-dians.

Same name, another (settlement), with the dedicatory titleof San Francisco, of the head settlement of Esca-

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teopan, and alcaldia mayor of Zaqualpa. 11 con-tains 204 families of Indians.

CAOTEPEC, Santa Maria, another (settlement), with the dedicatory title of Santa Maria, of the alcaldia mayor of Tacuba.It is very poor and much reduced.

Same name, another (settlement), the capital of the alcaldiamayor of the same kingdom ; the jurisdiction ofwhich comprehends three head settlements of thedistrict. It is of a moderate temperature, abound-ing in seeds and grain, which are cultivated inmany estates of its territoiy ; and in these somecattle also are bred. It contains 340 families ofIndians, 15 of Spaniards, and Mulattoes,with a good convent of monks of St. Domingo.Nine leagues to the no. of Mexico.

Same name , another (settlement), of the head settlement ofAmatepec, and alcaldia mayor of Zultepec, in thesame kingdom. It contains 20 families of Indians,who maintain themselves by breeding large cattle,and in sow ing some fruits and maize. Four leaguesto the n. of its head settlement.

COATEPEQUE, S. Paulo de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Zitaquaro, of the alcaldiamayor of Maravatio, in the bishopric of Mechoa-can. It contains 179 families of Indians, and isone eighth of a league’s distance from its headsettlement towards the s.

COATETELCO, S. Juan de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Mazatepec, and alcaldiaof Cuernavaca, in Nueva Espafia ; situatein a valley of a hot temperature. It contains 94families of Mexican Indians, who pride them-selves on their nobility, and suffer no other peopleto come and dwell among them. Here is a lakeformed by the winter rains, in which are caughtmojarras^ a fish much esteemed in Mexico.

COATINCHAN, a head settlement of the al-caldia mayor of the Puebla de los Angeles inNueva Espana. It has, besides the parish church,a convent of monks of St. Francis, 324 families ofIndians, and 50 of Spaniards, Mustees^ and Mu-lattoes, with those of the wards of its vicinity.Two leagues s. e. of its capital.

COATININGA, a river of tlie country of LasAmazonas, in the Portuguese possessions. It runsn. n. w. and enters the Madera.

COATLAN, a settlement of the head settlementof Metlatlan, and alcaldia mayor of Papantla, inNueva Espana. It contains 25 families of In-dians, and is little more than three leagues to thes. w. of its head settlement.

COATLAN, San Pablo, another (settlement), with the dedicatory title of San Pablo, the head settlement of the district ofthe alcaldia mayor of Miahuatlau in the samekingdom, being of a mild temperature. It con-

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tains 532 families of Indians, with those of itsimmediate wards, all of them employing thenn-selves in the cultivation of maize and other fruitsofthis region. It lies 12 leagues between the e.and s. of its capital.

Same name, another (settlement), the head settlement of thedistrict of the alcaldia mayor of Nexapa a in thesame kingdom. It has a convent of monks of St.Dcmiingo, and contains 114 families of Indians,employed in the cultivation and sale of grain and

cotton garments.

It lies 12 leagues to the n. of

the capital.

Same name, another (settlement), of the head settlement ofCozcatlan, and alcaldia mayor of Tasco, in thesame kingdom. It contains 130 families of In-dians, and lies three leagues to thee, of its capital.

Same name, a river of the province and alcaldiamayor of Soconusco in the kingdom of Guatemala,which runs into the S. sea, to the e. ofthe capital.

COATLINCHAN, San Miguel de, a settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Tezcuco in NuevaEspana. It contains 218 families of Indians, in-cluding those of its immediate wards, and is oneleague to the s. of its capital.

COAUCAZINTLA, a settlement of the dis-trict and head settlement of Tlacolula, and al-caldia mayor of Xalapa, in Nueva Espana ;situate between three lofty mountains, and in themidst of others with which its territory is covered.It is of a mild temperature, the soil is tortile, butproduces only maize and French beans, in whichconsists the commerce of the inhabitants. Theseare composed of 44 families of Indians. Oneleague to the n. e. of its head settlement.

COAUTITLAN, the district and alcaldiamayor of Nueva España ; being one of the mostfertile and rich territories, however inconsiderablein size, covered with cultivated grounds andestates, which produce quantities of maize, wheatbarley, and other grain. It is a grand plainjwatered by the river of its name, which traversesit, and runs from s. to n. It has a lake called Zum-pango, close to the settlement of Coyotepecwhich filling itself from the waters of the river*empties itself into the lake Ecatepec. This juris-diction contains the following settlements :

The capital of the same San Miguel de los Xa«

name.

queyes,

Teoloyuca,

Tepozotlan,

Xaltocan.

Coyotepec,

Santa Barbara,

Tultepec,

Huehuetoca,

The capital, which is the residence of the alcaldiamayor., lies in the direct road from Mexico to theinterior of the provinces, and upon this account3 Q

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