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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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wreck, and amongst these many valuables of goldand silver, which had grown quite discoloured, tothe amount of 40,000 dollars. Lat. 2°2l' s.

CHANEL, some islands near the coast of thecountry of Labrador, in the gulf of St. Lawrence.They are numerous and very small, one of thembeing very long and narrow ; forming a channelwith the coast, and giving its name to the rest.

CHANESES, a barbarous nation of Indians, ofthe province and government of Paraguay ; dwell-ing to the n. of the Rio de la Plata, and boundedby the Xarayes and Xacoces. They have theirhouses near the lakes, and maintain themselves byfishing.

CHANGAME, some small islands of the S. sea,and of the bay of Panamá, in the province and go-vernment of Tierra Firme. They are two in num-ber, being situate near the coast, and having be-tween them a shallow or quicksand, by which theyare communicated. They abound in a species ofbirds, from which they take their name.

CHANGO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tarma in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Chacayan.

CHANQUI, or Achanqui, a promontory orcape of the province and corregimiento of Valdiviain the kingdom of Chile ; being eight leagues tothe s. of San Marcelo. It forms and covers themouth or entrance of the gulf of Los Coronados,with the other cape, which is to thes. called De laBallena.

CHANTACO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Loxa in the kingdom of Quito,to the w. of Chuquri-bamba, and to the s. of SanPedro, consists entirely of Indians, and lies uponthe bank of a small river, being of an excellentclimate.

CHANTALI, a settlement of the province andgovernment of aen de Bracamoros in the king-dom of Quito ; situate on the shore of the river ofits name.

CHANUSSI, a river of the country of Las Ama-zonas, which runs from c. to w. through the woodslying towards the w. and enters the Guallaga onits ^ sido

CHANXEWATER, an English settlement inthe province and colony of New York ; situatenear the e. arm of the river Delaware.

CHAO, Farallones de, two small islands ofthe S. sea, near the coast of the province and cor-regimiento of Truxillo in Peru.

Chao, Morro de, a mountain of the coast ofthe same corregimiento.

CHAPA, Puerto de, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucumán, in the juris-

diction of the city of Cordoba ; situate near therivers Segundo and Tercero, at the foot of theMontana Nevada, or Snowy mountain.

CHAPACOTO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chimbo in the kingdom ofQuito ; situate at the skirt of the Gran Cuesta, ormountain of San Antonio. Through it passes asmall river, which runs down from this mountain,and empties itself in the river of Chimbo ; is of avery cold temperature, and lies in the middle of awood. Lat. l°40's.

CHAPADA, Sierra, mountains of the king-dom of Brazil, in the province and captainshipof Todos Santos. They run from e. to w. untilthey reach nearly as far as the coast.

CHAPALA, a settlement of the head settlementof the district and alcaldia mayor of Caxititlan inNueva Espana ; situate on the shore of the greatlake or sea of this name ; has a good convent ofthe monks of St. Francis, and in its valley, whichis very fertile, there is an abundance of all kinds ofseed, as wheat, maize, French beans, and many de-licious fruits.

Chapala, another settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Zaiula in the same kingdom ; situate ina plain of a mild temperature. It contains 42 fa-milies of Indians, who trade in seeds and otherfruits, since its district abounds in garden grounds.It has a convent of the religious of St. Francis ;lies 22 leagues between the e. and n. of its capital.

Chapala, a great lake of the kingdom ofNueva Galicia, called Mar de Chapala, on ac-count of its size, is navigated by many vessels,and is extremely well stocked with fish ; fromwhich the inhabitants of the immediate settlementsderive their source of commerce.

CHAPAMARCA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Loxa, in the kingdom ofQuito; situate to the s. of the capital.

CHAPANCHICA. See Madrigal.

CHAPARE, or Parati, a river of the provinceand government of Santa Cruz de la Sierra. Itrises in the serrania of the Altos or Lofts of Inti-nuyo, from two small rivers which unite ; runs inan inclined course to the e. and enters the Mar-more Grande, forming a good port.

CHAPARIPARI, a river of the province andgovernment of Cumaná, runs e. and enters thesea in the gulf of Triste.

CHAPARRA, Valle de, a valley of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Cumaná in Peru ; inthe vicinity of which is a mine abounding in ametal called chumillo.

CHAPARRAL, a small settlement of the cor-regimiento of Coyaima in the Nuevo Reyno de

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Belille,Ayacasi,Libitaco,Tofora,Palaqueua,Alahamaca,Toro,Asicnto de Quivio,Colquemarca,Yanqui,Capacmarca,Cancahuana,Llauzeo,Caspi,Quinota,Santo Tomas,Alca,Piiica,TomipampajCotahuassi,Qnillunza,Cupi.

CHUMEHE, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cuenca in the kingdom of Quito.

CHUMPULL, a settlement of the district andprovince of Toltenbaxo in the kingdom of Chile;situate near the sea-coast in the point of Tiraha.

Same name, a river of this province (Toltenbaxo), whichruns n. n. w. and enters the Callacalla.

CHUNANAS, an ancient nation of Indians ofthe province of Cuzco in Peru. It was subjectedand made tributary to the empire by the Inca Huay-nacapac, thirteenth Monarch of Peru.

CHUNCARA, a settlement of the corregimientoof Cuzco in Peru ; one of those which have re-mained in this kingdom from the time of theIncas. It was the boundary or extent of theconquests of Sinchiroca, eleventh Emperor, andhe left at it a strong garrison to guard against in-vasion from the neighbouring people. Twentyleagues from its capital.

CHUNCHANGA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Yea in Peru.

CHUNCHI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Chimbo in the kingdom of Quito ;lying between the rivers Alausi to the n. and Po-mallacta to the w.

Same name, another settlement of the provinceand government of Jaen de Bracamoros in thesame kingdom. It is entirely of Indians, of an hotclimate, atid in its territory towards the n. andtowards the e. are some gold mines, which werein former times worked, but to-day abandoned.Its situation is between the rivers Patacones to thee. and Chinchipe to the w. upon the high roadwhich leads from Loyola to Tomependa.

CHUNCHILEA, a river of the district of Guadalabquen in the kingdom of Chile. It runs n. n. w.and enters the Callacalla.

CHUNCHIPE, a river of the province andgovernment of Jaen de Bracamoros in the king-dom of Quito. It runs s. and forming a bendtowards the e. enters theMaranon.

CHUNCHOS, a barbarous nation of Indians,of the province and government of Tarma in Peru,and much dreaded by the Spaniards, on accountof the repeated incursions made by those savageson their possessions. In Lima they are in a con-tinal state of fear and apprehension of some sud-den attack from these enemies ; for in 1742 theytook and destroyed several settlements and estates,killing many Franciscan monks who were mis-sionaries amongst them. They were, however,once attacked by the brigadier, the Marquis deMena Hermosa, general of Callao, who construct-ed some forts, which are still served with artilleryand troops sufficient to protect them. These In-dians have a chief or prince, called the chuncho,descended, according to their accounts, from theroyal race of the Incas, who would fain layclaim to the monarchy of Peru as his right; andaccordingly, in 1744, represented to the Marquisof Villa Garcia, not without great threats, his in-tention of doing himself justice by force of arms :he is a Catholic, and has added to h is own honours thetitle of King of Peru ; he was brought up at Limaamongst the Spaniards as the son of a cazique,where he was instructed in the rules of government,policy, and military tactics, which he introducedinto his own country, and made known the useof swords and fire-arms. He went to Rome dis-guised as a menial, was introduced to the court ofMadrid, where he kissed the hand of King PhilipV. and the foot of the Pontiff Clement XII. Hehas two sons well instructed and equal in mentalenergies. These Chuiichos Indians are numerous,and live, some of them, in villages, and othersscattered over the mountains and in the woods ;they maintain a secret correspondence with the"Indians of all the other settlements of Peru andQuito, as well as with the Christians and infidelsinhabiting the forests where missions are establish-ed ; by tliis means they know vvhat is passing inall the provinces, cities, and settlements, &c.Many Indians who are malcontents, or fugitivesfrom justice on account oferimeordebt, invariablybetake themselves to the Chunchos, and this is thereason why this nation is so very populous. Theviceroy of Peru uses the greatest precautions, and iscontinually on the alert against any movements ofthe Chunchos or other Indians, and keeps a garri-son of good troops upon his frontiers.

CHUNCHURI, an ancient province of Peruin Las Charcas. It is small, and its natives werethe most valorous and hardy of any in the king-dom. The Inca Roca, fourth Emperor, subjectedthem, having attacked them with 30,000 of hisbest troops.

CHUNGUI, a settlement of the province Huamanga.

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