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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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Massachusetts, incorporated in 1797, it being formerly the n. part of Stoughton.)

CANUARI, a small river of the province and government of Buenos Ayres. It runs to the n. and enters the Rio Grande of the Portuguese, between the Mbouqui and the Pobatini.

CANUEIRAS, a point of the n. extremity of the island of Santa Catalina, on the coast of Brazil.

CANUERALES, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Cuyo in the kingdom of Chile, situate near the river Diamante.

CANUTO, a river of the province and government of Venezuela. It rises in the mountain Tacazuruma, runs nearly s. and enters the river of La Portuguesa.

CANXA, a small settlement of the head settlement of Orizavá, and alcaldía mayor of Yxmiquilpan, in Nueva España.

(CANY Fork, in the state of Tennessee, is a short navigable river, and runs n. w. into Cumberland river, w. of the Salt lick, and opposite Salt Lick creek, 50 miles in a straight line from Nashville.)

CANZE, a river of the colony and government of Surinam, in the part of Guayana possessed by the Dutch. It rises between the Berbice and the Corentin, and after a very round-about course, enters the former, close to its mouth, or where it runs into the sea.

CAO, Santa Maria Magdalena de, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Truxillo in Peru, situate in the valley of Chicama. It was the capital in the time of the Indians, and the number of these 200 years ago was 3000 ; but now it is reduced to a wretched state, and occupies a small spot on the other side of the river, being nine leagues distant from its capital.

Cao, with the dedicatory title of Santiago, to distinguish it from another settlement of the same province and corregimiento, although they are both equally poor and reduced. Its inhabitants maintain themselves by the cultivation of maize, wheat, rice, and vegetables, which they carry for sale to the other provinces, so that they are for the most part a race of carriers, and indeed possess no inconsiderable droves of mules. It is six leagues from its capital, just by the sea.

CAOBAS, River of the, in the island of St. Domingo, in that part possessed by the French. It rises in the valley of San Juan, runs to the w. and afterwards changing its course to the n. w. enters the Artibonito.

CAORA, a river which runs down from the mountains of Guayana to the s. of the lake

Cassipa, into which it enters ; and afterwards running out at the n. side of this lake, it finds its way through a subterraneous passage, until it empties itself into the Orinoco, on its s. shore. The borders of this river are inhabited by a nation of barbarous Indians, who wander continually through the forests without any fixed abode. They are cannibals as well as the other Indian tribes around them, and with whom they keep up a continual warfare.

CAPACA, a settlement of the province of Culiacan in Nueva España ; situate near the head settlement.

CAPACHICA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Paucarcolla in Peru ; situate on the w. shore of the lake Titicaca.

Capachica, a narrow strip of land formed by the great lake Titicaca. Of these strips there are three, and this appears, for the distance of a league, to be completely divided from any main land.

CAPACHO, a village under the jurisdiction of the town of San Christoval, in the new kingdom of Granada ; of a warm temperature ; abounding in sugar-cane, from which much sugar is manufactured, and in cacao ; but it is much infested by the barbarian Indians, called the Motilones (shorthaired), who destroy the plantations. It contains 200 house- keepers, and is 24; leagues n. e. of Pamplona, in the road which leads to Mérida and La Grita, and eight leagues from the city of San Christoval.

CAPACMARCO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chumbivilcas in Peru.

CAPAIA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Soraica.

Capaia, another settlement in the province of Barcelona, and government of Cumana; situate on the coast, on the banks of a river of the same name.

Capaia, a river of the same province and government, which rises in the serranía, and after making many turnings runs into the sea, near the cape Codera towards the e.

CAPAIAN, a settlement of the province and government of Tucumán, in the jurisdiction of the city of Rioja.

CAPAIRE, a settlement of the province of Venezuela, and government of Maracaibo ; situate very near the coast, at the point Colorada, on the shore of the river Guepe.

(CAPALITA, a large town of North America, and in the province of Oaxaca. The country round abounds with sheep, cattle, and excellent fruit.)

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4S0 C O A

C O A

Santiaijo de la Monclava, and the other settlements arc as follows :

J>an Buenaventura, Catano,

Villa del Saltillo,

Las Juntas,

La Hacienda del Alamo, Los Ranchos,

San Pedro de Boca Leo-

San Francisco Aguayo,

San Miguel,

El Presidio del Sacramento,

San Juan Bautista de

Rio Grande,

Petoyes,

San Francisco de Bizar. nes,

ron, Monte Rey.

Nra. Sra. de la Victoria,

COAHUITLAN, Santiago de, a settlement of the head settlement of Amuzgos, alcaldia ynayoT of Xicayan, of Nueva Espana. It is composed of 10 families of Indians, who are busied in cultivating cochineal, cotton, and hainilla. Twenty -two leagues to the w. of its head settlement.

COAI, a small river of the province and government of Paraguay. It runs e. and enters the Parana close to the settlement of the mission of St. Thomas.

COAILLO, a settlement of the province and 4torreeimiento of Cañete in Peru.

COAJUSCO, San Francisco de, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Zultepec in Nueva Espana. It contains S6 families of Indians, and is three leagues to the s. of its capital.

COALAQUE, a settlement of the province and torregimiento of Moquehua in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Puguina.

COANDA, a province uncultivated and little known, s. t of that of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdom of Quito. It is full of forests, rivers, lakes, and pools ; the climate is hot, moist, and unhealthy.

COAPA, a settlement of the head settlement of San Luis, of the coast and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in Nueva Espafia. It is of a hot temperature, and contains 86 families of Indians.

Same name, another settlement in the alcaldia mayor of Comitlan, of the kingdom of Guatemala.

COAPAN, San Pablo de, a settlement of the head settlement of Tlacolula, and alcaldia mayor of Xalapa, in Nueva Espana. It is very close on the s. w. side of its head settlement.

COAPETENGO, San Martin de, a settlement of the head settlement of Zitepec, and alcaldia mayor of Tenango del Valle, in Nueva Espana. It belonged formerly to the jurisdiction of Tancuba, and was united to this of Tenango, on account of being closer to it than to its former jurisdiction. It contains 35 families of Indians.

COAPILLA, a settlement of the province and alcaldia mayor of Zoques in the kingdom of Guatemala.

COARI, a large river of the kingdom of Peru, the head and course of which are unknown, save that it runs through countries belonging to the infidel Indians till it enters the Maranon : according to the map of Don Juan de la Cruz, it has its source from the large ri vers of Cuchivara or Purus, and of Tefe. It runs $. e. then «. and then turning to a s. e. course, enters with a large body of water into the Maranon, through the territory of the Zurinas Indians.

Same name, a settlement of the province and country of Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions. It is upon the shore of the Maranon, and at the mouth of the fornn;er river.

COATA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Paucarcolla. in Peru. In its vicinity are three eminences of 20 yards in height, and wrought by the hand ; there being a tradition amongst the Indians, that in one of them is inclosed a certain great treasure taken at the time that the Incas conquered this country : in its church is venerated an image of Nuestra Senora de la Presentacion, which is a subject of devotion to all the faithful of the neighbouring provinces. It is situate on the bank of the great lake Titicaca.

COATE, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Combaya.

COATEPEC, San Geeonimo de, a head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Xalapa in Nueva Espana. Its district is eight leagues in length, and its own situation is very pleasant, and its productions are many, such as maize, French beans, and tobacco, the latter being its chief article of commerce. Its inhabitants are composed of 12 families of Spaniards, 214 of Mustees and Mulattoes, and 138 of Indians ; of the latter, some employ themselves as drovers, and others in fattening pigs for the supply of Vera Cruz ; land being very deficient, and the Avhole of the territory allotted to them not exceeding 600 yards. Two leagues s.e. of Xalcomulco.

COATEPEC, another settlement, in the head settlement of Teutalpan, and alcaldia mayor of Zacatlan, in the same kingdom. It contains 120 families of Indians, and is three leagues from its head settlement.

Same name, another (settlement), which is the head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Zaqualpa in the same kingdom. It contains 150 families of Indians.

Same name, another (settlement), with the dedicatory title of San Francisco, of the head settlement of Esca

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COL

m

COIOTZINGO, S. Miguel de, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Guejozingo in Nueva Espana. It contains IS families of Indians.

COIQUAR, a settlement of the province and government of Cumaná, situate on tlie shore of a river, between t!ie city of Cariaco, and the interior bay of the gulf Triste.

COIUCA, San Miguel de, a settlement and head settlement of tlie district of the government of Acapulco in Nueva Espana. It contains 137 families of Indians, and is nine leagues to the n. e. of its capital. Close by this, and annexed to it, is another settlement, called Chinas, with 120 families.

Coiuca, with the dedicatory title of San Agustin, another settlement of the head settlement and alcaldin mayor of Zacatula in the same kingdom ; containing 32 families of Indians and some Mustees, and being annexed to the curacy of its capital.

COIULA, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Cuicatlan in Nueva Espaua. It contains SO families of Indians, who trade in cochineal. Three leagues e. of its capital.

COIUTLA, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Zochicoatlan in Nueva Espana ; situate on a plain surrounded bj^ heights. It is annexed to the curacy of its capital, and contains 37 families of Indians, being; 15 leagrucs distant from its capital.

COJATA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Paucarcolla in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Vilques.

COJEDO, a settlement of the province and government of Venezuela in the kingdom of Tierra Firme ; situate on the skirt of a mountain near the river Guarico,

(COKESBURY College, in the town of Abington, in Harford county, Maryland, is an institution which bids fair to promote the improvement of science, and the cultivation of virtue. It was founded by the methodists in 1785, and has its name in honour of Thomas Coke and Francis Asbury, the American bishops of the methodist episcopal church. The edifice is of brick, handsomely built on a healthy spot, enjoying a fine air and a very extensive prospect. The college was erected, and is wholly supported by subscription and voluntary donations. The students, who are to consist of the sons of travelling preachers, annual subscribers, members of the society, and orphans, are instructed in English, Latin, Greek, logic, rhetoric, history, geography, natural philosophy,

VOL. I.

and astronomy ; and when the finances of the college will admit, they are to be taught the Hebrew, French, and German languages. The rules for the private conduct of the students extend to their amusements ; and all tend to promote regularity, encourage industry, and to nip the buds of idleness and vice. Their recreations without doors are walking, gardening, riding, andbathiiig; within doors they have tools and accommodations for the carpenter’s, joiner’s, cabinet-maker’s, or turner’s business. These they are taught to consider as pleasing and healthful recreations, both for the body and mind.]

COLAISACAPE, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Loxa in the kingdom of Quito.

COLUMBO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Loxa in the kingdom of Quito.

COLAMI, a settlement of Indians of S. Carolina; situate on the shore of the river Albama.

COLAN, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Piura in Peru, on the coast of the Pacific ; annexed to the curacy of Paita. its territory produces in abundance fruits and vegetables, which are carried for the supply of its capital. All its inhabitants are either agriculturists or fishermen. It is watered by the river Achira, also called Colan, as well as the settlement ; and though distinct from Cachimayu, it is not so from Catamayu, as is erroneously stated by Mr. La Martiniere. [Here they make large rafts of logs, which will carry 60 or 70 tons of goods ; with these they make long voyages, even to Panama, 5 or 600 leagues distant, 'fhey have a mast with a sail fastened to it. They always go before the wind, being unable to ply against it ; and therefore only fit for these seas, where the wind is always in a manner the same, not varying above a point or two all the way from Lima, till they come into the bay of Panama ; and there they must sometimes w'ait for a change. Their cargo is usually wine, oil, sugar, Quito cloth, soap, and dressed goat-skins. The float is usually navigated by three or four men, who sell their float where they dispose of their cargo ; and return as passengers to the port they came from. The Indians go out at night by the help of the land-wind with fishing floats, more manageable than the others, though these have masts and sails too, and return again in the dav time with the sea-wind.] Lat. 4° 56' s.

Colan, the aforesaid river. See Cat am a yu.

COLAPISAS, a settlement of Indians of the province and government of Louisiana ; situate on the shore of the Mississippi, upon a long strip of land formed by the lake Maurepas.

3 R

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CONGACA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Angaraes in Pern ; annexed to the uracy of Yulcamarca.

CONGARI, a large river of S. Carolina. It runs s. e. taking various names, till it enters the sea. It is first called Trente Milles, or Thirty Miles, then Congari, and afterwards Santi.

CONGAS, a settlement of the province and rorregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Ocros.

CONGER, Rock of, a small island or rock, close to the e. coast of the island of Barbadoes.

CONGO, a settlement of the province and government of Darien, and kingdom of Tierra N ueva ; situate on the shore of a river, which gives it its name, and of the coast of the S. sea, within the gulf of S. Miguel.

CONGOHAS, a settlement of the province and captainship of Espiritu Santo in Brazil ; situate to the w. of the Villa Rica.

CONGURIPO, Santiago de, a- settlement of the head settlement of Puruandiro, and alcaldta mayor of Valladolid, in the province and bishopric of Mechoacan ; situate on a plain or shore of the Rio Grande. It is of a hot temperature, and contains 12 families of Spaniards and Mustees^ and 57 of Indians. Twenty-six leagues from the captital Pasquaro.

CONHAWAY, a large river of N. Carolina. It runs many leagues ; first n. e. then n. and afterwards n. w. and enters the Ohio. It is called also Wood river and New river.

CONHAWAY, another, in the province and colony of Virginia, with the additional title of Petit, or Little. It also runs n. w, and enters the Ohio.

(CONHOCTON Creek, in New York, is the n. head water of Tioga river. Near its mouth is the settlement called Bath.)

CONICARI, a settlement of the province and government of Cinaloa in Nueva Espana ; situate on the shore and at the source of the river Mayo. It is a reduccion of the missions which were held by the regulars of the company of Jesuits.

CONIGUAS, a barbarous nation of Indians of the province and government of Tarma in Peru, who inhabit the mountains of the Andes, united with the Cunchos, and of whom but little is known.

CONIL, Bocas de, entrances which the sea makes upon the coast of the province of Yucatán, between the river Lagartos, and the baxos or shoals of Cuyo.

CONILABQUEN, a small river of the district of Tolten Alto in the kingdom of Chile. It runs s. and enters the Token.

CONIMA, a settlement of the province and cor-

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regimiento of Paucarcolla in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Moxo.

CONNECTICUT, a county of the province and colony of New England in N. America. It is bounded w. by New York and the river Hudson ; is separated from the large island by an arm of the sea to the s. ; has to the e. Rhode island, with part of the colony of Massachusetts, and the other part of the same colony to the n. It is traversed by a river of the same name, which is the largest of the whole province, and navigable by large vessels for 40 miles. This province abounds in wood, turpentine, and resins ; in the collecting of which numbers of the inhabitants are occupied, although the greater part of them are employed in fishing, and in hewing timber for the building of vessels and other useful purposes. The merchants of the province once sent to King Charles II. some timber or trees, of so fine a growth as to serve for masts of ships of the largest burthen. The great trade of woods and timbers carried on by means of the river has much increased its navigation. This territory is not without its mines of metal, such as lead, iron, and copper: the first of these have yielded some emolument, but the others have never yet produced any thing considerable, notwithstanding the repeated attempts which have been made to work them. This county is well peopled and flourishing, since it numbers upwards of 40,000 souls, notwithstanding the devastations that it has suftered through the French, the Indians, and the pirates, in the reign of Queen Anne, when all the fishing vessels were destroyed. When this colony was first founded, many great privileges were given it, which have always been maintained by the English governor, through the fidelity which it manifested in not joining the insurrection of the province of Massachusetts, until, in the last war, it was separated from the metropolis, as is seen in the article U n ited States OF America.

(Connecticut, one of the United States of North America, called by the ancient natives Qunnihticut, is situated between lat. 41° and 42° 2' n. and between long. 71° 20' and 7.3° 15' w. Its greatest breadth is 72 miles, its length 100 miles; bounded «. by Massachusetts ; e. by Rhode island ; s. by the sound which divides it from Long island ; and w. by the state of New York. This state contains about 4674 square miles; equal to about 2,640,000 acres. It is divided into eight counties, viz. Fairfield, New Haven, Middlesex, and New London, which extend along the sound from w. to c. : Litchfield, Hartford, Tolland, and Windham, extend in the same direction on the border of the] 3 T 2

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