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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

23
Indexed

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from which they are enabled to make sugar. It is intersected by three rivers, which are of no use whatever to it, being too low in their beds ; but they unite and form the Pachachaca, which enters the province of Abancay, and has more than 40 bridges of wood and cord thrown over it in different parts. There are innumerable veins of gold and silver ore in this province, which are not worked, from the want of energy, and from the poverty existing among the inhabitants ; and thus only some trifling emoluraeul is now and then derived from one or the other. It was otherwise in former times, but these mines are now almost all filled with water. Some mines of quicksilver have been discovered, but the working of them has been forbid. Here is little of the cattle kind, and no cloth manufactures peculiar to the country arc made here, with the exception of a sort of thick quilt, which they call Chuces ; and a kind of grain is gathered here, known by the name of Maino. This province was united to the empire of Peru by Capac Yupanqui V. Emperor of the Incas. The language of the natives is the same as that which is most universal throughout the kingdom. The capital formerly consisted of a large and w ell ordered settlement, which was called Tintay, but which is at present but thinly inhabited, on account of the scarcity of water, and from a plague, in which almost all its inhabitants perished. The number of souls in the whole of the province may amount to 15,000. It eontains 50 settlements within its jurisdiction. The yearly tribute received by the corregidor used to amount to 800,100 dollars, and the duties paid upon the alcavahif (a centage on goods sold), to 688 dollars.

The settlements of its jurisdiction are ;

Chaluanca. Ayahuasa.

Colca. Huancaray.

Mollebamba. Sabaino.

Carabaniba. Catarosi.

Matara. Antilla.

Antabamba. Huaquirca.

Oropesa. Pocoanca.

Totora. Tapairihua,

Traparo. ChalvauL

Chacoche. Caypi.

Caleauzo. Caracara.

Viru Sanaica.

Pampamarca. Huaillaripa.

Silco. Pichihua.

Atuncama. Amoca.

Chacna. Yanaca,

Capaya. Saraico.

Muitu. Subyunca.

Pachaconas. Lucre.

Sirca. Pichurhua. Colcabamba. Soraya. Huairahuacho. Toraya.

ChuquiBga.

Ancobainba.,

Pampayacta.

Chaj>imarca.^

Lambrama*

Pairaca.

AIMAHAPA, a small river of the province and colony of Surinam, in the part of Guayana possessed by the Dutch. It is one of those which enter the Cuyum near where it joins the Esquivo.

AINACA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Cochamarca.

AINACOLCA, a gold mine of the province and corregimiento of Arequipa in Peru. It is famous for the excellent quality of this metal, but it is very difficult to be worked, on account of the hardness of its stone.

AIO, a settlement of the province and corregU miento of Condensuyos de Arequipa in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Chichas.

AIOAIO, a settlement of the province and corregirniento of Sicasica in Peru, eight leagues from its capital.

AIOCUESCO, Santa Maria de, the head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Antequera, in the province and bishopric of Mechoacan in Nueva España. It is of a hot temperature, contains a convent of the religious order of Santo Domingo, and 400 Indian families, who carry on some commerce in the cochineal, (the plant producing which they cultivate), and a very considerable one in the manufacture of Pulgues^ on account of the abundance of Magueyes which are found here. Seven leagues s. of its capital.

AIOTITLAN, the head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Amola in Nueva Espana, immediately upon the coast of the S. sea, and situate between two deep ravines. Its temperature is very hot and troublesome to live in, on account of the various venomous animals and insects that abound in its territory. It contains 76 Indian families, whose trade consists in making troughs and trays very finely painted. This settlement, in which there is a convent of the order of St. Francis, is beautifully surrounded with plantations. Fifteen leagues distant from its capital.

AIONANTOU, a settlement of Indians of New France, situate in the county of Canahoque, on the shore of one of the salt marshes that are found there.

AIOZINAPA, a settlement of the head settlement of Olinala, and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa, in Nueva España, of a hot and moist temperature, ?,ijd abounding in cochineal, fruit, and pulse, with 2

Last edit over 3 years ago by Romina De León
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