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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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name. Tlie religion of these idolaters is very singular, for they acknoAvledge a supreme being, who, they imagine, manifests himself to them in the figure of some animal which feeds in their fields ; and when this dies, tlvey substitute another, after having signified very great demonstrations of regret for the fate of the one whicli is lost.

AKANKIA, a river of the province and government of Louisiana. It is an arm of the Mississippi, which runs s. s. e. and enters the lake of Maurepas.

AKANSA, a settlement of Indians of the province and government of Louisiana. It has a fort built by the French, and it is near the mouth of the river of its name, where it enters the Mississippi.

Akansa, another settlement in the same province, situate also on the shore of the aforesaid river, and distinguished by the name of Petit Akansa.

Akansa (river), a river of the above province and government. It rises in the country of the Ozaques Indians, runs many leagues s. e. as far as the town of Satovis, Avhen, turning to the s. it enters by two mouths into the Mississippi, being throughout subject to large cataracts.

AKOUKA, a settlement of the province of La Guayana, in the Dutch possessions, or colony of Surinam ; situate on the shore of the river Little, just before it enters tlie Marawin.

[ALABAHA, a considerable river in E. Florida. Also said to be the name of a branch of St. Mary’s river.]

[ALABAHA, a considerable river of Georgia, which pursues a s. course to thegulph of Mexico, 100 miles w. of the head of St. Mary’s river. Its banks are low, and a trifling rain sAvells it to more than a mile in Avidth. In a freshet the current is rapid, and those Avho pass are in danger of being ^entangled in vines and briars, and droAvned ; they are also in r<'ul danger from great numbers of hungry alligators. The country for nearly iOO miles on each side of this river, that is to say, from the l)ead of St. Mary’s to Flint river, Avhicli is 90 miles w. of the Alabaha, is a continued soft, miry Avaste, affording neither water nor food for men or beasts ; and is so poor indeed, as that the common game of the Avoods are not found here. The i ountry on the of Alabaha is rather preferable to that on the e.l

[ALABAMOUS, an old French fort, in the w. part of Georgia ; situate between Coosa and Tallapoose rivers, and not far from their confluence.]

ALABAMA, an Indian village, delightfully situated on the banks of the Mississippi, on several swelling green hills, gradually ascending from the verge of the river. These Indians are the remains of the ancient Alabama nation, who inhabited the e. arm of the Great Mobile river,. Avhich still bears their name, now possessed by the Creeks, or Mnscogulges, who conquered the former.]

[Alabama River is formed by the junction of the Coosa or Coosee, or High Town river, and Tallapoosee river, at Little Tallasee, and runs in a s. w. direction, until it meets Tombigbee river from the n. w. at the great island which it there forms, 90 miles from the mouth of Mobile bay, in thegulph of Mexico. This beautiful river has a gentle current, pure waters, and excellent fish. It runs about two miles an hour, is 70 or 80 rods wide at its head, and from 15 to 18 feet deep in the driest season. The banks are about 50 feet high, and seldom, if ever, overfloAved. Travellers have gone down in large boats, in the month of May, in nine days, from Little Tallasee fo Mobile bay, Avhich is about 350 miles by water. Its banks abound Avith valuable productions in the vegetable and mineral kingdoms.

[ALABASTER, or Eleutheua, one of the Bahama or Lucayo islands, on which is a small fort and garrison. It is on the Great Bahama bank. The soil of this island and Harbour island, which lies at the n. end of it, is better tlian Providence island, and produces the greatest part of the pineapples that are exported ; the climate is very healthy. Lat. 24° 40' to 26° 30' n. Long. 76° 22' to 76° 56' W.1

[ALACHUA Savannah is a level green plain, in the country of the Indians of that name in E. Florida, situate about 75 miles w. from St. Augustine. It is about 15 miles over, and 50 in circumference ; and scarcely a tree or bush of any kind to be seen on it. It is encircled Avith high sloping hills, covered with Avaving forests, and fragrant orange groves, rising from an exuberanfly fertile soil. The ancient Alachua town stood on the borders of this savannah ; but the Indians mnoved to Cuscowilla, two miles distant, on account of the unhealthiness of the former site, occasioned by the stench of the putrid fisli and reptile.s, in the summer and autumn, driven on shore by the alligafors, and <he noxious exhulutions from the marshes of ti)e savannah. Though the horned cattle and horses bred in these meadows are large, sleek, sprightly, and faf, yet they are subject to mortal diseases; such as the water rot, or scald, occasioned by the warm Avater of the savannah ; Avhile those which, range in the high forests are clear of this (lisonler.1 °

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mules, poultry, cheese, and salt meats. It has likewise some mines in its district, which are not altogetlier neglected, though the advantages derived from them would be immensely increased, if the number of labourers were greater. It is governed by a lieutenant nominated by the governor of Santiago de Veragua. [Lat. 8° 12' n. Long. 80“ 40' a;.l

ALAQUES, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Tacunga in the kingdom of Quito.

ALAQUINES, a branch of the head settlement of the district of Tamazunchale, and alcaldia mayor of Valles, in Nueva España, situate on the shore of a large river which divides this jurisdiction from that of Guadalcazar.

ALARA, a river of the province and government of Antioquia in the new kingdom of Granada. It rises at the foot of the sierra of Guamoco, and s. of the town of this name; runs and enters the Cauca.

[ALASKE, a long peninsula on the n. w. coast of America, formed by Bristol bay and the ocean on the n. w. and n. and by the ocean and the waters of Cook’s river on the s. and s. e. At its extremity are a number of islands, the chief of which, in their order westward, are, Oonemak, Oonala.sha, and Ocumnak, which form part of the chain or cluster of islands called the Northern Archipelago. Captain Cook, on his return in 1779, passed through the channel e. of Oonemak island. See North-avest Coast of America.]

ALATAMALIA, a large river of the province and government of Florida. It runs nearly due e. and enters the sea opposite the Georgean isles. [This river, Avliich is navigable, is more properly of Georgia. It rises in the Cherokee mountains, near the head of a western branch of Savannah river, called Tugulo. In its descent through the mountains it receives several auxiliary streams ; thence it Avinds, with considerable rapidity, through the hilly country 250 miles, from Avhcnce it throAvs itself into the open flat country, by the name of Oakmulgee. Thence, after meandering for 150 miles, it is joined by the Oconee, which likewise has its source in the mountains. After this junction it assumes the name of Alatamalia, Avhen it becomes a large majestic river ; and flow'ing Avith a gentle current through forests and plains 100 miles, discharges itself into the Atlantic by several mouths. The n. channel glides by the heights of Darien, about 10 miles above the bar, and after several turnings, enters the ocean between Sapelo and Wolf islands. The s. channel, which is esteemed the largest and deepest.

after its separation from the >?. descends gently,, taking its course between MDntosh and Broughton islands, and at last by the w. coast of St. Simon’s sound, betAveen the s. end of the island of that name, and the n. end of Jeky! island. At its confluence with the Atlantic it is 500 yards Avide.]

ALAUSI, a province and small corregimiento or district of the kingdom of Quito ; bounded «. by the province of Riobamba, n. w. by Chimbo, s. by Cuenca, w. by the district of Yaguache, and e. by that of Macas. It is Avatered by the rivers Uzogoche, Gussuntos, Pinancay, Alausi, and others of less note. It abounds in mountains, the most lofty of Avhich are tOAvard the©.; the country is pleasant, and yields liberally every kijid of fruit and grain that are common either to America or Europe. It contains many sugar mills, and the sugar is the best intlie kingdom. The air here is mild and healthy, and the climate cannot be said to be inconveniently hot. It is governed by the corregidor, who resides in the capital.

Alausi, the capital of the above province. It has in its district some mineral fountains of hot water, established with suitable conveniences by some families of consideration residing there. Its trade consists in cloths, baizes, and cotton garments, Avhich are wrought in its manufactories. It has a very good parish church, and a convent of the order of St. Francis. [Lat. 2“ 12' «. Long. 78° 39' ©.]

[ALBANS, St. a township in Franklin county, Vermont, on lake Champlain, opposite N. Hero island, Avith 256 inhabitants.]

ALBANIA, or Albany, a county of the province and colony of New York. It contains a certain number of plains fertile in grain, in AA'hich, and in planks of pine, its principal commerce consists. The Avinter is extremely cold, and the river Hudson is generally frozen for 100 miles, so a* to bear immense burthens. The gveat cpiautity of snow that falls at this season is useful, not only because it covers the grain, and keeps it from pe rishing by the frost, but because, when it melts, it so increases the waters of the river, as to facilitate thereby the transportation of the productions of the country.

[Albany County Lies Between Ulster And Saratoga ; Its Extent 46 Miles By 28|ALBANY County lies between Ulster and Saratoga ; its extent 46 miles by 28. By the state census, .fan. 20, 1796, the number of electors in this county were 6087, and the number of towns 11.]

Albania, or Albany, the capital of the above county, founded by the Dutch in 1608, together with tiiat of Orange, on the sliorc of the E 2

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river Hudson. It is small, but has a great trade from the contiguity of the Iroquese Indians. It contains 350 houses, buiH afterthe Dutch fashion ; and that of the magistracy, which consists of a mayor, six aldermen, and a recorder, is very beautiful. The city is defended by a regular fort with four bastions, the rest of the fortification consisting of palisades. Here the treaties and alliances have been made with the Indians. It was taken by Robert Car in 1664, and added to this province by Colonel Dongan. [It is 160 miles «. of the city of New York, to which it is next in rank, and 340 s. of Quebec. This city and suburbs, by enumeration in 1797, contained 1263 buildings, of which 863 were dwelling houses, and 6021 inhabitants. Many of them are in the Gothic style, with the gable end to the street, which custom the first se^ttlers brought from Holland; the new houses arc built in the modern style. Its inhabitants are collected from various parts of tlie world, and speak a great variety of languageJ^, but the English predominates ; and the use of efery other is gradually lessening. Albany is urfrivalled for situation, being nearly at the head of sloop navigation, on one of the noblest rivers in the world. It enjoys a salubrious air, and is the natural emporium of the increasing trade of a large extent of country ay. and w. — a country of an excellent soil, abounding in every article for the W. India market; plentifully watered with navigable lakes, creeks, Snd rivers ; settling with unexampled rapidity ; and capable of aftbrdingsubsistenceto millions of inhabitants. The public buildings are, a low Dutch church, of ancient and very curious construction, one for Episcopalians, two for Presbyterians, one for Germans'or Higli Dutch, and one for Methodists ; an hospital, city hall, and a handsome brick jail. In the year 1609, Henry II udson, whose name the river bears, ascended it in his boat to Aurnnla, the spot on which Albany now stands. The improvements in this city have, of late years, been very great in almost all respects. Wharfs have been built on the river, the streets have been paved, a bank instituted, a new and handsome style of building introduced. One mile n. of this city, in its suburbs, near the manor-house of lieutenant-governor Van Renssalaer, are very ingeniously constructed extensive and useful works, for the manufacture of Scotch and rappee snuff, roll and cut tobacco of dilferent kinds, chocolate, mustard, starch, hair-powder, splitpease, and hulled barley. These valuable works are the property of Mr. James Caldwell, who unfortunately lost a complete set of similar works by fire, in Jidy 1791, with the stock, valued at

37,500 dollars. It is a circumstance worthy of remark, and is evincive of the industry and enterprise of the proprietor, that the whole of the pre« sent buildings and machinery were begun and completed in the short space of eleven mouths. These works are decidedly superior to any of the kind in America. All the articles above enumerated, even to the spinning of tobacco, are manufactured by the aid of water machinery. For the invention of this machinery, the proprietor has obtained a patent. These Avorks give employment and subsistence to 40 poor boys, and a number of workmen.] Long. 73° 42' w. Lat. 42° 40' n.

Albania, or Albany, a large river of New France, which takes its rise from the lake Christinaux, runs n. e. and enters the sea at Hudson’s bay.

Albania, or Albany, a fortress in New South Wales, N. America. [Lat. 32° 17' n. Long. 81° 51' a;.]

ALBARICOQUES, Point of the, a cape on the n. coast, in the head settlement of the island of Santo Domingo, and in the French territories. It lies between the Trou d’Enfers and Cape Bombon.

ALBARRACIN, Desert of, a very lofty mountain, always covered with snow, in tlie new kingdom of Granada.

ALBARRADA, a settlement of Indians of the kingdom of Chile, situate on the shore of the river Cauchupil.

Albarrada, another settlement, with the dedicatory title of San Miguel, in the head settlement of the district of Mitla, and alcaldia mayor of Tentitlan, in Nueva España. It contains 22 Indian families, and is seven leagues n. of its head settlement.

ALBARREGAS, a large and abundant river of the new kingdom of Granada, which descends from the mountains of Bogota, irrigates the country and the city of Merida, running n. of this city until it enters the lake Maracaibo.

ALBEMARLE, a county of the province and colony of N. Carolina, and that part of it which is most agreeable, fertile, and salutary. It produces various sorts of fruits and pulse, and the winter is very temperate. This colony was established in 1670 by the lords and proprietors of it, who equipped, at their own expence, three ships, and a coiisiderable number of persons, with provisions for 18 months, and an abundance of merchandize, tools, and arms fit for the new establishment ; to which they sent resources yearly, in the proportion . required, until it appeared tube in a fit

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shore of the Rio Grande Colorado, (large coloured river), or of the North.

ALCO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chumbivilcas in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Libitaca.

ALCOHOLADES, a nation of Indians of the province of Venezuela. They are of a docile and affable disposition, and live upon the borders of the lake Maracaibo. Their numbers are much diminished, from the treatment they received from the German Weltzers, who, through a covetousness to possess the gold of these people, killed the greater part of them.

ALCOZAUCA, a settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in Nueva Espana. It contains 104 families of Spaniards, Mulattoes, and Mustees; not a single Indian dwells in it. It is of a mild temperature, and in its district were the once celebrated mines of Cayro, which were crushed in and destroyed, having been almost unparalleled for the quantity of silver that they produced. Eight leagues from its capital.

ALDAS, a small settlement or ward of the head settlement of the district of Santa Ana, and alcaldia mayor of Zultepec, in Nueva Espana.

ALDEA, DEL Espiritu Santo, a settlement of the province and captainship of Tondos Santos in Brazil, situate on the coast, at the mouth of the river Joana.

Aldea, del Espiritu Santo, another settlement of the province and captainship of Seregipe, in the same kingdom (Brazil), situate on the shore, and at the entrance of the river Real.

[ALDEN, Fort, in Cherry Valley, in the state of New York.]

ALU WORT, a settlement of the island of Barbadoes, in the district and parish of Santiago, on the coast.

ALEBASTER, or Eleuthera, an island of the channel of Bahama. See Alabaster.

ALEGRE, a settlement of the province and captainship of S. Vincente in Brasil, situate s. of the settlement of Alto.

[ALEMPIGON, a small lake northward of lake Superior.]

ALEXANDRIA, a city of Virginia, [formerly called Belhaven, and situated on the southern bank of the Patowmac river, in Fairfax county, about five miles s. w. from the Federal city, 60 L from Baltimore, 60 n, from Fredericksburgh, 168 n. of Williamsburgh, and 290 from the. sea; 38° 54' n. lat. and 77° 10' w. long. Its situation is elevated and pleasant. The soil is clayey. The original settlers, anticipating its future growth and importance, laid out the streets

on the plan of Philadelphia. It contains about 400 houses, many of which are handsomely built, and 2748 inhabitants. This city, upon opening the navigation of Patowmac river, and in consequence of its vicinity to the future seat of the federal government, bids fair to be one of the most thriving commercial places on the continent. Nine miles from hence is Mount Vernon, the celebrated seat of the late General Washington.]

[Alexandria, a township in Grafton county. New Hampshire, containing 298 inhabitants, incorporoted in 1782.]

[Alexandria, a township in Hunterdon county. New Jersey, containing 1503 inhabitants, inclusive of 40 slaves.]

[Alexandria, a small town in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, on the Frankstown branch of Janiatta river, 192 miles n. w. of Philadelphia.]

ALEXO, S. an island of the N. sea, near the coast of Brazil, in the province and captainship of Pernambuco, between the river Formoso and Cape S. Agustin.

ALFARO, S. Miguel de, a settlement of the province and government of the Chiquitos Indians; situate on the shore of the river Ubay. It has a good port, from whence it is also known by the name of Port of the Chiquitos. It is, however, at present destroyed, and the ruins alone remain.

ALFAXAIUCA, a settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Kilotepec in Nueva Espana. It contains 171 Indian families, and is seven leagues e. n. e. of its capital.

ALFEREZ, Valley of the, in the province and correscimienlo of Bogota in the new kingdom of Granada.

Alfeuez, a river of the province and captainship Rey in Brazil; it runs w. and enters the lake of Mini.

[ALFORD, a township in Berkshire county, Massachusetts, containing 577 inhabitants ; 145 miles w. from Boston.]

[ALFORDSTOWN, a small town in Moor county, North Carolina.]

ALfjrARROBO, a settlement of the province and government of Antioquia in the new kingdom of Granada ; situate on the bank of an arm of the river Perico, in an island which it forms in th« serranias of Guamoca.

ALGODON, Island of the, one of those which are in the N. sea, between the s. point of the Cayco Grande and the Panuelo Quadrado.

Algodon, a settlement of the same name. See Biezmet.

ALGODONALES, a .settlement of the province

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