Texas State Association of Architects Minutes and Proceedings

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is this shown by the intemperate and lavish display of ornament otuside and inside on most of late. But we must be free to admit that we see a strong tendency in all cases to add all that is possible for domestic comfort first, and second, the beauty of the outline of the building. Thus we see in the present day the low wide entrance steps in place of the high narrow steps. Wide windows, wide and square framed stairways, wide, open fireplaces and handsome wood mantles take the place with their warm and pleasing tint and shades of the cold and cheerless marble that was used in the past. From all that has been said it is evident that the artistic eye and mind of the architect of the present day has reached a variety of styles of which our city and county buildings afford examples in all their variety. We must admit that the architect of the present day has a broader field and better opportunity to educate and prepare himself to meet the increasing demand for skillful and competent work than he has ever had at any time before.

The importance of the

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architectural profession and the increase in its ranks, shown the necessity of organization to encourage a close professional intercourse and fellowship, and to be a bond of union between all its members who are engaged in its professional practice.

In 1867 the American Institute of Architects was established for the object of associating as many as possible of the architects of good standing in all parts of the country. This was found not be sufficient to meet the want by those who lived in distant cities. It was found to be necessary to establish local chapters in various cities for the more close fellowship and personal intercourse of the members with each other in the order that all might practice under the same code. A few of its members were scattered in distant points from each other in the west. When the west and northwest to stretch out her mighty armies, building large and populous cities on her broad praries and sunny hills, then the evident necessity was felt for a Western Association of Architects and a fellowship of the men who were building up those magic cities in the west and

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Northwest. Hence the Western Association of Architects was formed. The members of this association were scattered in all the states of the west, northwest and south. Like the American Institute with its chapters, it soon became evident that state associations must be formed under the same rules and laws as the Western Association for the purpose of uniting all architects of good standing in various states in a bond of fellowship that the practice of all who belonged to the various state associations would practice under a uniform code, same as the Western Association of Architects, and to produce a fraternal feeling of fellowship amongst all those who are engaged in the professional pracitce of architecture. Hence, gentlemen, the organization of the Texas State Association of Architects. May it ever be in the future as it has been in the past two years of its existence - a bond, uniting its members in a feeling of fraternal friendship. To you, gentlemen, who represent the association in its youth and infancy, will the honor be due of placing it on

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a high and honorable place with its sister states associations, by making and enforcing just and honorable rules for the guidance and practice of its members, and to be ever ready to exert our best efforts to elevate the profession to which we belong.

On motion of W. C. Dodson, of Waco, seconded by Eugene J. Heiner of Houston, it was resolved - that the thanks of the association be tendered President Kane for his able address, and that the address be spread upon the minutes and published in the next annual report in full.

Moved by W. C. Dodson that the reading of the minutes of the last meeting be dispensed with, as each member of the association was in possession of a printed of the last minutes. The motion prevailed.

The report of the Executive Committee admitted the following architects as members of the association,

A. B. Bristol, Dallas Cortez Clark, Dallas Guy M. Tozer, Dallas

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Albert Ullrich, Dallas George W. Stewart, Dallas A. O. Watson, Austin George E. Dickey, Houston

The treasurer, W. W. Larmour of Waco, submitted the following report.

To the Texas State Association of Architects:

Gentlemen - Herewith the treasurer presents this report for the year ending January 17th 1888:

Balnaces on hand from last report. January 19th 1887 ...... $80.50 Membership fees & annual dues 95.00 $175.50

By order certified by J. J. Kane $50.00 Balance in hands of treasurer 125.50 $175.50

Referred to the Auditing Committee

Roll of members in good standing

John Adrewartha Austin A. B. Bristol Dallas Albert F. Beckman San Antonio N. J. Clayton Galveston Cortez Clark Waco W. C. Dodson Waco George E. Dickey Houston W. W. Dudley Waco Alfred Giles San Antonio

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