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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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wliich there is a bank of fine sand, extending amile into the sea, and affording good anchorage.Lat. 1° 59' n. Long. 157° 35' w.]

[Christmas Sound, in Tien a del Fuego, S.America. Lat. 55° 21' n. Long. 69° 48' tw.]

CHRISTOVAL, San, atown of the government and jurisdiction of Maracaibo in the Nuevo Rey no de Granada; foundedby Captain Juan de Maldonado in 1560. It is of•a hot but healthy temperature, produces abundanceof sugar-canes, of which are made honey, sugar,and conserves, in immense quantities ; also a greatproportion of smoking tobacco, which is carried toMaracaibo. It has a good church and a conventt)f St. Augustin, which latter has fallen much todecay with regard to its establishment. The po-pulation of the town consists of 400 housekeepers.It lies 20 leagues n. e. of Pamplona, from the juris-diction of which it is divided by the river Pam-plonilla. It is the native place of Don Gregoriode Jaimes, archdeacon of Santa Fe, and bishop ofSanta Marta.

Same name, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Lipes, archbishopric of Char-cas in Peru ; in which took place the following ex-traordinary occurrence: The curate of this placegoing to confess a sick person in the settlement ofTahisa of the province of Paria, which was annexedto this, sunk into a spring of water in the pampasor llanos dela Sal, when he was drowned, and withthe two Indians who accompanied him on horse-back, never more appeared, nor were any vestigesever found of them : this was the reason why thelatter settlement has since been disunited from thecuracy of San Christoval.

Same name, a capital city of the provinceand captainship of Sergipé in the kingdom of Bra-zil ; being also known by that name. It is foundedon the sea-shore, and has a fine and well defendedport. It has a magnificent parish church with thetitle of Nuestra Senora de la Victoria ; two fineconvents, the one of the order of the Franciscans,and the other of the Carmelites ; also a chapel ofdevotion of the Virgin of the Rosary. The council-house is a very fine edifice, and in the suburbs isa hermitage of San Gonzalo, which is frequentedas a pilgrimage by this and other settlements of thejurisdiction. In this city resides the chief captain,who governs this province, and who is attended bya company of troops as a body-guard. In earlytimes it was filled with nobility, descended from thefirst families in Portugal; but it is now reduced to600 housekeepers. in its district, towards thepart called Coninquiva, is a parish with fourchapels, and towards the river Vaza-Barris fiveothers. It has also 25 engines, by which abundanceof sugar of an excellent quality is manufactured ;this article affords a great commerce w ith t!ic bayof Todos Santos. Lat. ll°40's. Long. ST'* SO' tw.

Same name, an island of the N. sea ; oneof the Antilles, discoverctl by Admiral Christoj)herColumbus, who gave it his name, in 149S. It isfive leagues in circumference, and is very fertile,and abounding in productions, particularly in cot-ton, tobacco, indigo, sugar, and brandy ; by allof which it carries on a great commerce. Here arcsome good salines, and in the mountains are somewoods of fine timber, well adapted for the buildingof ships. The English and the French both esta-blished themselves here in 1625, holding a dividedpossession, when they were driven out by the Spa-niards. After this the former again returned andre-established themselves in the greatest part of theisland, leaving, however, a small share to theFrench, until the year 1713, when the latter, inconjunction with the Spaniards themselves, cededit entirely to the English, who from that time haveheld it and kept it well fortified. [St. Christopher,situate in lat. 17° 21', long. 62° 48' ze. was calledby its ancient possessors, the Charibes, Liamuiga,or the Fertile Island. It was discovered in Novem-ber 1493 by Columbus himself, who was so pleasedwith its appearance, that he honoured it with hisown Christian name. But it was neither plantednor possessed by the Spaniards. It was, however,(notwithstanding that the general opinion ascribesthe honour of seniority to Barbadoes), the eldest ofall the British territories in the \V. Indies, andin truth, the common mother both of the Englishand French settlements in the Charibean islands.A Mr. Thomas Warner, an Englishman, asso-ciated himself Avith 14 other persons in the year1622, and with them took his passage on board aship bound to Virginia. From thence he and hiscompanions sailed from St. Christopher’s, wherethey arrived in January 1623, and by the monthof September following had raised a good crop oftobacco, which they proposed to make their staplecommodity. By the generality of historians whohave treated of the affairs of the W. Indies, it isasserted that a party oflhe French, under the com-mand of a person of the name of D’Esnambuc,took possession of one part of this island, on thesame day that Mr. Warner landed on the other;but the truth is, that the first landing of Warnerand his associates happened two years before thearrival of D’Esnambuc; who, it is admitted byDu Tertre, did not leave France until IG25. Un-fortunately the English settlers, in the latter end of

1623, had their plantations demolished by a dread- j

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[And the Import of Slaves, by report of privycouncil, 1788, at a medium of four years, andby a return to house of commons in 1805, at amedium of two years from 1803, was as follows :

Average of

Imports.

Re-exports.

Retained.

Four years to 1787

658

102

556

Tw o years to 1803

971

124

847

By report of privy council, 1788, and by subse-quent estimate, the population amounted to

Years.

Whites.

People of

Slaves.

Colour.

1787

1912

1908

20,435

1805

1800

198

26,000

See Caribe (Leeward) Islands; and for thelater political inquiries, see West Indies.]

Same name, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district and alcaldia mayor ofToluca in Nueva Espana. It contains 64 familiesof Indians, and lies a small distance to the n. of itscapital.

Same name, another, of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Zacatlan in the samekingdom, lying two leagues from its capital.

Same name, another, of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tetelaxonotla in thesame kingdom, lying two leagues to the w. of thatplace.

Same name, another settlement of the province andcorregimienio of Angaraes in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of San Antonio, and situate on the contraryside of the river.

Same name another, settlement of the province andeorreghniento of Conchucos in the same kingdom ;annexed to the curacy of San Marcos.

Same name, another settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Lucanas in the same kingdom ;annexed to the curacy of its capital.

Same name, another settlement of the head settlement of Pinotepa, and alcaldia mayor of Xicayan,in Nueva Espana. It contains 24 families ofIndians, and is seven leagues to the n. of its headsettlement.

Same name, another settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Cuquio in the samekingdom ; situate near to the conflux of the riversMesquital and Grande, its population is large.

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and it lies 15 leagues to the w. of its capital, an^10 to the n. w. of the capital of the province ofGuadalaxara.

Same name, another settlement of the head settle-ment of Axixique, and alcaldia mayor of Zayula,in the same kingdom ; situate on the shore of thegreat lake or sea of Chapala. It contains 70 faj-milies of Indians, who employ themselves in fish-ing and agriculture ; is 13 leagues to the s. of itshead settlement.

Same name another settlement of the provinceand country of the Amazonas, in the PortugueseK ossessioiis ; situate on the shore of the riverlaranon, at the mouth where it enters the Ovari-pana.

Same name another settlement of the provinceand government of Cartagena in the district ofSinu ; situate on the bank of the river Pichelin, inthe division of this jurisdiction and that of Tolu.It is one of those which were founded, in 1776, bythe Governor Don Juan Piraienta.

Same name another settlement of the kingdom ofBrazil ; situate on the shore of a river whichenters the Yguan to the s. of the settlement of JesusMaria.

Same name another settlement of the provinceand captainship of Sergipé in the same kingdom (Brazil) ;situate on the sea-coast, between the river Sirugipaand thatof Vazabaris.

Same name another settlement of the provinceand kingdom of Nueva Galicia ; situate near itscapital.

Same name,of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the companyof the Jesuits in the province of Tepeguana, andkingdom of Nueva Vizcaya.

Same name another settlement of Nuevo Mexico ;situate on the shore of the Rio Grande del N.(Large River of tlie N.) where this enters the Con-ch os.

Same name, a bay on the coast of theprovince of California, in the part opposite thecoast of Nueva Espana.

Same name another settlement, an isle of the N. sea, in theinterior of the bay and port of the Cul de Sac Grand,of the island of Guadalupe.

[CHRISTOPHER, Sr. See Christovae.]CHUAO, a port of the coast of the kingdomof Tierra Firme, in the province and governmentof Venezuela, to the w. of the port of La Guaira.

==CHUAPA, a settlement and head settlement ofthe alcaldia mayor of Villalta in Nueva Espana.It contains 112 familes of Indians, and is 12 leaguesn. e. of its capital.

Same name, a river of the kingdom of Chile.

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manufactures peculiar to the country, such ascoarse trowsers, baizes, and blankets. Although itis some years since this province has received anymischief from the infidels who inhabit the moun-tains of the Andes, yet it has regular advanced de-tachments or guards stationed for the defence of thefrontiers, prepared against a recurrence of the evilsexperienced in former times. As we have beforesaid, it is the largest province, so also it is the bestpeopled, since it contains upAvards of 50,000 soulsand 33 settlements, the capital of Avhich has thesame name. Its repartimiento, or tribute, used toamount to 226,730 dollars, and it used to pay analcavala of 1814 dollars per annum. The settle-ments are,

Cicasica, Mecapaca,

Coroico, Pasca,

Yanacache, Ynquisive,

Chulumani, Quimi,

Caza, Collana,

Suri, Huayrapaya,

Cabari, Coripaya,

Mohosa, Chupe,

Capinata, Milluhuay,

Ychoca, Taxma,

Coani, Choxlla,

Yaco, Chirca,

Luribay, Yrupana,

Haichayo, Colqui,

Calamarca, Plaraca,

Zapanqui, Ocavaya.

Caracato,

CICAYARI, a river of the province and countryof Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions.It rises in the territory of the Chappoanas Indians,runs n. n. w. and enters the Rio Negro.

[CICERO, a military township in New York,on the s. tv. side of Oneida lake, and between it,the Salt lake, and the Salt springs.]

CICLADAS Grandes, islands of the South sea,discovered by Mr. De Bouganville in 1763.

CICOBASA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Quixos y Macas in the kingdom of Quito,and of the district of the latter. It rises in thecordillera of the province of Cuenca, runs s. andenters the river Santiago.

CIENEGA, a settlement and real of the silvermines of the province of Tepeguana, and kingdomof Nueva Vizcaya ; situate near the settlement ofParral.

Same name, another settlement, of the provinceand government of Santa Marta in the NuevoReyno de Granada. It is situate on the sea-coast,and on the bank of the cknega or marsh which

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lies close to it, and which gives it its name. It waga reduccton of the monks of St. Domingo.

CIENEGA of Oro, another (settlement), with the surname of Oro, in the province and government of Cartagena, of thesame kingdom, it is of the district of Tolu, andformed by the re- union of other settlements in theyear 1776, effected by the Governor Don JuanPimienta.

Same name, another (settlement), of the island of Cuba; situateon the n. coast.

CIMA, a valley of the province and govornraentof Antioquia ; bounded by that of Paucura, fromwhich it is divided by the river Cauca just at itssource.

CINACANTLAN, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldia mayor of Chiapa in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

==CINAGUA Y GUACANA, the alcaldia mayorand jurisdiction of the province and bishopric ofMechoacán in Nueva Espana. It is 80 leagueslong from e. to w. and 60 wide from n. to s. Itsterritory is for the most part mountainous and un-even, and its temperature bad. Its productionsare large cattle, wax, maize, and fruits. Tire ca-pital is the settlement of the same name, of a hottemperature, and inhabited by 25 families of In-dians, who cultivate maize and melons, uponwhich this scanty population consists, though itwas formerly of some consideration. It has suf-fered, no doubt, from the iinkindness of the tempera-ture, and from the wantof water. The jurisdictionis 80 leagues to the w. with a slight inclination tothe s. of Mexico. The other settlements are,Guacana, Paraquaro,

Ario, Nocupetajo,

Etuquarillo, Acuiyo,

Santa Ana Turicato. Punguco.

CINALOA, a province and government ofNueva España. It is between the w. and «. ofMexico, from whence it is distant 300 leagues. Itextends in length as far as proselytes have beenmade to the gospel, viz. to 140° ; and it ex-tends to 40° in width. On the e. of it arethe loftiest sierras of Topia, running towardsthe n. and on the w. it is embraced by the arm ofthe sea of California. On the s. it has the town ofCuliacan, and to the n. the innumerable nations ofIndians, the boundaries of which are unknown.This province lies between lat. 27° and 32° n . ; thisbeing the extent to Avhich the inissonaries havepenetrated. The temperature is extremely hot,although the cold is intense during the months ofDecember and January. It rains here very little,especially upon the coast ; and seldom more than3 p

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Santiaijo de la Monclava, and the other settlementsarc as follows :

J>an Buenaventura,Catano,

Villa del Saltillo,

Las Juntas,

La Hacienda del Alamo,Los Ranchos,

San Pedro de Boca Leo-

San Francisco Aguayo,

San Miguel,

El Presidio del Sacra-mento,

San Juan Bautista de

Rio Grande,

Petoyes,

San Francisco de Bizar. nes,

ron, Monte Rey.

Nra. Sra. de la Victoria,

COAHUITLAN, Santiago de, a settlementof the head settlement of Amuzgos, alcaldiaynayoT of Xicayan, of Nueva Espana. It is com-posed of 10 families of Indians, who are busiedin cultivating cochineal, cotton, and hainilla.Twenty -two leagues to the w. of its head settlement.

COAI, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Paraguay. It runs e. and enters theParana close to the settlement of the mission ofSt. Thomas.

COAILLO, a settlement of the province and4torreeimiento of Cañete in Peru.

COAJUSCO, San Francisco de, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor ofZultepec in Nueva Espana. It contains S6 fami-lies of Indians, and is three leagues to the s. of itscapital.

COALAQUE, a settlement of the province andtorregimiento of Moquehua in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Puguina.

COANDA, a province uncultivated and littleknown, s. t of that of Jaen de Bracamoros inthe kingdom of Quito. It is full of forests, rivers,lakes, and pools ; the climate is hot, moist, andunhealthy.

COAPA, a settlement of the head settlement ofSan Luis, of the coast and alcaldia mayor ofTlapa in Nueva Espafia. It is of a hot tempera-ture, and contains 86 families of Indians.

Same name, another settlement in the alcaldia mayorof Comitlan, of the kingdom of Guatemala.

COAPAN, San Pablo de, a settlement of thehead settlement of Tlacolula, and alcaldia mayorof Xalapa, in Nueva Espana. It is very close onthe s. w. side of its head settlement.

COAPETENGO, San Martin de, a settlement of the head settlement of Zitepec, and alcaldiamayor of Tenango del Valle, in Nueva Espana.It belonged formerly to the jurisdiction of Tancuba,and was united to this of Tenango, on account ofbeing closer to it than to its former jurisdiction.It contains 35 families of Indians.

COAPILLA, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Zoques in the kingdom of Guatemala.

COARI, a large river of the kingdom of Peru,the head and course of which are unknown, savethat it runs through countries belonging to the in-fidel Indians till it enters the Maranon : accordingto the map of Don Juan de la Cruz, it has itssource from the large ri vers of Cuchivara or Purus,and of Tefe. It runs $. e. then «. and then turn-ing to a s. e. course, enters with a large body ofwater into the Maranon, through the territory ofthe Zurinas Indians.

Same name, a settlement of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese posses-sions. It is upon the shore of the Maranon, andat the mouth of the fornn;er river.

COATA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Paucarcolla. in Peru. In its vicinityare three eminences of 20 yards in height, andwrought by the hand ; there being a traditionamongst the Indians, that in one of them is incloseda certain great treasure taken at the time that theIncas conquered this country : in its church isvenerated an image of Nuestra Senora de la Pre-sentacion, which is a subject of devotion to all thefaithful of the neighbouring provinces. It is si-tuate on the bank of the great lake Titicaca.

COATE, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Combaya.

COATEPEC, San Geeonimo de, a headsettlement of the alcaldia mayor of Xalapa inNueva Espana. Its district is eight leagues inlength, and its own situation is very pleasant, andits productions are many, such as maize, Frenchbeans, and tobacco, the latter being its chief ar-ticle of commerce. Its inhabitants are composedof 12 families of Spaniards, 214 of Mustees andMulattoes, and 138 of Indians ; of the latter, someemploy themselves as drovers, and others in fatten-ing pigs for the supply of Vera Cruz ; land beingvery deficient, and the Avhole of the territory allot-ted to them not exceeding 600 yards. Two leaguess.e. of Xalcomulco.

COATEPEC, another settlement, in the head settlement of Teutalpan, and alcaldia mayor of Za-catlan, in the same kingdom. It contains 120families of Indians, and is three leagues from itshead settlement.

Same name, another (settlement), which is the head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Zaqualpa in thesame kingdom. It contains 150 families of In-dians.

Same name, another (settlement), with the dedicatory titleof San Francisco, of the head settlement of Esca-

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teopan, and alcaldia mayor of Zaqualpa. 11 con-tains 204 families of Indians.

CAOTEPEC, Santa Maria, another (settlement), with the dedicatory title of Santa Maria, of the alcaldia mayor of Tacuba.It is very poor and much reduced.

Same name, another (settlement), the capital of the alcaldiamayor of the same kingdom ; the jurisdiction ofwhich comprehends three head settlements of thedistrict. It is of a moderate temperature, abound-ing in seeds and grain, which are cultivated inmany estates of its territoiy ; and in these somecattle also are bred. It contains 340 families ofIndians, 15 of Spaniards, and Mulattoes,with a good convent of monks of St. Domingo.Nine leagues to the no. of Mexico.

Same name , another (settlement), of the head settlement ofAmatepec, and alcaldia mayor of Zultepec, in thesame kingdom. It contains 20 families of Indians,who maintain themselves by breeding large cattle,and in sow ing some fruits and maize. Four leaguesto the n. of its head settlement.

COATEPEQUE, S. Paulo de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Zitaquaro, of the alcaldiamayor of Maravatio, in the bishopric of Mechoa-can. It contains 179 families of Indians, and isone eighth of a league’s distance from its headsettlement towards the s.

COATETELCO, S. Juan de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Mazatepec, and alcaldiaof Cuernavaca, in Nueva Espafia ; situatein a valley of a hot temperature. It contains 94families of Mexican Indians, who pride them-selves on their nobility, and suffer no other peopleto come and dwell among them. Here is a lakeformed by the winter rains, in which are caughtmojarras^ a fish much esteemed in Mexico.

COATINCHAN, a head settlement of the al-caldia mayor of the Puebla de los Angeles inNueva Espana. It has, besides the parish church,a convent of monks of St. Francis, 324 families ofIndians, and 50 of Spaniards, Mustees^ and Mu-lattoes, with those of the wards of its vicinity.Two leagues s. e. of its capital.

COATININGA, a river of tlie country of LasAmazonas, in the Portuguese possessions. It runsn. n. w. and enters the Madera.

COATLAN, a settlement of the head settlementof Metlatlan, and alcaldia mayor of Papantla, inNueva Espana. It contains 25 families of In-dians, and is little more than three leagues to thes. w. of its head settlement.

COATLAN, San Pablo, another (settlement), with the dedicatory title of San Pablo, the head settlement of the district ofthe alcaldia mayor of Miahuatlau in the samekingdom, being of a mild temperature. It con-

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tains 532 families of Indians, with those of itsimmediate wards, all of them employing thenn-selves in the cultivation of maize and other fruitsofthis region. It lies 12 leagues between the e.and s. of its capital.

Same name, another (settlement), the head settlement of thedistrict of the alcaldia mayor of Nexapa a in thesame kingdom. It has a convent of monks of St.Dcmiingo, and contains 114 families of Indians,employed in the cultivation and sale of grain and

cotton garments.

It lies 12 leagues to the n. of

the capital.

Same name, another (settlement), of the head settlement ofCozcatlan, and alcaldia mayor of Tasco, in thesame kingdom. It contains 130 families of In-dians, and lies three leagues to thee, of its capital.

Same name, a river of the province and alcaldiamayor of Soconusco in the kingdom of Guatemala,which runs into the S. sea, to the e. ofthe capital.

COATLINCHAN, San Miguel de, a settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Tezcuco in NuevaEspana. It contains 218 families of Indians, in-cluding those of its immediate wards, and is oneleague to the s. of its capital.

COAUCAZINTLA, a settlement of the dis-trict and head settlement of Tlacolula, and al-caldia mayor of Xalapa, in Nueva Espana ;situate between three lofty mountains, and in themidst of others with which its territory is covered.It is of a mild temperature, the soil is tortile, butproduces only maize and French beans, in whichconsists the commerce of the inhabitants. Theseare composed of 44 families of Indians. Oneleague to the n. e. of its head settlement.

COAUTITLAN, the district and alcaldiamayor of Nueva España ; being one of the mostfertile and rich territories, however inconsiderablein size, covered with cultivated grounds andestates, which produce quantities of maize, wheatbarley, and other grain. It is a grand plainjwatered by the river of its name, which traversesit, and runs from s. to n. It has a lake called Zum-pango, close to the settlement of Coyotepecwhich filling itself from the waters of the river*empties itself into the lake Ecatepec. This juris-diction contains the following settlements :

The capital of the same San Miguel de los Xa«

name.

queyes,

Teoloyuca,

Tepozotlan,

Xaltocan.

Coyotepec,

Santa Barbara,

Tultepec,

Huehuetoca,

The capital, which is the residence of the alcaldiamayor., lies in the direct road from Mexico to theinterior of the provinces, and upon this account3 Q

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which is above 100 leagues distant, and thatthrough a desert country.]

COBITU, a river of the province and mis-sions of the Gran Paititi. It rises in themountains of the infidel Indians, which serveas a boundary to the province of Larecaja ;runs nearly due n. collecting the waters of manyothers, and enters theMarmore w ith the name of Mato.

COBLER’S Rock, a rock or isle of the North sea,very close upon the e. coast of the island of Bar-badoes.

[COBLESKILL, a new town in the county ofSchoharie, New York, incorporated March 1797.]

COBO, a river of the province and governmentof Neiva in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. Itrises in a llanura^ or plain, runs w, and enters theriver Magdalena, opposite the city of La Plata.

COBORCA, a large and capacious bay of theprovince of Pimeria in Nueva Espana.

COBOS, a fortress of the province and govern-ment of Tucuman in Peru ; of the district and ju-risdiction of the city of Salta, from whence it isnine leagues distant ; having been founded in 1693at the foot of a declivity, to serve as an outworkor defence against the Indians of Chaco, it is atpresent destroyed and abandoned, and serves as acountry-house on the estate of an individual.

COBRE, Santa Clara de, a settlement ofthe alcald'ia mayor of Valladolid, in the provincennd bishopric of Mechoacan. It contains 100 fa-milies of Spaniards, bO oi Mustees, 38 of Mulat-toes, and 135 of Indians ; some of whom speculatein working the mines of copper which are closeby, others in the cultivation of maize, and othersgain their livelihood as muleteers. Three leaguess. of the city of Pasquaro.

COBRE, another settlement in the island of Cuba,on the s. coast.

Same name, a river of the province and governmentof Veragua in the kingdom of Tierra Firrae. Ithas its origin in the sierras of Guanico to the s.and enters the Pacific sea.

Same name, a mountain on the coast of the provinceand corregimiento of Coquimbo in the kingdom ofChile. It derives its name from some very abun-dant copper mines. Great quantities of this metalare carried from hence to Spain for founding artil-lery, and for different purposes.

COBULCO, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Los Zacatepeques in the king-dom of Guatemala.

COCA, a large river of the kingdom of Quito.It rises from different streams which flow downfrom the cordillera oi t\\e paramo, or mountain de-sert, of Cotopaxi. It continually follows the course

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of the large river Napo, and at last becomes in-corporated with the same.

COCAGNE, a small river of NovaScotia. It runs e. and enters the sea in the gulf ofSt. Lawrence, and in the strait formed by the islandof St. John, opposite the island of its own name.

[COCALICO, a township in Lancaster county,Pennsylvania.]

COCAMA, a great lake in the midst of thethick woods which lie in the country of Las Amazonas, to the s. and w. of tlie river Ucayale. It is10 leagues long from n. to s. and six wide from e.to w. On the e. it flows out, through a littlecanal, into the river Ucayale, and on the w. itforms the river Cassavatay, which running n. andthen e. enters also the Ucayale. Its shores areconstantly covered with alligators and tortoises.

COCAMAS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe country of Las Amazonas, who inhabit thew'oods to the s. of the river Maraiion, and in thevicinities of Ucayale. It takes its name from theformer lake, called La Gran Cocama. Theyare a barbarous and cruel race, wandering over theforests in quest of birds and wild beasts for meresustenance. Their arms are the macana, and theIndian cimeter, or club of chonia, a very strongebony.

COCANIGUAS, a settlement of the provinceand government of Esmeraldas in the kingdom ofQuito.

COCAS, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Castro Vireyna in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Uuachos.

Same name, another settlement, in the province andcorregimienito of Vilcas Huaiman, of the samekingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Tofos.

COCATLAN, San Luis de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Coatlan, and alcadia mayorof Nexapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains 160 fa-milies of Indians, employed in the trade in cochi-neal and cotton stuffs. It is four leagues to the n.of its head settlement.

COCAYA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Maynas in the kingdom of Quito. Itunites itself with the Ibinelo, and then takes thename of Unquizia, and enters the Putumayo.

COCHA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdomof Quito.

Same name, another settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cotabambas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Llaaquas.

COCHA, another (settlement), of the province and corregimi-ento of Vilcas Huaiman in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Vilcas.

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venerated an image of Oar L idy, the most cele-brated for miracles of any in the whole kingdom.The wonderful things, indeed, that have beenwrought here, have caused it to be the object ofgreat devotion ; accordingly an handsome templehas been erected, and the riches and ornamentswhich adorn the same are exceedingly valuable.People conse here from all the distant provinces tooffer up their prayers, to implore the protection ofthe Holy Virgin, and to thank her for benefits re-ceived. The festival here celebrated is on the 8thof September, when the quantity of people as-sembled is so large as to give the place, for thespace of 12 days, t!ie‘ appearance of a fair.

COCHAS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru.

COCHE, an island of the North sea, near the coastof Nueva Andalucia, and belonging to the islandof Margarita. It is nine miles in circumference,and its territory is low and barren. It was cele-brated for the pearl-fishery formerly carried onhere. It is four leagues to the e. of Cubagiia.

COCHEARI, a river of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas. It runs w. and enters theMadera opposite the Yamari.

[COCHECHO, a n.w. branch of Piscataquariver in New Hampshire. It rises in the Bluehills in Strafford county, and its mouth is fivemiles above Hilton’s point. See Piscat.xqua.J

COCHEIRA, Cumplida, a river of the coun-try of Brazil. It rises to the n. of the gold minesof La Navidad, runs w. and enters the Tocantineson the e. side, between the Salto de Ties Leguasand the settlement of the Portal de San Luis.

COCHIMATLAN, a settlement of the headsettlement of Almololoyan, and alcald'ia mayor ofColima, in Nueva Espana. It contains 100 fami-lies of Indians, whose trade consists in the manu-facturing of salt, and the cultivation of their gar-dens, which produce various kinds of fruits. Twoleagues to the w. of its head settlement.

COCHINOCA, a settlement of the provinceand governmeist of Tucuman, in the jurisdictionof the city of Xnjui. It has an hermitage, withthe dedicatory title of Santa Barbara, which is achapel of ease, and three other chapels in the set-tlement of Casivindo. The Indians of this placemanufacture gunpowder equal to that of Europe,and in its district are some gold mines.

COCHINOS, Ensenada de, a bay on the s.coast of the island of Cuba, between the pointGorda and the bay of Xagua, opposite the falls ofi)iego Perez.

COCHITI, a settlement of the kingdom ofNuevo Mexico ; situate at the source of a riverwhich enters the large river Uel Norte, or of theNorth.

COCHOAPA, a settlement of the alcaldia mayorof Tlapa in Nueva Espana; situate upon a dryand barren plain. It contains 150 families of In-dians, who are busied in the cultivation of cotton,the only production of the place.

COCHON, a small isle of the North sea,near the island of Guadalupe, in the bay ofthe Cul de Sac Petit, or Cala Angosta.

COCHUTA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Sonora in Nueva Espana.

COCHUY, a province of the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, to the n. e. ; bounded by the provinceof Chita. It has now the name of Laches, fromhaving been inhabited by this nation of Indians.It is very thinly peopled, of a hot climate, andabounding in Avoods.

COCKAHISPEN, a small river of Canada,which runs n. e. and enters Hudson’s bay.

[COCKBCRNE, a township in the n. part ofNew Hampshire, Grafton county, on the e. bankof Connecticut river, s, of Colebrooke.]

[COCKERMOUTH, a town in Grafton county,New Hampshire, about 15 miles n. e. of Dart-mouth college. It was incorporated in 1766, andin 1775 contained 118 inhabitants ; and in 1790,373.]

[COCKSAKIE. See Coxakie.]

COCLE, a large river of the province and go-vernment of Panama in the kingdom of TierraFirmc. It is formed by the union of the Penomeand the Nata, which run to the right and left ofthe mountain of Toabre, becoming navigable fromthat part to their entrance into the sea. A contra-band trade was in former times constantly carriedon through this river into the S. sea ; for whichreason Don Dionisio de Alcedo (the father of theauthor of this Dictionary) built a fort which de-fended its entrance, as likewise a rvatch-tower orsignal-house, to give notice of any strange vesselswhich might enter the river for the above pur-poses. The English took this tower, and built an-other fort by it in 1746, having been assisted by acompany of at least 200 smugglers. These w eredislodged in their turn by the aforesaid president,who inflicted condign punishment upon the headsof all the offenders.

COCMONOMAS, a barbarous nation of Indians of Peru, who inhabit the mountains ol' theprovince of Guanuco. They are docile, of a noblespirit, and in continual warfare with the Callisecasand Mazupes.

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rapid current, between high banks on eacli side,and pours the whole body of its water over a per-pendicular rock of about 40 (some say more) feetin height, which extends quite across the riverlike a mill-dam. The banks of the river, imme-diately below the falls, are about 100 feet high.

A bridge 1100 feet long, and 24 feet wide, restingon 13 piers, was erected, at the expence of 12,000dollars, in 1794, a mile below the falls, from whicha spectator may have a grand view of them; butthey appear most romantically from Lansinburghhill, five miles e. of them. 1

(COHONGORONTO is the name of Potow-raack river before it breaks through the Blueridge, in lat, 39° 45' n. Its whole length to theBlue ridge may be about 160 miles ; from thenceit assumes the name of Potowmack, which see.)

(COHUIXCAS, a country in New Spain, inwhich there is a considerable mountain of load-stone, between Tcoiltylan and Chilapan.)

COIABAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chilques and Masques inPeru; annexed to the curacy of Calpi. Anearthquake was experienced in this province in1707, Avhich desolated many settlements ; whenalso happened that extraordinary phenomenonwhich is accredited and related by Don CosineBueno, geographer of Lima, as having takenplace ; which was, that a small estate was by thisearthquake removed from one side of the river tothe other, together with the house, garden, andinhabitants, without their perceiving any thinghad happened ; and as the event took place atmidnight, Avhen they were all asleep, that theywere not a little surprised to find themselves esta-blished in the curacy of Colcha. This extraordi-nary occurrence, however, has its precedent ina similar circumstance which happened in thekingdom of Quito.

COIACHI, a settlement of the missions whichwere held at the expence of the regulars of thecompany of Jesuits, in the province of Taraumara,and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya, 18 leagues andan half between the s. w. and s. e. of the town andreal of the mines of San Felipe de Chiguagua.

COIAIMA, a settlement and head settlementof the corregimiento of this name in the NuevoReyno de Granada. It is of an hot temperature,produces cacao, sugar-cane, maize, ^uca<!, plan-tains, and an infinite quantity of cattle and swine ;but it is much infested with reptiles and insects,vipers, snakes, spiders, and mosquitoes. It alsoabounds in gold, and the Indians to the number of450, who go to Santa Fe to pay their tribute, pro-ceed in companies, and are accustomed to collect

in four or five daj's, on Die shores of the river Sal-dana, as much gold as is necessary for the tributethey are obliged to pay in the city.

COIAME, a river of the province and countryof Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions.It runs n. in a serpentine course, and enters theMaranon between the rivers Tefe and Catoa.

COIBA==, a small island of the S. sea, close to thecoast of the province and government of Veragua,in the kingdom of Tierra Firme, and five leaguesdistant from the point Blanca.

COIN, a river of the island of Guadalupe. Itruns to the n. w. in the isthmus Avhich almost di-vides the island into two parts, and enters the seaat the bottom of the bay of Cul de Sac Petit.

COIOACAN, a district and alcaldia mayor ofNueva España. It is one of the most pleasant,and fertile in wheat, maize, barley, and other seeds.Nearly the whole of its population live in coun-try houses, in gardens and orchards which pro-duce quantities of fruit, such as pears of severalkinds, peaches, apples, prunes, plums, damsons,pomegranates, quinces, oranges, and lemons, withwhich a great commerce is carried on rviththe cityof Mexico. In some parts of this province clothsand baizes are fabricated. It belongs to thejurisdiction of the marquisate Del Valle de Oax-aca ; to which the tributes are paid, the king re-taining the sum of four tomines, (a Spanishcoin weighing the third part of a drachm.) Thesettlements of this district are,

San Angel, Chapultepec,

San Augustin de las Nuestra Senora de los

Culvas, Remedies.

Tacubaya,

The capital, which bears the same name, is alarge, pleasant, fertile, and well peopled town. Ithas shady arbours, country houses, and orchardsand gardens, which serve as a recreation to thepeople of Mexico, from whence it is distant twoleagues to the s. s. e. Its population amounts to1885 Indian families. It has a good convent ofthe religious order of St. Dominic, and manywork-shops, in which are fabricated cloths, baizes,and serges. Long. 99° 4'. Lat. 19° 20'.

COIOMEAPA, Santa Maria de, a settle-ment and head settlement of the alcaldia mayorof Theacan in Nueva Espana. It contains 300families of Indians, and 20 of Mustees and Mu-lattoes. Twelve leagues s. e. of its capital.

COIOTEPEC, San Mateo De, a settlement ofthe alcaldia mayor of Yanguitlan in Nueva Es-pana. It contains 22 families of Indians, whosubsist by the trade in cochineal. Six leagues s. c.of its capital.

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of Atengo, and alcald'ia mayor of Chilapa, inNueva Espana. It contains 27 families of Indians,and is two leagues to the n. of its head settle-ment.

COMALA, another settlement, in the head settle-ment of Almololoyan, and alcald'ia mayor of Co-lima. It contains 67 families of Indians, who ex-ercise themselves in the cultivation of the lands.Two leagues to the n. e.- of its head settlement.

COMALAPA, a .settlement of the province andalcald'ia mayor of Chiapa in the kingdom of Guate-mala.

COMALTEPEC, a settlement and head settle-ments of the mayor of Villalta, of a hottemperature, with 310 families of Indians. Nineleagues between the e. and ??. of its capital.

COMALTEPEC, another, in the alcald'ia mayorof Tecocuilco. It contains 78 families of Indians,who cultivate nothing but cochineal and maize,and these only in as much as is nece.ssary for theirsustenance.

COMANJA, a settlement of the head settlementof Tirindaro, and alcald'ia mayor of Valladolid, inthe province and bishopric of Mechoacan. Itcontains 13 families of Indians, and is one leagueto the s. of its head settlement.

=COMANJA==, another settlement and real of minesin the alcald'ia mayor oi Lagos, of the kingdom andbishopric of Galicia ; the population of which con-sists of 30 families of Spaniards, Mustees, andMulattoes, and 50 of Indians, who live by thecommerce of and labour in the mines, which,although these inhabitants are little given to in-dustry, produce good emolument. This settle-ment is at the point of the boundary which dividesthe settlements of this kingdom from the king-dom of Nueva Espana. Seven leagues e. of itscapital.

COMAO, a province of the country of LasAmazonas, to the s. of this river, from the mouthof which it is 40 leagues distant, extending itselfalong the banks of the same; discovered in 1745by Francisco de Orellana. The territory is leveland fertile, and the climate moist and hot. Itabounds in maize, and has some plantations ofsugar-cane. It is watered by different rivers, allof which abound in fish, as do also its lakes ; andin these an infinite quantity of tortoises are caught.This province belongs to the Portuguese, and ispart of the province of Para.

(COMARGO, a town of New Leon in N.America ; situate on the s. side of Rio Bravo,which empties into tlie gulf of Mexico on the w.side.)

COMARU, or De los Angeles, a settle-

ment of the missions held by the Portuguese in thecountry of the Amazonas, on the shore of the riverNegro.

COMARU, another settlement in the provinceand captainship of Pará, and kingdom of Brazil ;situate on th.e s. shore of the river of Las Ama-zonas, on a point or long strip of land formed bythe mouth of the river Topayos.

COMAS, a settlement of the province and cor-regmiienio of Xauxa in Peru.

Comas, a lake of the province and governmentof Venezuela, of an oval figure, between the riverGuarico and the jurisdiction which divides thisgovernment from that of Cumana.

COMATLAN, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Chixila, and alcald'ia mayor of Villalti.It contains 32 families of Indians, and is fiveleagues to the n. of its capital.

COMATLAN, another settlement, the head set-tlement of the district of the alcald'ia mayor of Te-quepexpa ; of a hot temperature. It contains 20families of Indians, who live by cultivating thelands. Fifteen leagues to the s. of its capital.

COMAU, a settlement of the province and cap-tainship of Pará in Brazil ; situate at the mouth ofthe river Las Amazonas, to the n. n. e. of thetown of Macapa.

COMAUUINI, a river of the province andgovernment of Guayana, in the Dutch possessions,on the shores and at the mouth of which they haveconstructed the fort of Amsterdam. It runs n. andafterwards turning to the s. s. e. enters the Co-tica.

COMAYAGUA, or Valladolid, a city andcapital of the province of Honduras in the king-dom of Guatemala ; founded by the CaptainAlonzo de Caceres, by the order of Pedro de Al-varado. It was at first called Nuestra Senora dela Concepcion, and by this title there is still namedan hospital which is well endowed and served.Here are also some convents of the religious orderof La Merced, and a very good church, erectedinto a bishopric in 1539. One hundred and tenleagues from the capital Guatemala. Lat. 20° 58'n. Long. 87° 5 P

Bishops who have presided in Comayagua.

1. Don Fray Juan de Talavera, of the orderof St. Jerome, prior of his convent of NuestraSenora del Prado, near Valladolid : being nomi-nated first bishop, he refused the appointment.

2. Don Christoval de Pedraza, elected bishopfrom the renunciation of the former; at the sametime nominated protector of the Indies, and resi-dentiary judge to the conquerors Pedro Alvaredoand Francisco de Montejo, in 1539,

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mills. The whole of the district of its territory iscovered with estates and country-seats, whichabound in all kinds of fruits, at once rendering ita place pleasing and advantageous for residence.

Concepcion, another, of the province and cor-regimiento of Pacajes in Peru ; situate on the shoreoflhe lake Titicaca, and at the mouth of the riverDesa<;uadero.

Concepcion, anotlier, of the province and go-vernment of the Chiquitos Indians, in the samekingdom ; a reduccion of the missions which wereheld in this province by the regulars of the com-pany of the Jesuits ; situate between the source ofthe river Verde and the river Ubay.

Concepcion, another, of the province and go-vernment of Moxos in the kingdom of Quito ;■situate between the rivers Guandes and Y laibi, andnearly in the spot where they join.

Concepcion, another, of the former provinceand government ; situate on the shore of the riverItenes.

Concepcion, another, of the province andcountry of the Amazonas, in the Portuguese pos-sessions ; a reduccion of the missions which are heldby the Carmelite fathers of this nation ; situate onthe shore of a pool or lake formed by the riverUrubu. . .

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits in California ; situate near the sea-coast andthe Puerto Nuevo, or New Port.

Concepcion, another, of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán in Peru, and district ofChaco ; being a reduccion of the Abipones Indians,of the mission held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits, and to-day under the charge of the reli-gious order of S. Francisco.

Concepcion, another, which is also called hu-enclara or Canada, of the missions held by the re-ligion of St. Francis, in the kingdom of NuevoMexico.

Concepcion, another, which is the real oi inesilver mines of the province and government ofSonora in Nueva Espana.

Concepcion, another, of the province and cap-iahiship ot Rio Janeiro in Brazil 5 situate on thecoast, opposite the Isla Grande.

Concepcion, another, of the province and cap-iainship of S. Vincente in the same kingdom.

Concepcion, another, of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Ayres; situate at the mouth ofthe river Saladillo, on the coast which lies betweenthe river La Plata and the straits of Magellan.

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-

suits, in the province and government of BuenosAyres ; situate on the w. shore of the river Uru-guay. (Lat. 27° 58' 43". Long. 53° 27' 13" re.)

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the country of the Chiquitos Indians, inthe kingdom of Peru ; situate to the e. of that ofSan Francisco Xavier.

Concepcion, another, of the province and go-vernment of Cinaloa in Nueva Espana.

Concepcion, another, of the province and go-vernment of Quixos and Macas in the kingdom ofQuito, which produces nothing but maize, yucas^plantains, and quantities of aloes, with the whichthe natives pay their tribute, and which are muchesteemed in Peru.

Concepcion, a town of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán in Peru, in the jurisdictionof the city of Santiago del Estero, between therivers Bermejo and Salado. It was destroyed bythe infidel Indians.

Concepcion, a bay of the kingdom of Chile,at the innermost part of which, and four leaguesfrom its entrance, is found a bed of shells, fromwhich is made excellent lime.

Concepcion, another bay, in the gulf of Cali-fornia, or Mar Roxo de Cortes. It is very largeand capacious, having within it various islands.Its entrance is, however, very narrow.

Concepcion, a river in the province and go-vernment of Costarica, which runs into the sea be-tween that of San Antonio and that of Portete.

Concepcion, another, of the kingdom of Bra-zil, which rises to the w. of the town of Gorjas,runs s. 5 . K). and unites itself with that of the Re-medies, to enter the river Prieto or La Palma.

Concepcion, another, which is an arm of theriver Picazuru, in the province and government ofParaguay.

Concepcion, another, of the kingdom of Chile,which runs through the middle of the city ofConcepcion, and enters the sea in the bay of tliisname.

(Concepcion, a large bay on the c. side ofNewfoundland island, whose entrance is betweencape St. Francis on the s. and Flamborough headon the n. It runs a great way into the land in a s.direction, having numerous bays on the w. side,on which are two settlements, Carboniere andHavre de Grace. Settlements were made here in1610, by about 40 planters, under Governor JohnGuy, to whom King James had granted a patentof incorporation.)

(Concepcion of Salaye, a small town of N.America, in the province of Mechoacán in Mexico

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Chuquibamba, and the other settlements of its juris-diction, -which comprehend nine curacies, are thefollowing :

Chuquibamba,

San Pedro de Illotnas,Andaray,Yanaquihua,Chorunga,

Alpacaj,

Llanca,

Cayaraiii,

Areata,

Salamanca,

Chichas,

Quechalla,

Belinga,

Andaliua,

Cliilca and Marca,Viraco,

Pampacolca,Umachulco,

H uancarama,Orcopampa,

Chachas,

Ayo,

San J nan Crisostomo deChoco,

Ucuchacas,Machahuay,

Arirahua, Tipan.

CONDIRAS, an arm of the river Jamunda, inthe country of Las Amazonas, and in the Portu-guese possessions. It runs from the lake Mari-pava, and enters the Maranon.

CONDOCONDO, a settlement of the provinceand corre^imiento of Pariá in Peru.

CONDONOMA, a mine, celebrated for itsabundance of silver, of the province and corregi-miento of Tinta in Peru.

CONDORGUASI, a settlement of the provinceand government of Tucumán in Peru ; belongingto the jurisdiction of Jujui, situate on the shore ofthe river Laquiaca.

CONDOROMA, a settlement and asiento of thesilver mines of the province of Canes and Canchesor Tinta in Peru, -where, during tempests of thun-der and lightning, is experienced a singular phe-nomenon ; namely, a certain prickly sensation uponthe hands and face, -which they called moscas,(flies), though none of these insects are ever seen.It is indeed attributed to the air, which is at thattime highly charged with electric fluid ; the effectsof which may be observed on the handles of sticks,buckles, lace, and other metal trinkets ; the sameeffects ceasing as soon as the tempest is over. Itis observed, that in no other parts is the same phe-nomenon known to exist.

CONDOROMA, another settlement, of the pro-vince and government of Chucuito in the samekingdom ; situate on the shore of the lake.

CONDUITE, or CoNDUITA, a small river ofthe province and country of the Iroquees Indians.It runs w. forming a curve, and enters the lakeOswego.

(CONDUSKEEG, a settlement in the districtof Maine, in Hancock county, containing 567 in-habitants.)

CONEUAGUANET, a small river of the pro-

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vince and colony of Pennsylvania and counfy ofCumberland. It runs c. and enters the Susque-hanna.

CONEGA, a small island of the s. coast of theisland of Newfoundland, between the isle of Des-pair and port Bartran.

CONEGHTA, a small river of S. Carolina. Itrises in the territory of the Tuscaroras Indians, runss. e. and enters the Neus.

(CONEGOCHEAGUE Creek rises near Mer-cersburg, Franklin county, Pensylvania, runs s.in a -winding course, and after supplying a numberof mills, empties into the Potowmack, at Williamport, in W ashington county, Maryland ; 19 miless. e. of Hancock, and eight miles s, of the Pennsyl-vania line.)

CONEGOGEE, a small river of the provinceand colony of Maryland. It runs s. and entersthe Potowmack.

CONEIUAGA, a small river of the provinceand colony of Pennsylvania, in the county of York,It runs e. and enters the Susquehanna.

(CONEMAUGH River, and Little Cor emaugh,are the head waters of Kiskemanitas, in Pennsyl-vania : after passing through Laurel hill and Ches-nut ridge, Conemaugh takes that name, andempties into the Alleghany, 29 miles n. e. of Pitts-burg. It is navigable for boats, and there is -aportage of 18 miles between it and the Frankstownbranch of Juniata river.)

(CONENTES, Las, a city of La Plata orParaguay in S. America, in the diocese of BuenosAyres.)

(CONESTEO, a w. w. branch of Tioga river inNew York. See Canjcodeo Creek.)

CONESTOGA, a settlement of Indians of thesame province and colony as the former river ; si-tuate between the e. and w. arms of the river Sus-quehanna, where the English have a fort andestablishment for its defence.

Conestoga, a river of this province, whichrunsw. then turns s. and enters the Susquehanna.

(CONESUS, a small lake in the Genesseecountry. New York, which sends its waters n. w,to Genessee river.)

CONETLA, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Comitlan in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CONFINES. See Villanueva de los In-fantes.

CONFUSO. See Togones.

CONG, a small river of the province and c^p-iainship of Rio Grande in Brazil. It rises near thecoast, runs e. and enters the sea between the riverGoyana and the settlement of Gonzalo.

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York, wliicli falls into a bay at the s. side of theisland. It lies two miles to tlies. of Rockonkamapond.)

CONNESTIGUCUNE, an establisliment oftlie English, in the county of Albany, inthew. partand to the e. of Chenectady, or of (he river Mo-hawk, where it gives a fall from above 70 feet inlieiglit. See Arm any.

CONNETABLE, or CoN?)ESTABr^E, a smallisland of tire county of Cayenne, belonging to theFrench, between the city of Cayenne and capeOrange.

CONNETABLE, anotlier small island of tire sameprovince, witli the addition of Petite, to distin-guish it from the former.

CONOCOTO, a settlement of the kingdom ofQuito, in the corregimimto of the district of theCinco Leguasde la Ciudad, in the district of whichis a rising ground called A Halo, and upon theskirts of this are many warm-water mineral streams,much frequented as baths for the curing of in-firmities.

CONOMA, a lake of the province and countryof the Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions.It is formed from some waste water of the riverMadera, very near its shore, and at a small distancefrom the river of Las Amazonas.

CONOME, Cape of, a point of land of thecoast of Nova Scotia, in the bay of Fundy, and inthe most interior part of the same.

CONORIBO, a river of the province and cap-ainship of Seara in Brazil. It rises near the coast,runs n. and enters that of La Concepcion or S.Francisco, and that of La Cruz, and then entersthe sea.

CONOSTEE, a settlement of Indians of N.Carolina ; situate on the shore of the river Eu-phasee.

CONSAHATCHEE, a river of the provinceand colony of Georgia. It runs s. e. and enters thesea.

CONSATA, a settlement of the missions whichwere held by the religious order of St. Augustin,in the country of Paititi, of the province and cor-regimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

CONSETS, Point of, on the e, coast of theisland of Barbadoes, on the side of the point ofBele.

CONSOLACION, Nuestra Senora de, aset-tlement of the government of Neiba in the NuevoReyno de Granada ; annexed to the curacy of thetown of La Purificacion. It is situate on theshore of the river Pardo, is of a hot temperature,abounding in the vegetable productions of a similar

climate, and in troublesome and venomous in-sects. It contains more than 200 house-keepers.

CONSOLACION, a point or long strip of landcalled Possession, on the n. coast of the straits ofMagellan ; one of those which form Possessionbay, and where are to be seen the ruins of the fortnamed Jesus, which was founded by the AdmiralPedro de Sarin iento.

CONSTANCE, or Constancia, a small cityof the English, in the island of Barbadoes.

CONSTANTINO Perez, an island of theriver Valdivia, in tlie kingdom of Chile, oppositethe same city, with two other small islands, theone before, the other behind it, and which, together,form the celebrated port of this name. The pas-sage on both sides is navigable, but the channel onthe s. side being the most wide, is the course uni-formly taken by large ships and vessels, and in thesame manner the n. channel is mostly, as it isnarrower, entered by frigates and small craft.

CONTAS, Rio das, a river in the provinceand captainship of Ylheos in Brazil. It rises nearthe coast, runs e. and enters the sea in the Barraor Bar of Camamu, in the river of Ylheos.

CONTAS, a town of the above province andkingdom.

(CONTINENTAL Village was situated onNorth river, in New York state. Before its de-struction by Sir Henry Clinton, in October 1777,there were here barracks for 2000 men.)

CONTOOK, a settlement of the English, inthe province of Hampshire, one of the four ofNew England ; situate on the shore of the riverPenny cook.

Contook, a river of the above province. Itrises from a small lake, runs s. then turns e. andenters the Pennycook.

CONTOY, an island of the N. sea, near thecoast of the province and government of Yucatan,close to the cape Cotoche.

CONTRE-PASTURAGE, a river of the pro-vince and colony of Virginia. It runs n. e. andenters the head of the river James.

CONTRERAS, a small island of the S. sea,close to the coast of the province and governmentof Veragua in the kingdom of Tierra Firme.

CONTUMAZA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru.

CONUCO, a settlement ofthe province and cor-regimiento of Ytata in the kingdom of Chile ; situatenear the coast, opposite the island of Quiriquina.

CONUENTOS, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Rey in Brazil, at the source of theriver Curitaba.

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upon the loftiest part of that most beautiful lltinura,from which the prospect is so enchanting ; sliew-ing on one side the sea, on another the river whichwaters tlie precincts, and on another some shadypoplar groves. It is of an extremely benign tem-perature, and enjoying throughout the year a per-petual spring, being neither incommoded by heatnor cold. It is extremely fertile, and abounds inwhatever can conduce to the comfort and conve-nience of life. The city is tolerably large ; all thestreets are drawn at straight lines ; and the housesare disjoined from each other by large gardens,which are all well supplied with water brought byaqueducts from the river. The parish church isvery beautiful, and not less so are those of the re-ligious orders of St.. Francis, St. Domingo, St.Augustin, La Merced, San Juan de Dios, and thecollege which formerly belonged to the regularsof the company of the Jesuits. It has a port,which is convenient ajid much frequented by ves-sels ; upon the shore of which are caught tunnies,abacoras, and various other kinds of fish ; alsomany delicate kinds of shell-fish. At a small dis-tance is a very abundant copper mine, from whichmuch metal is extracted and carried to Europe ;and it is of this, as well as of its excellent breedof horses, its wine, oil, tallow, cow-hides, anddried meats, that its commerce is composed ; send-ing, as it does yearly, four or five vessels loadedwith these effects to Lima. Although it has minesof the purest gold, yet these are but little worked.The whole of the town is covered with beautifulmyrtles, and of these there is a delightful grove.It was destroyed by the Araucanos Indians in1547 ; and in 1579 it was attempted to be taken byFrancis Drake, who was repulsed by the inhabi-tants, la 1680 it seemed to be rebuilt only thatit might undergo a sacking the same year by theEnglish pirate, Bartholomew Sharps. Its popula-tion consists of 500 families of Spaniards andpeople of colour, and some Indians. Fifteenleagues from the city of Concepcion, and 58 fromthe capital of the kingdom, Santiago. Lat. 30° s.Long. 71° 18'. [See Chile,]

COQUIMBO, an island of the coast of this pro-vince and corregimiento.

COQUIN, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Tarma in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Cayna.

COQUINOCA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chichas and Tarija in Peru.

CORAI, Santa Clara de Cosme, a settle-ment of the province and corregimienlo of Hu-anta in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Paucar-baraba.

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CORAJAIS, a settlement and village of th«Portuguese in the province and country of LasAmazonas ; situate on the shore of the riverNegro.

CORAL, a settlement of the province and c«/j*iainship of Rey in Brazil; situate on the sea-coast,at the mouth of the river Imbau.

(Coral River, in New Mexico, runs acourse w. by s. and empties into the head of thegulf of California, close by the mouth of Colo-rado river.)

(CORAM, a post-town in Suffolk county. Longisland. New York, It has about 60 houses, andlies 62 miles e. of New Y ork city, and 10 fromSrnithtown.)

CORANI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Carabaya in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Ayapata.

CORAS, Santiago de los, a settlement of themissions which were held by the regulars of thecompany of Jesuits in California ; situate at anequal distance from both coasts. It is composedof Indians of the nation of its name, and is theplace where the Father Lorenzo Carranza, a mis-sionary, suffered martyrdom.

Coras, some shoals, lying very little underwater, near the coast of the province and coptam-ship of Marañan in Brazil, at the mouth of a riverwhich is also thus called.

CORAZON DE Jesus, a settlement of thecorregimiento and jurisdiction of Velez in theNuevo Reyno de Granada. Its population i*small, and it is situate in a country mountainousand full of pools, being scanty in vegetable pro-ductions, with 200 inhabitants, a miserable race.It is near the settlement of Chiquinquira, and tothe s. of Velez.

CORAZON, another, called De Maria, of the mis-sions which were held by the regulars of the companyof J esLiits, in the province and government of May-nas, of the kingdom of Quito ; situate on theshore of the river Aguarico.

CORAZON, another, called De Jesus, in the pro-vince and government of the Chiquitos Indians inPeru ; situate at the foot of the cordillera of SanFernando, a reduccion of the missions which wereheld there by the regulars of the company,

CORAZON, another, of the kingdom of Quito,in the corregimiento of the district of Las CincoLeguasde esta Ciudad (the Five Leagues from thisCity), and in the road which leads down fromGuayaquil.

CORAZON, a mountain of the kingdom of Quito,on the s. s. e. part, from the ivhich on the w. flowdown the rivers of San Lorenzo and Yaraboya,

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(bring in exchange dry goods, and this they doeither by avoiding the vigilance of the guards, orby purchasing a connivance. The population ofCoi^ is composed of 10,000 people of all colours ;few slaves are to be seen here, since the Indians,although they everywhere else have a particularpartiality for the blacks, entertain a decided aver-sion against them in this city. This antipathywas very useful in 1797 to the public tranquillity,for when the Negro slaves employed at w ork inthe fields, wished to follow the example of theblacks of St. Domingo, and selected chiefs, underwhom they committed some robberies, the In-dians of Corojoined the white people, and marchedagainst the rebels with most extraordinary cou-rage ; the revolt was thus suppressed almost assoon as it broke out ; the ring-leaders were hang-ed, and every thing was restored to order ; therebel army never amounted to more than 400blacks. All work at Coro is done by Indians,notwithstanding the wages are very low ; indeedthey li ve here with so much parsimony that a per-son cannot fetch fire from his neighbour’s withoutcarrying in exchange a piece of wood of the sizeof the firing he takes away, and even this is notalways done without difficulty. The city has nospring, and the water they drink is brought fromthe distance of half a league by asses in barrels, ofwhich two compose a load. The houses, thoughoriginally well built, bear evident marks of misery,and of the ravages of time; those belongingtothe Indians are yet more pitiful. The streets runin parallel lines, but are not paved ; the publicbuildings consist of a parish church, formerly acathedral, which title is yet given to it by the in-habitants, although for more than 160 years ithas been without a bishop or a chapter, the dutybeing performed by two curates, belonging to aconvent containing about seven or eight Francis-cans, and to a parish church in which are threemonks of the same order. The civil power isexercised by a cahildo. Since 1799, a militarycommandant has been established here, who sharesat the same time the judicatory authority, and thatof the police ; his revenue being 2000 dollars perannum. Two miles to the n. of Coro is an isthmusof about one league in breadth, which joins tlie pen-insula of Paragona to the continent ; it stretches outfrom the s. w. to n. w. about 20 leagues ; is inhabit-ed by Indians and a few whites, whose only em-ployment is the rearing of cattle, which they smug-gle over in great numbers to Cura^oa ; thebutchers’ shops of that island being always bettersupplied than those of the principal cities of TicrraFirme.

VOL. I,

This was the only city of Venezuela, exceptMaracaibo, which had not declared independenceon the 2Ist August 1811. See Venezuela.The city is in lat. 11° 24' n. and long. 69° 40'; itis a league distant from the sea, SO leagues w. ofCaracas, 33 n. of Barquisimeto, and 55 of Mara-caibo.)

Coro, a settlement of the province and coregi-miento of Pastos in the kingdom of Quito ; situateon the shore of the river Cascabeles, where thisenters the Caqueta.

Coro, another, of the province and corregi-mienlo of Carangas in Peru, and of the arch-bishopric of Charcas ; annexed to the curacy ofCorquemar.

COROA Grande, a settlement of the provinceand captainship of Pará in Brazil ; situate on theshore of the river Tocantines.

COROA, a large shoal near the coast of the pro-vince and captainship of Marañan in Brazil, atthe entrance of the river Coras.

COROAIBO. SeeCossA.

COROBAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chachapoyas in Peru, inwhich is venerated a miraculous image of NuestraSenora de Guadalupe. Near it are two caves,each capable of containing 50 horsemen with theirspears erect.

COROBAMBA, another settlement in the aboveprovince and kingdom.

COROBANA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana, which, according to Mr.Beilin, in his chart and description of the course ofa part of the Orinoco, runs continually n. andenters this river near where it runs into the sea.

COROCOTO, a settlement of Indians, of theprovince and corregimiento of Cuyo in the king-dom of Chile; situate on the shore of one of thelakes of Huanacache, distinct from the followingtown.

COROCOTO, a town of the above province andcorregimiento, a reduccion of the Pampas Indians ;situate on the shore of the river Tunuyan, nearthe high road which leads from Mendoza to BuenosAyres, in the district of which are tiie estates ofCarrizal Grande, Carvalillo, Lulunta, and Men-docinos.

COROCUBI, a river of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions.It is small, runs s. and enters the Negro, forminga dangerous torrent or whirl-pool, which bears thesame name.

COROI, a settlement of the missions wliicli be-long to the French in Guayana; situate near th«coast, and at the mouth of the river Kourrou.

3 s.

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CORORAMO, a small river of tbe province andgovernment of Guayana. It rises to the w. of thelake Icupa, runs n. and enters the Paraguay.

COROYA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán in Peru ; of the district andjurisdiction of the city of Cordoba ; situate on theshore of the river Priraero.

COROYO, a lake of the province and countryof Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions.It is in the island of Topinambes, and is formedby the waters of the Maranon. '

COROZAL, or Pileta, a settlement of theprovince and government of Cartagena in the king-dom of Tierra Firme.

CORPAHUASI, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Cotabamba in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Huaillati.

CORPANQUI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Tillos.

CORPUS-CHRISTI, a settlement of the mis-sions which were held by the regulars of the com-pany of Jesuits in the province and government ofParaguay ; situate on the shore of the river Parana,about 11 leagues n. e. of Candelaria. Lat. 27° T23" s. Long. 55° 32' 29" w.

Corpus-Christi, a large, beautiful, and fertilevalley of the province and government of Mariquitain the Nuevo Reyno de Granada.

CORQUEMAR, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Carangas in Peru, and of thearchbishopric of Charcas.

CORQUINA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana. It runs s. and enters theOrinoco.

CORRAL, a settlement of the district of Gua-dalabquen, of the kingdom of Chile ; situate on theshore of the river Valdivia.

Corral, Quemado, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Piura in Peru ; situatein an angle formed by a river of this name.

CORRALES, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Antioquia ; situate on the shore ofthe river Perico, in the sierras of Guarnoco.

CORRALITO, a setdement of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, in the district and juris-diction of the city of Santiago del Estero ; to thee. of the same, and on the shore of the river Gua-rico.

CORRIENTES, S.Juan de , a city of theprovince and government of Buenos Ayres inPeru ; founded in 1588, on the e. coast of the riverLa Plata, near the part where those of the Paranaand Paraguay unite. It has, besides the parish

church, three convents, of St. Domingo, St. Francis,and La Merced, and a college which belonged tothe regulars of the company of Jesuits. This cityhas been harassed by the infidel Abipones In-dians, who have here put to death many Spaniards,and taken others prisoners ; on which account aguard of horse-militia has been established for itsdefence. (It is 100 leagues n. of the city of SantaFe, and contained, in 1801, 4300 inhabitants. Lat.27° 27' 21" s.)

CORRIENTES, S. JUAN DE, a rivcr of the pro-vince and government of Darien in the kingdom ofTierra Firme. It rises in the mountains towardsthe n. and enters the sea in the large plain oppositethe Mulatto isles.

CORRIENTES, S. JUAN DE, another river, of theprovince and government of Buenos Ayres, whichrises from the lake Yberia, and runs s. w. to enterthe river La Plata.

CORRIENTES, S. JUAN DE, another, of the pro-vince and government of Paraguay. It rises in theserrania which lies between the rivers Paraguayand Parana, runs w. and enters the former betweenthe rivers Mboeri and P'areiri.

CORRIENTES, S. JUAN DE, another, of the pro-vince and captainship of Rey in Brazil, which runss.s. e. and enters the large lake of Los Patos.

CORRIENTES, S. JUAN DE, a Cape of the s. coastof the island of Cuba : CO leagues from the islandof Trinidad, and 13 from the cape of San An-tonio.

CORRIENTES, S. JUAN DE, another cape, calledalso De Arenas Gordas, on the coast which lies be-tween the river La Plata and the straits of Ma-gellan, between the capes San Antonio and SaaAndres.

CORRIENTES, S. JUAN DE, another Cape OF pointof the coast, in the province and captainship ofSeara, between the river Molitatuba and the portPalmeras.

(CORTLANDT, a township in the n. part ofthe county of W. Chester, on the e. bank of Hud-son river. New York, containing 1932 inhabitants,of whom 66 are slaves. Of its inhabitants, in 1796,305 were electors.)

CORUPA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Darien in the kingdom of Tierra Firme.It rises near the coast of the N. sea to the e. of theprovince, and enters the Tarina.

CORUPA, another river. See Curupa.

CORUPO, San Francisco de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Uruapa, and alcaldia mayorof Valladolid, in the province and bishopric ofMechoacan. It contains S3 families of Indians,3x2

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residences here, it has fallen into decay ; and al-though it is now reduced to a small town, the-4itleof Capital has not been taken from it. Its onlyinhabitants are those who own some estates in itsdistrict, and this forms a government subordinateto that of the Havana. [The damage done by theearthquake of October 1810, to the shipping at tlieHavana, was computed at 600,000 dollars.; theinjury at St. Jago could not be correctly estimated,but the loss of the lives at both places was believedto be not fewer than 350. In long. 76° 3', andlat. 20° r.l

CUBAGUA, an island of the N. sea, near thecoast of Tierra Firme, discovered by tiie AdmiralChristopher Columbus. It is three leagues incircumference, and is barren, but has been, -informer times, celebrated for the almost incredibleabundance of beautiful pearls found upon thecoast, the riches of which caused its commerce tobe very great, and promoted the building in itthe city of New Cadiz; but at present, since thefishery is abandoned, this town has fallen entirelyinto decay, and the island has become desert. Itis a little more than a league’s distance from theisland of Margareta, in lat. 10° 42' n.

CUBAZ, a settlement of the province and cap-tainship of San Vincente in Brazil ; situate betweenthe rivers Pedroza and Recisto.

CUBIGIES, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Riobamba in the kingdom of Quito.

CUBILLI, a lake of the kingdom of Quito,in the province and corregimiento of Alausi, nearthe paramo or mountain desert of Tioloma.

CUBZIO, a settlement of the corregimientoof Bogota in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada;situate ort the shore of the river Bogota, near thefamous waterfal of Tequendama. Its climate isagreeable and fertile, and it abounds in gardensand orchards, in which are particularly cultivatedwhite lilies, these meeting with a ready sale forornamenting the churches of Santa Fe and theother neighbouring settlements.

CUCAITA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; situate in a valley which is pleasant,and of a cold and healthy temperature. It pro-duces in abundance very good wheat, maize,truffles, and other fruits of a cold climate ; hereare some fiocks of sheep, and of their wool aremade various woven articles. It is small, but never-theless contains 23 families and 50 Indians. Itis a league and an half to the s. w. of Tunja, inthe road which leads from Leiba to Chiquinquiraand Velez, between the settlements of Samaca andSora.

CUCHERO, San Antonio de, a settlementof the province and government of Guanuco inPeru ; situate at the source and head of the riverGuallaga.

CUCHIGAROS, a barbarous nation of In-dians, little known, who inhabit the shores of theriver Cuchigara, which enters the Maranon, andis one of the largest of those which are tributaryto the same. The natives call it Purus ; it is na-vigable, although in some parts abounding withlarge rocky shoals, and is filled with fish of dif-ferent kinds, as also with tortoises ; on its shoresgrow maize and other fruits : besides the nationaforesaid, it has on its borders those of the Gti-maiaris, Guaquiaris, Cuyaeiyayanes, Curucurus,Quatausis, Mutuanis, and Curigueres ; these lastare of a gigantic stature, being 16 palms high.They are very valorous, go naked, have largepieces of gold in their nostrils and ears ; their set-tlements lie two long months’ voyage from themouth of the river.

CUCHILLO, San Pedro del, a settlementof the mission which is held by the religious orderof St. Francis, in the precinct of New Mexico.

CUCHILLO, with the addition of Parado, ano-ther settlement of the missions of the province ofTaraumara, and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya ;situate on the shore of the river Conchos.

CUCHIN, a small river of the territory ofCuyaba in Brazil. It runs n. and enters theCamapoa; on its shore is a part called La Es-tancia, through which the Portuguese are accus-tomed to carry their canoes on their shoulders, inorder to pass from the navigation of this latter riverto that of the Matogroso.

CUCHIPIN, a small river of the same kingdom (Brazil)and territory as the two former. It rises in themountains of the Caypos Indians, runs n. n» w. andenters the Taquari.

CUCHIPO, a river of the kingdom of Brazil,in the same territory as the former. It rises in themountains, and runs w.

CUCHIRIHUAY, a settlementof the provinceand corregimiento of Chilques and Masques inPeru ; annexed to the curacy of Pampachucho.

CUCHIUARA, or Cuckiguara, an island ofthe province and country of Las Amazonas, in thepart possessed by the Portuguese. It is in the riverof its name, at the sama mouth by which itenters the Maranon.

CICHIUERO, a river of the province andgovernment of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia. Itrises in the sierra of Mataguaida, runs n. andenters the Ytari.

CUCHUMATLAN, a settlement of the king-

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dom of Guatemala, in the province and alcaldiamayor of Chiapa.

CUCHUNA, a large settlement of Indians, andformerly the capital of a small province of thisname in Peru, to the w. of the mountains of (heAndes. It was founded by Maita Capac, fourthEmperor of the Incas, after that he had literallystarved the country into obedience. These In-dians were treacherous, and used to give theirenemies a very deadly poison ; the said emperorcaused many to be burnt alive for having practisedthis abominable custom, and their houses to bedestroyed, together with their cattle and posses-sions.

CUCIO, a settlement of the head settlement ofPerucho, and alcaldia mayor of Guimco, in NuevaEspana. It contains 140 families of Indians, andis a quarter of a league from its head settlement.

CUCUANA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Mariquita in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; situate on the shore of the river Mag-dalena.

CUCUCHO, San Bartolome de, a settle-ment of tlie head settlement of Arantzan, and aleal-dia mayor of Valladolid, in the province andbishopric of Mechoacan. It contains 27 familiesof Indians, who employ themselves in agriculture,cutting wood, and making earthen-ware and

CUCUCHUCHAU, San Pedro de, a settle-ment of the bead settlement of the city of Cucupao,and alcaldia mayor of Valladolid, in the provinceand bishopric of Mechoacan ; situate on the shoreof the lake. It contains 18 families of Indians,and is two leagues to the s. of its head settle-ment.

CUCUISAS, a small river of the province andgovernment of Guayana. It rises to the e. of thesettlement of Encaramada, and enters the Itari.

CUCUMAYA, a river of Spanish island, or St.Domingo, which rises near the s. coast, runs s.and enters the sea between the Seco and the Bo-mana, opposite the island Cataline.

CUCUNUBA, a settlement oiihe corregimientoof Ubate in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It isof a cold temperature, and produces the fruits ofthis climate. It consists of 100 families, includingthose of its vicinity, and of 80 Indians; is nineleagues to the n. of Santa Fe.

CUCUNUCO, a mountain to the e, of the pro-vince and government of Popayan, eternallycovered with snow. From it rises the river Pu-rase, as also the river La Plata. It takes its namefrom a nation of Indians, by whom it was inhabit-

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ed, and of whom a few only, who are reduced tothe,faith, remain.

CUCURPE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Sonora in Nueva Espana; situateon the shore of the river of its name, between thesettlements of Dolores and Ticapa.

CUCURULU, a river of the kingdom of Peru,which runs through the country of the CanisiencsIndians to the e. of the Andes, it abounds in fishof a very fine quality, which serve as food to thebarbarians; runs e. and being much swelled bythe waters it collects from others, enters the riverSanta Rosa.

CUCUTA, San Joseph de, a settlement ofthe government and jurisdiction of Pamplona inthe Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It is of a hottemperature, though healthy, of great commerce,owing to the cacao with which it abounds, andwhich is brought by persons coming from variousparts, the greater portion of it being embarked onthe river Sulia for Maracaibo. It contains morethan 100 rich Indians, but is infested with snakes,lice, and other noxious insects and reptiles.

CUCUTA, an extensive valley of this province (Pamplona),between the cities of Pamplona and S. Christoval,discovered by Juan de San Martin in 1534 ; cele-brated for its fertility, and excellent breed ofmules, by which the kingdom is supplied. It iswatered by many streamlets which render it luxu-riant and fertile, and most particularly in cacaoof the finest quality. The herb on which the muleschiefly feed is wild marjoram.

CUDAJA, a lake of the province and countryof Las Amazonas, in the territory possessed by thePortuguese. It is formed by one of the arms w hichis thrown out by the river Maranon, and returnsto enter the same, in the country of ihe CabaurisIndians.

CUDIHUEL, a settlement of Indians of thedistrict of Guadalabqueu in the kingdom of Chile,on the shore of the riv'er Valdivia.

CUDUUINI, a small river of the provinceand government of Cumaná. It rises in the ser~of Irnataca, runs s. and enters the Curgunion the n. side.

CUEBAYA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Sonora in Nueva Espana ; situateat the source of the river Bezani, to the w. of thegarrison which takes this name.

CUECA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Lucanas in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Chipan.

CUELLO, a settlement of the jurisdictionof Tocayma, and government of Mariqnita, in

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souls. Sixty leagues from Quito, in lat. 2° 55'5. and long. 78° 50'.

Cuenca, a settlement of tlie province and eor-regimiento of [Angaraez]] in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Conayca. In its district is a spring ofhot water, which issues boiling.

CUENCAME, San Antonio de, a town ofthe province of Tepeguana, and kingdom ofNueva Vizcaya. It is the rea/of the silver mines,where reside numbers of people of all ranks. Ithas a convent of the religious order of St. Francis,and in its district are various manufactories forgrinding the metals that are extracted from themines. It is 37 leagues to the n. of the capitalGuadiana, and 24 from Durango.

CUENCO, a settlement of the head settlement ofTirindaro, and alcald'ia mayor of Valladolid, in theprovince and bishopric of Mechoacan ; situate ina glen surrounded by many mountains. Throughits gutters runs a crystalline stream of sweet water,which serves to fertilize its orchards and cultivatedgrounds. It contains 66 families of Indians, andis two short leagues to the n. of its head settle-ment.

CUENTLA, a settlement of the head settlementof San Francisco, of the valley and alcaldia mayorof Zultepec in Nueva Espana. It contains 53families of Indians.

CUERNAVACCA, a town of the intendancyof Mexico, the ancient Quauhnahuac, on the s.declivity of the cordillera of Guchilaque, in a tem-perate and delicious climate, finely adapted forthe cultivation of the fruit-trees of Europe.Height 1655 metres, or 5429 feet.]

CUERNO, Island of, or of the Horns, inthe N. sea, near the coast of Florida, between theislands Delfina and De Navios.

CUERO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Riobamba in the kingdom ofQuito. Some write it with a Q.

CUERNOS, a small river of the province andgovernment of Maracaibo. It is an arm of thePalmar,, which enters the great lake.

CUES, San Juan de los, a settlement of thebead settlement and alcaldia mayor of Cuicatlanin Nueva Espana. It contains 72 families of In-dians, whose commerce is in maize, French beans,and fruits. In its vicinity is a sugar-mill, at which60 families of Negro slaves assist.

CUES, San Antonio DE los, in the intend-ancy of Oaxaca in Nueva Espaua. A very po-pulous place on the road from Orizaba to Oaxaca,celebrated for the remains of ancient Mexican for-tifications.]

CUEUAS, San Agustin de las, a settlement

and head settlement of the district of the alcaldiamayor of Coyoacan in Nueva Espana. It is of avery good temperature and of a healthy situation,abounding in waters and fruit-trees, and coveredwith country houses, orchards, and gardens,which serve as a recreation to the people of Mex-ico. It has a convent of the religious order of St.Domingo, and 751 families; lying three leaguesto the s. of Mexico, and two from its capital.

Cueuas, another settlement, of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits in the province of Tepeguana, andkingdom of Nueva Espana; situate on the shoreof the river Florido, and at the distance of sixleagues from the garrison of the valley of San Bar-tolome.

Cueuas, another, of the missions which wereheld by the same regulars of the company, in theprovince of Taraumara, of the same kingdom asthe former, 20 leagues to the s. of the real of themines of Chiguagua.

CUEYTE, a river in the island of Cuba, whichabounds with alligators.

CUGUI, a small river of the district of Toltenbaxo in tire kingdom of Chile. It runs n. andenters the Tolten.

CUIABA, Jesus de, a town of the province ofMatagroso in Brazil ; situate on the shore of theriver Paraguay, at its source, near the large lakeof LosXareyes. In its vicinity are some abundantgold mines, which have been worked by the Por-tuguese since the year 1740. Lat. 14° 33'.

Cuiaba, a river of this kingdom (Brazil), and in theterritory of its name. It rises in the mountains,runs n. and afterwards turning its course to thew. enters the sea.

CUIABENO, a lake of the province and go-vernment of Quijos and Macas in the kingdom ofQuito. It is to the s. of the settlement of SanAntonio de Amoguajes.

CUIAC, Santiago de, a settlement of thehead settlement of Amatlan, and alcaldia mayor ofZacatlan, in Nueva Espana. It lies four leaguesfrom its bead settlement, but the journey to it fromthence is almost impracticable, owing to its beingsituate in the middle of the sierra.

CUIACLAZALA, a settlement of the headsettlement of San Luis de la Costa, and of the al^caldia mayor of Tlapa, in Nueva Espana. Itproduces a great quantity of cochineal, this beingthe only production in which its inhabitants mer-chandize. These are composed of 60 families ofIndians. It is seven leagues to the j. of itscapital.

CUIANA, a small river of the province and

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country of Las Amazonas. It flows in the territoryof the Carigueres or Mutuanis Indians, runs c.and enters the Madera opposite the great cataract.

CUIAPAN, a settlement of the head settlementof Atoyaque, and alcaldia mayor of Zayula, inNueva Espana. It contains 70 families of In-dians, who live by agriculture and making coarsestuffs. It is one league to the s. of its head settle-ment.

CUIATAN, a settlement of the head settlementof the district and alcaldia mayor of Caxitlan,being a league and a half’s distance to the s. w.

CUIAUTEPEC, Santiago de, a settlementof the head settlement of Olinala, and alcaldiamayor of Tlapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains32 families of Indians, and is two leagues to then. c. of its head settlement.

CUIAUTEPEC, another settlement of the headsettlement of Ayotitlan, and alcaldia mayor ofAmola, in the same kingdom. It contains 13 fa-milies of Indians, who live by agriculture andbreeding cattle; is 10 leagues to the w, of itshead settlement.

CUICATLAN, the alcaldia mayor of the pro-vince and bishopric of Mechoacan. It is 19leagues in length from e. to w. and 1 1 in widthn. s. It is of a hot temperature, abounds in salt-petre, scarlet-dye, and cotton, of which beautifulornamental dresses are made ; these being the prin-cipal source of its commerce. The capital is thesettlement of the same name, inhabited by 125 fa-milies of Cuicatecos Indians, who cultivate greatquantities of maize, French beans, and cotton. Itis 70 leagues to the e. with a slight inclination tothe s. of Mexico. The other settlements of thisdistrict are,

Alpizagua==, ==Teponastla,

Cotahuiztla==, Teutitlan]],

Nacantepec==, Santa Ana]],

Quiotepeque==, ==San Lucas,

Coyula==, ==San Antonio,

Izcatlan==, ==San Mateo,

Papalotipac==, ==San Martin,

Santiago==, ==Casa Blanca,

San Lorenzo==, ==Nanahuatipac,

San Geronimo==, ==San Juan de los Cues,

Santa Cruz==, ==Thecomahuaca,

Santa Maria==, ==Teopuxco,

San Lorenzo==, ==Santiago,

Los Santos Reyes==, ==Huehuetlan,

Tepeuzila==, ==San Pedro,

San Pedro==, ==San Juan,

San Andres==, ==Huahutla,

Santa Maria==,==Chilchola.

==CUICEO=, (Of the lake), the alcaldia mayor of

the province and bishopric of Mechoacan ; boundedc. by the province of Acambaro ; n. by that ofZelaya; nc. by that of Pasquaro ; and s. by thatof Valladolid. It is in length eight leagues frome. to w. and five in width «. s. It is surroundedby a lake of wholesome water, which gives itsname to the jurisdiction, and which, towards then. part, becomes dry in the summer season, itswaters being supplied from certain drains fromanother large lake which lies on its s. side. Thetemperature here is, for the most part, mild anddry, and the place abounds with salutary waters,which bubble out from a fountain in an island ofthe above mentioned lake. Its commerce is verysmall, since it produces only maize, French beans,and Chile pepper, and a kind of fish found in greatabundance in both the lakes, called charaes.

The capital is the settlement of the samename ; situate in front of the island formed bythe lake.. It contains a convent of the religiousorder of St. Augustin, and 190 families of Indians,including those of the wards of its district, 72 ofSpaniards, 11 of Mulattoes, and 43 of Mustees.It is 50 leagues to the w, of Mexico. The othersettlements are,

San Marcos==, ==San Buena Ventura,

San Geronimo==, ==Cupandaro,

Sta. Ana Maya==, ==San Juan. (Mechoacan)

CUICOCHA, a large lake of the province andcorregimiento of Octavalo in the kingdom ofQuito, surrounded by living stone. To the e. ithas a rock, where it forms a streamlet, which after-wards enters the river Blanco. It does not appearto receive its waters from any source, and i«thought to be filled through subterraneous aque-ducts from the mountain of Cota-cacbe, which iscovered with eternal snow. In the middle of thislake rise two hills, which have the appearance oftwo beautiful isles, the one being covered withtrees, and filled with stags and mountain goats, andthe other being bedecked with a herb calledp^jow,amongst which thrive many Indian rabbits, which,in the language of the country, are called cuy^ andfrom thence the name of Cuy-cocha, which meansthe lake of Indian rabbits. The water which runsbetween the two islands, forms a channel of 3000fathoms. This lake belongs to the noble familyof the Chiribogas of Quito.

CUILAPA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Ygualapa in Nueva Espana,half a quarter of a league’s distance from its ca-pital.

CUILAPA, a town, the head settlement of thedistrict of the alcaldia mayor of Quatro Villas inNueva Espana ; situate at the skirt of a mountain.

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It is of a mild temperulurcj but rather inclined tocold than heat. It contains 264 families of In-dians, and a convent of the religious order of St.Domingo, and in its district are various estates, inwhich, and in the 10 settlements of which its dis-trict consists, are collected scarlet dje, seeds, fruits,coal, woods, and timber. It is two leagues s. e. ofthe capital.

CUILOTO, a river of the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, It rises in the mountains of Bogota,runs e. through the llanos or plains of Casanare andMeta, and afterwards enters the river Meta. Somebarbarian Indians, the liraras and Chinalos, liveabout its borders, dispersed amongst the woods.

CUIQUE, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela ; situate on the shore of thelake Tacarigua, towards the s.

CUIQUILA, Santa Maria de, a settlementand head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Tepozcolula in Nueva Espana. It is of a cold tem-perature, contains 76 families of Indians, whoseonly employment is that of making stone flags ;and these in sufficient quantity to supply the wholeprovince. Is nine leagues s.w. of its capital.

CUISILLO, San Francisco de, a settlementand head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of thetown of Leon, in the province and bishopric ofMechoacan, contains S3 families of Indians, whoemploy themselves in the cultivation of maize andmany fruits. It is very close to its capital.

CUITES, a settlement of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province and govetument of Cinaloaof Nueva Espaila.

CUITI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Darien, of the kingdom of Tierra Firme.It rises in the mountains towards the n. and entersthe sea between the islands Palmas and Pinos.

CUITINA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; situate in the llanura of Sogamoso, be-tween the settlement of this name and that of Tota.It is of a cold temperature, produces wheat, maize,papas, and the other fruits of a cold climate. Itcontains 60 housekeepers, and as many Indians ;lies eight leagues to the n. of Tunja.

CUIXTLAHUACA, San Juan de,, a settle-ment of the alcaldia mayor of Yanguitlan in NuevaEspaila. It contains 604 families of Indians, withthose of the wards of its district. It is of a hottemperature, and lies 16 leagues s. w. of its capi-tal. It produces some scarlet dye and seeds,

CUIXTLAHUACA, San Juan de, another settle-ment, of the alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in the samekingdom. It contains 15 families of Indian’s,

VOE. 1.

CUJENA, Cano de, an arm of the river Negro,in the country of Las Amazonas. It runs nearlydue s. and joins the Parime.

CUJILLOS, a settlement of province and go-vernment of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdomof Quito ; situate on the shore of the river Ma-railon.

[CUJO. See Cuva.]

CUL DE Sac, a settlement and parish of theFrench, in the part possessed by them in theisland of St. Domingo. It is in the head of the w.and upon the w. coast, on the shore of a river be-tween port Principe and the river of Naranjos orOranges.

Cul de Sac, another settlement and parish inthe island of Guadalupe. It lies on the shore ofthe bay of its name, between the rivers Vondi-piques and Testu. There is also another settle-ment in the same bay, between the rivers Lezardand Sarcelles.

CUL DE SAC, a large bay and convenient portof the same island (Guadalupe), which is the principal of thewhole island, and in which are many smallerislands. There is also another close to it, dis-tinguished by the title of Cul de Sac Petit ; andthese are divided by an isthmus of land, which al-lows a communication to the same lakes by a nar-row channel.

CULATAS, a small settlement of the districtand jurisdiction of the town of San Gil, in the cor-regimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra-nada ; annexed to the curacy of Oiba, It lies be-tween the settlements of Socorro and Charala,

CULAUI, a river of the island of La Laxa, inthe kingdom of Chile. It runs w. forming a bendbetween those of Huaque and Duqueco, and entersthe Biobio.

CULCHE, a settlement of Indians, of the dis-trict of Guadalabquen, and kingdom of Chile;situate at the source of the river Valdivia.

CULEBRAS, Rio de, a river on (he coast ofthe province and government of Costarica, of tliekingdom of Guatemala. It runs into tlie N. sea,between the river Bocaes and the bay of Almi-rante.

CuLEBRAs, Rio de, another river in the pro-vince and kingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises inthe mountains of the n. coast, and point of SanBias, and runs into the sea to the w.

CULEBRAS, Rio de, another, of the island ofSanto Domingo, in the e. head ; runs into thesea in the great bay of Samana, between the riversMagua and Yaina.

CULEBRAS, Rio de, a lake of the province andgovernment of Venezuela, between the river of Sa-4 B

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shoal of rock, Vfliich runs into the sea at the en-trance of the river Maranan, in the same pro-vince.

CUMAIPI, a small river of the country of LasAmazonas, or part of Guayana possessed by thePortuguese. It runs c. under the equinoctial line,and enl^ers tlie Marailon, at its mouth or entranceinto the sea.

CUMANA, a province and government of S.America, called also Nueva Andalucia ; though,properly sj)eaking, the latter is only a part of Cu-inana, which contains in it also other provinces.It extends 76 geographical leagues from e. to w.from the point of Piedra, the oriental extremity ofTierra Firme, on the coast of Paria, and greatmouth of Drago, as far as the mouth of the riverUnare, the deep ravines of which form, as it Avere,limits to the w. between this province and that ofVenezuela; the waters of the aforesaid river run-ning for a great distance towards the serramaor settlement of Pariguan ; from wliich point theline of division is undecided as far as the riverOrinoco, 20 leagues to the s. From the w. to s.it is 270 leagues, namely, from the sea-coast to thegreat river or country of Las Amazonas, the terri-tory of which is divided by the renowned riverOrinoco. On the e. it is terminated by the sea,which surrounds the coast of Paria, the gulfTriste, the mouths of the Orinoco, the riverEsquivo and Cayenne ; on the s. no. it is boundedby the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, which extendsits limits as far as the river Orinoco, being dividedby this river from Guayana. It is a continued ser-Tanitty running along the whole coast from e. to w.being nine or 10 leagues wide ; and although it isnot without some llanos or extensive plains, theseare but little known, and are entirely impassable,owing to the swamps and lakes caused by the in-undations of the rivers which flow down from thesierra. The sierra, in that part which looks to then. is barren, and in the vicinities of the coast thesoil is impregnated with nitre, and is unfruitful.The temperature is healthy but cold, especially atnight. The most common productions of this pro-vince are maize, which serves as bread, supplyingthe want of wheat, ^uca root, of which anotherkind of bread is made, cosabe, plantains, and otherfruits and pulse peculiar to America ; also cacao,although with great scarcity, and only in the n.part ; and sugar-canes, which are only cultivatedin a sufficient degree to supply the sugar consumedhere. It has some cattle ; and although there aremeans of breeding and feeding many herds, thenatives choose rather to supply themselves from

ANA.

the neighbouring province of Barcelona, notwith-standing the difficulty of bringing them hither oversucli rugged and almost impassable roads. Tliewhole of the coast yields an immense abundance offish, also of shell fish of various kinds, and of themost delicate flavour. Of these the consumjitiouis very great, and a great proportion of them aresalted, and carried to the inland parts ; and to theprovince of Venezuela alone upwards of 6000quintals yearly. It has several convenient and se-cure ports and bays, and indeed the whole coast iscovered with them, as the sea is here remarkablycalm, and peculiarly so in the celebrated gulf ofCariaco, as also in the gulfs of the lake of Obispo,Juanantar, and Gurintar. It has many very abun-dant saline grounds, so much so, that the wholecoast may be looked upon as forming one ; sincein any part of it as many might be established aswere necessary ; and this without mentioning thatcelebrated one of Araya, and those of the gulfTriste, between the settlements of Iraca and Soro,and the Sal Negra, (Black Salt), used only by theIndians. In this province there are only threerivers of consideration, that of Cariaco, of Cumana,and of Guarapiche : the others which flow downfrom the serrama are of little note, and incorporatethemselves with the former before they arrive inthe valley. Its jurisdiction contains six settle-ments belonging to the Spaniards, seven belongingto the Indians, 13 to the missions supported bythe Aragonese Capuchin fathers, and 16 belong-ing to the regular clergy. [From the river Unareto'the city of Cumana, the soil is very fertile.From the Araya to the distance of between 20 and25 leagues, more to the e. the coast is dry, sandy,and unfruitful. The soil is an inexhaustible mineboth of marine and mineral salt. That which isnear the Orinoco is fit only for grazing, and this isthe use to which it is put. It is here that all thepens of the province are kept. All the rest of thiscountry is admirably fertile. The prairies, thevalleys, the hills, proclaim by their verdure and bythe description of the produce, that nature has de-posited here the most active principles of vegetablelife. The most precious trees, the mahogany, theBrazil and Campechy woods, grow even up to thecoast of Paria ; and there are found here manyrare and agreeable birds. In the interior of the go-vernment of Cumana are mountains, some of Avhichare very high : the highest is the Tumeriquiri,which is 936 fathoms above the surface of the sea.The cavern of Guacharo, so famous among the In-dians, is in this mountain. It is immense, andserves as an habitation for thousands of night birds, 14 B 2

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found in the environs of Cumana what the Spa-niards call til spa, a species of the Jesuits’ bark ;the calaguala, a plant, the root of which isdissolvent, aperitive, and sudorific ; the pissi-phii, a species of emetic ; the caranapire, a speciesof sage ; and the tualua, a more powerful purga-tive than jalap. There arc also a great number ofspices, which are suffered to rot on the spot where 'first they grew. In lat. 10° 27'. Long. 64° IS'.]The settlements of the province of Cumana are,

San Baltasar de los Cum pa,

Arias, Rio Caribes,

San Felipe de Austria, A raja.

Those of the missions,

Cocuisas, San Francisco,

San Feliz, Santa Maria de los An-

San Lorenzo, geles,

Chacaracuan, San Antonio.

Of the doctrines {dodrinas),

Cacuar,

Unare,

Punccres,

Guanaguana,

Soro,

Caicara,

Irapa,

Yaguara,

Caripe,

Teresen,

Guayuta,

Tipirin,

Amacuro,

Paro.

Cumana, a river of the above province (Cumaná) andgovernment, which rises in the spot called Co-coyan, in the serrama. It runs n. following thiscourse continually through the sierra until itflows down to the plain near the city, from whenceit enters the gulf, first having divided itself intofour arms. In the winter time it generally over-flows ; but as the distance from the sierra to itsmouth, or where it enters the sea, is so short, itquickly subsides within its proper bed, when itleaves water enough for the navigation of a barge ;and there w ould be sufficient for large vessels, wereit not for the bar which is at its mouth and im-pedes its entrance. In the summer time, how-ever, it becomes so dry, tliat it is scarcely navi-gable for canoes.

CUMANACOA, a city lying s. e. of Cumana14 leagues ; in the middle of the valley of the samename. The population amounts to 4200 people ;the air is wholesome, the w aters have a diureticqua-lity not commonly to be met with. This city wantsnothing but hands to avail itself of the produc-tions which the richness of the land would yield,if it were cultivated. The fruits have here an un-eommonly fine savour, taste, and substance. Thegovernment gives this city the name of San Bal-tasar de los Arias, but that of Cumanacoa has somuch prevailed, that it is the only one by whichit is now known. See Cumana.

2

CUMANAGOTA, a city of the former pro-vince and government ((Cumaná), in the kingdom of TierraFirme, called also San Baltasar de los Arias. Ithas a good, convenient, and secure port ; issituate on the skirts of the most elevated part ofthe serrama, in a fertile valley, which abounds instreams, which irrigate 26 estates of yucales, somesmall plantations of cacao, and some cattle. Theproductions of all these estates are consumed in thecountry ; since, through the unevenness of theroads, it is impossible to carry^them out of it, withthe exception, however, of tobacco, with whichCumana is supplied. The soil is the most fertileof any in the province, especially to the n. of thesietTa, where there might be established some verygood cacao estates ; but this is not to be accom-plished, considering the scarcity of its inhabitants,and their great poverty. This city, just after the con-quest of these countries, was noted for its famouspearl-fisheries, which were afterwards abandoned.Its vicinity was inhabited by many gentile Indians,who were at continual enmity with the Spaniardsand the other inhabitants ; but these troublesomepeople were reduced to obedience by Don Juan deUrpin, who had held consultations for that pur-pose with the council of the Indies. The popu-lation amounts to 800 souls, including the Negroslaves and the people of colour.

CUMAPI, a large lake of the country of LasAmazonas. It is a waste water of the large riverCaqueta, in the territory of the Guayonas In-dians.

CUMARA, a river of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas, in the territory possessed bythe Portuguese, is an arm of the Cuchivara orPurus, which enters the Maranon before the otherstreams which are tributary to this river.

CUMAREBO, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela ; situate on the sea-coast, and at the point of its name, with a good,though small port, and one that is much frequentedby vessels.

CUMARU, Los Santos Angeles de, a settle-ment of the province and country of Las Amazonas,in the part possessed by the Portuguese; situateon the shore of a large river.

CUMATEN, a small river of the province andcolony of Surinam, or part of Guayana possessedby the Dutch. It rises in the mountain of Areyuc-tuquen, and runs, collecting the waters of manyothers, to enter the Cuyuni on the s. side.

CUMATl, a small river of the province andgovernment of Paraguay. It runs s. and entersthe large river of the Portuguese.

CUMAYARIS, a barbarous nation of Indians,

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Ostimiiri in Nueva Espana ; situate 45 leaguesfrom the river Chico.

CUMPLIDA, an island of Paraguay, in theprovince and government of this name. It issuesfrom an arm thrown out on the w. side of the river,and forms the lake Jayba.

CUMPLIDA, another island, of the Itenes orGuapore, in the province and country of LasAmazonas.

CUMPLIDO, Cayo, an inlet of the N. sea,near the coast of the island of Cuba, the Cayo Ro-mano, and the Cayo de Cruz.

[CUNCHES, Indians of Chile. See index toadditional history respecting that country, chap.

CUNDAUE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Antioquia in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada.

CUNDINAMARCA. See Granada.

Cundurmarca|CUNDURMARCA]], a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Caxamarquilla in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of its capital.

CUNEN, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Zacapula in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CUNGAYO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Angaraez in Peru.

CUNGIES, a barbarous nation of Indians, whoinhabit the «. of the river Napo, between therivers Tambur to the e. and the Blanco, a smallriver, to the w. These infidels are bounded n. bythe Ancuteres, and dwell near to the Abijiras andthe Icahuates.

[Cuniue|CUNIUE]], a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cuenca in the kingdom of Quito ;in the district of which are many estates, as thoseof Pillachiquir, Guanacauri, Tianorte, Pugni,Tambo de Marivina, Alparupaccha, and Chi-nan.

CUNIUOS, a barbarous and ferocious nationof the province and country of Las Amazonas, tothe c. of the river Ucayale, and to the s. of theMaranon. It is very numerous, and extends asfar as the mountain of Guanuco, and the shore ofthe river Beni. These Indians are the friends andallies of the Piros, and were first converted by theregulars of the company of Jesuits, the mission-aries of the province of Maynas ; but in 1714 theyrose against these holy fathers, and put to deaththe Father Bicter, a German, and the LicentiateVazquez, a regular priest, who accompanied thesaid mission.

[Cuntuquita|CUNTUQUITA]], a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Carabaya ; annexed to thecuracy of Coaza.

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CUNUMAL, San Geronimo de, a settle-ment of the province and corregimiento of Luyaand Chillaos in Peru ; annexed to the curacy ofOlto.

[Cunuri|CUNURI]], a settlement of the province andgovernment of Guayana, one of those belongingto the missions held there by the Capuchin fathers.It is on the shore of the river Y uruario, near thesettlement of San Joseph de Leonisa.

CUNURIS, a river of the same province as theabove settlement (Guyana). It rises in the mountain of Oro,or of Parima, and runs s. until it enters the Mara-non, in lat. 2° SO' s. It takes its name from thebarbarous nation of Indians who live in the woodsbordering upon its shores.

CUPALEN, a river of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Ayres. It runs e. and entersthe Uruguay, between the rivers Gualeguay andSaspoy.

CUPANDARO, Santiago de, a settlementof the head settlement and alcaldia mayor ofCuiceo in Nueva Espana ; situate on the shore ofthe lake. It contains 33 families of Indians, whohave the peculiarity of being very white and goodlooking ; they live by fishing in the same lake.The settlement is two leagues from its capital.

CUPE, a large and abundant river of the pro-vince and government of Darien, and kingdom ofTierra Fir me. It rises in the mountains in theinterior, runs many leagues, collecting the watersof other rivers, and enters the Tuira.

CUPENAME, a river of the province andgovernment of Guayana, or country of the Ama-zonas, in the part of the Dutch colonies.

CUPl, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Chumbivilcas in the same kingdom ;annexed to the curacy of Toro.

[CUPICA, a bay or small port to the s. e. ofPanama, following the coast of the Pacific ocean,from cape S. Miguel to cape Corientes, Thename of this bay has acquired celebrity in thekingdom of New Granada, on account of a newplan of communication between the two seas. FromCupica we cross, for five or six marine leagues, asoil quite level and proper for a canal, whichwould terminate at the Embarcadero of theRio Naipi ; this last river is navigable, and flowsbelow the village of Zatara into the great RioAtrato, which itself enters the Atlantic sea. Avery intelligent Biscayan pilot, M. Gogueneche,was the first rvho had the merit of turning theattention of government to the bay of Cupica,which ought to be for the new continent whatSuez was formerly for Asia. M. Gogueneche pro-posed to transport the cacao of Guayaquil by the4 c

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llio Naipi to Cartagena. The same way offersthe advantage of a very quick communication be-tween Cadiz and Lima. Instead of dispatchingcouriers by Cartagena, Santa Fe, and Quito, orby Buenos Ayres and Mendoza, good quick-sail-ing packet-boats might be sent from Cupica toPeru. If this plan were carried into execution,the viceroy of Lima would have no longer to waitfive or six months for the orders of his court. Be-sides, the environs of the bay of Cupica aboundswith excellent timber fit to be carried to Lima.We might almost say that the ground betweenCupica and the mouth of the Atrato is the onlypart of all America in which the chain of theAndes is entirely broken.]

CUPIN, a small river of the province and cap-tainship of Para in Brazil. It runs n. n. zo andenters the Guama, before it runs into the Amazo-nas or Maranon.

CUPIRA, a river of the province of Barcelona,and government of Cumana, in the kingdom ofTierra Firme. It rises in the serrania, and runsf. until it enters the sea, close to the settlement ofTucuyo.

CUPITA, Cano de, an arm of the riverOrinoco, which runs out by the w. side, and takesits course n. opposite the mouth of the Caura.

CUPLICOS, a river of the province and alcal-dia maijor of Tabasco in Nueva Espana, whichfalls into the sea in the bay of Mexico, between theDos Bocas and the Tabasco.

CUPO, a small river of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas, in the part possessed by thePortuguese. It rises in the territory of the Nou-rises Indians, runs s. and enters the Trqpibetas.

CUQUE, a large river of the province andgovernment of Darien, and kingdom of TierraFirme. It rises near the N. sea, to the e. of theprovince, and following an e. course, enters thecanal of Tarena.

CUQUIARACHI, a settlement of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits, in the province and government of LaSonora.

CUQUIO, the alcaldia mayor and jurisdictionof Nueva Espana, in the kingdom of Nueva Ga-licia, and bishopric of Guadalaxara ; is one of themost civilized and fertile, abounding in fruits andseeds, and being of a mild temperature. It iswatered by three rivers, which are the Verde onthe e. the Mesquital on the w. and the Rio Grandeon the s. in which last the two former becomeunited.

The capital is the settlement of its name, in-habited by a large population of Indians, some

Mmtets and Mulattoes, and a few Spaniards ;is 13 leagues to the n. e. of Guadalaxara, in long.268° ; and lat. 21° 40'. The other settlements are,Cantla== , ==Tenalucan,

Manalisco== , ==Quaquala,

Huisculco== , ==Ocotic,

Yagualica== , ==Tepunahuasco,

Acatico== , ==Yotahuacan,

Mestitlan== , ==Tacotan,

Nochistlan== , ==San Christoval,

Toyagua== , ==Iscatlan.

Apulco,

[CURA, with the surname of St. Louis de, issituate in a valley formed by mountains of a verygrotesque appearance ; those on the s. w. side arecapped with rocks. The valley is, however, fer-tile, and covered with produce, but the greaterpart of the property consists in animals. Thetemperature is warm and dry ; the soil is a reddishclay, which is extremely muddy in the rainy sea-sons ; the water is not limpid, although it is whole-some. The inhabitants are 4000, governed bya cabildo. In the church is an image of our Ladyof Valencianosy the claim to which was long asubject of dispute between the curate of Cura andthat of Sebastian de los Reynos ; and after a SO yearscontest, it was ordered by the bishop Don Fran-cisco de Ibarro to be returned to this place, whenit was received in a most triumphant manner. Thiscity is in lat. 10° 2' ; twenty-two leagues s. xo. ofCaracas, and eight leagues s. e, of the lake ofValencia.]

CURABICO, a river of the province and cap-tainship of Maranan in Brazil.

CURACOA, or Curazao, an island of theN. sea, one of the Smaller Antilles ; situate nearthe coast of the province and government of Vene-zuela. It is 30 miles long, and 10 broad, and is theonly island of any consideration possessed by theDutch in America. It was settled in 1527, by theEmperor Charles V. as a property upon theliouse ofJuan de Ampues ; is fertile, and abounds in sugarand tobacco, large and small cattle, also in very goodsaline grounds, by which the other islands are pro-vided : but its principal commerce is in a contra-band trade carried on with the coasts of TierraFirme ; on which account its storehouses are filledwith articles of every description imaginable.Formerly its ports were seldom without vessels ofCartagena and Portobelo, which were employedn the Negro trade, bringing home annually froiu1000 to 15,000 Negroes, with various other ar-ticles of merchandise, although this branch ofcom-merce has, from the time that it was taken up bythe English, greatly declined. On the s. part of

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CURAHUARI an ancient province of Peru, tothe n. of Cuzco. The Inca Capac Yupanqui,fifth Emperor, conquered and united it to the em-pire.

CURAHUASI, a settlement of tlie provinceand con eginiietito of Abancay in Peru, S3 leaguesdistant from the city of Cuzco.

CURAI, a settlement of the province and cor~regimiento of Caxatarabo in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Churin.

CURAL, a settlement of the province and cap-tainship of Rio Janeyro in Brazil ; situate on thecoast, opposite the Isla Grande.

CURAMA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Guayana. It enters the Meta, and losesits name.

CURAMPA, an ancient settlement of the pro-vince of Chinchasuyu in Peru. The Prince Ya-huar Huacar, eldest, son of the first Emperor, theInca Roca, took it by force of arms, and subjectedit to the crown. It was then one of the strongplaces of the province.

CURANARIS, a barbarous and numerous nationof Indians, divided into bodies of militia, who in-habit the woods near the river Bayari to the s. ofthe Maranon.

CURANTA, an islet or rocky shoal of thecoast of the kingdom of Chile, close to the point ofXosH umos.

CURAPO, a settlement of the missions whichare held by the religious Capuchins, in the pro-vince and government of Guayana.

CURAUAUA, a river of the kingdom of Chile,in the district and jurisdiction which belonged tothe city Imperial. It runs w. and forms Avith theEyou the great lake of Puren, out of which it runson the 5. w. side, uniting itself with the Cauten,or the Imperial.

CURASAY a large and navigable river of theprovince and government of Maynas in the king-dom of Quito. It rises in the paramos of 'i'a-cunga, and after running e. for more than 90leagues, enters the Napo ; first collecting the wa-ters of the Soetuno, Noesino, and Turibuno, onthen, and on the s. the Villano. The woods onthe s. are inhabited by some barbarous nations ofIquitos, Ayacores, and Scimugaes Indians, and the«. parts by the Yates and Zaparas.

CURARICARU, a river of the province andgovernment of Guayana. It rises in the countryof the Maraucotos Indians, runs e. and turning itscourse enters the Parime or Puruma.

CURASANA, a river of the province of Barcelona, and government of Cumana. It rises neartlie settlement of Cari, towards the c. runs s. and

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enters the Orinoco, near the Angostura, or narrowpart.

CURASCO, a settlement of the province andcorregimieyito of Cochabamba in Peru ; annexed tothe coracy of Ayruhanca.

CURASENI, a small river of the province andgovernment of San Juan de los Llanos in theNuevo Reyno de Granada. It runs e. and entersthe Orinoco between the settlements of the missionsAvhich were held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits, called Santa Teresa, and San Ignacio.

CURASIRI, a small river of the province andgovernment of Cumana. It rises in the serraniaof Ymataca, runs s. and enters the Cuyuni on then. side.

CURATAQUICHE, a settlement of the pro-vince of Barcelona and government of Cumana ;situate on the shore of the river Nevery, to the s.of the city of Barcelona.

CURAZAICILLO, a small river of the pro-vince and government of Mainas in the kingdomof Quito. It rises in the country of the AbijirasIndians, runs e. and turning afterwards to the n.enters the Napo, close to the settlement of Oravia.

CURAZILLO, or Curaza Chico, or Little,a small island of the N. sea, near the coast ofTierra Firme, and close upon the e. side of Cu-ra^oa.

CURBA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimknio of Larecaxa in Peruj annexed to thecuracy of Charazani.

CURBATI, a small settlement of Indians ofthe province and government of Maracaibo; an-nexed to the curacy of the city of Pedraza. Itsnatives, although few, are docile and well in-clined.

CURE River of, in the island of Guadalupe,one of the Antilles or Windward isles. It rises inthe mountains to the e. and enters the sea betweenthe bay of La Barque and the port of Las Gpa-yabas.

CURECA, a river of the province and captain-ship of Para in Brazil. It runs nearly due n.and enters that of Las Amazonas.

[CURIACO, a bay in Tierra Firme, S. Ame-rica, on the N. sea.]

CURIANCHE, an habitation or palace, builtby the first Emperor of the Incas, Manco Capac,of very large stones, and covered with straAv; fromAvhence the city of Cuzco has its origin. Thispalace was afterwards dedicated to the sun, andbecame converted into a temple, being the mostbeautiful and rich structure of any in Peru, in thetime of the Indians; the inside of it being casedAvitb gold, and the outside with silver, these metals

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CURCURIBISA, a river of the province and government of Quijos and Macas, in the district of *he second, and in the kingdom of Quito. It rises in the country of the Xibaros Indians, runs inclining to the s. e. and enters the Santiago. CURICO, San Joseph de, a town of the province and corregimiento of Maule in the kingdom of Chile ; situate on the shore of the river Huaico. It is small, and but thinly peopled, its inhabitants being for the most part composed of people of colour. [The metal of the mine lately discovered here has obtained the name of natural avanturine, from its being filled with brilliant particles that give it a beautiful appearance. This metal is used by the goldsmiths for rings, bracelets, and other ornaments of jewellery.] CURICURARI, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, in the part possessed by the Portuguese. It runs e. between the rivers Cicayuri and Yurubechi, and enters the Negro. CURIEPE, a settlement of the province and government of Venezuela ; situate on the coast, near the point or cape of Codera, on the shore of the river of its name. Curiepe. This river rises in the mountains near the coast, runs e. and enters the sea in the bay formed by the cape Codera.

CURIES, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Yea in Peru ; annexed to one of the curacies of the Indians of its capital. CURIGUACURU, a river of Nueva Andalucia, Austral or Inferior, in the province of Guayana. It flows down from the mountains of the Caribes Indians to the n. and. running s. and increasing its waters by many other streams, enters the Maranon. CURIGUIMAR, a lake of the province and government of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia, on the shore of the river Orinoco, close to the town of Sanchez. CURIGUIRES, a barbarous nation of Indians, who inhabit the woods bordering upon the source of the river Cuchigaras, and bounded by the Indians of this name, as also by the Cumavaris. Some of these Indians are warlike, and of gigantic stature. CURIMON, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Aconcagua in the kingdom of Chile in the district of which is a convent of the religious recollects, or strict observers of the order of St. ■ Francis, bearing the title of Santa Rosa de Vfr terbo. CURINAS, a barbarous nation of Indians, who inhabit the s. part of the river Maranon. It is but little known, and all that is traced of them is, that they are in continual warfare with the Aguas ; so that their numbers are gradually diminishing. CURIPANA, a port of the coast of the N. sea, in the province and government of Cumana, to the s. of the city of Cariaco. CURIQUAXES, S. Francisco de los, a settlement of the province and government of Quixos and Macas in the kingdom of Quito. It belongs to the district of the former, and is one of those which compose the reduccion of the Sucurabos Indians, held at the charge of the regulars of the company of Jesuits. CURITI, a small settlement of the jurisdiction of the town of San Gil, and corregimiento of Tunja, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; annexed to the curacy of Guane. It is of a very wood temperature, pleasant and agreeable. Its natives, who should amount to 30 or 40 Indians, are docile, mild, and of good dispositions. CURITIMI see CorentinCURITUBA, a town of the province and captainship of Rey in Brazil ; situate near the coast. Curitcjba, a river, called also Yguazii, in the province and government of Paraguay. It runs w. collecting the waters of many other rivers, and enters with a large stream into the Parana. See Yguazu.

CURU, a river of the province and captainship of Seara in Brazil. It runs n. and enters the sea, between the coast of Los Humos and the point of Los Baxos or Arricifes. CURUA, a river of the province and captainship of Para in Brazil. It rises in the country of the Aritues Indians, runs to the n.n.e. and enters the river of Las Amazonas on the 5. side. CURUARI, a river of the kingdom of Brazil, in the territory of the Cayapos Indians. It rises in its mountains, runs s.s.e. and enters the n. side of the large river Parana. CURUAT, a small river of the province and government of Guayana. It runs nearly parallel with the river Caroni, collecting the waters of many others in its course, until it enters this river. CURUAU, an island of the N. sea ; situate at the mouth or entrance of the river of Las Amazonas, to the s. of the island of La Penitencia. CURUA-UASU, a village and settlement of the Portuguese, in the kingdom of Brazil ; situate on the shore of a small river which enters the Sono.

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CURUCAG, a small river of the province and government of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia. It rises to the w. of the settlement Murucuri, runs w. and afterwards turning; n. enters the Orinoco opposite the mouth of the Curusama. CURUCAY, a river of the province and captains/u'p of San Vicente in Brazil. It rises near the coast, and runs to the w. CURUCUANES, a barbarous nation of Indians but little known, who inhabit the shores of the river Paraguay towards the w. CURUGUATI, a settlement of the province and government of Paraguay ; situate on the shore of the river Xexuy. It was in former times very considerable, but at present reduced to a scanty population of people of colour, who live in a miserable way. [About 39 leagues n. e. of Asuncion. Lat. 24° 28' 10". Long. 55° 54' 25" a>.] CURULAUA, a valley or llanura of the kingdom of Chile, in the country and territory of the Araucanos Indians ; celebrated for their having here surprised the Spaniards, and having at the same time put to death the governor Don Martin Garcia Ofiez de Loyola, with 50 others who accompanied him. CURUMA, a settlement of the province and government of Valparaiso in the kingdom of Chile; situate on the coast and at the point of its name. Curtima, a river of the province and government of Cutnana. It rises in the serrania of Ymataca, runs 5. and unites itself with the Tucupu to enter the Cuyuni.

CURUME, an ancient and large province of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, to the w. of the river Cauca : discovered by the Marshal George Robledo. The Indians who inhabited it, and who were called Curumenes, have become extinct, notwithstanding that they were in great numbers at the time of the entrance of the Spaniards in 1542. Some believe that they have retired within the woods, and to the mountains of Darien. This province, which is bounded by that of Popayan, and is at the present day contained in the same, is mountainous, rough, barren, and of an unhealthy climate ; and although rich in gold mines, these are not worked. Curume, a small town of the same province ; situate in an extensive valley, which also takes this denomination, near the river Tonusco.

GURUPA==, or ==Coropa, a settlement of the province and captainship of Para in Brazil « situate "on the shore of the river Maranon. CurupAj a river of the province and govern- cus ment of Buenos Ayres, which runs e. and enters the Aguapey.

CURUPARER, a small river of the province and government of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia. It rises in the country of the Parecas Indians, near the settlement of San Joseph de Otomacos, runs n. and enters the Orinoco to the w. of the settlement of Encaramada. CURUPI, a river of the province and government of San Juan de los Llanos, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It rises near the Curaseni, runs e. and nearly parallel to the same river, and enters the Orinoco. CURUPUTUBA, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, or part of Guayana possessed by the Portuguese. It rises in the sierra of Tumucuraque, runs s. many leagues, between the rivers Ubuquara to the e. and Tombetas to the w. and enters the Maranon on the n. side, in lat. 1°52' s. The infidel Curuputubas Indians live more than 40 leagues to the n. of the river, near the mouth of the Topajocos. Curuptjtuba, a settlement of the Portuguese, being a reduction of Indians of this name; situate on the shore of the above river, after which it is called.

CURURU, a small river of the province and captainship of Pernambuco in Brazil. It rises near the coast, runs s. s. e. and enters the sea between the Ypoba and the Yquen. CURUTUTE, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, which, according to Mr. Bellin, runs s. s. e. and enters the Maranon, between the rivers Uruparate and Putumayo.

CURUZICARIS== or ==Yumaguaris, which signifies Founder of Metals, a barbarous and numerous nation of Indians, who inhabit the woods near the river Maranon, towards the y. and extending as far as the mountains to the w. of the kingdom of Brazil. The same extract from the mines great quantities of gold. They have some sort of civil government, are industrious, and fond of labour. CUSABATAY, a river of the province and government of Mainas in the king- e. for many leagues, and dorn of Quito, runs enters the Ucayale. CUSAHUAYA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Ambana. [CUSCO==. ==See Cuzco.]

CUSCOPANG==, a river of the province and colony of N. Carolina. It runs n. and enters the sea in the strait of Albemarle. [CUSCOWILLA, in E. Florida, is the capital of the Aluchua tribe of Indians, and stands in

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the most pleasant situation that could be desired, in an inland country, upon a high swelling ridge of sand hills, within 3 or 400 yards of a large and beautiful lake, abounding with fish and fowl. The lake is terminated on one side by extensive forests, consisting of orange groves, overtopped with grand magnolias, palms, poplar, tilia, liveoaks, &c. ; on the other side by extensive green plains and meadows. The town consists of 30 habitations, each of which consists of two houses, nearly of the same size, large, and convenient, and covered close with the bark of the cypress tree. Each has a little garden spot, containing corn, beans, tobacco, and other vegetables. In the great Alachua savannah, about two miles distant, is an inclosed plantation, which is worked and tended by the whole community, yet every family has its particular part. Each family gathers and deposits in its granary its proper share, setting apart a small contribution for the public granary, which stands in the midst of the plantation.]

CUSE, a river of the kingdom of Peru. It rises in the mountains of the province of Moxos, and runs e. w. from the river and lake of Sara to the river Ubay. It follows its course to the n. and enters the last mentioned river. [CUSHAI, a small river which empties into Albemarle sound, between Chowan and the Roanoke, in N. Carolina.] [CUSHETUNK Mountains, in Hunterdon county, New Jersey.]

[CUSHING, a township in Lincoln county, district of Maine, separated from Warren and Thoraaston by St. George's river. It was incorporated in 1789, contains 942 inhabitants, and lies 216 miles w. by n. of Boston.] CUSHNOE, a waterfal of the river Kenebec, in the province of Sagadahoc, opposite fort Wertern. CUSI, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Yauyos in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Pampas. CUSIANA, a settlement of the jurisdiction of Santiago de las Atalayas, and government of San Juan de los Llanos, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; annexed to the curacy of Santiago. It is much reduced and very poor, of a hot temperature, and producing only maize, yucas, plantains, &c. Cusiana, a river of the same province (San Juan de los Llanos). It rises from a small lake near the settlement of Gameza, in the jurisdiction and corregimiento of Tunja, and there enters the Mcta.

CUSIBAMBA, a river of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru. It rises in the cordillera of the Andes, runs w. and en- e u t iers the Apurimac, opposite the settlement of Curaguasi. Cusibamba, a valley of this province.

CUSICAS, a barbarous nation of Indians, who dwell to the e. of the nation of the Chiquitos, and to the n. of the settlement of San Juan Bautista de los Xamoros. All that is known of them is, that they are numerous and ferocious. CUSITAS, a settlement of Indians of the province and colony of Georgia ; situate on the shore of the river Apalachicola. CUSMO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Santa in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Guarmey. [CUSSENS, a small river in Cumberland county, Maine, which runs a s. e. course to Casco bay, between the towns of Freeport and N. Yarmouth.] [CUSSEWAGA, a settlement in Pennsylvania.] CUSSIA, a settlement of the Salivas Indians, forming the greater part of this nation, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; situate near the river Sinaruco, in the llanuras or plains of the Orinoco. The Caribes destroyed and burnt it in 1684. CUSSIQUINA, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, which laves the territory of the Mayorunas Indians, who live upon its borders to the s. This river, after running many leagues to the n, e. enters the said territory, in lat. 3° 20' *.

[CUSSITAH, an Indian town in the w. part of Georgia, 12 miles above the Broken Arrow, on Chattahoosee river.] CUSTODIO, a river of the kingdom of Brazil. It runs n. n. w. is small, and enters the Tocantines, between that of San Elias and the river Preto or De la Palma. CUSUMPE, a small lake of the province of Hampshire; one of those of New England, between the rivers Pennycook and Pygwaket. CUTACO, a river in a narrow vale of the Andes, the bed of which was ascertained by Humboldt, in 1802, to be at the vast depth of 4200 feet. On its banks are many plantations of sugarcanes. CUTAGOCHI, a settlement of Cherokees Indians, in the province, and colony of S. Carolina ; situate at the source of the river Eu phase, where the English have a commercial establishment. CUTAWA, or Catawba, a river of N. Carolina. It runs n. and enters the Ohio ;. its waters are always full of coal.

CUTERUO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed to' the curacy of Huambos.

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CUTI, a river of the province and captainship of Maranan in Brazil. CUTIGUBAGUBA, a settlement of the Portuguese, in the province and captainship of Para in Brazil; situate on the shore of the river of Las Amazonas ; to the n. of the city of Para. Cutiguba, an island of the river of Las Amazonas, opposite the city of Para.

CUTIMERIN, a river of the province and cap- . tainship of Maranan in Brazil.

CUTINANAS, Santo Tome de los, a settlement of the missions which were held by the regulars of the company of Jesuits, in the province of Mainas and kingdom of Quito.

CUTQUISCANAS, a barbarous and ferocious nation of Indians, who inhabit the n. e. of the ancient province of Los Panataguas. They are few, and little more is known of them than their name.

CUTTS Island, a small island on the coast of York county, Maine. See Neddock River.]

CUTUBUS, a settlement of the province and government of Sonora in Nueva Espana ; situate on the shore of the river Besani. CUTUCUCHE, a river of the province and government of Tacunga in the kingdom of Quito. It flows down on the s. side of the skirt of the mountain and volcano of Cotopacsi, and united with the Alaques, forms the San Miguel, which laves part of the llanura of Callo, runs near the settlement of Mulahalo, and by a country seat and estate of the Marquisses of Maenza, who have here some very good cloth manufactories. This river runs very rapid, and in 1766, owing to an eruption of the volcano, it inundated the country, doing infinite mischief; again it was, a second time, thrown out of its bed, though the damage it then did was nothing like what it was on the former occasion.

CUTUN, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Coquimbo in the kingdom of Chile. COTUNLAQUE, a pass of the road which leads from the city of Quito to Machache, almost impracticable in the winter time, and only noted for being a place of infinite difficulty and vexation to such as are obliged to travel it. CUTUPITE, Cano de, an arm of the river Orinoco, in the province and government of Guayana, one of those which form ifs different mouths or entrances; it is that which lies most close to the coast of Tierra Firme, aud which, with the coast, forms part of the canal of Manao.

CUXUTEPEC, a settlement of the province and akaldia mayor of San Salvador in the kingdom of Guatemala. vol. i.

CUYO, Cotio, or Cujo, a large province of the kingdom of Chile, and part of that which is called Chile Oriental or Tramontano, from its being on the other side of the cordiUera of the Andes; bounded e. by the country called Pampas ; n. by the district of Rioxa, in the province and government of Tucuman ; *. by the lands of Magellan, or of the Patagonians; and®, by the cordillera of the Andes, which is here called the Western, Cismontana, part of those mountains. It is of a benign and healthy climate ; and although in the summer, the heat on the llanuras is rather oppressive, extremely fertile, and abounding, independently of the fruits peculiar to the country, in wheat, all kinds of pulse, wine, and brandies, which were formerly carried to the provinces of Tucuman aud Buenos Ayres, although this traffic has of late fallen into decay, from the frequent arrivals of vessels from Spain. It abounds in all kinds of cattle, and in the cordiUera, and even ia the pampas, are large breeds of vicunas, huanacos, vizcachas, turtles, two kinds of squirrels, ostriches, tigers, leopards, and an infinite quantity of partridges, pigeons, and turtledoves. The flesh of the swine and mules is esteemed the best in all America; and, generally speaking, victuals areso cheap that it may be procured at little or no expence. The skirts of the mountains are covered with beautiful woods, and their tops are overspread with snow. Throughout nearly the whole province is found a great quantity of glasswort, and in the cordiUera are some mines of silver, especially in the valley of Iluspallata, which were formerly worked by fusion, to the great detriment of the metal, but which are to this day worked in the same manner as those of Peru, and consequently afford greater emolument. Here are also some gold mines, and others of very good copper. The rivers which water this province all rise in the cordiUera, and the most considerable of them are the Tunuyan, which is the first to the s. those of Mendoza, San Juan, Jachal, and the Colorado to the n. e. In the cordiUera, near the high road leading from Santiago to Mendoza, is the great lake of the Inca, wherein are said to be great treasures deposited by the Incas at the beginning of the conquest, to keep them from the Spaniards. This lake is bottomless, and it is thought to be formed of the snows melted and flowing down from the mountainous parts of the district. On the side towards Chile the lake has a vent by six or seven small branches, forming the river of Aconcagua ; and from the opposite side issue some other streams in a contrary direction, and form the Mendoza. In the very heat of summer this

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lake is as cold as snow itself, This province, like all the others of the kingdom which lie to the s. e. of the cordilfcra, is ever subject to terrible tempests of thunder and lightning, accompanied with boisterous winds and rains from October to March; the same not happening in the provinces which lie to the to. The Indians of this province are of a darker complexion than those of any other ; but they are also of loftier stature, better made, agile, and extremely addicted to the chase, in which they greatly excel, and more particularly in the taking of ostriches, which abound in the llanuras to \X\cs. ; and by all of these exercises they become so light and active as to be able to keep pace with a horse. These Indians are generally known here by the name of Guapes, and are descendants of the Pampas, their neighbours to the e. with whom they trade in the fruits of the country in exchange for clothes and other articles, money not being known amongst any of these barbarians. The Guapes are of a docile and generous disposition, but of great spirit, and very warlike, robust, and well formed. This country, considering its extent, is but thinly peopled, since its inhabitants amount to only 25,000 of all sexes and ages, according to the latest calculation. The capital is the city of Mendoza. [See Chile.] _ _

CUYO, a shoal formed by two rocks in the N. sea, near the coast of the province and government of Yucatan, close to the cape of Cotoche.

[ CUYOACAN, a settlement of the intendancy of Mexico, containing a convent of nuns founded by Hernan Cortes, in which, according to his testament, this great captain wished to be interred, " in whatever part of the world he should end his days." This clause of the testament was never fulfilled.] CUYOCUYO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Carabaya in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of its capital. CUYOTAMBO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Quispicanchi in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Quishuares. CUYOTEPEC, San Bartolome de, a head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Antequera, in the province and bishopric of Oaxaca in Nueva Espana. It is of a middle temperature, contains 358 families of Indians, and a convent of the religious order of St. Dominic. In its district are sown in abundance various kinds of seeds and American aloes, of which is made pulque: Four leagues s. of its capital. CUYUANA, an island of the province and country of Las Amazonas, in the territory of the Portuguese, formed by two arms of the river Cudiivara or Purus, which separate before they c u z enter the Maranon. It is large, and of an irregular square figure. CUYUM, or Cuyuni, a large river of the province of Guayana, and government of Cumana. Its origin is not known for certain ; but, from the accounts of the Caribes Indians, it is somewhere near the lake Parime, in the interior of the province, and to the n. e. of the said lake. It runs nearly due from n. to s. making several turnings, until it enters the Esquivo. By this river the Dutch merchants of this colony, assisted by the Caribes, go to entrap the Indians, to make them labour in the estates ; and they have built two forts on either side of the mouth of this river.

CUZABAMBA, a large settlement of the province and corregimiento of Lamas in Peru ; close to which passes a small river of the same name, and which afterwards unites itself with the river Moyobamba. Cuzabamba, another settlement in the province and corregimiento of Tacunga, of the kingdom of Quito.

CUZALAPA, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Ayotitlan, and alcaldia mayor of Amola, in Nueva Espana. Its population is very small, and its inhabitants employ themselves in the cultivation of seeds and breeding of cattle. Nine leagues to the w. of its head settle ment. CUZAMALA, a head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Azuchitlan in Nueva Espana, lying 10 leagues to the n. of its capital, and being divided from the same by two large rivers. It is of a hot and dry temperature ; its population is composed of 36 families of Spaniards, 30 of Mustees, 48 of Mulattoes, and 53 of Indians, who speak the Taracan language. The trade here consists in large cattle, in the cultivation of maize, and making cascalote. Some emolument also is derived from renting the lands belonging to the capital and the neighbouring settlements. CUZCATLAN, a settlement of the province and alcaldia mayor of San Salvador in the kingdom of Guatemala. CUZCO, as it is called by the Indians, a city, the capital of a corregimiento in Peru, the head of a bishopric, erected in 1536, founded by the first Emperor of the Incas, Manco Capac, in 1043, who divided it into Hanam Cozco and Hurin Cozco, which signify Cuzco Lofty and Low, or Superior and Inferior ; the former towards the n. and the second towards the s. It is situate upon a rough and unequal plain formed by the skirts of various mountains, which are washed by

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