LatAm Digital Edition and Gazetteer

OverviewStatisticsSubjects

The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

308
Indexed

[1803 amounted to 5,500,000, and the exports con-sisted of produce to the value of 4,000,000 dollars.He also states the population in 1808 at 900,000souls. The receipts of Caracas, Guatemala, andChile, are consumed within the country. Thepopulation of some of the chief cities is thus stated ;Caracas 40,000, La Guaira 6000, Puerto Cabello7600, Coro 10,000. The harbour, or La Vela deCoro, as it is commonly called, and its environs, aresupposed to contain not less than 2000. In 1797three state prisoners were sent from Spain to Ca-racas, on account of their revolutionary propensi-ties. Being treated with great indulgence by theofficers and soldiers to whose care they were com-mitted, they formed the project of a conspiracyagainst the government. They engaged a numberof persons, some of them of consequence, in theirparty. After gaining their first converts, the spiritdid not spread. The coldness and apathy of thepeople did not admit of the effervescene they de-sired. After the plot had been kept a secret formany months it was disclosed to the government.Some of the ringleaders escaped, and others weretaken. It was found that seventy-two had enteredinto the conspiracy; six were executed. Therest either escaped, or were sent to the galleys orbanished from the country. For an account of therecent revolution in Caracas, see Venezuela.]

Caracas, some islands of the N. sea near thecoast of the kingdom of Tierra Firme, in the pro-vince and government of Cumana. They are sixin number, all small and desert, serving as placesof shelter to the Dutch traders, who carry on anillicit commerce on that coast.

Caracas, a small port of the coast of TierraFirme, in the province and government of Vene-;zuela, between the capital and cape Codera.

CARACHE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Maracaibo, situate n. of the city ofTruxillo, on the shore of a small river which entersthe Matazan.

CARACHIS, San Carlos de a settlement ofthe province and country of the Amazonas ; a re-duccion of the missions which belonged to the abo-lished order of the Jesuits. It is at the mouth ofthe river Huerari, where this enters the Maranon.

CARACOA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Parinacoche in Peru, where thereis a spring of warm medicinal water.

CARACOL, Port, on the coast of the S. sea,and of the province and government of Panamá ;it is near the point of Garachine, behind mount Zapo.

CARACOLI, a port of the coast of the kingdomof Tierra Firme, and of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela, to the w., of cape Codera.

Caracoli, a bay formed by the s. coast, in theprovince and government of Darien, of the kingdomof Tierra Firme ; it lies at the back of point Gara-chine.

Caracoli, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cartagena, situate on the shore ofthe Rio Grande de la Magdalena, and on the n, ofthe town of Maria.

CARACOLLO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Oruro in Peru, eight leagues dis-tant from its capital.

=CARACOTO== a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Lampa in Peru.

Caracoto, another, in the province and corregi-mienlo of Sicasica in the same kingdom.

==CARAGAIAS, a town of the island of Cuba,situate on the n. coast between Cadiz and Nizao,

CARAGUATAI, a river of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres ; it runs s. s. w. andenters the Ayum or Yumeri.

CARAGUET, a small river of Nova Scotia orAcadia ; it runs e. and enters the sea in the gulfof St. Lawrence, opposite the island of its name.

CARAHUACRA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru; annexedto the curacy ofYauli.

CARAIBAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Chalvanca.

CARAIMA Alta, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Quillota in the kingdom ofChile ; situate on the coast between point Caraimiliaand point Pena Blanca.

CARAIMILLA, a settlement on the coast ofthe province and corregimiento aforementioned,between point Caraima Alta, and the isle of Obispo.

CARAMA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Antioquia in the new kingdom ofGranada.

CARAMANTA, a city of the province and go-vernment of Antioquia in the new kingdom ofGratiada ; founded by Sebastian de Benalcazar in1543, near the river Cauca. Its temperature ishot and unhealthy, but it is fertile in maize, vege-tables, grain, and abounds with herds of swine : nearit are many small rivers which enter the Cauca,and some salt pits of the whitest salt. On themountains within its jurisdiction, are some settle-ments of barbarian Indians very little known. Thiscity is indifferently peopled, and is 65 leagues dis-tant to the n. e. of Popayan, and 50 from Antio-quia. Long. 75° 33' w. Lat. 5° 58' «.

CARAMATIBA, a settlement of the provinceand captainship of Rio Grande in Brazil ; situateon the shore of the river Carabatang.

Last edit about 3 years ago by kmr3934
490
Indexed

490

COL

COL

COLARIA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, in the district of thecapital, to the zo. of this province.

COLASTINA, a small river of the provinceand government of Buenos Ayres. It runs e. andenters the Parana,

COLATE, a small river of the province andalcaldta mayor of Tecoantepec in the kingdom ofGuatemala. It runs into the S. sea, between therivers Azatian and Capanerealte.

COLATPA, a settlement of the head settlementof Olinalá, and alcald'in mayor of TIapa, in NuevaEspana. It contains 29 families of Indians, whoemploy themselves in the commerce of chia, av/hite medicinal earth, and cochineal, which aboundin their territory : n. w. of its head settlement.

COLAZA, a small and ancient province, ex-tremely fertile and delightful, belonging at the pre-sent day to the province of Popayán in the NuevoReyno de Granada. It was discovered by Sebas-tian de Benalcazar in 1536. Its inhabitants, whowere a warlike and cruel race, are entirely extir-pated.

COLCA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Vilcas Huaman in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Huanacapi.

COLCA, another settlement in the province andcorregimiento of Xauja in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Chongos.

COLCA, another, in the province and corregi-miento of Aimaraez in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Pampamarca.

COLCABAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru.

COLCABAMBA, another settlement, in the pro-vince and corregimiento of Theanta in the samekingdom.

COLCAHUANCA, a settlementof the provinceand corregimiento of Huailas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Pampas.

COLCAMAR, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Luya and Chillaos in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Luya, its capital.

COLCHA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento oi Lipes, and archbishopric of Charcas,in Peru. It was formerly the capital, and pre-serves in its cluirch an image of the blessed virgin,sent thither by the Emperor Charles V. It is nowannexed to the curacy of San Christoval.

COLCHA, another settlement, of the'province andcorregimiento of Chilques and Masques in the samekingdom.

COLCHA, another, of the province and corregi-miento of Cochabamba in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Berenguela,

COLCHAGUA, a province and^ corregimientoof the kingdom of Chile ; bounded on the e. bythe cordillera Nevada ; s. by the province ofMaule, the river Teno serving as the boundary ;and w. by the sea. It is 40 leagues in length frome. to w. and 32 in width from n. to s. Here aresome gold mines, and there were several others,the working of which has been discontinued : hereare also some copper mines. It abounds in wheat,large and small cattle, horses and mules. In apart called Cauquencs are some hot baths, whicharc much frequented, from the salutary affects theyproduce, especially upon those affected with theFrench disease, leprosy, spots on the skin, orwounds. The inhabitants of this province amountto 15,000 souls, and its capital is the town of SanFernando.

COLCHAGUA, a settlement of this province andcorregimiento, which is the head of a curacy ofanother, and contains four chapels of ease.

(COLCHESTER, a township in Ulster county.New York, on the Popachton branch of Delawareriver, s. w. of Middletown, and about 50 miless. w. by s. of Cooperstown. By the state censusof 1796, 193 of its inhabitants are electors.)

(Colchester, a large township in New Londoncounty, Connecticut, seltled in 1701 ; about 15miles tc. of Norwich, 25 s. e. of Hartford, and 20n. w. of New London city. It is in contemplationto have a post-office established in this town.)

(Colchester, the chief town in Chittendencounty, Vermont, is on the e. bank of lake Cham-plain, at the mouth of Onion river, and n, of Bur-lington, on Colchester bay, which spreads n. of thetown.)

(Colchester, a post-town in Fairfax county,Virginia ; situate on the n. e. bank of Ocquoquamcreek, three or four miles from its confluence withthe Potowmack ; and is here about 100 yardswide, and navigable for boats. It contains about40 houses, and lies 16 miles s. w. of Alexandria,106 n. by e. of Richmond, and 172 from Phila-delphia.)

(Colchester River, Nova Scotia. See Cohe-QUIT.)

COLCURA, a fortress of the kingdom of Chile,built on the opposite shore of the river Biobio, torestrain the incursions of the warlike AraucanianIndians, who burnt and destroyed it in 1601.

COLD Bay, in the extremity of the n. coast ofthe island of Jamaica, between the port Antonioand the n. e. point.

(COLD Spring, in the island of Jamaica, is avilla six miles from the high lands of Liguania.The grounds are in a high state of improvement.

Last edit about 3 years ago by kmr3934
493
Indexed

COL

COL

493

tirely unknown to tiiis. Its inlmbitants lead aregular life ; they give without cxjicctation of in-demnification, and are governed l!)roughoiit the■whole tribe by the sounding of a bell. In short,they might serve as a model for all the other settle-ments of Indians in the kingdom.

COLLANA, another settlement of the same pro-vince and corregimicnto ; annexed to the curacy ofMecacapaca.

COLLANES, a chain of very lofty mountains,almost continually covered with snow, in the pro-vince and corre"imiento of Riobamba in the king-dom of Quito, to the s. of the river Pastaza, and ofthe mountain runguragua. They take their namefrom the nation of barbarous Indians who livescattered in the woods of these mountains, whichrun from w. to e. forming a semicircle of 20leagues. The mountain which out-tops the rest,they call the Altar.

COLLANI, a settlement of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of theJesuits in Nuevo Mexico.

COLLATA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Santa Olaya.

COLLAY. See Pataz.

COLLETON, a county of the province of Ca-rolina in N. America ; situate n. of the county ofGrenville, and watered by the river Stone, whichunites itself with an arm of the Wadrnoolan. Thatpart which looks to the n, e. is peopled with es-tablishments of Indians, and forms, with the otherpart, an island called Buono, which is a little belowCharlestown, and is well cultivated and in-habited. The principal rivers of this country are,the Idistows, the S. and N. Two or three miles upthe former river, the shores are covered with plan-tations, which continue for more than three milesfurther n. where the river meets with the N. Edis-tow, and in the island formed by both of them,it is reckoned that 20 freeholders reside. Theseare thus called, from the nature of the assignmentand distribution of lands which took place in thenew colonies. But the English governor did notgrant an absolute and perpetual property, save toparticular individuals : the concession was some-times for life, sometimes considered as lineal,sometimes to descend to the wife, children, or re-lations, and sometimes with greater restrictions.The above-mentioned people have, however, theirvote in the assembly, and send to it two members.In the precinct of this county is an Episcopalchurch.

Colleton, another county, of the provinceand colony of Georgia.

Colleton, a settlement of the island of Bar-badoes, in the district of the parish ot TodosSantos.

COLLICO, a small river of the district of Tol-ten Baxo in Ihe kingdom of Chile. It runs h. n.w. and enters the river Tolten.

COLLIQUEN, a llanura, or plain, of thecorregimiento of Truxillo in Peru. It is fertile, andof a dry and healthy climate, although thinly in-habited and uncultivated.

COLLIUE, a settlement of Indians of the king-dom of Chile, situate on the shore of the riverTolpan.

COLLQUE, an ancient, large, and well peo-pled settlement of Peru, to the n. of Cuzco ; con-quered and carried by force of arms by the IncaHuayna Capac, thirteenth Emperor of Peru.

COLNACA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Chichos and Tarija in Peru, ofthe district of the second, and annexed to the cu-racy of its capital.

COLOATPA, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Olinalá, and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa, inNueva Espana. It contains 29 families of In-dians, who occupy themselves in the commerceof chia^ a white medicinal earth, and cochineal,which abounds in this territory. It lies to then. w. of its head settlement.

COLOCA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Santa Cruz de la Sierra in Peru,situate on the shore of the river of La Plata, and tothe n. of its capital.

COLOCINA, San Carlos de, a settlement ofthe province and government of Cartagena, in thedistrict of the town of Tolu; founded in 1776 bythe governor Don J uan Pimienta.

COLOCINA, some mountains of this province andgovernment, also called Betanzi, which run n. formany leagues from the valley of Penco.

COLOCOLO, a settlement of Indians of thekingdom of Chile ; situate on the shore of the riverCarampangue, and thus called from the celebratedcazique of this name, one of the chiefs in the warin which these Indians were engaged with theSpaniards.

COLOLO, a small river of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres. It runs n. and en-ters the river Negro, near where this enters tireUruguay.

COLOMBAINA, a small settlement of the ju-riscidiction of Tocaima, and government of Mari-quita, and in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; an-nexed to the curacy of the settlement of Amba-leina. It is situate on the shore of the riverMagdalena; is of a very hot temperature, and

Last edit about 3 years ago by kmr3934
503
Indexed

CON

or New Spain, was built bj the Spaniards, as wellas the stations of St. Michael and St. Philip, to se-cure the road from Mechoacan to the silver minesof Zacatea. They have also given this name toseveral boroughs of America; as to that in His-paniola island, and to a sea-port of California,&C.)

CONCHA, San Martin de la, a town andcapital of the province and corregimiento of Quil-lota in the kingdom of Chile ; founded in 1726by the Licentiate Don Joseph dc Santiago Concha,who gave it his name, being at the time temporalpresident of this kingdom. Its situation is in avalley, the most beautiful and fertile of any in theJcingdom, and it particularly abounds in wheat.It has been celebrated for the abundance of goldthat has been taken out of a mine within its dis-trict, and for the protection of which a fort hadbeen built by Pedro de Valdivia. It has a very^ood parish church, three convents of the religiousorders of St. Francis, St. Augustin, and La Merced,and a collec^e which belona-ed to the regulars ofthe company of Jesuits, and which is at present oc-cupied by {jic monks of St. Domingo, and a houseof retirement for spiritual exercies, founded andendowed by a certain individual. In the districtof this city European chesnuts grow, and not farfrom it is a lime-kiln belonging to the king, andwhich renders a supply for the works going on atthe garrison of Valdivia. Nine leagues from Val-parayso. Lat, 32^48' s. Long. 71° 10' zo.

Concha, a settlement of Indians of S. Carolina;situate near the source of the river Sonlahowe.

Concha, a bay on the coast of the province andgovernment of Santa Marta, to the e. of the capeof La Aguja.

Concha, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán in Peru ; situate at themoiitli of the river of its name, and where it en-ters the Pasage.

Concha, a river in the jurisdiction of the cityof Salta, runs e. and enters the Pasage betweenthe river Blanco and that of Metau.

CONCHACHITOUU, a settlement of Indiansof S. Carolina, where a fort has been built by theEnglish for the defence of the establishment whichthey hold there.

CONCHALI, a river of the province and cor-regimienlo of Quillota in the kingdom of Chile. Itruns Z 0 . and enters the sea.

CONCHAMARCA, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Huanuco in Peru ; an-aexed to the curacy of San Miguel de Huacar.

CONCHAO, a settlement of the province and

CON 503

corregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Andajes.

(CONCHAS, a parish of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Ayres ; situate on a river ofthe same name, about six leagues n. zs. of BuenosAyres. Lat. 34° 24' 56" s. Long. 58° 23' 30" ay.)

Conchas, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Ayres. It runs n. e. and en-ters the river La Plata, at a small distance fromthe capital.

Conchas, another river, in the province andcaptainship of the Rio Grande in Brazil. It issmall, rises near the coast, and empties itself at themouth of that of Amargoso.

Conchas, another, of the kingdom of NuevaEspaña, which runs into the sea at the bay ofMexico, being first united to the Bravo.

Conchas, another, a small river of the provinceand government of Buenos Ayres, distinct fromthat of which we have spoken. It runs zso. andenters the Parana, close to the settlement of LaBaxada de Santa Fe.

(CONCHATTAS, Indians of N. America, al-most the same people as the Allibamis. Theyfirst lived on Bayau Chico, in Appelousa district ;but, four years ago, moved to the river Sabine,settled themselves on the e. bank, where they nowlive, in nearly a s. direction from Natchitoch, anddistant about 80 miles. They call their numberof men about 160 ; but say, if they were altogether,they would amount to 200. Several families ofthem live in detached settlements. They are goodhunters. Game is here in plenty. They kill anuncommon number of bears. One man alone,during the summer and fall hunting, sometimeskills 400 deer, and sells his skins at 40 dollars per100. The bears usually yield from eight to 12gallons of oil, each of which never sells for lessthan a dollar a gallon, and the skin a dollar more.No great quantity of the meat is saved. Whatthe hunters do not use when out, they generallygive to their dogs. The Conchattas are friendlywith all other Indians, and speak well of theirneighbours the Carankouas, who, they say, liveabout 80 miles s. of them, on the bay, which isthe nearest point to the sea from Natchitoches.A tew families of Chactaws have lately settled nearthem from Bayau Bceiif. The Conchattas speakCreek, which is their native language, and Chac-taw, and several of them English ; and one or twoof tliem can read it a little.)

CONCHOS, San Francisco DE LOS, a Settle-ment and garrison of the province of the Tepe-guana, and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya ; situate

Last edit about 3 years ago by kmr3934
519
Indexed

COR

seasons, and is flooded by waters rushing downthrough a neighbouring channel, and in factAvould be hereby rendered iinitdiabitable, but forthe mounds Avhich have been raised for its defence.One half of the city experiences in one day a va-riation of all the winds from n. to s. These winds,thus changing, are accompanied with great tem-pests of thunder and lightning. At one momentthe heat which accompanies the n. wind is ex-cessive, and at another the cold which accompaniesthe s. is intolerable. It is, indeed, to this causethat the number of sudden deaths which occurhere are attributed. The city is small, and nearlyof a square figure, but the buildings are superiorto any in the province. It has three convents ;those of the religious order of St. Francis, St. Do-mingo, and La Merced, an hospital of Bethleraites,with the dedicatory title of San Roque ; two mo-nasteries of nuns, tlie one of Santa Teresa, the otherof Santa Clara, and two colleges with the titles ofuniversities, it is the head of a bishopric, erectedin 1570, and is very rich, owing to the great com-merce which it carries on in mules bought in theprovince of Buenos Ayres, and fattened in thepastures here, for the purpose of being sold for thesupply of the other provinces, and in fact of thewhole of Peru. It abounds in all kinds of pro-ductions, and is 70 leagues from Santiago del Es-tero, to the s. in 62° 39'; long. 31° 20' s. lat. (Foran account of the late revolutions of this place,see La Plata.)

Cordova, another city, in the province andgovernment of Cumaná, founded by Gonzalo deOcampo in 1525, near the sea-coast. It is so re-duced and poor, that it does not deserve the nameof a city. It is bounded by the Caribes Indians.

Cordova, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Castro Vireyna in Peru.

Cordova, another, of the province and go-vernment of Santa Marta in the kingdom of Ti-erra Firme, situate upon the coast. It was sackedby the English pirate Gauson in 1625.

CORDOVES, Rio Del, a river of the provinceand government of Buenos Ayres. It runs zo. andenters the Yazigua close to the pass of Chileno.

CORE, Bank of, an isle of the N. Sea, nearthe coast of S. Carolina, between those of Oca-cook and Drum.

(Core Sound, on the coast of N. Carolina,lies s. of, and communicates with Pamlico.)

COREBO, a river of the province and govern-ment of Chocó. It rises in the valley of 'I'atave,at the foot of the mountains of Choco, and entersthe Paganagandi.

CORENA, a port on the coast of the province

COR 51^

and captainship of the Rio Janeiro in Brazil, closeto the island of Santa Maria.

CORENTE, a river of the kingdom of Brazil.It rises in the head of that of the Paraguas and theVerde, runs s, s.e. and enters the above river atmid-course.

CORENTIN, a river of the province and co-lony of Surinam, or part of Guayana in the Dutchpossessions, according to the last advices ot theFather Bernardo Rosclla of the extinguished so-ciety, Avhich advices were received from theDutch, and served, in 1745, to the making the mapof this province and the Orinoco. It rises in then. part of the famed lake Parime, which some havethought to exist merely in fable. It runs s. wa-teringtlie Dutch colonies; and five leaguesto the w.of Berbice, and to the s. e. of the Orinoco, emptiesitself into the sea, in 5° 22' n. lat. : at its entranceit is one league wide. The English call it Devil’screek, which signifies Barranco del Diablo. Inthe interior of its course it has some sand-banks,which extend for three leagues, and render its na-vigation difficult, notwithstanding that at the lowtide there arc still some channels of water. In thisriver are likewise three small well cultivated islands,lying in a direction from n. tov. They are veryfertile, and covered with trees, and the soundingsof the river about them varies from five to sixfathoms.

CORETIQUI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarquilla in Peru.

CORIANA. See Coro.

CORIDON, Salinas de, salt grounds in thepoint and zo. head of the island of St. Domingo,on the shore of the port Pimiento.

CORIMPO, a settlement of the province ofCinaloa in Nueva Espaiia ; situate on the shore ofthe river Mayo, between the settlements of Heco-joa and Nabajoa.

(CORINTH, a township in Orange county,Vermont, z€. of Bradford, containing 578 inha-bitants.)

CORIO, a settlement of the province and cap-tainship of San Vincente in Brazil, on the shoreand at tlie source of the river Uruguay.

CORIPATA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Canta in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of Atabillos Altos.

CORIPI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Guayana, iii the French possessions. Itenters the sea between the Oiapoco and capeOrange.

CORIS, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento oi Huailas in Peru, annexed to the cu-racy of Aija.

Last edit about 3 years ago by kmr3934
Displaying Page 1 - 5 of 9 in total