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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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belongs to the bishopric of La Paz, and is so situateas to have a fine view of the lake. It is a settle-ment at once the most pleasant and convenient,fertile, and abounding in fruits and cattle, butits temperature is excessively cold. It has twoparishes, with the dedicatory title of Santo Do-mingo and La Asuncion, and two hermitages de-dicated to St. Barbara and St. Sebastian. Theother settlements are,

Asiento de Minas de Mi- Asiento del Desagua-

chacani, dero,

Asiento de San Ante- Acora,

nio de Esquilache, Hi lave,

Pomata, *July,

Asiento de Huacullani, Santiago,

Zepita.

Same name, The lake of, which, although it bethus called, is also known by the name of Titicaca,is 51 leagues in length from n. w. to s. e. and 26in width, although in some parts less. On its shoresare six provinces or corregimientos^ which are.The province of this Paucarcolla,name, Lampa,Pacages, Asangaro.Omasuyos,This lake is of sufficient depth for vessels ofany size, since in many bays not far in from itsshores there are from four to six fathoms of water,and within it, some places from 40 to 50. It is, asfar as is ascertained, without any shoals or banks.Near it grow some herbs, called clacchos, eaten bythe cows and pigs ; also a great quantity of theherb called totora, or cat’s tail, which in someparts grows to the length of a yard and an half.Of this the Indians make rafts, not only for fishingbut for carrying to and fro the cattleand productionsof the harvest and crops growing in the variousislands lying in this lake. Some of these islandsare so covered and hemmed in with the herb totorathat it requires much force and labour to cut a pas-sage through it. In one of the largest of theseislands the Incas had a magnificent temple, dedi-cated to the sun, the first that was ever built. Thislake is not without its tempests and squalls ; theyare, on the contrary, frequent, and have at timescaused no inconsiderable mischief. Its watersare thick, but are nevertheless drank by the cattle,and even the Indians ; particularly by those ofthe nation of the Uros, who are a poor ignorantpeople, who formerly lived upon the islands ingreat wretchedness, and who by dint of great solici-tations have been prevailed upon to leave them forthe mainland^ where they now reside in some mi-serable caves, excavated places, or holes in theearth covered over with fiags of totora^ maintain-

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ing themselves by fishing. This lake containslikewise various kinds of fish, such as trout,ormantos, cuches, anchovies, and boquillas inabundance; these are, for the most part, aboutthe length of a man’s hand, and three fingersthick. The Indians of Yunguyo take upwardsof 700 yearly, and sell them at four and six dollarsthe thousand. They also catch some small peje-reyesy and an infinite variety of birds, which aresalted, and afford excellent food. It is confidentlyand repeatedly asserted by the Indians, that thegreater part of the riches of the country was throwninto this lake when the Spaniards entered it at thetime of the conquest ; and amongst other valuablesthe great gold chain made by the order of theInca Huayanacap, which was 2S3 yards in length,and within which 6000 men could dance.

CHUCURPU, an ancient settlement of warlikeIndians of the province and corregimiento ofCuzco in Peru. It lies to the e. of this city, andwas subjected and united to the empire after along resistance by Pachacutec, emperor of theIncas.

CHUCUTI, a river of the province and go-vernment of Darien in the government of TierraFirme. It rises in the mountains towards the e.and following this course, enters the Taranena at asmall distance from its source.

CHUDAUINAS, a barbarous nation of Indians of the kingdom of Quito, to the s, e. ofthis city. They inhabit the part lying s. w. ofthe river Pastaza, and are bounded on the s. e, bythe Ipapuisas, and w. by the Xibaros. They arenot numerous, owing to the continual wars whichthey have maintained with their neighbours ; andthough of a martial spirt, they are of a docile andhumane disposition. Some of them have 'Unitedthemselves with the Andoas, in the settlement ofthis name, which lies upon the w. shore of theriver Pastaza.

CHUECA, San Agustin de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Lipes, and archbi-shopric of Charcas, in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of San Christoval.

CHUETI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Choco. It rises in the sierras of Abide,runs w. and enters the Paganagandi.

CHUFIAS, a barbarous nation of Indians whoinhabit the e. of the river Aguaricu, bounded onthe n. w. by the nation of the Encabellados, withwhom they are in continual warfare.

CHUGOD, Santa Catalina de, a settlementof the province and corregimiento of Caxamarcain Peru, annexed to the curacy of Chetu.

CHUI, a river of the province and captainship3 o

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of Key in Brazil. It runs s. and turning e. en-ters the lake Mini.

Same name, a settlement of this province (Rey) ; situate onthe sea-coast, and lying between this and the lakeMini.

CHUIGOTES. See Chiugotob.

CHUILLE, a river of the province and go-vernment ot Darien in the kingdom of TierraFirme. It has its source in the mountains towardsthe e. runs n. e. and enters the river Tarena.

CHUIRIEUI, a river of the province and go-vernment of Paraguay. It runs n. and enters theIguy near the mission of San Miguel.

CHULK, a small port or creek of the coast ofthe S. sea, in the province and corregimiento ofArequipa. It is shallow, insecure, and exposedto the ,v. w. winds.

==CHULIHUCANI, a settlement of tlie province and government of Potosiin Peru.

CHULINA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Charazani.

CHULISANA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Andahuailas in Peru; annexed tothe curacy of Cachi.

CHULUMANI, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Cicasica in Peru.

Same name, a river of the above province (Cicasica),which rises at the end of the cordillera of Ancuma,begins its course to the e. and forming a large bendtowards the n. enters the Beni just at its source,and where it keeps the name of the Chuquiavo.

CHUMA, a river of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, which flows down from the mountains ofBogota. It waters the territory of Merida, pass-ing opposite the city, and enters through the s.side into the lake of Maracaybo.

Same name, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

CHUMATLAN, a settlement of the head settle-nidnt of Zozocoles, and alculdia mayor of Papantla,in Nueva Espana. It is situate at the top of anhigli mountain, and from it may be seen all the set-tlements belonging to this jurisdiction. Its popu-lation amounts to 183 families of Indians, and itlies to the n. of its head settlement, three leaguesdistant from this, and 14 from the capital.

CHUMBE, a village of the province and corre-gimiento of Cuenca in the kingdom of Quito. Itis to the xd. of Tarqui, and on the w. shore of oneof the torrents rising in fhe river Paute. Not farfrom it are some excellent hot baths, of which nouse is made. LHere the stately melastoma and theembothriuin are growing at an elevation of 12,000feet, according to Humboldt, who visited this vil-lage in 1802. Lat. 3° 10' s.]

CHUMBES, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Vilcas Huaman in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Vizchongo.

CHUMBI, a settlement of the province and cor-of Parinacochas in Peru, where thereis a pious sanctuary, with an excellent painting ofthe blessed virgin, said to have been given by apontitf to the curate of this settlement when he wasat Rome.

CHUMBICHA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tucuman in Peru; situate to thew. of the valley of San Fernando de Cata-inarca.

CHUMBICOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Piura in Peru ; situate on theshore of a small river of the same name.

CHUMBILLA, a mountain of the province andcorregimiento of Huamanga in Peru ; celebratedfor a rich silver mine. It lies three leagues froma small settlement called Canaria, which is at pre-sent abandoned and deserted.

CHUMBIVILCAS, a province and corregi-miento of Peru. It is bounded n. by the provinceof Quispicanchialgo, and by that of Chilquesand Masques on the n. w. ; by those of Cota-bamba and Aymaraez on the jr. ; by that of Con-dcsuyos de Arequipa on the s . ; and on the e. bythat of Canes and Cauches. Its temperature isfor the most part cold, although in some placestemperate, so that it produces the fruits peculiar toeither climate ; such as wheat, barley, maize, pa-pas, and other seeds, though none in abundance,but plenty of neat cattle. In this province arefound the lofty and vast snowy mountains calledCondesuyos del Cuzco. It lies on the boundariesof the province of Parinacocha, being separatedfrom it by the river which flows down from theprovince of Camana. Here much cloth peculiarto the country is manufactured ; and in its districtare many mouths of gold and silver mines, themounds and pits of which, together with the re-mains of several mills for working metal, indicatethat in former times they were probably worked tono small advantage. They gather here a greatquantity of Cochineal, which is called macno, withwhich cloths are dyed of very fine colours. Ithas likewise fountains and mineral streams of hotwater, and is subject to earthquakes. Its reparti-mento used to amount to 85,800 dollars, and its al-cavala to 685 dollars per annum. Its inhabitants,including the district of Condesuyos, amount to16,000 souls, who live in the 22 following set-tlements :

Last edit over 2 years ago by LLILAS Benson
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