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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

387
Indexed

CHI

CHI

settlement of Naiilingo, and alcaldm mayor of Xalapa, in Nueva Espaila, the name of which signifies the place of six fountains. It is situate in the most lofty part of a rugged and mountainous sierra, on which account its temperature is every where cold, and subject more than any other part of its district to continual fogs and rains. Its commerce consists in maize, which it produces in abundance, and in the breeding of swine, both of which articles are carried for sale to Vera Cruz. Its inhabitants are also engaged in the mule-droves which pass through these parts in tlieir way to the windward coasts, and which proceed over a road so rough and stony that they are under the necessity of descending and ascending precipices by means of steps or artificial passages hewn out of the rocks ; and however difficult this might appear to some, they do not experience any gleat delay, although the animals are very heavily loaded, and the road be rendered still more diflicult, if, as it often happens, the journey be performed in the winter season. This very stony route is a narrow pass or defile which shortens the way leading to the province of La Guasca. The inhabitants of this settlement are composed of 236 families of Indians. It lies three short leagues to the n. of its capital.

CHICONCUAUTLA, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Guachinango in Nueva Espana. It is of a mild temperature, and contains 270 families of Indians, including the three other small settlements of its district. Six leagues to the e. of its capital.

CHICONTEPEC, a settlement of the head settlement of Tlalixcoya, and alcaldia maijor of Mizantla, in Nueva Espaila. It contains 53 families of Indians.

CHICORATO, a settlement of the missions which were held by the regulars of the society of Jesuits, in the province and government of Cinaloa.

CHICUAS, a nation of Indians of Peru. It is at present reduced to merely a settlement of the province of Condesuyos, in which is found abundance of cochineal, made use of by the natives in dyeing of wool ; this being the branch of commerce by which they maintain themselves.

CHIEGNETO, a settlement and fort of the English, in the province and colony of Nova Scotia, in the most interior part of the bay of Eundy.

Chiegneto, a small river of the above province, which rises from a lake, runs s. and enters the Basin of the Mines.

387

Chiegneto, a cape or point of the coast of the same province, in the bay of Fundy.

CHIEN, Trou au, a river of the island of Guadalupe. It rises in the mountains towards the e. runs e. and enters the sea between the point of Petit Carbet and the river Trou or Chat.

==CHIENS, ISLA DE LOS, or Island of the Dogs==, in the gulf of St. Lawrence, at the entrance of the strait of Belleisle, and on the w. coa«t of the island of Newfoundland.

CHIETLAN, a head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Yzucar in Nueva Espaila. It was formerly the corregbniento, and is at present embodied with this jurisdiction. It is of a warm and moist temperature, but very pleasant, and covered with gardens full of flowers, fruits, and vegetables. The territory also abounds in wheat, maize, and other seeds, and particularly in dates, the whole of the district being covered with palms. Its inhabitants consist of 267 families of Spaniards, Mustees, and Mulattocs, and of 356 families of Indians, including those dwelling in the settlements which belong to this district. It abounds likewise in garbanzos, or Spanish pease, anniseed, and melons, all of which are of the best quality of anj^ in the whole kingdom. It lies three leagues s. of its capital.

The aforesaid settlements are,

Ahuehuezingo,

San Nicolas de Tenaxcalco,

Santiago de Azalan.

CHIGNAL, VOLCAN DE, a mountain of the province and corregimiento of Maúle in the kingdom of Chile, distinct from the other which is near to it and of the same name.

(CHIGNECTO Channel, then. to. arm of the bay of Fundy, into which Petitcodiac river falls. The spring tides rise here 60 feet.)

CHIGUACHI, a settlement of the corregimiento of Ubaqué in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; situate behind the mountains of Guadalupe and Monserrat, of the city of Santa Fe, from whence it is distant five leagues to the c. It is of a delightful temperature, and abounds in wheat, maize, barley, potatoes, sugar-cane, and plantains. Its inhabitants consist of 200 families of Spaniards, and a very tew Indians.

CHIGUAGUA, San Felipe de, a town of the province of Taraumara, and kingdom of Nueva Viscaya ; situate near the river San Pedro. Its population consists of 2000 families of Spaniards, and some of Mustees and Mulattoes. The town is large and well built, and the liouses are handsome ; amongst otlier buildings, the most con-

Last edit over 3 years ago by kmr3934
539
Indexed

CUB

539

C U A

island of Cuba, called Cruz del Principe (Cross of the Prince. )

CUA, Sahante de, a village and settlement of the Portuguese, in the kingdom of Brazil ; situate in the sierra of Los Corixes, between the river of this name and that of Araguaya.

CUACHIMALCO, a settlenaent of the head settlement of Olinala, and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains 06 families of Indians, and is two leagues to the n. e. of its head settlement.

CUAITLAN, a settlement of the head settlement of Metlatlan, <x\\A. alcaldia mayor of [Papantla]], inNueva Espana. It contains 8i families of Indians, and is three leagues from its head settlement, 16 s. w. of the capital.

CUALA, Santiago de, a settlement and head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Tezcoco in Nueva Espana; annexed to the curacy of Capulalpa, and six leagues to the n. e. of its capital.

CUALAQUE, a scttlerneut of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in Nueva Espana. It contains two families of Spaniards, eight of Mustees^ 140 of Indians, and a convent of the religious order of St. Augustin. It is of a mild temperature, and its principal commerce consists in making painted cups of fine manufacture. Four leagues w. of its capital.

CUAMILA, a small settlement or ward of the alcaldia mayor Guachinango in Nueva Espana ; annexed to the curacy of the settlement of TIaola.

CUANALA, Santa Maria de, a settlement of the bead settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tezcoco in Nueva Espana ; situate on the shore of the pleasant valley of (3culma. It is surrounded by many small settlements or wards, in which there are reckoned 212 families of Indians, and 10 of Muslees and Mulattoes ;* all of whom are employed as drovers or agriculturalists. Two leagues n. of its capital.

CUAPALA, a settlement of the head settlement of Atlistac, and aluddia mayor of Tlapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains 42 families of Indians.

CUATALPAN Santiago de, a settlement of the alcaldia mayor Tezcoco in Nueva Espana. it contains 36 families of Indians, and 27 of Spaniards and Mustics.

CUATLAN, a settlement of the head settlement of Ixtlahuacan, and alcaldia mayor of Colima ; .situate on the margin of a river which fertilizes the gardens lying on either of its banks, the same abounding in ail kinds of fruits and herbs. It is

of a mild temperature, and its commerce consists in maize, French beans, and in the making of mats. In its precincts are six estates or groves of coco trees ; and in those dwell .nine families of Spaniards and Miistees. In the settlement are 70 families. It is three leagues e. of its head settlement.

CUAUCHINOLA, a settlement of the head settlement of Xoxutla, and alcaldia mayor of Cuernavaca, in Nueva Espana.

CUAUCOTLA, S. Diego de, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Cholula in Nueva Espana. It contains 27 families of Indians, and is a quarter of a league from its capital.

CUAUTIPAC, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in Nueva Espana. It contains 23 families of Indians, and is one league to the s. e. of its capital.

CUAUTLA, San Juan de, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Cholula in Nueva Espana. It contains 16 families of Indians, and is one league to the w. of its capital.

CUAUTLA, with the dedicatory title of San Miguel, another settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Cuernavaca in the same kingdom ; situate in a fertile and beautiful open plain near the settlement of Mazate.pec. It contains 23 families of Indians, and 11 of Spaniards and Mulattoes, who employ themselves in fishing for small but well-flavoured bagres, which are found in great abundance in a river which runs near the town.

CUAUTOLOTITLAN, a settlement of the head settlement of Atlistac, and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains 42 families of Indians.

CUB, a small river of the province and colony of Virginia. It runs and enters the Staunton.

CUBA, a large island of the N. sea, and the largest of the Antilles ; situate at the mouth or entrance of the bay of Mexico. It is 235 leagues in length from c. to a', from the cape of St. Antonio to the point of Maizi, and 45 at its widest part, and 14 at the uarrow'est. To the n. it has Florida and the ijiicayes isles ; to the c. the island of St. Domingo, and to the s. the island of Jamaica, and the s. continent; and to the w. the gulf or hay of Mexico. It is betw een and 23°15'n. Int. and

from 74° 2' 3'^ to 84°55'tw. long It was discovered by Admiral Cliristopher Columbus in 1492, in his first voyage, before he discovered St. Domingo ; and he mistook it for the continent, and landed upon it. In tJie year 1494, it was found to be au island by Nicholas do Obando. lie measured its circumierence, and careened his ve.s.sel in the port of the Havana, which from that time has been

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