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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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Villas. It contains 34 families of Indians, whocultivate and trade in grain, pulse, coal, and thebark of trees. A little more than two leagues tothe w. with a slight inclination to the s. of its headsettlement.

Agustin, San, another setttlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucuman in Peru ; si-tuate on the shore of the river Tercero (third river.)

Agustin, San, another settlement of the pro-vince and alcaldia mayor of Vera Paz in the king-dom of Guatemala.

Agustin, San, another of the province andgovernment of Popayan in the kingdom of Quito.

Agustin, San, another of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres in Peru, on the shoreof the river Ibiquay.

Agustin, San, another of the province andalcaldia mayor of Culiacan in Nueva España,situate near the town of Rosario.

Agustin, San, a point or cape of the coast ofBrazil, in the province and captainship of Per-nambuco, between the port Antonio Vaz and theriver Tapado. One hundred leagues from thebay of Los Miiertos ; [300 miles n. e. from the bayof All Souls. Lat. 8° 38' s. Long. 35° 11' tc.]

Agustin, San, another point or cape of thecoast of the province and government of Rio deHacha, and kingdom of Tierra Firme, close to thelake of San Juan, on the e. side.

Agustin, San, a river of the province andgovernment of Antioquia, in the new kingdom ofGranada. It runs from s. to n. and afterwards,with a slight inclination to the w. enters the riverS. Juan, of the province of Choco.

Agustin, San, a small island of the gulph ofCalifornia, or Red Sea of Cortes ; situate in themost interior part of it, and near upon the coast ofNueva España, opposite the bay of San JuanBaptista.

[ AGWORTH, a township in Cheshire county.New Hampshire, incorporated in 1766, and con-tains 704 inhabitants ; eight miles e. by n. fromCharlestown, and 73n. w. by a), from Portsmouth.]

AHOME, a nation of Indians, who inhabit theshores of the river Zuaque, in the province ofCinaloa, and who are distant four leagues fromthe sea of California : they were converted to theCatholic faith by father Andres de Rivas, a Jesuit.Their country consists of some extensive and fer-tile plains, and they are by nature superior to theother Indians of Nueva España. Moreover, theirHeathenish customs do not partake so much of thespirit of barbarism. They abhorred polygamy,and held virginity in the highest estimation : andthus, by way of distinction, unmarried girls wore

a small shell suspended to their neck, until the dayof their nuptials, when it was taken off by the bride-groom. Their clothes were decent, composed ofwove cotton, and'they had a custom of bewailingtheir dead for a whole year, night and morning,with an apparently excessive grief. They aregentle and faithful towards the Spaniards, withwhom they have continued in peace and unityfrom the time of their first subjection. The prin-cipal settlement is of the same name, and lies atthe mouth of the river Fuerte, on the coast of thegulph of California,* having a good, convenient,and well sheltered port.

AHORCADOS, Point of the, on the shore ofthe large lake of Los Patos, of the province andcaptainship of Rey in Brazil.

Ahorcados, some small islands or points onthe coast of the S. sea, in the district of SantaElena, of the province and government of Guay-aquil, close to the mouth of the river Colonche.

AHUACATEPEC, San Nicolas de, anothersettlement of the above head settlement and alcal-dia mayor.

AHUACATES, Santa Maria de, a branchof the head settlement of the district and alcaldiamayor of Cuernavaca in Nueva España.

AHUACATLAN, Santa Maria de, a set-tlement of the head settlement of the district ofSan Francisco del Talle, and alcaldia mayor ofZultepec, in Nueva España. It is of a cold tem-perature, inhabited by 51 families of Indians, anddistant three leagues s. of its head settlement.

Ahuacatlan (Zochicoatlan), another settlement of’the headsettlement and alcaldia mayor of Zochicoatlan inNueva España. It is of a cold temperature, si-tuate on a small level plain, surrounded by hillsand mountains. It contains 13 families of In-dians, and is seven leagues to the n. of its capital.

Ahuacatlan, with the dedicatory title of SanJuan, the head settlement of the district of thealcaldia mayor of Zacatlan in Nueva España.Its inhabitants are composed of 450 families ofIndians, and 60 of Spaniards, Mustees, and Mu-lattoes, including the settlements of the district.Five leagues from its capital, and separated by amountainous and rugged road, as also by a verybroad river, whose waters, in the winter time, in-crease to such a degree as to render all communi-cation between the above places impracticable.

Ahuacatlan, another, of the head settlementof the district of Olinala, and alcaldia mayor ofTlapa, in the above kingdom. It contains 160families of Indians, who trade in chia^ (a whitemedicinal earth), and grain, with which its territoryabounds. It lies n, w. of its head settlement.

Last edit over 2 years ago by MJG
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COCO, a river of the province and governmentof Darien in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. Itrises in the mountains of the n. and enters the seaopposite the island of Las Palmas, and gives itsname to the territory of a Cacique, thus called.

Same name, a point of the coast of the South sea,and kingdom of Tierra Firme, in the bay ofPanama.

COCOLI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Honduras. It runs e. and enters the seain the gulf of this name.

COCOLI, a point of the coast, in the same pro-vince and kingdom (Honduras).

COCOLOT, a city, which some liave supposedto be in the province of Chaco in Peru, but of theexistence of which no proofs are at present to befound.

COCOMERACHI, a settlement of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits, in the province of Taraumara, andkingdom of Nueva Vizcaya. It is 40 leagues tothe w. s.zo. of the town 'And real of the mines ofChiguaga.

COCOMICO, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Popayan in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada,

COCONUCO, See Cucunuco.

COCORALE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Venezuela in the kingdom ofTierra Firme; situate at the w. of the town of SanFelipe.

COCORIN, a settlement of the province ofOstimuri in Nueva Espana; situate on the shoreof the river Hiagui, between the settlements ofBacun and Comoriopa.

COCOROTE, some copper mines in the pro-vince and government of Venezuela, much cele-brated.

COCOS, some small islands of the Pacific orS. sea, lying close together, and divided by somenarrow channels. They abound in cocoa-trees,and from thence take their name. They are alsocalled Santa Cruz, from having been discoveredon the day of the invention of the cross. Theclimate here is pleasant, but the isles are unculti-vated and desert. Lat. 5° n.

Same name, a point of the island of Trinidad, on thee. coast.

COCOSPERA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Sonora in Nueva Espana ; situateat the source of a river,

COCOTA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tunja, in the jurisdiction of thecity of Pamplona, of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada.

COCOTZINGO, S. Geronimo de, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor ofCuernavaca in Nueva Espana.

COCUI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Tunja in the NueVo Reyno de Gra-nada ; situate at the foot of the sierra Nevada. Itis of a cold temperature, but abounds in all kindsof productions, and particularly in wheat, maize,barley, &c. It contains 700 white inhabitants,and 150 Indians. Thirty-two leagues from Tunja,and eight from the settlement of Chita.

COCUISAS, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cumana in the kingdom of TierraFirme, It lies to the s. of the city of Cariaco.

Same name, a river of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela, being one of those whichenter the Gamaiotal, before this runs into that ofLa Portuguesa.

COCULA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Tlajomulco in Nueva Es-pana. It contains a convent of the religious orderof St. Francis, and is six leagues to the w. of itscapital.

COCUPAC, a city and headsettlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofValladolid in Nueva Espana, and of the bishopricof Mechoaean. Its situation is in a nook to the n.of the great lake. On the e. and ze. are two loftymountains, which form so many other entrances,the one to the 5. and the other to the n. Its tem-perature is rather cold than w'arm ; and althoughit does not want for fruits, it is but ill supplied withwater, the only stream it has not running morethan the distance of a stone’s throw before it entersa lake. The inhabitants are thus under the ne-cessity of supplying themselves by wells. Thepopulation of this city consists in 45 families ofSpaniards, 52 of Mustees and Mulattoes, and 150of Indians. They occupy themselves in the mak-ing of tiles or flags ; and the inferior order aremuleteers. It has a convent of the religious orderof St. Francis.

COCUS, Punta de, a point on the e. coast ofthe island of Newfoundland, between cape Spearand the bay of Tor.

COD, a cape of the coast of New England andprovince of Massachusetts. It runs for many leaguestowards the sea, forming a large semicircle, andafterwards returning, forms the bay of Barnstable.[See Cape Cod, Barnstable, &c.]

CODDINGTON, a settlement of the island ofBarbadoes, in the district of the parish of SanJuan.

CODEBORE, a small river of New Britain,

Last edit over 2 years ago by LLILAS Benson
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