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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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Indexed

Massachusetts, incorporated in 1797, it being formerly the n. part of Stoughton.)

CANUARI, a small river of the province and government of Buenos Ayres. It runs to the n. and enters the Rio Grande of the Portuguese, between the Mbouqui and the Pobatini.

CANUEIRAS, a point of the n. extremity of the island of Santa Catalina, on the coast of Brazil.

CANUERALES, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Cuyo in the kingdom of Chile, situate near the river Diamante.

CANUTO, a river of the province and government of Venezuela. It rises in the mountain Tacazuruma, runs nearly s. and enters the river of La Portuguesa.

CANXA, a small settlement of the head settlement of Orizavá, and alcaldía mayor of Yxmiquilpan, in Nueva España.

(CANY Fork, in the state of Tennessee, is a short navigable river, and runs n. w. into Cumberland river, w. of the Salt lick, and opposite Salt Lick creek, 50 miles in a straight line from Nashville.)

CANZE, a river of the colony and government of Surinam, in the part of Guayana possessed by the Dutch. It rises between the Berbice and the Corentin, and after a very round-about course, enters the former, close to its mouth, or where it runs into the sea.

CAO, Santa Maria Magdalena de, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Truxillo in Peru, situate in the valley of Chicama. It was the capital in the time of the Indians, and the number of these 200 years ago was 3000 ; but now it is reduced to a wretched state, and occupies a small spot on the other side of the river, being nine leagues distant from its capital.

Cao, with the dedicatory title of Santiago, to distinguish it from another settlement of the same province and corregimiento, although they are both equally poor and reduced. Its inhabitants maintain themselves by the cultivation of maize, wheat, rice, and vegetables, which they carry for sale to the other provinces, so that they are for the most part a race of carriers, and indeed possess no inconsiderable droves of mules. It is six leagues from its capital, just by the sea.

CAOBAS, River of the, in the island of St. Domingo, in that part possessed by the French. It rises in the valley of San Juan, runs to the w. and afterwards changing its course to the n. w. enters the Artibonito.

CAORA, a river which runs down from the mountains of Guayana to the s. of the lake

Cassipa, into which it enters ; and afterwards running out at the n. side of this lake, it finds its way through a subterraneous passage, until it empties itself into the Orinoco, on its s. shore. The borders of this river are inhabited by a nation of barbarous Indians, who wander continually through the forests without any fixed abode. They are cannibals as well as the other Indian tribes around them, and with whom they keep up a continual warfare.

CAPACA, a settlement of the province of Culiacan in Nueva España ; situate near the head settlement.

CAPACHICA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Paucarcolla in Peru ; situate on the w. shore of the lake Titicaca.

Capachica, a narrow strip of land formed by the great lake Titicaca. Of these strips there are three, and this appears, for the distance of a league, to be completely divided from any main land.

CAPACHO, a village under the jurisdiction of the town of San Christoval, in the new kingdom of Granada ; of a warm temperature ; abounding in sugar-cane, from which much sugar is manufactured, and in cacao ; but it is much infested by the barbarian Indians, called the Motilones (shorthaired), who destroy the plantations. It contains 200 house- keepers, and is 24; leagues n. e. of Pamplona, in the road which leads to Mérida and La Grita, and eight leagues from the city of San Christoval.

CAPACMARCO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chumbivilcas in Peru.

CAPAIA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Soraica.

Capaia, another settlement in the province of Barcelona, and government of Cumana; situate on the coast, on the banks of a river of the same name.

Capaia, a river of the same province and government, which rises in the serranía, and after making many turnings runs into the sea, near the cape Codera towards the e.

CAPAIAN, a settlement of the province and government of Tucumán, in the jurisdiction of the city of Rioja.

CAPAIRE, a settlement of the province of Venezuela, and government of Maracaibo ; situate very near the coast, at the point Colorada, on the shore of the river Guepe.

(CAPALITA, a large town of North America, and in the province of Oaxaca. The country round abounds with sheep, cattle, and excellent fruit.)

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wliich there is a bank of fine sand, extending a mile into the sea, and affording good anchorage. Lat. 1° 59' n. Long. 157° 35' w.]

[Christmas Sound, in Tien a del Fuego, S. America. Lat. 55° 21' n. Long. 69° 48' tw.]

CHRISTOVAL, San, a town of the government and jurisdiction of Maracaibo in the Nuevo Rey no de Granada; founded by Captain Juan de Maldonado in 1560. It is of •a hot but healthy temperature, produces abundance of sugar-canes, of which are made honey, sugar, and conserves, in immense quantities ; also a great proportion of smoking tobacco, which is carried to Maracaibo. It has a good church and a convent t)f St. Augustin, which latter has fallen much to decay with regard to its establishment. The population of the town consists of 400 housekeepers. It lies 20 leagues n. e. of Pamplona, from the jurisdiction of which it is divided by the river Pamplonilla. It is the native place of Don Gregorio de Jaimes, archdeacon of Santa Fe, and bishop of Santa Marta.

Same name, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Lipes, archbishopric of Charcas in Peru ; in which took place the following extraordinary occurrence: The curate of this place going to confess a sick person in the settlement of Tahisa of the province of Paria, which was annexed to this, sunk into a spring of water in the pampas or llanos dela Sal, when he was drowned, and with the two Indians who accompanied him on horseback, never more appeared, nor were any vestiges ever found of them : this was the reason why the latter settlement has since been disunited from the curacy of San Christoval.

Same name, a capital city of the province and captainship of Sergipé in the kingdom of Brazil ; being also known by that name. It is founded on the sea-shore, and has a fine and well defended port. It has a magnificent parish church with the title of Nuestra Senora de la Victoria ; two fine convents, the one of the order of the Franciscans, and the other of the Carmelites ; also a chapel of devotion of the Virgin of the Rosary. The councilhouse is a very fine edifice, and in the suburbs is a hermitage of San Gonzalo, which is frequented as a pilgrimage by this and other settlements of the jurisdiction. In this city resides the chief captain, who governs this province, and who is attended by a company of troops as a body-guard. In early times it was filled with nobility, descended from the first families in Portugal; but it is now reduced to 600 housekeepers. in its district, towards the part called Coninquiva, is a parish with four chapels, and towards the river Vaza-Barris five others. It has also 25 engines, by which abundance of sugar of an excellent quality is manufactured ; this article affords a great commerce w ith t!ic bay of Todos Santos. Lat. ll°40's. Long. ST'* SO' tw.

Same name, an island of the N. sea ; one of the Antilles, discoverctl by Admiral Christoj)her Columbus, who gave it his name, in 149S. It is five leagues in circumference, and is very fertile, and abounding in productions, particularly in cotton, tobacco, indigo, sugar, and brandy ; by all of which it carries on a great commerce. Here arc some good salines, and in the mountains are some woods of fine timber, well adapted for the building of ships. The English and the French both established themselves here in 1625, holding a divided possession, when they were driven out by the Spaniards. After this the former again returned and re-established themselves in the greatest part of the island, leaving, however, a small share to the French, until the year 1713, when the latter, in conjunction with the Spaniards themselves, ceded it entirely to the English, who from that time have held it and kept it well fortified. [St. Christopher, situate in lat. 17° 21', long. 62° 48' ze. was called by its ancient possessors, the Charibes, Liamuiga, or the Fertile Island. It was discovered in November 1493 by Columbus himself, who was so pleased with its appearance, that he honoured it with his own Christian name. But it was neither planted nor possessed by the Spaniards. It was, however, (notwithstanding that the general opinion ascribes the honour of seniority to Barbadoes), the eldest of all the British territories in the \V. Indies, and in truth, the common mother both of the English and French settlements in the Charibean islands. A Mr. Thomas Warner, an Englishman, associated himself Avith 14 other persons in the year 1622, and with them took his passage on board a ship bound to Virginia. From thence he and his companions sailed from St. Christopher’s, where they arrived in January 1623, and by the month of September following had raised a good crop of tobacco, which they proposed to make their staple commodity. By the generality of historians who have treated of the affairs of the W. Indies, it is asserted that a party oflhe French, under the command of a person of the name of D’Esnambuc, took possession of one part of this island, on the same day that Mr. Warner landed on the other; but the truth is, that the first landing of Warner and his associates happened two years before the arrival of D’Esnambuc; who, it is admitted by Du Tertre, did not leave France until IG25. Unfortunately the English settlers, in the latter end of

1623, had their plantations demolished by a dread- j

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llio Naipi to Cartagena. The same way offers the advantage of a very quick communication between Cadiz and Lima. Instead of dispatching couriers by Cartagena, Santa Fe, and Quito, or by Buenos Ayres and Mendoza, good quick-sailing packet-boats might be sent from Cupica to Peru. If this plan were carried into execution, the viceroy of Lima would have no longer to wait five or six months for the orders of his court. Besides, the environs of the bay of Cupica abounds with excellent timber fit to be carried to Lima. We might almost say that the ground between Cupica and the mouth of the Atrato is the only part of all America in which the chain of the Andes is entirely broken.]

CUPIN, a small river of the province and captainship of Para in Brazil. It runs n. n. zo and enters the Guama, before it runs into the Amazonas or Maranon.

CUPIRA, a river of the province of Barcelona, and government of Cumana, in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises in the serrania, and runs f. until it enters the sea, close to the settlement of Tucuyo.

CUPITA, Cano de, an arm of the river Orinoco, which runs out by the w. side, and takes its course n. opposite the mouth of the Caura.

CUPLICOS, a river of the province and alcaldia maijor of Tabasco in Nueva Espana, which falls into the sea in the bay of Mexico, between the Dos Bocas and the Tabasco.

CUPO, a small river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, in the part possessed by the Portuguese. It rises in the territory of the Nourises Indians, runs s. and enters the Trqpibetas.

CUQUE, a large river of the province and government of Darien, and kingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises near the N. sea, to the e. of the province, and following an e. course, enters the canal of Tarena.

CUQUIARACHI, a settlement of the missions which were held by the regulars of the company of Jesuits, in the province and government of La Sonora.

CUQUIO, the alcaldia mayor and jurisdiction of Nueva Espana, in the kingdom of Nueva Galicia, and bishopric of Guadalaxara ; is one of the most civilized and fertile, abounding in fruits and seeds, and being of a mild temperature. It is watered by three rivers, which are the Verde on the e. the Mesquital on the w. and the Rio Grande on the s. in which last the two former become united.

The capital is the settlement of its name, inhabited by a large population of Indians, some

Mmtets and Mulattoes, and a few Spaniards ; is 13 leagues to the n. e. of Guadalaxara, in long. 268° ; and lat. 21° 40'. The other settlements are, Cantla== , ==Tenalucan,

Manalisco== , ==Quaquala,

Huisculco== , ==Ocotic,

Yagualica== , ==Tepunahuasco,

Acatico== , ==Yotahuacan,

Mestitlan== , ==Tacotan,

Nochistlan== , ==San Christoval,

Toyagua== , ==Iscatlan.

Apulco,

[CURA, with the surname of St. Louis de, is situate in a valley formed by mountains of a very grotesque appearance ; those on the s. w. side are capped with rocks. The valley is, however, fertile, and covered with produce, but the greater part of the property consists in animals. The temperature is warm and dry ; the soil is a reddish clay, which is extremely muddy in the rainy seasons ; the water is not limpid, although it is wholesome. The inhabitants are 4000, governed by a cabildo. In the church is an image of our Lady of Valencianosy the claim to which was long a subject of dispute between the curate of Cura and that of Sebastian de los Reynos ; and after a SO years contest, it was ordered by the bishop Don Francisco de Ibarro to be returned to this place, when it was received in a most triumphant manner. This city is in lat. 10° 2' ; twenty-two leagues s. xo. of Caracas, and eight leagues s. e, of the lake of Valencia.]

CURABICO, a river of the province and captainship of Maranan in Brazil.

CURACOA, or Curazao, an island of the N. sea, one of the Smaller Antilles ; situate near the coast of the province and government of Venezuela. It is 30 miles long, and 10 broad, and is the only island of any consideration possessed by the Dutch in America. It was settled in 1527, by the Emperor Charles V. as a property upon theliouse of Juan de Ampues ; is fertile, and abounds in sugar and tobacco, large and small cattle, also in very good saline grounds, by which the other islands are provided : but its principal commerce is in a contraband trade carried on with the coasts of Tierra Firme ; on which account its storehouses are filled with articles of every description imaginable. Formerly its ports were seldom without vessels of Cartagena and Portobelo, which were employed n the Negro trade, bringing home annually froiu 1000 to 15,000 Negroes, with various other articles of merchandise, although this branch ofcommerce has, from the time that it was taken up by the English, greatly declined. On the s. part of

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