AIA Southern Chapter Proceedings

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THE SOUTHERN CHAPTER, A. I. A. 13

son, that, like Michael Angelo of old, had greatness thrust upon him which he did not expect, and perchance it came so thick and fast he had to give up the ghost and leave an unfinished style for the ambitious young men to work out, not on the conditions of Angelo at St. Peter's, that no salary should be inserted in the agreement, but on the contrary the siren ery of the Angelo of to-day is, "What about the commission?"

Yet it is a very important fact in this day and generation to keep up the standard of proper remuneration for services rendered. How necestary it is then that as a profession we should possess the requirements of ability and business tact necessary in the administration of our business, that we may be able to give our clients value received for the small compensation we ask, and in the great revival which we see in the works of the rising generation of young architects, the success of those who have earned a reputation, has been the result of close study, actuated by artistic aspirations worthily won among the closest competitions.

As a profession architecture can boast variety in its labors; great scope is given the imagination and artistic mind as it is unfolded in the studies of design and the theory of construction, the latter being the great object of the means intended, yet not losing the artistic treatment which should always be studied, and after the ideal is formulated on the board, then the masterpiece on which depends the successful carrying out of the work is the specification -- defined by one writer as "a written statement of particulars for a certain proposed structure," to formulate which the architect should first have a perfectly practical knowledge of the profession. This is considered one of the most difficult branches of the profession, a duty which cannot be delegated to the draughtsman or any other employee. How often does an experienced practical builder smile to himself at manyof the absurd volumes of specifications exhibited to him to tender on, or execute work from, and which is often the cause of the great difference in bids. It should be simple in language and expressed in a clear, concise way.

As a body we have a great work to accomplish in the development of Southern architecture. Our climate demands entirely different planning, and there is a large scope of country to be worked, our prosperous cities, thriving towns and growing hamlets, all add to its various wants and studies. We have not yet reached the high building craze of our Western brethren; we have plenty of room to spread out on, and plenty of fresh air, and our genial climate demands that we plan for comfort and make room for the occupants without stint or cost.

Let us then, in this our second. annual convention, endeavor to assist each other in discharging the trust in our hands, in every good word and work, as brethren engaged in a profession, as a labor of love as well as for the money benefits we derive, and when we meet on the bloodless field of competition, either in Alabama, Florida, Texas or Georgia, or in the Lookout Valleys of Tennessee, may we not forget the interests of all as a whole, and act as if we were destitute of honorable sentiments, and not worthy of association. Let us then co-operate with our Eastern and

Last edit about 1 year ago by Colin Morgan
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14 THE SOUTHERN CHAPTER, A. I. A.

Western brethren in the profession and reap the benefits to be derived from a united interest in our chosen profession.

I will close by quoting a sentence taken from the Journal of Architecture, of Philadelphia, which expresses fully the object of our assembly to-day; "Architects as a fraternity should, by their intermingling and interchange of ideas, by their unremitted and unanimous action, and, if possible, in a broad and all-embracing organization, working from within by and upon its membership, attempt to render the methods and practice of architecture more uniform, raise the average standard of design, and by making all true criteria of architectural merit more generally known and more universally adopted, pave the only highway to the popularity of true architecture which seems at present to be open."

The President: 'The next thing in order is the report of the Board of Directors.

The Secretary : As sec'y of the Board of Directors I wish to state that but one meeting of the Board of Directors was held in 1892, which occurred at Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 1st. At this meeting the letter ballot, similar to that used by the A. I. A. was adopted. The Board of Directors also instructed the Secretary to have a Certificate of Membership engraved with such conditions shown in its face as render it void after the following annual meeting, a copy of which, properly filled out, to be given to each Fellow, upon the full payment of all dues for the current year. A copy of this certificate is herewith submitted for your consideration. It was further ordered that Fellows of the A. I. A. requesting membership in this Chapter be excused from furnishing photographs or other drawings as evidence of their professional ability, but in other respects the application blank to be filled out by each applicant and endorsed in the usual way.

The Board of Directors held a meeting this morning prior to the assembling of this Convention, and after considering the applications filed in proper form with the Secretary, they recommend for membership the following named architects, viz.: W. E. Hall, Winston, N. C.; Tom Wood, Sherman, Tex.; C. H. Read, Jr.., Richmond, Va.; G. W. E. Field, Richmond, Va.; J. G. Barnwell, Rome, Ga.; C. C. Wilson, Roanoke, Va.; J. W. McClain, Birmingham, Ala.; E. W. Smith, Lexington, Ky.; Geo. W. Stewart, Dallas, Texas ; Harry D. Breeding, Huntsville, Ala.; P. S. Rabbit, Galveston, Tex.; J. A. Tempest, Houston, Tex.; W. A. Bird, Bir-

Last edit about 1 year ago by Colin Morgan
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mingham, Ala.; Wm. Stanton, Vicksburg, Miss.; W. Chamberlin, Knoxville, Tenn.; T. H. Abrahams, Charleston, S.C.; B. B. Davis, Paducah, Ky.; H. H. Huggins, Roanoke, Va.; F. L. Smith, Lexington, Ky.; Geo. E. Dickey, Houston, Tex.; J. Riely Gordon, San Antonia, Tex.; Henry C. Holland, Houston, Tex.; C. W. Bulger, Galveston, Tex.; W. T. Walker, Montgomery, Ala.

On motion of Mr. Helmich the report of the Directors was adopted and ordered to be spread upon the Minutes of the meeting.

On motion of Mr. Goodrich the letter ballot was suspended and the above named architects were unanimously elected Fellows of this Chapter.

On motion of Mr. Wheelock the Chair appointed a committee (consisting of Mr. Lind and Mr. C. Wheelock) to notify the applicants present of their election.

The President: The next thing in order will be the report of the Committee on Charter.

The Secretary : As a member of this committee I beg to report that the Charter has been obtained from the American Institute of Architects, and is here for examination by the members present.

On motion of Mr. Goodrich the report of the committee was accepted and the committee discharged.

The President: The next thing in order will be the report of Committee on Seal.

The Secretary : As a member of this committee I beg to state that the design of the seal was chosen by your committee from a number of designs submitted, and the seal was engraved and furnished by the American Seal Works.

On motion of Mr. Goodrich the report of the committee was adopted and the committee discharged.

The President: Mr. Wheelock; Chairman of Local Committee of Reception, wishes to make a statement regarding the presence of members of the Legislature of Alabama, who are now in the city.

Mr. Wheelock: I wish to state that I have had a conference with several members of the Legislature regarding the anticipated bills to be presented to the Legislatures of the

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16 THE SOUTHERN CHAPTER, A. I. A.

Southern States in regard to laws controlling the practice of architecture, and it is necessary that we now appoint a time to give these gentlemen a hearing, and I move that three o'clock to-morrow evening be set as the time for this conference.

Which motion was unanimously carried.

At this point Mr. Bassett read an address from Mr. Hubner, editor of ''The Southern Architect," who was unavoidably prevented from attending:

GREETING OF THE SOUTHERN ARCHITECT.

To the Members of the Southern Chapter of the American Institute of Architects in Annual Session al Birmingham, Alabama:

GENTLEMEN: No profession is more thoroughly identified with the material progress of this section of our country, or more instrumental in developing a taste for the beautiful in Art, than the men who honor the profession of Architecture. No part of our great Republic has cause to be prouder of its representative architects than the South. Along with the wonderful progress of the Southern States since the war, in material prosperity and industrial growth, wealth and power, there has been apparent an encouraging development of the art-taste among our people in its architectural side. This finds expression in numerous grand public buildings and handsome private residences; and this practical art-taste has been promoted and fostered by educated and experienced architects in our midst, whose wholesome influences and whose respect for the classic models of their art, have largely contributed in suppressing the vulgar and bizarre, and in bringing about among our people the good taste increasingly expressing itself to-day in the architectural appearance of our towns and cities, in public edifices and private residences, as well as in the tasteful homes of our suburban and rural districts.

In view of these facts it is certainly a gratifying spectacle to see, gathered in this renowned and prosperous city, a body of men who are co-workers in this grand work, who worthily represent their noble profession, and to whose labor, zeal, fidelity and culture, the remarkable development of the art-taste of the New South, already alluded to, is largely due.

The organization of the Southern Chapter of the American Institute of Architects was a happy thought of those who conceived it, and the results thereof have proved the wisdom of their conception, and its practical value to the profession in the South. All honor is due to the founders and promoters of this Chapter, and they will be held in grateful remembrance as long as the beneficial influences of this organization shall exist.

Beginning with a few zealous members, and under many disadvan-

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tages, the Chapter has grown and strengthened and expanded its sphere of usefulness. Nor will it cease its wholesome growth until its sphere shall embrace this entire section, and in its membership shall be found the name of every reputable architect in the South. Its objects and purposes are well-known to all. The measures to be discussed and the actions to be enforced are all intended to conserve the best interests of the profession, and of the public; to elevate the profession to the high plane it is entitled to and to keep it there, and to engender and promote the fraternity and harmorty so necessary to every organization, and whose effects are so well expressed in the old adage, "in union there is strength."

Proud of its position as the officialorgan and literary representative of this Chapter, "The Southern Architect" will leave nothing undone that would foster and advance the objects and purposes of this body. Its management feels the responsibility of its position, but also its opportunities for good works in a noble cause. Its constant aim shall be to do its duty, and to promote whatsoever is true and good and beautiful. To do this to the best advantage, the good-will and practical cooperation of every present and prospective member of the Chapter is necessary. Surely we will not be mistaken iu the hope that this goodwill and practical co-operation will be given us now, and in still larger and increasing measure as time goes on.

As your organ and representative in literature, we greet you, and heartily wish all the members of the Chapter, and the profession everywhere, health, prosperity and success during the new year!

The President : 'The next thing in order will be the appointment of a committee to examine the Treasurer's books, and I appoint Messrs. Lind and James M. Maddox on that committee, and request that they make their report to-morrow morning.

The President: The next thing in order will be the appointment of the usual Nominating committees, and I will appoint Messrs. Helmich, Woodruff and Wood as one of these committees, and Mess. C. Wheelock, Smith and Burke as the other committee, with the request that they report at the afternoon session to-morrow.

At the suggestion of Mr. Goodrich, Mr. Bassett, representing ''The Southern Architect," made explanation of engravings to be published, and recommended that pen and ink Perspectives, of any sizes, should be submitted from which to have the cuts made, and that they were usually reduced to 6 x 9 inches in size.

After a discussion participated in by quite a number of the

Last edit 11 months ago by Colin Morgan
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