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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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finger, but of so hard a texture, that, when split, they cut exactly like a knife. These Indians speak the Tchicachan language, and with the other nations are in alliance against the Iroquees.

ABERCORN, a town of the province and colony of New Georgia, on the shore of the river Savannah, near where it enters the sea, and at a league's distance from the city of this name. [It is about 30 miles from the sea, 5 miles from Ebenezer, and 13 N W of Savannah.]

ABIDE, mountains, or serrania, of the province and government of Cartagena. They run from W to N E from near the large river of Magdalena to the province of Chocó, and the S. Sea. Their limits and extent are not known, but they are 20 leagues wide, and were discovered by Capt. Francisco Cesar in 1536; he being the first who penetrated into them, after a labour of 10 months, in which time he had to undergo the most extreme privations and excessive perils ; not that these exceeded the hardships which were endured by the licentiate Badillo, who entered upon its conquest with a fine army.

ABIGIRAS, a settlement of Indians, one of the missions, or a reduction, which belonged to the regular order of the Jesuits, in the province and government of Mainas, of the kingdom of Quito ; founded in the year 1665, by the father Lorenzo Lucero, on the shore of the river Curarari, 30 leagues from its mouth, and 240 from Quito.

[Abineau Port, on the N side of lake Erie, is about 13 miles W S W from fort Erie. Lat. 42° 6' N Long. 79° 15' W. ]

[ABINGDON, a town at the head of the tide waters of Bush river, Harford county, Maryland, 12 miles SW from Havre-de-Grace, and 20 NE from Baltimore. Cokesbury college, instituted by the methodists in 1785, is in this town. Lat. 39° 27' 30" N Long. 76° 20' 35" W.]

[another, the chief town of Washington county, Virginia, contained but about 20 houses in 1788, and in 1796 upwards of 150. It is about 145 miles from Campbell's station, near Holston; 260 from Richmond in Virginia, in a direct line, and 310 as the road runs, bearing a little to the S of W Lat. 36° 41' 30" N Long. 81° 59' W.]

[ABINGTON, a township in Plymouth county, Massachusetts; 22 miles SE from Boston, and contains 1453 inhabitants. Lat. 42° 4' 30". ]

[another, a parish in the town of Pomfret in Connecticut. Lat. 42° 4' 30". Long. 70° 51' 30".]

[another, a village in Pennsylvania, 32 miles N of Philadelphia.]

Abipi, a small settlement of the jurisdiction of Muzo, and corregimiento of Tunja, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It is of a hot temperature, producing some wheat, maize, yucas, plantains, and canes ; it has been celebrated for its rich mines of emeralds, which are, however, at present abandoned from want of water; it is nearly three leagues distant from the large mine of Itoco.

ABIPONES, a nation of barbarous Indians, of the province and government of Tucuman, inhabiting the S shores of the river Bermejo. Their number once exceeded 100000; but they are certainly at present much reduced. They go naked, except that the women cover themselves with little skins, prettily ornamented, which they call queyapi. They are very good swimmers, of a lofty and robust stature, and well featured: but they paint their faces and the rest of their body, and are very much given to war, which they carry on chiefly against such as come either to hunt or to fish upon their territory. Their victims they have a custom of sticking upon lofty poles, as a landmark, or by way of intimidation to their enemies. From their infancy they cut and scarify their bodies, to make themselves hardy. When their country is inundated, which happens in the five winter months, they retire to live in the islands, or upon the tops of trees: they have some slight notion of agriculture, but they live by fishing, and the produce of the chase, holding in the highest estimation the flesh of tigers, which they divide among their relations, as a sort of precious relic or dainty ; also asserting that it has the properties of infusing strength and valour. They have no knowledge either of God, of law, or of policy; but they believe in the immortality of the soul, and that there is a land of consummate bliss, where they shall dance and divert themselves after their death. When a man dies, his widow observes a state of celibacy, and fasts a year, which consists in an abstinence from fish: this period being fulfilled, an assembly run out to meet her, and inform her that her husband has given her leave to marry. The women occupy themselves in spinning and sewing hides; the men are idlers, and the boys run about the whole day in exercising their strength. The men are much addicted to drunkenness, and then the women are accustomed to conceal their husband's weapons, for fear of being killed. They do not rear more than two or three children, killing all above this number.

Abisca, an extensive province of the kingdom of Peru, to the E of the Cordillera of the Andes, between the rivers Yetau and Amarumago, and to the S of Cuzco. It is little known, consisting entirely of woods, rivers, and lakes; and hither many barbarous nations of Indians have retired, selecting for their dwelling places the few plains which belong to the province. The Emperor Yupanqui endeavoured to make it subservient to his controul, but without success: the same disappointment awaited Pedro de Andia in his attempt to subjugate it in the year 1538.

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the same being the case with regard to the numerous rivers which intersect and fertilize the province ; all of them entering and augmenting the already abundant stream of the Mississippi. In the middle of the lake is a pyramidical mount, of above 100 yards in circumference, composed of a stone similar to crystal, and being the loftiest of any in the province. Its borders abound with cattle, called cibolas, a sort of wild cow, having the neck well covered with a long and soft wool, and affording delicious food to the natives. By the fat which they procure from the numerous anteaters, which breed here, they supply {he want of oil. There are also some castors, and other kinds of mountainanimals. Two leagues from the garrison.

Adaes, a river of the above province, which runs 5. e. in the district or country of the Indians, who give it the denomination ; and enters the river Mexicano.

[ADAIZE are Indians of N. America, who live about 40 miles from Natchitoches, below the Yattasses, on a lake called Lac Macdon, which communicates with the division of Red river that passes by Bayau Pierre. They live at or near where their ancestors have lived from time immemorial. They being the nearest nation to the old Spanish fort, or mission of Adaize, that place was named after them, being about 20 miles from them to the s. There are now but 20 men of them remaining, but more women. Their language differs from all others, and is so difficult to speak or understand, that no nation can speak ten Avoids of it; but they all speak Caddo, and most of them French, to whom they were always attached, and join them against the Natchez Indians. After the massacre of Natchez, in 1798, while the Spaniards occupied the post of Adaize, their priests took much pains to proselyte these Indians to the Roman Catholic religion, but, we are informed, were totally unsuccessful.]

[ADAMS, a township in Berkshire county, Massachusetts, containing 2040 inhabitants, is about 140 miles n. w. of Boston. In the n. part of this town is a great natural curiosity. A pretty mill stream, called Hudson's brook, which rises in Vermont, and falls into the n. branch of Hoosuck river, has, for 30 or 40 rods, formed a very deep channel, in some places 60 feet deep, through a quarry of white marble. Over this channel, where deepest, some of the rocks remain, and form a natural bridge. From the top of this bridge to the water is 62 feet ; its length is about 12 or 15, and its breadth about 10. Partly undcrthis bridge, and about 10 or 12 feet below it, is another, Which is wider, but not so long ; for at the e. end they form one body of rock, 12 or 14 feet thick, and under this the water flows. The rocks here are mostly white, and in other places clouded, like the coarse marble common at Lanesborough, and in other towns in Berkshire county.]

ADAMSTOWN, a town in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, containing about 40 houses; 20 miles n. e. of Lancaster.]

ADAUA, a river of the province and government of St. Juan de los Llanos, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It rises between the Meta and Meteta, runs e. and enters the Orinoco in the port of San Francisco de Borja.

ADAUQUIANA, a small river of the province and government of Guayana, or Nueva Andalucia, which rises near the sierra of Parime ; and running from to. to e. enters the sources of the Cauca.

ADA YES. See Mexicano River.]

ADDI, a settlement of the province and government of Sonora in Nueva Espana ; situate on the shore of a small river, between the settlements of Uquitoa and Tibutana.

ADDIS, a settlement of the island of Barbadoes, one of the Antilles ; situate in the district of the parish of Christ Church, on the s. coast.

ADDISON, a township of the district of Maine in Washington county, 10 miles s. w. of Machias, on the seaboard, between Englishmen's bay and Pleasant river. It was called No. 6. until it was incorporated in Feb. 1797.]

[Addison County], in Vermont, is on the e, side of lake Champlain, and is divided nearly int© equal parts by Otter creek ; has Chittenden county on the n. and Rutland county on the s. and contains 6449 inhabitants, dispersed in 21 townships. It is about SO miles by 27. A range of the green mountains passes through it. Chief town Middlebury, granted Nov. 1761.]

Addison, a town of the above county (Addison County), containing 401 inhabitants. It lies on lake Champlain, and is separated from Newhaven, on the e. by Otter creek. Snake mountains on the s. e. lie partly in this township, granted 1761.1

ADEQUATANGIE Creek, in New York state, is the eastern headwater of Susquehannah river.]

ADICONI, a port on the coast of the N. sea, in the province and government of Venezuela. It is e. of the peninsula of Paraguana.

[ADMIRALTY Bay, and Port Mulgrave, on the n. w. coast of America, lie in Lat. 59° 31' n. Long. 140° 18'.]

ADOLES, a settlement of Indians, of the pro-

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from s. to e. between 'the rivers Mechicor and St.John, and entering the sea at the mouth of thebay of Fundy.

AGRATUMATI, a river of the province andgovernment of Darien, in the kingdom of TierraFirme. It rises in the mountains of the ». andefiters the sea by the Little Beech, opposite Cali-donia.

AGREDA, or NUEVA MA'LAGA, a city of theprovince and government of Popayan, in the king-dom of Quito, founded by Geronimo Aguado in1541. It is small, and of a hot temperature, butabounds in gold mines. Forty-five leagues s. w.of its capital, 42 from Quito, and 37 to the e. ofthe S, sea.

AGRESINAS, a settlement founded by thePortuguese fathers of the Carmelite. order, in thecountry of the Amazonas, situate on the shores ofthe river Amazonas.

AGRIAS, a nation of Indians of the provinceand government of Santa Marta, to the w. of theCienega Grande. It was formerly very numerous,but at present considerably reduced.

AGUA, Port of, on the n. coast of the islandof St. Domingo, between Point Rabeland the Bayof Marques-

Agua, a small island, situate near the k. coastof the island of Vaca, in the channel formed by theisland of St. Domingo, in front of the bay ofMesle.

Agua, also Ojos de Agua, two springs orfountains of the province and corregimi'ento ofCuyo, in the kingdom of Chile, near the lake ofInca, from whence the river Quillota takes itssource.

Agua Blanca, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela, situate between therivers Sarare and Acarigua, to the e. of the town ofAraure.

Agua Buena y Dulce, or Fresh Water,a bay of the strait of Magellan, near the bayof La Gente.

Agua-Caliente, a settlement of the kingdomof Guatemala.

Agua-Clara, a river of the province andgovernment of Paraguay. It runs e. and entersthe Parana on the w. side.

Agua Colorada, a river of the same provinceand government as the former(Paraguay), which runs e. andenters also the large river of Parana.

==Agua de Culebra, SAN FRANCISCO XA-VIER DE LA==, 'a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela, a reduccionof Indians ofthe Capuchin fathers ; but the place is also inha-bited by some Spanish families. It belongs to the

district and jurisdiction of the city of San Felipe ;and in its vicinity dwell a great number of peoplein the estates belonging to it, and which produceabundance of cacao, plantains, yucas, and othervegetable productions.

Agua-Dulce, Caleta de, or Creek of, onthe s. coast of the strait of Magellan, on the sideof the bay of San Martin.

Agua Escondida, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Sonora in Nueva Espana,situate at the foot of a mountain, and to the n. ofSanta Clara.

Agua-Verde, an island of the gulph ofCalifornia, or Red sea of Cortes, situate near thecoast, between the islands of Carmen and Mon-serrat.

AGUACAGUA, a settlement of the provinceof Guayana, and government of Cumana, one ofthose belonging to the missions of the CatalanianCapuchin fathers. It is on the shore of the riverCaroni, near the mouth, through which this en-ters the Orinoco. Lat. 8° 22' n. Long. 62^42' w.

AGUACATAL, a settlement of the provinceand government of Antioquia, situate in the val-ley of Peneo, on the shore of the river Cauca.Lat. 8° n. Long. 75° 28' w.

AGUACATENANGO, a settlement of the pro-vince and alceddia mayor of Chiapa in the king-dom of Guatemala. [Lat. 16° 18' n. Long.91° 57' a).]

AGUACATLAN, the head settlement of thedistrict of the alcaldia mayor of Xala in N uevaEspana. In 1745 it contained 80 families of In-dians, who employed themselves in the culture ofmaize and French beans. It has a convent of thereligious order of St. Francis, and lies two leaguess. e. of its capital.

AGUACHAPA, a settlement of the provinceand government of Nicaragua in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

AGUADA, a settlement of the island of Porto-rico ; situate in the bay of its name (Aguda), between thecapes Boriquen and St. Francis. It serves as aninlet for ships going to Tierra Firme and NuevaEspana to take in water. [Lat. 18° 23' «. Long.67° 6' a;.]

Aguada (Bay), the aforesaid bay (Aguda) in the above island (Porto rico).

Aguada (point), the point on the coast and at the headof the above island, 27 leagues distant from thecape of San Rafael, of the island of St. Domingo.

Aguada (river), a river near the cape (San Rafael) or former point (Aguada),and in the same island (St. Domingo), being a place where shipsare accustomed to take in water.

Aguada (Small river), a small river of the province and

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Villas. It contains 34 families of Indians, whocultivate and trade in grain, pulse, coal, and thebark of trees. A little more than two leagues tothe w. with a slight inclination to the s. of its headsettlement.

Agustin, San, another setttlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucuman in Peru ; si-tuate on the shore of the river Tercero (third river.)

Agustin, San, another settlement of the pro-vince and alcaldia mayor of Vera Paz in the king-dom of Guatemala.

Agustin, San, another of the province andgovernment of Popayan in the kingdom of Quito.

Agustin, San, another of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres in Peru, on the shoreof the river Ibiquay.

Agustin, San, another of the province andalcaldia mayor of Culiacan in Nueva España,situate near the town of Rosario.

Agustin, San, a point or cape of the coast ofBrazil, in the province and captainship of Per-nambuco, between the port Antonio Vaz and theriver Tapado. One hundred leagues from thebay of Los Miiertos ; [300 miles n. e. from the bayof All Souls. Lat. 8° 38' s. Long. 35° 11' tc.]

Agustin, San, another point or cape of thecoast of the province and government of Rio deHacha, and kingdom of Tierra Firme, close to thelake of San Juan, on the e. side.

Agustin, San, a river of the province andgovernment of Antioquia, in the new kingdom ofGranada. It runs from s. to n. and afterwards,with a slight inclination to the w. enters the riverS. Juan, of the province of Choco.

Agustin, San, a small island of the gulph ofCalifornia, or Red Sea of Cortes ; situate in themost interior part of it, and near upon the coast ofNueva España, opposite the bay of San JuanBaptista.

[ AGWORTH, a township in Cheshire county.New Hampshire, incorporated in 1766, and con-tains 704 inhabitants ; eight miles e. by n. fromCharlestown, and 73n. w. by a), from Portsmouth.]

AHOME, a nation of Indians, who inhabit theshores of the river Zuaque, in the province ofCinaloa, and who are distant four leagues fromthe sea of California : they were converted to theCatholic faith by father Andres de Rivas, a Jesuit.Their country consists of some extensive and fer-tile plains, and they are by nature superior to theother Indians of Nueva España. Moreover, theirHeathenish customs do not partake so much of thespirit of barbarism. They abhorred polygamy,and held virginity in the highest estimation : andthus, by way of distinction, unmarried girls wore

a small shell suspended to their neck, until the dayof their nuptials, when it was taken off by the bride-groom. Their clothes were decent, composed ofwove cotton, and'they had a custom of bewailingtheir dead for a whole year, night and morning,with an apparently excessive grief. They aregentle and faithful towards the Spaniards, withwhom they have continued in peace and unityfrom the time of their first subjection. The prin-cipal settlement is of the same name, and lies atthe mouth of the river Fuerte, on the coast of thegulph of California,* having a good, convenient,and well sheltered port.

AHORCADOS, Point of the, on the shore ofthe large lake of Los Patos, of the province andcaptainship of Rey in Brazil.

Ahorcados, some small islands or points onthe coast of the S. sea, in the district of SantaElena, of the province and government of Guay-aquil, close to the mouth of the river Colonche.

AHUACATEPEC, San Nicolas de, anothersettlement of the above head settlement and alcal-dia mayor.

AHUACATES, Santa Maria de, a branchof the head settlement of the district and alcaldiamayor of Cuernavaca in Nueva España.

AHUACATLAN, Santa Maria de, a set-tlement of the head settlement of the district ofSan Francisco del Talle, and alcaldia mayor ofZultepec, in Nueva España. It is of a cold tem-perature, inhabited by 51 families of Indians, anddistant three leagues s. of its head settlement.

Ahuacatlan (Zochicoatlan), another settlement of’the headsettlement and alcaldia mayor of Zochicoatlan inNueva España. It is of a cold temperature, si-tuate on a small level plain, surrounded by hillsand mountains. It contains 13 families of In-dians, and is seven leagues to the n. of its capital.

Ahuacatlan, with the dedicatory title of SanJuan, the head settlement of the district of thealcaldia mayor of Zacatlan in Nueva España.Its inhabitants are composed of 450 families ofIndians, and 60 of Spaniards, Mustees, and Mu-lattoes, including the settlements of the district.Five leagues from its capital, and separated by amountainous and rugged road, as also by a verybroad river, whose waters, in the winter time, in-crease to such a degree as to render all communi-cation between the above places impracticable.

Ahuacatlan, another, of the head settlementof the district of Olinala, and alcaldia mayor ofTlapa, in the above kingdom. It contains 160families of Indians, who trade in chia^ (a whitemedicinal earth), and grain, with which its territoryabounds. It lies n, w. of its head settlement.

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mules, poultry, cheese, and salt meats. It haslikewise some mines in its district, which are notaltogetlier neglected, though the advantages de-rived from them would be immensely increased, ifthe number of labourers were greater. It is go-verned by a lieutenant nominated by the governorof Santiago de Veragua. [Lat. 8° 12' n. Long.80“ 40' a;.l

ALAQUES, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tacunga in the kingdom ofQuito.

ALAQUINES, a branch of the head settle-ment of the district of Tamazunchale, and alcaldiamayor of Valles, in Nueva España, situate on theshore of a large river which divides this jurisdic-tion from that of Guadalcazar.

ALARA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Antioquia in the new kingdom of Gra-nada. It rises at the foot of the sierra of Gua-moco, and s. of the town of this name; runsand enters the Cauca.

[ALASKE, a long peninsula on the n. w. coastof America, formed by Bristol bay and the oceanon the n. w. and n. and by the ocean and thewaters of Cook’s river on the s. and s. e. At itsextremity are a number of islands, the chief ofwhich, in their order westward, are, Oonemak,Oonala.sha, and Ocumnak, which form part ofthe chain or cluster of islands called the NorthernArchipelago. Captain Cook, on his return in1779, passed through the channel e. of Oonemakisland. See North-avest Coast of America.]

ALATAMALIA, a large river of the provinceand government of Florida. It runs nearly duee. and enters the sea opposite the Georgean isles.[This river, Avliich is navigable, is more properlyof Georgia. It rises in the Cherokee mountains,near the head of a western branch of Savannahriver, called Tugulo. In its descent through themountains it receives several auxiliary streams ;thence it Avinds, with considerable rapidity,through the hilly country 250 miles, from Avhcnceit throAvs itself into the open flat country, by thename of Oakmulgee. Thence, after meanderingfor 150 miles, it is joined by the Oconee, whichlikewise has its source in the mountains. Afterthis junction it assumes the name of Alatamalia,Avhen it becomes a large majestic river ; and flow'-ing Avith a gentle current through forests andplains 100 miles, discharges itself into the Atlan-tic by several mouths. The n. channel glides bythe heights of Darien, about 10 miles above thebar, and after several turnings, enters the oceanbetween Sapelo and Wolf islands. The s. chan-nel, which is esteemed the largest and deepest.

after its separation from the >?. descends gently,,taking its course between MDntosh and Brough-ton islands, and at last by the w. coast of St.Simon’s sound, betAveen the s. end of the islandof that name, and the n. end of Jeky! island.At its confluence with the Atlantic it is 500 yardsAvide.]

ALAUSI, a province and small corregimientoor district of the kingdom of Quito ; bounded «. bythe province of Riobamba, n. w. by Chimbo, s.by Cuenca, w. by the district of Yaguache, ande. by that of Macas. It is Avatered by the riversUzogoche, Gussuntos, Pinancay, Alausi, andothers of less note. It abounds in mountains, themost lofty of Avhich are tOAvard the©.; the countryis pleasant, and yields liberally every kijid offruit and grain that are common either to Americaor Europe. It contains many sugar mills, andthe sugar is the best intlie kingdom. The air hereis mild and healthy, and the climate cannot be saidto be inconveniently hot. It is governed by thecorregidor, who resides in the capital.

Alausi, the capital of the above province. Ithas in its district some mineral fountains of hotwater, established with suitable conveniences bysome families of consideration residing there. Itstrade consists in cloths, baizes, and cotton gar-ments, Avhich are wrought in its manufactories.It has a very good parish church, and a conventof the order of St. Francis. [Lat. 2“ 12' «.Long. 78° 39' ©.]

[ALBANS, St. a township in Franklin county,Vermont, on lake Champlain, opposite N. Heroisland, Avith 256 inhabitants.]

ALBANIA, or Albany, a county of the pro-vince and colony of New York. It contains acertain number of plains fertile in grain, in AA'hich,and in planks of pine, its principal commerce con-sists. The Avinter is extremely cold, and the riverHudson is generally frozen for 100 miles, so a*to bear immense burthens. The gveat cpiautityof snow that falls at this season is useful, not onlybecause it covers the grain, and keeps it from perishing by the frost, but because, when it melts, itso increases the waters of the river, as to facilitatethereby the transportation of the productions ofthe country.

[Albany County Lies Between Ulster AndSaratoga ; Its Extent 46 Miles By 28|ALBANY County lies between Ulster andSaratoga ; its extent 46 miles by 28. By thestate census, .fan. 20, 1796, the number of elec-tors in this county were 6087, and the number oftowns 11.]

Albania, or Albany, the capital of theabove county, founded by the Dutch in 1608,together with tiiat of Orange, on the sliorc of theE 2

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and tonegimknio of Atacama in Peru, situate onthe coast.

ALGONQUINENSES, or Algonquins, anation of savage Indians, who inhabit a part ofCanada : they are continually at war with theIroqiiees. Their idiom may be looked upon asthe mother tongue of all the other nations of thatcountry, and differs very slightly from the rest,so that any one speaking it would be able totravel in any other nation in these parts. Theyborder o;i the north side of lake Huron; andalthough inhabiting the whole of the coast of lakeSuperior, their number, according to Mackenzie,does not exceed 150 families.

[ALGONQUINS, of Rainy Lake, Indians ofN. America, of the precise limits of whose coun-try we are not informed. They live very muchdetached in small parties. The country theyinhabit is but an indifferent one ; it has been muchhunted, and the game, of course, nearly exhaust-ed. They are well-disposed towards the whites.Their number is said to decrease. They are ex-tremely addicted to spirituous liquors, of whichlarge quantities are annually furnished them bythe n. w. traders, in return for their bark canoes.They live wretchedly poor.]

[Algonquins, of Portage de Prairie, In-dians of N. America, who inhabit a low, flat,marshy country, mostly covered with timber, andwell stocked with game. They are emigrantsfrom the lake of the Woods, and the country e. ofit ; who were introduced some years since by then, tc. traders, in order to hunt the country on thelower parts of Red river, which then aboundedin a variety of animals of the fur kind. They arean orderly, well-disposed people, but, like theirrelations on Rainy lake, addicted to spirituousliquors. Their trade is at its greatest extent.]

ALGUILGUA. See article Santa Monica;

ALllUE, a settlement of the province andcorregim'iento of Rancagua in the kingdom ofChile, annexed to the curacy of San Pedro.

Aliiue, a large lake of the same province andkingdom.

[ALIATANS, Snake Indians, ofN. America,a numerous and well disposed people, inhabitinga woody and mountainous country ; they aredivided into three large tribes, who wander ata considerable distance from each other, and arecalled by themselves So-so-na, So-s6-bubar, andI-a-kar ; these are again subdivided into smaller,though independent bands, the names of Avhich wehave not yet learnt : they raise a number of horsesand mules, with which they trade with the Crow In-dians, or which are stolen by the nations on the e. of

them. They maintain a partial trade with theSpaniards, from whom they obtain many articlesof clothing and ironmongery, but no warlike im-plements.]

[ALiATANs,of La Playes, Indians of N. Ame-rica, who inhabit the rich plains from the headof the Arkansas, embracing the heads of Redriver, and extending, with the mountains and highlands, e. as far as it is known towards the gulph ofMexico. They possess^ no fire arms, but arewarlike and brave. They are, as well as theother Aliatans, a wandering people. Their coun-try abounds in wild horses, beside great numberswhich they raise themselves. These people, andthe West Aliatans, might be induced to trade onthe upper part of the Arkansas river. The Alia-tans do not claim a country within any particularlimits.]

[Aliatans, of the West, Indians of N. Ame-rica, who inhabit a mountainous country, andsometimes venture in the plains e. of the rockymountains, about the head of the Arkansas river.They have more intercourse with the Spaniards ofNew Mexico than the Snake Indians. They aresaid to be very numerous and warlike, but arebadly armed. The Spaniards fear these people,and therefore take the precaution not to furnishthem with any warlike implements. In their pre-sent unarmed state, they frequently commit hos-tilities on the Spaniards. They raise a greatmany horses.]

ALLANTE, a volcano of the kingdom ofChile, in the province and country of Arauco ;in 1640 it burst, the mountain opening in twoplaces, and throwing out large shapeless masses oflava, with so great a noise as to be heard at manyleagues distance: the mischief it did was veryconsiderable.

ALIBAMONS, or Alibamis, a nation ofIndians of Louisiana, dwelling «. of the Apaches.It is very numerous, and is on terms of amity withthe French ; so that they never have communica-tion with the ihiglisli, but from necessity. Theformer, when they first established themselves inthis country, carried on a large trade here, but itafterwards declined, on account of the distance ofthe place. [These Indians are from West Florida,off’ the Allibami river, and came to Red riverabout the same time as the Boluxas and Appala-ches. Part of them have lived on Red river,about sixteen miles above the Bayau Rapide, tilllately, when most of this party, of about 30 men,went up Red river, and have settled themselvesnear the Caddoques, where, we are informed, theyhave lately raised good crops of corn. The Cad-

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Pichihua,

Yaura,

Marangani,

Tinta,

Pitumanca,

Surimana,

Langui,

Checa,

Asiento de Con-doroma,

Santuario de la Vir-gen de Huancani,

San Pedro de Cacha,

Combapata,

Pueblo Nuevo,

Santuario de Tan-gascucal,

Quehue,

Coporaque,

Candelaria.

Its repartimiento amounted to 112,500 dollars,and it paid 900 dollars yearly for alcavala. Thecapital is Tinta.

CANETE, a province and corregimiento ofPeru. Its jurisdiction begins six leagues s. ofLima, and extends as far as 35, following thecoast of the Pacific ocean. It is bounded on then. e. by the province of Huarochiri, on the e. byYauros, on the s. by Yca, on the s. e. by CastroVireyna, and on the w. by the sea. It is 31 leaguesin length from n. to s. and from eight to nine inwidth, from e. to w. It is watered by some streams,of which the most considerable are the Mala onthe n. which rises from the lake Huasca-cocha,in the province of Yauyos, and the Cañete. Onits coast are many small ports and bays, thoughvery insecure and of unequal bottom. It aboundsin wheat, maize, sugar-cane, and all sorts offruit. The lands of this province belong for themost part to noble families at Lima, with whichcapital it carries on a considerable trade in fish,(brought from the coast), in fruit and vegetables,salt procured from the salt grounds of Chielca,and in nitre brought from the town of Mala.Its corregidor used to have a repartimiento of124,000 dollars, and it paid 992 yearly for alca-vala. The settlements of this province are,

Cañete, San Pedro de Mala,

Chilca, Pacarán,

Calango, Almagro,

Chincha, Lunaguana,

Tanqui, Zuñiga.

Coillo,

Canete, a river of the same province, whichrises from the lake Tiell-cocha in Yauyos. Itruns to the w. and enters the sea near the Herbae.At its entrance are to be seen the remains of a fortwhich belonged to the Incas of Peru.

Canete, some islands near the coast of thesame province.

Canete, a port in the same province, fre-quented by small vessels. It is very confined andinsecure.

CANGREJILLOS, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucumán, and juris-

diction of Jujuy, situate on the shore of the riverLaquiaca.

CANGREJO, a large settlement of the sameprovince and government as the former, and ofthe same jurisdiction, situate likewise on the shoreof that river.

CANGREJOS, Island of the, lies at the en-trance of the river Orinoco, in its principal mouth,called Navios, on the n. side. Mr. Bellin callsit Cangray. It is small, and inhabited by CaribeeIndians.

CANI, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Huanuco in Peru, annexed to the cu-racy of Santa Maria del Valle.

(CANIADERAGO, a lake in Otsego county,New York, nearly as large as Otsego lake, andsix miles w. of it. A stream called Oaks creekissues from it, and falls into Susquehannah river,about five miles below Otsego. The best cheesein the state is said to be made on this creek.)

CANIBALES, or Caribes, a barbarous na-tion of Indians, who are, according to their name,cannibals, inhabiting the islands of the Antillesbefore they were taken and conquered by the Spa-nish, English, and French. There are few ofthese Indians at the present day inhabiting thoseislands ; the greater part are to be found in Domi-nica, which is entirely possessed by them ; theyadore a man who they affirm was uncreated, andthe first of all men, who descended from heaven,and was called Longuo, from whose navel wereborn other men , and some also from his legs, whichhe himself cleft open with a hatchet. With theManicheans, they believe in the two original causesof good and evil, and in the immortality of thesoul ; and whenever any one dies they bury withhim his slaves and servants, thinking they maybe of use to him in the other world. They arepolygamists, very cruel, but dexterous in the useof the bow and arrow ; they are to be found alsoin other parts of the continent. [See Caribes.]

(CANICODEO Creek, a s. w. head water ofTioga river in New York, which interlocks withthe head waters of Genessee river, and joins Co-nesteo creek 26 miles w. n. w. from the Paintedpost.)

CANICUARIS, a barbarous nation of Indians,who live scattered in the woods of Rio Negro tothe n. of Marañon. It is but little known.

CANIN, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chancay in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Canchas.

CANIS, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Caxatambo in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Tillos.

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Of Guadalupe, between the Three Rive*‘s and theAgujero del Ferro.

Carbet Point, on the s. coast of lake Superior,in New France, opposite the island of Philipeaux.

Carbet, a river of the island of Guadalupe,which tuns nearly e. and enters the sea betweenthe Grande and the Orange.

CARBON, Island of, situate in the middle ofa lake on the coast of the province and govern-ment of Buenos Ayres.

Carbon, Monte de, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Puchacay in the king-dom of Chile; situate upon the coast and on theshore of the bay of Culumo, near the mouth ofthe river Biobio.

CARBONIERE, a settlement of the island ofNewfoundland, situate on the e. coast, on theshore of the bay of Concepcion.

CARCAI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Lucanas in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Soras. It has a hot spring of water ofvery medicinal properties, and its heat is so greatthat an egg may be boiled in it in an instant.

CARCARANAL, a river of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres. It rises in the pro-vince of Tucuman, in the mountains of the cityof Cordoba, runs nearly from e. torw. with thename of Tercero, and changing it into Carcara-iial, after it becomes united Avith the Saladillo, joinsthe Plata, and enters the Salado and the Tres Hec-manas.

CARCAZI, a settlement of the government andJurisdiction of Pamplona in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, situate betAveen two mountains, whichcause its temperature to be very moderate. It pro-duces much Avheatand maize ; in its cold parts suchfruits as are peculiar to that climate, and in themilder parts sugar-cane. Its neighbourhoodabounds Avith flocks of goats ; and the number ofinhabitants may amount to about 200 Spaniardsand 30 Indians. It is situate on the confines Avhichdivide the jurisdictions of Tunja and Pamplona.

CARCHIPOR, a river of the province and go-vernment of Cayenne in the kingdom of TierraFirme. It rises in the mountains of the same pro-vince, and runs into the sea on the side of capeOra nge.

(CARDIGAN, about 20 miles e. of Dartmouthcollege, New Hampshire. The township ofOrange once bore this name, which see.)

CARDIN, a settlement of the province of Ve-nezuela and government of Maracaibo, situate onthe shore of the coast, in the interior of the gulfformed by the peninsula of cape San Roman.

CARDINALES, Sombreros de. See articlePitangoas.

CARDOSO, Real de, a settlement and realof gold mines in the province and captainship ofTodos Santos in Brazil; situate on the shore ofthe large river of San Francisco, to the n. of thevillage of Tapuyas.

CAREHANEU, a small river of Pennsylvania,which runs w. and enters the Ohio.

CAREN, a valley or meadow-land of the king-dom of Chile, renowned for its pleasantness, beauty,and extent, being five leagues in length; also fora fountain of very delicate and salutary water,which, penetrating to the soil in these parts, ren-ders them so exceedingly porous, that a person tread-ing somewhat heavily seems to shake the groundunder him. There is an herb found here that keepsgreen all the year round: it is small, resemblingtrefoil, and the natives call it caren: it is of a veryagreeable taste, and gives its name to the valley.

CARENERO, a bay of the coast of the king-dom of Tierra Firme in the province and govern-ment of Venezuela. It is extremely convenientfor careening and repairing ships, and from thiscircumstance it takes its name. It lies behind capeCodera towards the e.

CARET, Anse be, a bay of the island of St.Christopher, one of the Antilles, on the n. e. coast,and in the part possessed by the French beforethey ceded the island to the Englissh. It is be-tween the bays of Fontaine and Morne, or Fuenteand Morro.

=CARETI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Darien, and kingdom of Tierra Firme.It rises in the n. mountains, and enters the sea iathe bay of Mandinga.

CAREU, a settlement of the island of Barba-does, in the district of the parish of Christchurch.

CARGONACHO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Castro Vireyna in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Philpichaca.

CARGUAIRASO, a lofty mountain and vol-cano of the province and corregimiento of Rio-bamba in the kingdom of Quito. It is in the dis-trict of the asiento of Ambato, covered with snowthe whole year round. Its skirts are covered withfine crops of excellent barley. In 1698 this pro-vince was visited by a terrible earthquake, whichopened the mountain and let in a river of mud,formed by the snows which were melted by thefire of the volcano, and by the ashes it threw up.So dreadful were the effects of this revolution thatthe whole of the crops were completely spoiled ;and it was in vain that the cattle endeavoured to-

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escape the destruction which followed them where-ever they fled. Still are the vestiges of this cala-mity to be seen, and there are large quantities ofthis mud or lava, now become hard, scattered onthe s. side of the settlement.

CARHUA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Canta in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of its capital.

CARHUACAIAN, a settlement of the same pro-vince and corregimiento as the former ; annexedto the curacy of Pomacocha.

CARHUACALLANGA, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Jauja in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Chongos.

CARHUACUCHO, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Lucanas in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Laramate.

CARHUAMAIO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Tarma in Peru.

CARHUAPAMPA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru; an-nexed to the curacy of Lorenzo de Quinti.

Carhuapampa, another settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Cajatambo in the samekingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Hacas.

CARHUAZ, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huailas in Peru.

CARI, a river of the province and governmentof Cumaná in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. Itrises in the Mesa (Table-land) de Guanipa, andruns s. being navigable to the centre of the pro-vince, and enters the Orinoco near the narrowpart.

Cari, a settlement of the same province; oneof those under the care of the religious order of S.Francisco, missionaries of Piritu. It is situateon the shore of the former river.

CARIAI, a small river of the country of theAmazonas, in the part possessed by the Portuguese.It is by no means a considerable stream, runs n.and enters the Xingu.

CARIACO, a large gulf of the coast of TierraFirme, in the province and government of Curnana.It is also called, Of Curnana, from this -capital beingbuilt upon its shores. The bajr runs 10 or 12leagues from w. to c. and is one league toroad atits widest part. It is from 80 to 100 fathomsdeep, and the waters are so quiet as to resemblerather the waters of a lake than those of the ocean.It is surrounded by the serramasy or lofty chainsof mountains, which shelter it from all winds ex-cepting that of the n. e. which, blowing on it as itwere through a straitened and narrow passage,it accustomed to cause a swell, especially from 10

m the morning until five in the evening, after whichall becomes calm. Under the above circumstances,the larger vessels ply to windward ; and if thewind be very strong, they come to an anchor outhe one or other coast, and wait till the evening,when the land breezes spring up from the s. e. Inthis gulf there are some good ports and bays, viz.the lake of Obispo, of Juanantar, of Gurintar,and others.

Cariaco, a river of the same province and go-vernment, taking its rise from many streams andrivulets which rise in the serrania, and unite be.fore they flow into the valley of the same Uame.After it has run some distance over the plain, it iscut off' to water some cacao plantations, and thenempties itself into the sea through the former gulf.In the winter great part of the capital, which issituate upon its banks, is inundated, and the riveris tlien navigated by small barks or barges ; but inthe summer it becomes so dry that there is scarce-ly water sufficient to nqvigate a canoe.

Cariaco, a small city of the same province,situate on the shore of the gulf. [This city (ac-cording to Depons) bears, in the official papersand in the courts of justice, the name of San Fe-lipe de Austria. The population is only 6500,but every one makes such a good use of his timeas to banish misery from the place. The produc-tion most natural to the soil is cotton, the beautyof which is superior to that of all Tierra Firme.This place alone furnishes annually more than3000 quintals ; and besides cacao they grow a littlesugar. Lat. 10° SO' n. Long. 63° 39' w.

(CARIACOU is the ehief of the small isles de-pendent on Granada island in the West Indies;situate four leagues from isle Rhonde, which is alike distance from the «. end of Granada. It con-tains 6913 acres of fertile and well cultivated land,producing about 1,000,000 lbs. of cotton, be-sides corn, yams, potatoes, and plaintains for theNegroes. It has two singular plantations, and atown called Hillsborough.)

CARIAMANGA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Loxa in the kingdom ofQuito.

CARIATAPA, a settlement which belonged tothe missions of the regular order of the Jesuits, inthe province of Topia and kingdom of Nueva Viz-caya ; situate in the middle of the sierra of thisname, and on the shore of the river Piastla.

CARIBABARE, a small settlement which be-longed to the missions of the regular order of thsJesuits, in the province and government of SanJuan de los Llanos of the new kingdom of Granada.

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tive of Barcelana, a celebrated engineeer; also re-nowned in the constructing of the land-gate or en-trance to Cadiz : he was promoted to this govern-ment for the purpose of inspecting and repairingthe towers which had been destroyed by AdmiralVernon, which commission, after he had executed,he returned to Spain in 1755, and died director-general of the body of engineers.

61. Don Fernando Morillo Velarde, knight ofthe order of Alcantara, colonel of infantry, at thattime king’s lieutenant, when he received the go-vernment on account of the proprietor having goneto fortify the town of Portobelo.

62. Don Diego Tabares, knight of the order ofSantiago, brigadier-general ; promoted to this go-vernment from that of Camana in 1755, and go-verned till 1761, when arrived his successor,

63. Don Joseph de Sobremonte, Marquis of thisname, a brigadier, who was captain of the regimentof Spanish guards when he was nominated : he go-verned till 1770, when he died.

64. Don Gregorio de Sierra, also captain of gre-nadiers of the express regiment of Spanish guards ;he entered Cartagena in 1771, and died in 1774.

65. Don Juan Pimienta, colonel of the regi-ment of the infantry of Zamora, in rank a briga-dier, and knight of the distinguished order ofCharles III. ; he entered into the possession of thegovernment in 1774, and died in 1781.

66. Don Roque de Quiroga, king’s lieutenant ofthe fortified town, or Plaza ; promoted as provincialgovernor through the death of his antecessor, un-til arrived, under the king’s appointment, the pro-prietor,

67. Don Joseph de Carrion y Andrade, a bri-gadier, who before had been governor of thePlaza of Manilla, and had rendered himself re-nowned when it was besieged by the Emperor ofMarruecos, being nominated to this government in1774 : he died in 1785.

Cartagena, a river of the province and go-vernment of Choco : it rises in the mountains ofthis province nearthe settlement of Noanama, andenters the sea imimediately at the cape of Corri-entes.

Cartagena, a plain of the province and cor-regimiento of Maule in the kingdom of Chile,close to the port of San Antonio.

CARTAGO, a city of the province and go-vernment of Popayan, founded by the BrigadierGeorge Robledo in 1540, who gave it this name,with the dedicatory title of San Juan, his patron;the greater part of the military in it having comefrom the city of Cartagena in Europe. It did liebetween the rivers Otun and Quindio; but the

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continual invasions it has experienced from thePijaos and Pimaes Indians, who are a bold andwarlike people, determined its inhabitants to re-move it at the end of the I7th century to the spotwhere it now stands ; having bought for that pur-pose some land of Tomasa Izquierdo, on the bankof an arm of the river of La Vieja, which is alarge stream, and navigable for canoes and rafts,and which is at the distance of rather better thana quarter of a mile from the large river Cauca,into which the above river enters, forming beforethe city an island, which abounds in animals of thechase, and in cattle, and having on its banks ex-cellent fishing. This city is of a dry and healthyclimate ; and although hot, the atmosphere is al-ways clear and serene. It is situate upon a leveland somewhat elevated plain , of beautiful appear-ance ; the streets are spacious, wide and straight.It has a very large grand square. Its buildingsare solid and of good structure, and universallyroofed over with straw, having, however, the wallsof solid stone from the top to the bottom ; othersare built of brick, and others with rafters of wood,the walls being of clay, (which they call imbulidoSyor inlaid), so solid as to resist the force of the mostviolent earthquakes, as was experienced in onethat happened in 1785. At a small distance fromthe city are various lakes or pools of water, whichthey call denegas, formed by nature, assisted byart. It is the residence of the lieutenant-gover-nor of the government of Popayan, of two ordi-nary alcaldes, two of La Hermandad, two member*of an inferior court, a recorder, a procurator-gene-ral, a major domo de propiosy and six regidors^the cabildo enjoying the privilege of electing andconfirming these officers yearly. It has also a bat-talion of city militia, and two disciplined compa-nies ; also some royal cofiers, which were broughtfrom the city of Anserma. Besides the church ofMatriz, in which is venerated, as the patroness, theHoly Virgin, under the image of Nuestra Senorade la Paz, (this being the pious gift of PhilipIII.) it has five parishes, viz. Santa Ana, SantaBarbara, Llano de Buga, Naranjo, Micos, andPueblo de los Cerritos. The territory is extremelyfertile and pleasant, abounding as well in fruitsand pulse as in birds of various sorts ; and in nopart whatever are plantains so various, or of sofine a quality. Tlie coffee is good, and the cacao,which is of two sorts, is excellent, and is calledyellow and purple hayna. Of no less estimationis the tobacco, with which a great traffic wasformerly carried on at Choco. The district of thiscity abounds in trees, medicinal herbs and fruits,and in an exquisite variety of cacao plants; also

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Were Held by the Jesuits, in the province and go-vernment of Paraguay ; situate almost to the s, ofVilla Rica.

CASA-PIEDRA, Isla De, an island of thecoast and kingdom of Brazil, and province andcaptainship of the Rio Janeiro, close to Cape Frio.

CASA-PIEDRA, a settlement of this province andkingdom ; situate near the coast and upon the shoreof a river thus called.

Casa-Piedra, a river which runs s. s. e. in thisprovince, and joins the sea very near Cape Frio.

==CASAPOEIRA, Bahia de, or De BarrerasBermejas==, a bay on the coast and in the captain-ship of Marañon, arid kingdom of Brazil, betweenthe islands Ygirapa and Sipatuba.

CASARA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Andahuailas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Chincheros.

Casara, another settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Vilcas Huaman, also of Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Hualla.

CASARANI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Condesuyos de Arequipa inPeru.

CASARIDA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Maracaibo ; situate on the coast, atthe mouth of the river of its name.

Casarida. This river rises near the coast, runsn. and enters the sea.

CASAS-GRANDES, an extensive and beautifulvalley of the province of Los Apaches in NuevaEspaña.

CASAUATAI, a river of the province andcountry of the Amazonas : it rises from the lake ofthe Gran Cocama, in 6 ° 48' s. hit. runs to the s. ofthe Maraiion, and following its course towards then. for more than 25 leagues, runs e. to enter theUcayale on its e. side, and afterwards to receivethe waters of the Zapofe.

CASCABAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Andahuailas in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Talavera.

CASCABELES, a river of the province andcorregimiento of Pastos in the kingdom of Quito :it rises near the ruins of the city of Simancas, andenters the river Caqueta, where are also the ruinsof the city of Mocoa.

CASCADE, a small river of country and landof Labrador : it runs s. between the rivers Bois andSan Francisco, and enters the sea in the strait ofBellisle.

CASCAJAL, a river of the province and king-dom of Tierra Firme : it rises in the mountains ofPortovelo, and runs into the sea through the bay ofthis city.

Cascajal, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Cartagena ; situate on the shore of theriver Cauca, in the district and jurisdiction of thetown of Mompox.

CASCAJO, ISLA DEL, an island of the coast ofthe province and government of Cartagena, close tothe island of Arenas.

Cascajo, a point of the s. coast of the island ofSanto Domingo, in the French possessions : it liesbetween port Nonet and port Salud.

CASCARA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Parinacochas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Lampa.

CASCAS, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Conturnaza ; in the district of whichthere is, at three leagues distance, a large piece ofhewn stone of 13 yards long and three quarters of ayard wide on every face, particularly rough andunpolished.

Cascas, a large swamp of the province and go-vernment of San Juan de los Llanos, which isformed from different arms of the rivers Sarare andApure, and communicates itself with the lake ofArechona ; both of these lakes being near the lastriver, and at the skirt of ihe paramo or mountain de-sert of Chisgas.

CASCAY, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Paucartambo in Peru.

CASCAYUNCA, an ancient province of Peru, tothe n. e. of Cuzco, conquered by Tupac Yupanqui,twelfth Emperor.

(CASCO Bay, in the district of Maine, spreadsn. w. between cape Elizabeth on the s. w. and capeSmall Point on the n. e. Within these points,which are about 40 miles apart, are about 300 smallislands, some of which are inhabited, and nearlyall more or less cultivated. The land on theseislands, and on the opposite coast on the main, isthe best for agriculture of any on the sea-coast ofthis country. Casco includes several bays. Maquoitbay lays about 20 miles n. of cape Elizabeth. Thewaters of Casco extend several arms or creeks ofsalt water into the country. The waters go upMeadow’s river, where vessels of a considerablesize are carried by the tide, and where it flowswithin one mile of the waters of Kennebeck. Onthe e. side of cape Elizabeth is the arm of the seacalled Stroudwater. Farther e. is Presumpscotriver, formerly called Presumpea, or Presumpkeag,which rises in Sebago Pond. This river opens tothe waters of Casco bay on the e. of Portland ; itsextent is not great, but it has several valuable millsupon it. Rayal’s river, called by the nativesW estecustego, falls into the bay six miles from

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(Catherine’s Isle, a pleasant island on theharbour of Sunburj, in the state of Georgia.)

(Cathehine’s Isle, a small productive islandon the s. coast of St. Domingo, 20 leagues e. ofthe town of St. Domingo.)

(CATHERINE's Town, in Ontario county, NewYork, lies three miles s. of the 5 . end of Senecaake.)

Catilina, a bay of tlie e. coast of the island ofNewfoundland, between the capes Santos andNuevo.

(CATO, a military township in New York state,12 miles s. e. of lake Ontario, and about 20 s. ofOswego fort.)

CATOA, a river of the province and country ofLas Amazonas. It rises in tlie mountains of theAndes, runs n. and enters the Marailon on the s.side, between the rivers Coari and Coyame.

(==CATORCE, or La Purissima ConcepcionDe Alamos de Catorce==, one of the richest minesof New Spain, and in the intendancy of San LuisPotosi. The real de Catorce, however, has onlybeen in existence since 1773, when Don SebastianCoronado and Don Bernarbe Antonio de Zepedadiscovered these celebrated seams, which yield an-nually the value of more than from 18 to ^20 mil-lions of francs, or from 730,460/. to 833,500/.sterling.)

(CATTAHUNK, one of the Elizabeth isles, inthe state of Massachusetts. See Buzzard’sBay.)

CATUARO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Cumaná in the kingdom of TierraFirme ; situate near to and s. of the city of Ca-riaco.

CAUACUAN, a river of the province and cap-tainship of Rey in Brazil. It runs e. and entersthe Uruguay, between the rivers Ipau and Pi-ricaya.

CAUAIAMA, a small river of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres. It runs e. and en-ters the Uruguay, between the rivers Guarey andBracuaenda.

CAUAILLON, a settlement and parish of theFrench, in their possessions in St. Domingo ; situ-ate on the coast and at the w. head, near the bayof its name, between the settlements of Torbec andLos Cayos.

CAUAIU, a small river of the same provinceand government as the former. It runs w. andenters the Parana, between the rivers Verde andYocare-mini.

Cauaiu, a bay of the same island, opposite theIsla Vaca or Cow island.

CAUALA, a settlement of the province and cap-iainship of Espiritu Santo in Brazil ; situate > 1 . ofVillarica.

CAU-ALLERIZAS, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Yaguarsongo in the king-dom of Quito.

CAUANA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Conchucos in Peru.

CAUASAN, San Francisco Xavier de, atown of the province of Copala, and kingdom ofNueva Vizcaya ; situate in the midst of the sierraof Topia, on the coast of the S. sea, on the shoreof the river Plastin. It has a small port for lesservessels, which has oftentimes been invaded byenemies. It is a curacy administered by the cler-gy, and to which two small settlements of MexicaaIndians are annexed.

CAUCA, a large and copious river of the pro-vince and government of Popayán, which risesin the mountains of the government of Mariquita,and running 160 leagues from s. to?i. in whichcourse it collects the ’waters of many other rivers,it passes near the cities of Popaj'iin, Buga, Cali,and Anserma ; from whence it is navigable until itenters the large river of the Magdalena. It is verynarrow where it passes through the cities of Po-payan and Antioquia, and forms the letter S, tak-ing its course through rocks, which render its na-vigation very dangerous. The Indians, however,are so dexterous in guarding their canoes fromrunning against the rocks by paddles, that it isvery seldom indeed that any accident occurs tothem. They call this strait Las Mamas de Cara-manta, from a city which was here of this name.Many make this navigation for the purpose ofavoiding a round-about journey of many days, andin a bad road through the mountains ; and it issaid that some have had the good fortune to dis-cover a route by water free from all difficulties,and that this was actually made by the pontificateof the bishop of Popayan, Don Diego de Mon-toy.

Cauca, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela. It runs n. and entersthe sea at the mouth of the Golfete or Littlegulf.

CAUCAQUA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Venezuela ; situate near the riverTuy, opposite the cape of Codera.

CAUCHUPIL, a river of the kingdom of Chile;it runs to the s. s. e. and then turning s. enters theLebo.

CAUIAN, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Para in Brazil ; situate on the

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from six to 20 feet diameter, worn almost perfectlysmooth, into the solid body of a rock.]

(CAVIANA, an island in S. America, towardsthe n. w. side of Amazon river. Lat. 30' n.)

(CAVOGLIERO, a bay on the side of theisland of St. Domingo, at the mouth of the riverRomaine, 24 leagues e. of St. Domingo.)

CAXABAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Riobamba in the kingdom ofQuito.

Caxabamba, another settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huamachuco in Peru.

CAXACAI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru.

CAXAMARCA, a province and corregimientoof Peru, in the bishopric of Truxillo ; boundeds. e. by the province of Caxamarquilla, e. by thatof Chachapoyas, n.w. by that of Luya and Chil-Igos : all these three being situate at that part oft^e Maranon which serves as a limit to this pro-vince of Caxamarca. It is bounded ». by the pro-vince of Jaen, n. w. by that of Piura, w. by thatof Saha and by a part of Truxillo, and s. by thatof Huamachuco. It is in length 40 leagues froms. e. ion. w. ; and in breadth, or across, 36 leagues.To enter it through the province of Truxillo, whichis the grand road, it is necessary to pass the cordil-lera, which is not here so lofty as in the s. pro-vinces. This province, however, abounds witheminences which are branches of the cordillera;and on account of the height and situation ofthese, a great variety of temperature is experienced,some parts being subject to an intense heat, andothers to , a severe cold. Thus it partakes of thenature of the sierra, and its uneven figure no lesscorresponds with it : but it is for the most part of agood temperature, particularly in the capital. Theprovince abounds greatly in all kinds of fruits andcattle : in it are fabricated cloths, baizes, blankets,canvas for sails of ships, and cotton garments of aVery fine and excellent quality. Formerly its prin-cipal commerce was in swine ; at present it is not,though these animals still abound in some parts.It is watered by many rivers, of which those risingon the w. side of the cordillera, as the Sana, Lam-bay eque, and those passing through the provinceof Truxillo, all enter the S. sea. The others,amongst which that of the Criznejas is the largest,incoporate themselves with the Maranon. On itsshores are lavaderos, or washing-places of gold;and its rivers in general abound in very good andwholesome fish. Besides the fruits and the pro-ductions of every kind found in this province, ithas to boast many gold and silver mines, some ofwhich are worked. There a e also some of copper,

very fine lead, brimstone, and alcaparrosa. To-wards the n. part, where it touches the province ofJaen, are found some bark-trees, the production ofwhich, although not equal to the trees of Loxa, isof the colour of heated copper, and possesses allthe virtues of the common bark. Here are alsomany medicinal herbs, and amongst them the cele-brated calagimla. In the time of the Indians, andbefore the conquest, it was so well peopled that itsnatives formed upwards of 500 settlements. Atpresent they amount to 46,000, being divided into46 settlements. The capital bears the same title,and the repartimiento of the corregidor used toamount to 80,000 dollars, and it paid an alcavalaof 640 dollars per annum.

The settlements are.

Caxamarca, the ca-pital,

Santa Catalina,

San Pedro,

San Joseph,Cherillo,

Jesus,

Asuncion,

Contumaza,

Cascas,

Guzrnanga,

San Benito,

Trinidad de Chetu,S. Francisco doCay an,

Santa Cruz,

Pion,

Santa Catalina deChugod,

San Pablo de Cha-lique,

S. Luis de Tuniba-din,

S. Bernardino de

S. Juan de Llallan,Nepos,

Tinguis,

San Miguel de Pal-laques,

Celedin,

Sorocucho,

San Marcos,Catacachi,Amarcucho,Ichocan,

San Juan de Huam-bos,

Cochabamba,

Llama,

Cachen,

Cutervo,

Queracoto,

Chachopin,

Tocmocha,

Zocota,

Todos Santos deChota,Tacabamba,Yauyucan.

its figure is

Nice,

The capital is large and handsomeirregular, and it is situate upon a level plainT Thehouses are of clay, and the streets are wide andstraight. The parish church, Avhich has threenaves, is of finely worked stone, and the buildingexpences of it Avere defrayed by King Charles II.in the time of the viceroy the Duke of La Palata,in 1682. It has a parish of Spaniards, calledSanta Catalina ; two of Indians, which are SanPedro and San Joseph ; two convents of the orderof St. Francis, one of the Observers, and anotherof the Recoletans ; an hospital and a convent ofBethlemites, a monastery of nuns of La Concepcion,an house of entertainment of Nuestra Senora de

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another whose note resembles atrumpet. It aboundsin quadrupeds, as mules, horses, and cattle of thelarge and small kind, the antas, which is calledhere gran bestia^ (great beast), huanacos, vicunas,llamas, or native sheep, stags, bears, ant-eaters,wild bears, otters, tigers, mountain cats, visca-chas, (or large hares), large and small foxes, tor-toises, higuanos, and others ; all of which affordfood to tlie voracious Indians. In this provinceare also found many insects, such as scorpions,vipers, snakes of several kinds, some of two heads,and some with rattles, squirrels, mocamucas, am-palabas, or what are called in other countries owls,which are extremely deformed, and attract smallanimals to them by their screeching, quiriquinchosof various sorts, glow-worms, a great variety offlies and spiders, and of these a large kind veryvenomous, silk-worms, Avhich, if taken care of,would yield an abundance of silk, locusts, Avhichare eaten by the Indians both dry and fresh ; also ants,the beds of which are so deep as to render the roaddangerous for men and for horses to pass, theseinsects being of such an undaunted and trouble-some nature as often to attack a viper or locust inlarge bodies, and in some settlements to enter ahouse like a plundering army, devouring every in-sect and worm in their way, not leaving a singleeatable thing untouched ; scarcely shall these havefinished their operations, but they are succeeded byanother band, and indeed it is very liazardous todisturb them, since they bite very fiercely andcause much pain. This province has no mines,although it is said that formerly some were workedby the Indians ; some little time since, however,one of iron was discovered, when it was thought tohave been of gold. This extensive and pleasantcountry is inhabited by a multitude of infidel In-dians, of different nations and of various barbarouscustoms. It was casually discovered in 1586 byJuan de Banos, a native of Chuquisaca, a factorof the settlement of Yala ; he had an Indian slavewho used frequently to run away from his masterfor a time and return again, and who being askedonce whither he went, replied toChacu; this itAvas tliat led to its discovery, and to the subse-•quent attempts at several times made to conquerit; first by Martin de Ledesma, afterwards by.Tuan Manso, Don Pedro Lasarte, and lastly byD >11 Christoval de Sanabri, all of which were in-effectual. San Francisco Solano entered the coun-try, and succeeded in reducing some of the nativesto the Christian faith ; these, however, soon re-turned to their idolatry. The regulars of the com-pany of Jesuits likewise engaged themselves in thereduction of this country in 1587, the first of their

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preachers here being Father Alonzo Barzana,called the apostle of Peru ; they continued herefor a number of years, and during their stayfounded seven settlements. The inhabitants ofthe whole province are computed at 100,000.Catalogue of the nations which inhabit Chaco.

Chiriguanas,

Abayas,

Churumutas,

Yapayaes,

Mataguayos,

Niguaraas,

Tobas,

Ivirayaras,

Macobies,

Socondues,

Aquilotes,

Marapanos,

Malbalaes,

Cipores,

Agoyas,

Ayusequeteres,

Amulalaes,

Cororaetes,

Palomos,

Taparunas,

Lules,

Bayatuis,

Toconotes,

Layanos,

Toquistineses,

Payaguas,

Tanuyes,

Poreromos,

Chunipies,

ChilacutiquieSj

Bilelas,

Chiquinos,

Yxistineses,

Gortonos,

Oristineses,

Humayonos,

Guamalcas,

Tainuyes,

Zapitalaguas,

Tracanos,

Ojotaes,

Tobotionos,

Chiebas,

Pildoris

Orejones,

Caramais,

Guaicurues,

Perequanos,

Callagaes,

Cucroyenos,

Calchaquies,

Bocaracanas,

Abipones,

Xolotas,

Teutas,

Curetes,

Palalis,

Upionos,

Huarpas,

Morionos,

Tanos,

Bocoos,

Mogosnas,

Motitis,

Choroties,

Corotonos,

Naparus,

Guanas,

Chiribionos.

(Chaco, a large plain of the above province,in which Azara noticed a singular phenomenon,which he calls a large piece of pure iron, flexibleand malleable in the forge, but at the same timeso hard as not to be cut, though obedient to thefile. It contains about 468 cubic feet, and lieson the surface of the large plain of Chaco, on whichnot a single stone excepting this is to be found ;and what is still more curious, there is no volcanowithin 300 leagues, nor any iron mine to be heardof in that part of tho country.)

CHACOCHE, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Sirca.

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CHACOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tarma in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Huariaca.

CHACOTA,a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Aricá in Peru ; situate close to theQuebada de Victor.

CHACRALLA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Lucanas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Abucara.

CHACRAPAMPA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Andahuailas in Peru ; annex-ed to the curacy of Huayama.

CHACTAHATCHE, a river of S. Carolina,which runs s. and enters the Chicachas.

CHACTAW, a settlement and capital of theIndian district of this name in Louisiana, in whichthe French had a fort and establishment. (TheChactaws, or Flat-heads, are a powerful, hardy,subtle, and intrepid race of Indians, "vpho inhabita very fine and extensive tract of hilly country,with large and fertile plains intervening, betweenthe Alabama and Mississippi rivers, and in the w.part of the state of Georgia. This natioti had,not many years ago, 43 towns and villages, inthree divisions, containing 12,123 souls, of which4041 were fighting men. They are called by thetraders Flat-heads, all the males having the foreand hind part of their skulls artificially flattenedwhen young. These men, unlike the Muscogul-ges, are slovenly and negligent in every part oftheir dress, but otherwise are said to be ingenious,sensible, and virtuous men, bold and intrepid, yetquiet and peaceable. Some late travellers, how-ever, have observed that they pay little attentionto the most necessary rules of moral conduct, atleast that unnatural crimes were too frequent amongthem. Dift'erent from most of the Indian nationsbordering on the United States, they have largeplantations or country farms, where they employmuch of their time in agricultural improvements,after the manner of the Avhite people. Althoughtheir territories are not one-fburth so large as thoseof the Muscogulge confedraey, the number of in-habitants is greater. The Chactaws and Creeksare inveterate enemies* to each other. There area considerable number of these Indians on the w.side of the Mississippi, who have not been homefor several years. A bout 12 miles above the postat Oachcta on that river, there is a small villageof them of about 30 men, who have lived there forseveral years, and made corn ; and likewise onBayau Chico, in the n. part of the district ofAppalousa, there is another village of them ofabout fifty men, who have been there for aboutnine years, and say they have the governor of

Louisiana’s permission to settle there. Besidesthese, there are rambling hunting parties of themto be met with all over Lower Louisiana. Theyare at war with the Caddoques, and liked by. neither red nor white people.)

(Chactaw Hills, in the n. w. corner of Georgiariver.)

(CHACTOOS, Indians of N. America, wholive on Bayau Boeuf, about 10 miles to the s. ofBayau Rapide, on Red river, towards Appalousa ;a small, honest people ; are aborigines of thecountry where they live; of men about 30 ; di-minishing; have their own peculiar tongue;speak Mobilian. The lands they claim on BayauBceuf are inferior to no part of Louisiana in depthand richness of soil, growth of timber, pleasant-ness of surface, and goodness of water.. TheBayau Bceuf falls into the Chaffeli, and dischargesthrough Appalousa and Attakapa into Vermilionbay.)

CHACURIES, a settlement of the jurisdictionof the city of Pedraga, in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, is of the missions which were held thereof the order of St. Domingo. It is but small, andits climate is hot.

(CHADBOURNE’S River, district of Maine,called by some Great Works river, about 30 milesfrom the mouth of the Bonnebeag pond, fromwhich it flows. It is said to have taken its lattername from a mill with 18 saws, moved by onewheel, erected by one Lodors. But the projectwas soon laid aside. The former name is derivedfrom Mr. Chadbourne, one of the first settlers,,who purchased the land on the mouth of it, of thenatives, and whose posterity possess it at this day.)

CHAGONAMIGON, a point on the s. coastof lake Superior, in New France.

CHAGRE, a large and navigable river of theprovince and government of Panamá in the king-dom of Tierra Firme, has its origin and sourcein the mountains near the valley of Pacora, andtakes its course in various directions, makingmany windings, which are called randa/es, until itenters the N. sea. It is navigated by large vesselscalled chatas, (having no keels), up as far as thesettlement of Cruces, where is the wharf for un-lading, and the royal custom-houses ; the greaterpart of the commerce being conducted by thismeans, to avoid the obstacles occurring from a badand rocky road from Portobeloto Panama. It hasdifferent forts for the defence of its entrance ; thefirst is the castle of its name, at the entrance ormouth ; the second is that of Gatun, situate upona long strip of land formed by a river of this name ;and the third is that of Trinidad, situate in a simb

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de Granada, rises in the valley of Cerinza, runsn. and passing tlirough the city of San Gil, turnsto the w. and enters the Suarez or Sabandija.

CHALCAXINGO, a settlement of the headsettlement of Xonacatepéc, and alcaldía mayor ofCuernavaca, in Nueva España.

CHALCHILGUITES, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Nueva Vizcaya; situateclose to that of Sombrerete.

CHALCHITLAN, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldia mayor of Capanabastla in the king-dom of Guatemala.

CHALCO, Hamanalco, a district and alcal-día mayor of Nueva España ; situate between then. and s. of the city of Mexico, at eight leaguesdistance ; is very fertile, and abounds in produc-tions and the necessaries of life, especially in wheatand maize; the crops of the former usually amount to30,000 (argas (a measure containing four bushels)yearly, and of the latter to 25,000. Besides thisit produces great quantities of seeds, woods, sugar,honey, and the fruits of a hot climate, all ofwhich arc carried to Mexico, as well by land car-riage as by the lake, which is so favourable to itscommerce. In the sierra of the volcano of thisjurisdiction, there are silver mines, but they arenot worked, on account of the great expence. Thepopulation consists of 46 settlements, of which 16are head settlements of districts, and in 15 of thesethere are parish churches. Tlie capital is of thesame name, and it is situate on the shore of a lakeenjoying a mild temperature, and well knownfrom the fair which it celebrates every Fridaythroughout the year, to which flock a great num-ber of people from the neighbouring provinceswith merchandize ; some even coming from themost distant parts in canoes by the lake, or withdroves of mules on land. It lies between the riversFiamanalco and Tenango, which run into thelake, and the waters of this serve, when it is ne-cessary, to replenish the lake of Mexico, forwhich purpose there are proper sluices provided.It contains 350 families of Indians, and someSpaniards and Mustees ; is seven leagues fromMexico. The other settlements are,

Fiamanalco, Atlautla,

San Pedro de Ecazingo, Ayapango,

Tepozozolco, Ixtapalucan,

San Juan Tenango, Ayozingo,

Amecameca, Mexquique,

Zentlalpan, Hahuac,

Chimalhuacan, Themamatla,

Tepetuxpan, Ozumba.

CHALCO, with the dedicatory title of SanAgustin, another settlement of the head settle-

ment of Coxcotlan, and the alcaldia mayor of Val-les, in the same kingdom ; annexed to the curacyof Aquismon ; is of an extremely hot and moisttemperature, on account of which it has beenabandoned by several Indian families who residedin it formerly ; 12 of these families only are nowremaining ; is 23 leagues from its capital.

CHALCO, another, of the head settlement andalcaldia mayor of Zochicoatlan ; situate in theplain of a deep break or hole made by mountainfloods ; is of a hot temperature, and contains 35families of Indians ; lies 12 leagues to the n. of itscapital.

(Chalco Lake. See Mexico.)

CHALCOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Lucanas in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Cahuanca.

CHALEUAPAN, a settlement of the provinceand government of Nicaragua in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CHALEURS, a bay on the coast of the pro-vince of Nova Scotia or Acadia, and gulf of St.Lawrence. It is large and convenient.

CHALEURS, another bay on the s. coast of theisland of Newfoundland, near the point whichlooks to the w.

(CHALEURS, a deep and broad bay on the w.side of the gulf of St. Lawrence. From this bayto that of Verte, on the s. in the s. e. corner of thegulf, is the n. e. sea line of the British provinceof New Brunswick.)

CHALINGA, a settlement of Indians of theprovince and corregimiento of Coquimbo in thekingdom of Chile.

CHALIQUE, San Pablo de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Caxamarca inPeru.

CHALLABAMBA, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Paucartambo in Peru.

CHALLACATA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Paria in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Garu Mendoza.

CHALLACOLLO, a settlement of the sameprovince and corregimiento as the former, belong-ing to the archbishopric of Charcas. It has a con-vent of monks of the order of St. Augustin.

CHALLAHUACHO, a river of the provinceand corregimiento of Chilques y Masques in Peru.It rises near the settlement of Capi, runs in a ser-pentine course to the n. n. w. and enters the Apu-rirnac.

CHALLANA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

CHALLAPAMPA an ancient province ofPeru, of small extent, and to the c. of Cuzco. It

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20. Don Ignacio de Flores, native of Quito,who had served as captain of cavalry in the regi-ment of the volunteers of Aragon, and who was go-vernor of the province of Moxos, being of the rankof colonel ; he was nominated as president by wayof reward for his services, in having been instru-mental to the pacification of the Indians of Peru,and to the succouring of the city of La Paz, whichwas besieged by rebels : he governed until 1786,when he was removed from the presidency.

Charcas, a ferocious and barbarous nation ofIndians of Peru, to the s.w. of the lakes of Aul-laga and of Paria ; conquered by Mayta Capac,fourth monarch of the Incas. At present theyare reduced to the Christian faith in the govern-ment of Chuquisaca or La Plata.

Santa Maria Charcas, a settlement, with the dedicatory titleof Santa Maria, being the real of the mines of thekingdom of Nueva Galicia, in which are markedthe boundaries of its jurisdiction, and those ofNueva Espana, the last district of the bishopric ofMechoacan. It contains a convent of the religi-ous order of St. Francis, and 50 families of Spa-niards, ilfwstees, and Mulattoes, as also many of In-dians dispersed in the rancherias and the estatesof its district: is 130 leagues to the n. J to then. w. of Mexico, 75 from Guadalaxera, and 18 tothe n. e. of the sierra of Pinos. Lat. 22° 55'.Long. 100° 40'.

Charcas, another settlement and real of themines of the province of Copala, and kingdom ofNueva Vizcaya ; situate two leagues from thecapital. In its vicinity are the estates of Panuco,in which they work with quicksilver the metals ofthe mines. To its curacy, which is adminsteredby one of the Catholic clergy, are annexed twosmall settlements of Serranos Indians, amongst whomare found some few of the Tepeguana nation.

CHARIMIZA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Mainas in the kingdom of Quito.It rises in the cordillera towards the s. and entersthe Maranon.

(CHARLEMONT, a township in Hampshirecounty, Massachusets, 16 miles w. of Deerfield,having 665 inhabitants.)

(Charles, a cape on the s.w. part of the straitentering into Hudson’s bay. Lat. 62° 40' n.Long. 75° 15' w.)

Charles, a small lake of New France, to then. of the city of Quebec, which empties itself intothe river St. Lawrence.

Charles, another cape or point of the coast ofthe country of Labrador ; one of those which formthe w. entrance or mouth of the strait of Belle-isle.

(Charles River, in Massachusetts, called an-ciently Quinobequin, is a considerable stream,the principal branch of which rises from a pondbordering on Hopkinton. It passes through Hollis-ton and Bellingham, and divides Medway fromMed field, Wrentham, and Franklin, and thenceinto Dedham, where, by a curious bend, it forms apeninsula of 900 acres of land. A stream calledlother brook runs out of this river in this town,and falls into Neponsit river, forming a naturalcanal, uniting the two rivers, and affording a num-ber of excellent mill-seats. From Dedham thecourse of the river is n. dividing Newton fromNeedham, Weston, and Waltham, passing overromantic falls ; it then bends to the n. e. and e.through Watertown and Cambridge, and passinginto Boston harbour, mingles with the waters ofMystic river, at the point of the peninsula ofCharlestown. It is navigable for boats to Water-town, seven miles. The most remarkable bridgeson this river are those which connect Boston withCharlestown and Cambridge. SeeBosxoN. Thereareseven paper mills on this river, besides other mills.][Charles County, on the w. shore of Maryland,lies between Potowmack and Patuxent rivers. Itschief town is port Tobacco, on the river of thatname. Its extreme length is 28 miles, its breadth24, and it contains 20,613 inhabitants, including10,085 slaves. The country has few hills, is gene-rally low and sandy, and produces tobacco, Indiancorn, sweet potatoes, &c.)

(Charles City County, in Virginia, lies betweenChickahominy and James rivers. It containedformerly part of what now forms Prince George’scounty. It has 5588 inhabitants, including 3141slaves.)

(Charles, a cape of Virginia, in about lat. 37°15' n. It is on the n. side of the mouth of Chesa-peak bay, having cape Henry opposite to it.]

Charles, a promontory in N. America, men-tioned by the English captain Thomas James, inhis voyage published 1663, which was made forthe sake of discovering a pass to S. America.

CHARLES. See Carlos, San.

CHARLESTON, a capital city of S. Carolina,is one of the best of N. America, excelling inbeauty, grandeur, and commerce. It is situateupon a long strip of land between two navigablerivers, which are Ashley and Cowper, and thegreater part of it upon the latter. This forms inthe city two small bays, the one to the n. and theother to the s. The town is of a regular construc-tion, and well fortified both by nature and art,having six bastions and a line of entrenchment ; onthe side of the river Cowper it has the bastions of

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miles and a half e. ofirondequat or Rundagut bay,and SO e. from Niagara falls. The setlleincnts onChenessee river from its month upwards, areHartford, Ontario, Wadsworth, and Williams-burgh. The last mentioned place, it is probable,wili soon be the seat of extensive comineice.There will not be a carrying place between NewYork city and Williamsburgh Avhen tiie w.canals and locks shall be completed. The carry-ing places at present areas follows, viz. Albanyto Schenectady, 16 miles ; from the head of tiieMohawk to Wood creek, one ; Oswego lalls, two ;Chenessee falls, two ; so that there are but 2 1 milesland carriage necessary, in order to convey com-modities from a tract of country capable of main-taining several millions of people. The famousChenessee flats lie on the borders of this river.They arc about 20 miles long, and about fourwide; the soil is remarkably rich, quite clear oftrees, producing grass near 10 feet high. Tlieseflats are estimated to be worth 200,000/. as theynow lie. They arc mostly the property of theIndians.)

CHENGUE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Santa Marta in the kingdom ofTierra Firme ; situate on the sea-coast. It wassacked by William Gauson in 1655, who alsodestroyed and plundered circumjacent estates.

(CHEPAWAS, or Chipeways, an Indiannation inhabiting the coast of lake Superior andthe islands in the lake. They could, according toMr. Hutchins, furnish 1000 warriors 20 yearsago. Otlier tribes of this nation inhabit the coun-try round Saguinam or Sagana bay, and lakeHuron, bay Puan, and a part of lake Michigan.They were lately hostile to the United States, but,by the treaty of Greenville, August 3. 1795, theyyielded to them the island De Bois Blanc. SeeSix Nations.)

(CHEPAWYAN Fort is situated on a penin-sula at the s. w. end of Athapescow lake, lat. 58°40' n. long. 110° 25' Ji>. in the territory of theHudson bay company.)

CHEPEN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Saña in Peru.

CHEPETLAN, a settlement of the head settle-ment, and alcaldía mayor of Tlapa, in Nueva Es-paña. It contains 203 families of Indians, wholive by tiie making and selling of chocolate cups.Two leagues to the n. n. 70. of Tenango.

(CHEPEWAS, of Leach Lake, Indians ofN. America, claiming the country on both sides ofthe Mississippi, from the mouth of the Crow-wingriver to its source, and extending w. of the Missis-

sippi to the lands claimed by the Sioux, withwhom they still cop.tend for dominion. Theyclaim also, c. of the Mississippi, the country ex-tending as far as lake Superior, including thewaters of the St. lamis. Tliis country is thicklycovered with timber generally, lies level, andgenerally fertile, though a considerable propor-tion of it is intersected and broken up by smalllakes, morasses, and small swamps, particularlyabout the heads of the Mississipi and river St.Louis. They do not cultivate, but live princi-pally on the wild rice, which they procure in greatabundance on the borders of Leach lake and thebanks of the Mississipi. Their number has beenconsiderably reduced by W'ars and tlie small-pox.Their trade is at its greatest extent.)

(Chepewas, of Red Lake, Indians of N. Ame-rica, who claim the country about Red Lake andRed Lake river, as far as the Red river of lakeWinnipie, beyond which last river they contendwith the Sioux for territory. This is a low levelcountry, and generally thickly covered with timber,interrupted with many swamps and morasses. This,as well as the other bands of Chepewas, are es-teemed the best hunters in the ti. to. country ; butfrom the long residence of this band in the countrythey now inhabit, game is become scarce ; there-fore their trade is supposed to be at its greatest ex-tent. The Chepewas are a well-disposed people,but excessively fond of spirituous liquors.)

(Chepewas, of River Pembena, Indians of N.America, who formerly resided on the e. side ofthe Mississippi, at Sand lake, but were induced bythe N. W. company to remove, a few years since,to the river Pembena. They do not claim thelands on which they hunt. Tiie country is level,and the soil good. The w. side of the river ispi incipally prumVs, or open plains ; on the e. sidethere is a greater proportion of timber. Theirtrade at present is a very valuable one, and willprobably increase for some years. They do notcultivate, but live by hunting. They are well-disposed towards the whites.)

CHEPICA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Coquimbo in the kingdom ofChile ; situate on the coast, between the port ofHuasco and the point of Pajaros.

CHEPILLO, a small island of the S. sea, inthe gulf of Panamá, and at the mouth or entranceofthe river Bayano, is somewhat more than twoleagues distant Irom the continent; three miles incircumference, and enjoys a pleasant climate, al-though sometim.es subject to intense heat. It wasformerly inhabited by the Indians, of whom there

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fast for a long time together : they consequentlycat frequently ; the common food on these occa-sions being cJmcolatc, and which is even handedto them whilst at church. This irreverence thebishop very properly proclaimed against ; but itis said that this execution of his duty cost him noless than his life. It is 100 leagues distant fromGuatemala. Lat. 17'^ 4'. Long. 93° 53'.

CHIAPA, another city in the same province,which, to distinguish it from the former, is calledCliiapa de los Indios; these (the Indians) being,for the most part, its inhabitants ; is the largestsettlement in the whole province, and is situate ina valley close upon the river Tabasco, being 12leagues distant from the former city. It has va-rious churches, abounds in wealth, and is the placewherein the Indian families first settled. Theyenjoy many privileges and exemptions, owing tothe zeal of the bishop, J^rtr/y Bartolorae de las Ca-sas, their procurator at court. The river aboundsgreatly in fine fish ; and is full of barks, withwhich the}" occasionally represent sea-fights. Inthe city also there are commonly balls, plays, con-certs, bull-fights, and spectacles of horsemanship ;since the inhabitants are much given to diversions,and in these grudge no expence.

Bishops of Chiapa.

1. Don Fray Juan de Arteaga y Avendano, na-tive of Estepa in Andalucia ; elected in 1541 : hedied in the same year in Mexico, before he arrivedat his church.

2. Don Fray Bartolome de las Casas, a manrenowned lor his zeal in favour of the Indians ; hewas born at Seville, where he studied, and passedover to the island of St. Domingo, where he saidthe first mass ever celebrated in that part of theworld. He returned to Spain, in 1515, to declaimagainst the tyrannies which were practised againstthe Indians. He went back the following year tojNueva Espana, where he took the habit of a monkof St. Dominic ; and returning a second time toSpain, he was presented by the Emperor to thebishopric of Chiapa, which office he did not ac-cept ; blit was afterwards prevailed upon to do soby the united entreaties of the whole of his order ;he therefore entered upon it in 1544. He then leftthe bishopric, and returned, for the third time, toSpain ; and having retired to his convent of Val-ladolid, died in 1550.

3. Don Fray Tomas Casillas, also of the orderof St. Dominic ; he was sub-prior of the conventof Salamanca, and passed over to America withFray Bartolome de las Casas. Being renownedfor the great zeal which he manifested in tlie con-version of the infidel Indians, he was nominated

to be bishop in 1560 ; which office he accepted atthe express command of its general. He made thevisitation of all his bishopric, and died full of vir-tues, in 1567.

4. Don Fray Domingo de Lara, of the order ofSt. Domingo ; he made so strong a refusal of hiselection, his renunciation of the office not havingbeen admitted, that he prayed to God that hemight die before that the bulls should arrive fromRome; and this was actually the case, since hedeparted this life in 1572, before he was conse-crated.

5. Don Fray Alonzo de Noroila, who governedthe church here seven years, and had for suc-cessor,

6. Don Fray Pedro de Feria, native of the townof this name in Estreraadura, a monk of the orderof St. Dominic; he passed over to America, wasprior of the convent of Mexico, and provincial ofthat province ; he returned to Spain, refused thegeneral visitation to which he was appointed, andretiree! to his convent of Salamanca ; was presentedwith the bishopric of Chiapa, which he also re-fused ; but being commanded by his superiors, heafterwards accepted it, and governed 14 years,until 1588, when he died.

7. Don Fray Andres de Ubilla, of the order of St.Dominic, and native of the province of Guipuzcoa ;he took the habit in Mexico, where he studied andread the arls, and was twice prior and provincialof the province ; he came to Spain on affairstouching his religion, and returning to Mexico,found himself presented to this bishopric in 1592,where he governed until 1601, when he died, hav-ing been first promoted to the archbishopric ofMechoacan.

8. Don Lucas Duran, a friar of the order ofSantiago, chaplain of honour to his Majesty ; whoimmediately tiiat he was consecrated bishop ofChiapa, renounced his power, and the see was thenvacant nine years.

9. Don Fray Juan Gonzalez de Mendoza, na-tive of Toledo, a monk of the order of St. Augus-tin ; he passed over to America, was made bishopof Lipari, and titular in the archbishopric ofToledo ; and lastly of Chiapa, in 1607 ; fromwhence he was promoted in the following year toPopayan.

10. Don Tomas Blanes, native of Valen-cia, of the order of St. Dominic ; he passed overto Peru, where he resided many years, studyingarts and theology ; he assisted in the visitation ofthe province of St. Domingo, and having come toSpain, he was presented to the bishopric in 1609,holding the government until 1612, when he died.

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smaller size, are more delicate, and of superiorflavour to those caught in Newfoundland. Am-bergris is also found upon the coast. The moun-tains abound in trees of the most beautiful kind,laurels, oaks of four sorts, the carob-tree, thewood of M'hich is extremely hard, reulis, cinna-mon-trees, Cyprus, sandal, paraguas, hazel-nut,ivall-nut, volos, and alerces, which are a kind ofcedar, of which they make planks in great num-bers to carry to Lima and other parts. Many ofthese trees are green the whole year round, fromthe moisture and shelter they derive from the cor-dillera, which contains in its bowels much fire, asappears from the volcanoes found upon it, andwhich are 12 in number, without counting manyothers, even as far as the straits of Magellan. Al-though these mountains and woods are so immense,beasts of a savage kind are rarely to be found, ex-cepting such, now and then, as a tiger or leopard ;but there are great numbers of deer, stags, vicunas,and Imanacos, which served as food for the In-dians; as likewise of birds, as ducks, vandurrias,swans, herons, kites, doves, piuguenes, tarlales,parrots, hawks, falcons, goshawks ; and many sing-ing birds, as goldfinches, larks, starlings, diucas,trillies, and many others. Its present vegetableproductions are wheat, barley, Indian wheat, grainsof different kinds, oil of the finest olives, excellentwines, much esteemed in Peru; all kinds of suc-culent fruits, oranges, lemons, innumerable sorts ofapples, and every kind of garden herb. Flax andliemp is cultivated here, from which they makerigging for vessels trading to the S. seas ; and thiscould be supplied in a proportion equal to any de-mand. This kingdom keeps up a considerabletrade with Peru ; for, one year with the other, itsends to Lima from 150 to 180,000 bushels ofwheat, 120,000 quintals of grease, much wine,and other productions, as almonds, nuts, lentils,a sort of wild marjoram and bastard saffron ; andtakes in exchange sugar and cloths of the country.It derives also great emolument from large herdsof the cow kind, from flocks of sheep and goats,of the skins of which they procure fine tanned lea-ther, leathern jackets, sharaois leather, and soles ofshoes : from these animals is also procured muchfat or tallow. Flere are numerous breeds of mostbeautiful horse.s, and some of these, from excellingall the others in the swiftness of their paces, arecalled aguiliUias. It also abounds in mules, andit would still more so, if, as formerly, they werein request at Peru, where their skins were usedinstead of fine cloths and carpets. Baizes arc stillmade ; as likewise some sorts of small cord, coarse€tutfs, and many kinds of sackcloth, which is the

common vesture, and consists of a square garment,with an opening to admit the head ; but manylooms have been lost through a want of Indians inthe manufactories. The greater part of thesepeople still prefer their original uncivilized state,depending upon the natural fruits of the earth forfor their food ; for, besides the productions aboveenumerated, they used to gather, without thetrouble of cultivation, all sorts of delicious fruits,such as pines, though different from those of Eu-rope; and to make excellent chiclia of the murtilla.Indeed the luxuriance and abundance of delicateflowers, and aromatic and medicinal herbs, is al-most incredible ; of the last the following are themost esteemed for their virtue, viz. the cancliala-gua, quinchemali, alhahaquilla, and culen. Itcontains many mines of the richest gold, silver,copper, lead, tin, quick-silver, brimstone, load-stone, and coal : yielding immense riches, whichthe Indians never appreciated, nor even gavethemselves the least trouble about, until the con-quest of the Incas, who began to work them ;sending portions of gold to Cuzco for the orna-ment of the temples and palaces, rather by way ofgift than of tribute. The incursions and rebel-lions of the Indians, principally of the Arauca-nians, who, in the year J599, took and destroyedsix cities, viz. Valdivia, Imperial, Angol, SantaCrux, Chilian, and Concepcion, is the cause whythe population is in many places not large, andthat it consists of poor people, living in smallcommunities ; the fact being, that they are alwaj^sliving in constant dread of a surprise from the In-dians; not but that on the confines there are gar-risons, well defended by Spanish troops, with ne-cessary provisions of artillery, victuals, and am-munition. The war which has from the begin-ning been sustained by the Spaniards against thesemost ferocious Indians, has tended greatly to re-duce the numbers of the former ; some havingbeen killed on the spot, and others doomed to beslaves to their indignant conquerors. Indeed,when it was found that arms were of no availagainst them, some missionaries of the society ofthe Jesuits were sent among them, in the year1612, in order to propagate the gospel ; when theFathers Horacio Vechi and Martin de Arandasuffered martyrdom at their hands: after which atreaty of peace was made by the Governor Mar-quis de Baides, A. D. 1640, and which has sincebeen renewed yearly ; their deputies coming re-gularly to the capital to receive the presents fromthe king of Spain. They have, notwithstanding,at different times broken the treaty, making in-cursions into the Spanish towns, and their manner4

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[ing valiantly in a battle against the Araucanos, andkilled.

2. Don Garcia Hurtado de Mendoza, son of theMarquis de Cahete, who was viceroy in Peru ;immediately that he received new's of the death ofValdivia, lie nominated him as his successor, andhe returned to Peru as soon as he had seen himconfirmed in the government, and his title sanc-tioned by the king.

3. Francisco de Villagra, a noble captain, who,in pursuing his conquests, was also killed by theIndians in battle ; provisionally succeeded by hisuncle, until a governor w'as appointed by the king.

4. The Adelantado Rodrigo de Quiroga, whogoverned peaceably until his death, leaving thegovernment to the charge of his father-in-law.

5. The Brigadier Martin Ruiz de Gamboa, untilhe was nominated by tlie king.

G. The Doctor Melchor Bravo de Saravia, withthe title of first president, until his death.

7. Don Alonso de Sotomayor, Marquis deVilla-hermosa, appointed in the year 1584 : having ma-nifested his valour, talent, and address, in the go-vernment, which he held with much credit, andwith great advantage, against the Indians, untilthe year 1592, when arrived,

8. Don Martin Garcia Onez y Loyola, knightof the order of Calatrava ; w'as killed by the In-dians succouring the fortof Puren, which was be-sieged in the year 1599.

9. The Licentiate Pedro de Vizcarra, who ex-ercised the employ of lieutenant-general of thekingdom ; he was appointed to it when theformer was killed, until the viceroyalty of Peruwas given to,

10. The Captain Francisco de Quinones, whoemployed himself in restraining the Araucanosfrom their rebellion, until his death ; afterwardswas nominated for the viceroyalty of Peru.

11. Captain Alonzo Garcia Remon, an officerof much credit, and skilled in the country and thewar with the Indians ; being colonel of foot ofDon Alonzo Sotomayor, began to govern, ap-pointed by the viceroy of Lima, until arrived,sanctioned and duly elected by the king,

12. Don Alonso de la Rivera, Avho was servingin Flanders, and was sent to Chile, where, havingmarried contrary to the prohibition of his Majesty,he was deprived of his office, and in his place wasappointed,

13. The aforesaid Don Alonso Garcia Remon,whose speedy death did not suffer him long toreign, and he was succeeded by,

14. The Doctor Don Luis Merlo de la Fuente,chief auditor of the royal audience, who, through

VOL, I.

the death of his antecessor, governed also but ashort time before the arrival of,

15. Don Juan de Xaraquemada, native of (ka-naria, who was in Lima covered with honours ac-quired in the Avar of Chile, when he was nomi-nated governor by the viceroy of Peru, Marquisde Montes Claros.

16. Don Alonso de la Rivera again, being atthat time governor of Tucuman ; he Avas sepa-rated from this government, and Avas sent by theking, at the instance of the missionaries, to re-duce that kingdom by the experience he possessed,and gave proofs of his great ability in peace andAvar until his death.

17. The Licentiate Fernando Talaverano, mostancient oidor of the audience, Avas charged waththe government through this quality, and by theparticular recommendation of his antecessor, un-til the viceroy of Peru, Prince of Esquilache, re-gularly appointed,

18. Don Lope de Ulloa, ayIio, in the exercise ofthis office, Avas confirmed in it by his Majesty un-til his death, when the government was taken

up by,

19. Don ChristoA'al de la Cerda Sotomayor, na-tive of Mexico, chief auditor of the real audencia,whom, notAvithstanding his excellent qualities, andthe celebrity of his government, the viceroy ofPeru soon set aside, in favour of,

20. Don Pedro Sorez de Ulloa y Lemos, knightof the order of Alcantara, Avho in a short timeAvas confirmed in the government by the king, ex-ercising it until his death, and leaving it to thecare of his brother-in-laAV,

21. Don Francisco de Alva y Noruena, Avhoheld it a short time, from the viceroy Jiaving, ac-cording to custom, nominated a successor; andthis Avas,

22. Don Luis Fernandez de Cordoba y Arce,Senor del Carpio, Veinte y Quatro de Cordoba,who, although he was not confirmed by the king,maintained it some years, in consideration of thejudgment and skill he manifested, until, in theyear 1633, he Avas supplanted by,

23. Don Francisco Laso de la Vega, knight ofthe order of Santiago, a man of high endowmentsand splendid fortunes in the Avar of the Indians ;he finished his reign, delivering it to his suc-cessor,

24. Don Francisco de Zuniga, Marquis de Bay-des. Count del Pedroso, entered into the posses-sion of the government in the year 1640 ; it Avashe who established and secured the peace Avith theIndians by means of the missionaries of the so-ciety of the Jesuits ; with which glory he

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[ auxiliaries, from whence has sprung that rootedantipatliy which the Araucanians preserve againstthe residue of that nation. In the course of theyear 1546, Valdivia, having passed the Maule,proceeded in his career of victory to the riverItata ; but being defeated there, he relinquishedhis plans of proceeding farther, and returned toSt. Jago.

17. Valdivia sets sail for Peru ^ and returns withmen and supplies . — Being disappointed in hissuccours from Peru, he, in 1547, was on tlie eveof his departure for that country, when Pastenesarrived, but without any men, and bringing newsof the civil war which had broken out between theconquerors of the empire of the Incas. Neverthe-less, persuaded that he miglit reap an advantagefrom these revolutions, he set sail with Pastene forPeru, taking with him a great quantity of gold;on his arrival he served, in quality of quarter-mas-ter-general, in the famous battle that decided thefate of Gonzalo Pizarro. Gasca, the president, whounder the royal standard had gained the victory,pleased with the service rendered him upon thisoccasion by Valdivia, confirmed him in his otliceof governor, and furnishing him with an abun-dance of military stores, sent him back to Chilewith two ships filled with those seditious adven-turers, of whom he was glad of an opportunity tobe disembarrassed. The Copiapins, eager to re-venge the murder of their prince, killed about thesame time 40 Spaniards, who had been detachedfrom several squadrons, and were proceeding fromPeru to Chile ; and the Coquirnbanes, instigatedby their persuasion, massacred alt the inhabitantsoi’ the colony lately founded in their territory,ra,zing the city to its foundation. Francis Aguirrewas immediately ordered there, and had severalencounters with them with various success. In1549 he rebuilt the city in a more advantageoussit nation ; its inhabitants claim him as their founder,and the most distinguished of them boast them-selves as his descendants. After a contest of nineyears, and almost incredible fatigues, Valdivia,conceiving himself well established in that part ofChile which was under the dominion of the Peru-vians, distributed the land among his soldiers,assigning to each, under the title of commandery,a considerable portion, with the inhabitants liv-ing thereon. By this means, having quieted therestless ambition of his companions, he set outanew on his march for the s. provinces, with arespectable army of Spanish and Proraauciantroops.

18. Concepcion founded. — After a journey of150 miles, he arrived, without encountering many

obstacles, at the bay of Penco, which had beenalready explored by Pastene, where, on the 5th ofOctober 1550, he founded a third city, called Con-cepcion. The situation of this place was veryadvantageous for commerce from the excellence ofits harbour, but, from the lowness of the ground,exposed in earthquakes to inundations of the sea.Accordingly we find it destroyed in this mannerby an earthquake that occurred on the 8th of J uly1730, and the 24th of May 1751; for this reason,the inhabitants established themselves, on the 24thof November 1764, in the valley of Mocha, threeleagues s. of Penco, between the rivers Andalienand Biobio, where they founded New Concepcion,The harbour is situated in the middle of the baycalled Talgacuano, a little more than two leaguesw. of Mocha ; a fort is now all the building that isleft at Penco. But to return to our history, theadjacent tribes perceiving the intention of theSpaniards to occupy this important post, gave in-formation of it to their neighbours and friends theAraucanians, who foreseeing that it would not belong before the storm would burst upon their owncountry, resolved to succour their distressed allies,in order to secure themselves. But before we pro-ceed to relate the events of this war, it may bemore advisable to give some account of the cha-racter and manners of that warlike people, whohave hitherto, with incredible valour, opposed theoverwhelming torrent of Spanish conquest, andfrom henceforward will furnish all the materials ofour history.

CUAP. III.

Of the character and manners of the Arauca-nians.

1. Local situation . — The Araucanians inhabitthat delightful country situate between the riversBiobio and Valdivia, and between the Andes andthe sea, extending from 36° 44' to 39“ 50' of s.latitude. They derive their appellation of Arau-canians from the province of Arauco, which,though the smallest in their territory, has, likeHolland, given its name to the whole nation,either from its having been the first to unite withthe neighbouring provinces, or from having atsome remote period reduced them under its do-minion. This people, ever enthusiastically at-tached to their independence, pride themselves inbeing called auca, which signifies frank or free ;and those Spaniards who had left the army in theNetherlands to serve in Chile, gave to this countrythe name of Araucanian Flanders, or the InvincibleState ; and some of them have even had the mag-nanimity to celebrate in epic poetry tlie exploits]

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|]th€ government now devolved upon the eldest sonof die auditor, Don Louis Merlo de la Fuente.

46, Ineffectual efforts of Philip III. to establisha lasting^ peace. — Among the missionaries aboutiliis time charged with the conversion of the Chili-aiis, there was a Jesuit called Luis Valdivia,who perceiving that it was impossible to preach tothe Araucanians during the tumult of arms, wentto Spain, and represented in'! the strongest termsto Philip 111. who was then on the throne, thegreat injury done to tlie cause of religion by thecontinuance of the war. That devout prince, whobad more at lieart the advancement of religion thanthe augmentation of his territories, sent orders im-mediately to the government of Chile, to discon-tinue the war and settle a permanent peace withthe Araucanians, by establishing the river Eiobioas the line of division between tlie two nations.The articles of peace had been discussed, and wereabout to be mutually agreed upon, w hen an unex-pected event rendered abortive all the measuresthat had been taken. Among the wives of Anca-namon, the existing toqui, was a Spanish lady,who, taking advantage of his absence, fled for re-fuge to the governor, with two small children, andfour women, whom she had persuaded to becomeChristians, two of whom were the wives, and theothers the daughters of her husband. The indig-nation of the toqui on this occasion w as carried tosuch an extreme, that, upon some missionariesbeing sent under the superintendence of Valdiviato preach the gospel among the Araucanians, hehastened to meet them at Illicura, where, withoutdeigning to listen to their arguments, he put themall to the swwrd. Thus were all the plans of paci-fication rendered abortive ; Ancanamon incessantlyharassed the Spajiish provinces, and the war w'asrecommenced in 1617, with greater fury than be-fore. From the above-mentioned period to theyear 1637, nothing material occurred in our his-tory, saving the enterprises of the Toquis Lcinturand Pntapichion ; these, however, did not servematerially to change the state of affairs.

47. Second expedition of the Dutch. — In the fol-lowing year the Dutch attempted a second time toform an alliance with the Araucanians, in order toobtain ] ossession of Chile ; but this expeditionwas not more fortunate than the first. Tlie squa-dron, which consisted of four ships, was dispersedby a storm on i(s arrival on the coast, in 1638. Aboat well manned and armed, being afterwards dis-patched to the island of Mocha, belonging to theAraucanians, the inhabitants supposing that theycame to attack them, fell upon the crew, put thewhole to death, and took possession of the boat.

L E.

A iioliicrcrew' experienced a similar misfortune in thelittle island of Ta'ca or Santa Miwia. 'he Arau-canians, as has been already observed, were equallyjealous, and not (as inay be readily imagined)without reason, of every European nation.

48. Second expeddion of the English. — Notwith-standing the ill success of the Dutch, Sir JohnNarborough, an English naval commander, un-dertook some years alter a similar enterprise, byorder of his sovereign Charles II. ; but in pass-ing the straits of Magellan, he lost his whole fleet,which was much better equipped than that of theDutch. The war continued to rage with undi-minished fury until the year 1640, the time whenthe reins of government were assumed by DonFrancisco Zuniga, Marquis de Baydes. It wasunder his milder auspices, that, in January of thefollowing year, the articles of peace were agreedupon, the day of its ratification being fixed for thesixth of that month, and the place of meeting, thevillage of Quillin, in the province of Puren.

49. Peace at length concluded. — At the timeprefixed, the marquis appeared at the appointedplace, with a retinue of about 10,000 persons,from all parts of the kingdom. Lincopichion, theexisting toqui, at the head of the four hereditarytoquis, and a great number of ulraenes and othernatives, opened the conference with a very elo-quent speech. He then, according to the Chiliancustom, killed a llama., and sprinkling some of theblood on a branch of cinnamon, presented it intoken of peace to the governor. The articles ofthe treaty were next proposed and ratified, and inone of these the marquis stipulated that the Arau-canians should not permit the landing of anystrangers upon the coast, or furnish supplies toany foreign nation whatever; which being conform-able to the political maxims of the nation, wasreadily complied with. Thus Avas a period putto a w^ar of 90 years duration, and this grand nego-ciation Avas terminated by a sacrifice of 28 camels^and an eloquent harangue from Antiguenu, cliiefof the district, upon the mutual advantages Avhichbotli nations Avould derive from the peace.

50. Last expedition of the Dutch. — In 1643, twoyears after tlie peace, the importance of the articleinserted by the governor in tlie treaty was renderedvery apparent to the Spaniards, by a last attemptmade by the Dutcli to possess themselves of Chile.Their measures were so Avell taken, that had theybeen in tlie least seconded by the Araucanians, tlieymust liave infallibly succeeded. Having left Bra-zil, Avhich they had conquered, Avith a numerousfleet, Avell provided Avitli men and cannon, theytook possession of the harbour of Valdivia, which]

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[had been deserted for more than 40 years, wherethey intended to form an establishment in order toconquer the rest of the kingdom. With this viewthey immediately began building three strong fortsat the entrance of the river, in order to secure itspossession. The Araucanians were invited, withthe most flattering promises, to join them ; this theynot only declined, but strictly adhering to the sti-pulations of the treaty, refused to furnish them withprovisions, of which tliey were greatly in want.The Cunchese, to whom the territory which theyhad occupied belonged, following the counsel oftheir allies, refused also to treat with them or sup-ply them. In consequence of this refusal, theDutch, pressed with hunger, and hearing tliat acombined army of Spaniards and Araucanians wereon their march against them, were compelled toabandon the ])lace in three months aftertheir land-ing. The Marquis de Mancura, son to the vice-roy of Pern, having soon after arrived there insearch of them, with 10 ships of war, fortified theharbour, and particulary the island, which hassince borne the titular name of his family. Onthe termination of the sixth year of his govern-ment, Baydes was recalled by the court, and DonMartin IVluxica appointed in his place.

51. Dreadful earthquake.— lAa succeeded inpreserviiijr the kingdom in that state of tranquil-lity in which he found it, no other commotion oc-curring during his government, but that producedby a violent earthquake, which, on the 8th of May1617, destroyed part of the city of St. Jago.The fortune of his successor, Don vVntonio Acugna,was very dift'erent. During his government thewar was excited anew between the Spaniards andAraucanians ; but contemporary writers have leftus no accounts of the causes that produced it,Clentaru, the hereditaiy toqui of Lauquemapu,being, in 1655, unanimously elected general, sig-nalized his first campaign bj’ the total defeat ofthe Spanish army. He, moreover, continued topersecute the Spaniards with great violence for aperiod of 10 years, under the governments of DonPedro Portel Casanate, and Don Francisco Me-neses. The last, who was a Portuguese l)y birth,had the glory of terminating it, in 1665, by a peacemore permanent than that made by Baydes. Allthe succeeding governors appear to have kept upa good understanding witli the Araucanians untilthe year 1686, when Garro was nearly breaking it,on occasion of removing tlie inhabitants of theisland of Mocho to the ?z. shore of the Biobib,iti order to cut off all communication with foreignenemies.

^ 52. Commerce zeilh the French.~T\\Q com-

mencement of the present aera was marked in Chileby the deposition of the Governor Doi^ FranciscoIbanez, the rebellion of the inhabitants of Chiloe,and the trade with the French. The islandersof Chiloe were soon restored to obedience, throughthe prudent conduct of the quarter-master-generalof the kingdom, Don Pedro Molina, who succeededin reducing them rather by mild measures than byuseless victories. The French, in consequence ofthe war of the succession, possessed themselvesfor a time of all tlie external commerce of Chile.From 1707 to 1717, its ports were filled with theirships, and they carried from thence incrediblesums in gold and silver. It w as at this period thatthe learned F'ather Feuille, whoremained there threeyears, made his botanical researches and meteorolo-gical observations upon the coast. His amiable quali-ties obtained him the esteem of the inhai)itants, whostill cherish his memory with much affection. Itw'as in 1722 that the Araucanians, impatient atthe insolence of those who were designated by thetitle of captains of the friends ; and who having"'been introduced under pretence of guarding themissionaries, arrogated to themselves a species ofauthority over the natives, resolved to create atoqui, and have recourse to arms. A war in con-sequence ensued, but it soon became reduced tolittle skirmishes, which were finally terminated bytlie celebrated peace of Negrete, a place situatedat the confluence of the rivers Biobio and Lara,where the treaty of Quillan was reconfirmed, andthe odious title of captain of friends wholly abo-lished.

53. How the Pehuenches became inimical tothe Spaniards. Governor Gonzaga was thenext Avho excited the flames of war by endeavour-ing to effect more than his predecessors. He un-dertookto compel the Araucanians to live in cities.This chimerical scheme was ridiculed by thosewho knew the prejudices of tiiis people, and it wasfinally abandoned, not, however, till it had pro-cured another powerful, and for ever after impla-cable enemy to the Spaniards. Tiiis was no otherthan the Peliuenches, avIio being in the above warin alliance with (he Spaniards, and who sufiered aconsiderable defeat whilst fighting against theAraucanians, resolved all at once to'change sides,and have ever since been the firm allies of the lat-ter. They have a practice of attacking the Spa-nish caravans from Buenos Ayres to Chile, andevery year furnishes some melancholy inforinationof that kind. We shall not proceed particularlyto notice several actions, and among others abloody battle wdiich was fougiit in tlie beginning ofthe year 1773 ; mention of which was made in t1iel

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at the most, of 360 houses : for having been des-troyed by tlie Araucanians, in 1599, it as neversine e been able to reach its former degree of splen-dour. Jt lies between the river Nuble to the n.and the Itala to the s. in lat. 35° 56' s.

another, a mountain or volcano of the sameprovince and corregimiento (Chillan), at a little distancefrom the former city. On its skirts are the Indiannations of the Puclches, Pehuenches, and Chiquillanes, who have an outlet by the navigation ot theriver Demante.

another, a small river of the same province (Chillan).

CHILLAOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of this name in Peru. It is of ahot temperature, and produces some tobacco andalmonds.

CHILLOA, a llanura of the kingdom of Quito, near this capital, between twochains of mountains, one very lofty towards thee. and the other lower towards the s. It is wateredby two principal rivers, the Pita and the Amaguana,which at the end of the llanura unitethemselves at the foot of the mountain calledGuangapolo, in the territory of the settlement ofAlangasi, and at the spot called Las Juntas. In thisplain lie the settlements of Amaguana, Sangolqui,Alangasi, and Conocoto, all of which are curacies ofthe jurisdiction of Quito. It is of a mild and pleasanttemperature, although sometimes rather cold, fromits proximity to the mountains or paramos of Pintac, Antisana, Rurainavi, and Sincholagua. Herewas formerly celebrated the cavalgata, by the col-legians of the head- college and seminary of SanLuis dc Quito, during the vacations. The soilproduces abundance of wheat and maize. It ismuch resorted to by the gentlemen of Quito as aplace of recreation, it is eight or nine leagues inlength, and six in width.

CHILLOGALLO, a settlement of the kingdomof Quito, in the district of Las Cinco Leguasde su Capital.

[CHILMARK, a township on Martha’s Vineyard island, Duke’s county, Massachusetts, con-taining 771 inhabitants. It lies 99 miles s. by e.of Boston. See Maktha’s Vineyard.]

CHILOE, a large island of the Archipelago orAncud of the kingdom of Chile, being one of the18 provinces or corregimientos which compose it.It is 58 leagues in length, and nine in width at thebroadest part ; and varies until it reaches onlytwo leagues across, which is its narrowest part. Itis of a cold temperature, being very subject toheavy rains and fresh winds ; notwithstanding '

which its climate is healthy. Around it are fourother islands ; and the number of settlements inthese are 25, which are,

Achau,

Quehuy,

Lin-lin,

Chelin,

Llinua,

Limuy,

Qnenac,

Tanqui,

Meulin,

Chiduapi,

Cahuac,

Abtau,

Alau,

Tabor,

Apiau,

Quenu,

Chanlinec,

Llaycha,

Anihue,

Huar,

Chegniau,

Calbuco,

VAita-Chauquis,

Caucahue,

Isla Grande.

All of these are mountainous, little cultivatad,and produce only a small proportion of wheat,barley, flax, and papas ^ esteemed the best of anyin America ; besides some swine, of which hamsare made, which they cure by frost, and are of sodelicate a flavour as not only to be highly esteemedhere, but in all other parts, both in and out of thekingdom, and are in fact a very large branch ofcommerce. The principal trade, however, con-sists in planks of several exquisite woods, the treesof which are so thick, that from each of them arscut in general 600 planks, of 20 feet in length,and of 1| foot in width. Some of these treeshave measured 24 yards in circumference. Thenatives make various kinds of woollen garments,such as ponchos f quilts, coverlids, baizes, and bor~dillos. The whole of this province is for the mostpart poor ; its natives live very frugally, and withlittle communication with any other part of theworld, save with those who are accustomed to comehither in the fleet once a-year. Altliough it hassome small settlements on the continent, in Val-divia, yet these are more than 20 or 30 leagues dis-tant from this place, and are inhabited by infidelIndians. These islands abound in delicate shell-fish of various kinds, and in a variety of otherfish ; in the taking of which the inhabitants aremuch occupied, and on which they chiefly sub-sist. This jurisdiction is bounded on the n. bythe territory of the ancient city of Osorno, whichwas destroyed by the Araucanian Indians, bythe extensive Archipelagoes of Huayaneco andHuaytecas, and others which reach as far as thestraits of Magellan and the Terra del Fuego, e.by the cordilleras and the Patagonian country, andw. by the Pacific or S. sea. On its mountains arefound amber, and something resembling gold dust,which is washed up by the rains, although no

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mines have as yet been discovered here. Theseislands have some ports, but such as are small, in-secure, and without any defence, with the excep-tion of that of Chacao. The inhabitants shouldamount to 22,000 souls, and these are dividedinto 4 1 settlements or parishes, being formed bythe reducciones of the missionaries of St. Francis,and consisting at the present day, for the mostpart, of Spaniards and Creoles. The capital is thecity of Santiago de Castro, in the large island ofChiloe. [For further account, see index to addi-tional history of Chile, chap. lY. § 35.]

CHILON, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Santa Cruz de la Sierra in Peru ;situate in a valley which is beautiful and fertile,and which abounds in wheat. Twenty-eight leaguesfrom the settlement of Samaypata.

CHILOSTUTA, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldia mayor of Zedales in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CHILPANSINGO, a settlement of the intendancy of Mexico, surroundedwith fertile fields of wheat. Elevation 1080 me-tres, or 3542 feet.

CHILQUES Y MASQUES, a province andcorregimiento of Peru, bounded by the provinceof Quispicanchi; s.e. by that of Churabivilcas ;s. and s. w. by that of Cotabambas ; w. by that ofAbancay; and n. t®. by Cuzco. Its temperatureis various, the proportion of heat and cold beingregulated by its different degrees of elevation ; sothat in the quebradas or deep glens, it is warm,and in the sierras or mountains, cold. It is 13leagues in length, and 25 in width ; is watered bythree rivers, which are the Cusibamba, passingthrough the valley of this name, the Velille, andthe Santo Tomas ; over these rivers are extendedseven bridges, which form a communication withthe other provinces. It has likewise eight smalllakes, and in some of these are found water-fowl.The hot parts abound in all kinds of fruits ; inwheat, maize, pulse, potatoes, and are well stockedwith some sorts of cattle, and great herds of deer.Its natives fabricate the manufactures of the coun-try ; such as cloths, baizes, and coarse frieze, bymeans of chorillos, or running streams, as theyhave no mills for fulling, since a royal licence isnecessary for the making use of the same. Al-though the appearance of mines has in manyplaces been discovered amongst the mountains,yet no mines have as yet been worked, and twoonly have been known to have been opened informer times. This province has suffered muchfrom earthquakes ; and the greatest of these hap-pened in 1707, when many settlements were madedesolate. It is composed of 27 settlements, andthese contain 16,000 inhabitants. The capital isParuro ; and the repariimiento of the corregimientoused to amount to 84,550 dollars, and the alcamlaThe other settlements are.

to 676 dollars per ann.Colcha,

Araipalpa,

San Lorenzo,Parapacucho,

Ceapa,

Cuchirihuay,

Tucuyachi,

Coron,

Pacopata,

Aicha-Urinzaba,

Pilpinto,

Huayaconga,

Accha-Amansaia,

Parco,

Pocoray,

Hanoquite,

Corea,

Paucartarnbo,

Amacha,

Antapalpa,

Quilli,

Acca,

Vilque,

Capi,

Cavabamba,

Huancahuanca,

Yaurisque.

Same name, another settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Lucanas in the same king-dom ; annexed to the curacy of Pucquin.

CHILTAL, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Atacames or Esmeraldas in thekingdom of Quito ; situate in the valley of Chota,on the shore of the river Mira.

CHILTEPEC, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Tepalcatepcec in Nueva Espana. Its tem-perature is the mildest of any part of its jurisdic-tion. It is situate in the middle of a plain, ex-tending over the top of a hill, on two sides ofwhich are large chasms, so immensely deep, thatit is really astonishing to observe how the Indianscontrive to cultivate the impoleras on their edges.It contains 67 families of Indians, and is five leaguesto thes. of its head settlement.

Same name, a river of the province and alcal-diamayor of Tabasco, which runs into the sea.

CHILUA, San Marcos de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Huanta in Peru ;annexed to the Curacy of Huamanguilla.

CHIMA, a mountain of the kingdom of Quito,in the government and corregimiento of Chirnboor Guaranda, to tire zo. of the settlement of Asan-coto. It is entirely covered with woods and withstreams, which flow down from the heights intothe plains of Babahoyo. The river named De laChima runs from e. tow. until it joins the Caracol.A way has been opened through this mountainwhich leads to Guaranda or Guayaquil ; but it ispassable in the summer only. There is also an-other pass equally difficult and dangerous, calledAngas. The cold is great at the top of the moun-tain, and at the skirts the heat is excessive, it i.sin lat. 44' s.

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dried flesh, hung up to preserve them from corrup-tion. Their garments are a shirt without sleeves,reaching down to the middle of their legs. Themarried people wear drawers of baize with colouredpuckers for festival days, and those who enjoyoffices of state wear a baize jacket : they neitheruse hatnorshoes, and no one of them ever goes outwithout slinging round his neck some medals and arosary. The hair is worn short until they marry,and when they become old they suffer it to growlong. The women wear close gowns which reachdown to the ground, and which they call tapoyes:they never swathe or bind themselves round thewaist, but carry on their necks, on gala-days, somethreads strung with glass intermixed with beadsmade of cacao nuts, and coloured beans ; thesethreads usually amount to 20 or SO rows ; on en-tering the church they always loosen their hair.The regulars of the company of the Jesuits taughtthem offices, in which they assisted most dexte-rously ; and it really excites admiration that In-dians, acquainted only with their own barbariandialect, should be able to manage the compass ofthe notes, understand their proportions and num-bers, and apply the rules of music to its execution.At certain times of the year they go a mdear, orto hunt for honey among the woods : from thencethey bring back wax of two sorts, one which iswhite and odoriferous, Jhe other of less substance,as the wax of Europe, manufactured by a speciesof bees without stings, called opernus; also an-other kind of wax, made by a still different sort ofbees, but which are all properly denominated wildwax. This wax is delivered to the curate, whopreserves it in his house to send to the provinces ofPeru ; and from the product of this article, andfrom that of the cotton, which is made into woofs,to the amount of two pounds weight yearly byeach Indian, he procures in 3xchange whatever isnecessary for the settlement, such as baizes, colouredwools, bags, iron and steel articles, choppingknives, wedges, hatchets, scissars, pocket-knives,needles, medals, bugles, and other articles of hard-ware and little necessaries, which, being stored upby him, is distributed amongst the natives accord-ing to their necessities, and in a manner that theymay want for nothing, but live happy and con-tented. The settlements are as follows :

San Xavier, San Joseph,

La Concepcion, Santiago,

San Miguel, San Juan,

San Ignacio, El Santo,

Santa Ana, Corazon.

San Rafael,

CHIQUIZA, a settlement of the corregimientoof Sachica in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. Itis of a cold temperature, and produces wheat,maize, barley, papaSy and the other fruits peculiarto its climate. Its ijihabitants are so few as scarcelyto amount to 30 housekeepers, and about the samenumber of Indians. Four leagues to the n. w. ofTunja, and somewhat less from Velez.

CHIRA, a settlement and seat of the silver minesof the province and corregimiento of Piura in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Paita.

Same name, another settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Nicoya in the kingdomof Guate-mala.

[CHIRAGOW. See Plein River.]

CHIRAMBIRA, an island situate in the largebay of St. Juan, on the coast of the province andgovernment of Choco in the S. sea, which gives itsname to a small creek formed by this island and thecontinent.

CHIRCA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Sicasica in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Chulumani.

CHIRE, Santa Rosa de a city of the govern-ment and province of Los Llanos in the NuevoReyno de Granada ; founded by the GovernorFrancisco Anciso. It is of a very hot and un-healthy temperature, but affords the same vegetableproductions as the rest of the province. It is somean and reduced as to contain hardly 100 house-keepers, and scarcely deserves the name of a city.This settlement lies the furthest to the n. w. extre-mity of any in this kingdom, and is bounded inthat quarter by the province and bishopric of Ca-racas.

Same name a river of the aboveprovince and government. It rises at the foot ofthe lomas del Viento, runs e. and enters the Meta,traversing the country of the Betoyes Indians.

CHIRGUA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela. It rises in the mountain of Ta-cazuruma on the s. runs s. and enters the Gamalo-tal, after having collected the waters of many otherrivers.

CHIRIBIQUI, Santa Fe de a settlement ofthe province and government of Cumana in thekingdom of Tierra Firme ; situate on the coast,between the rivers Mosina and Marecapana.

CHIRICOAS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe Nuevo Reyno de Granada, to the e. of themountains of Bogota, and at the entrance of thellanos or plains of Cazanare and Meta. Theylead a wandering life through the woods in com-pany with the Guaibas ; they are crafty and verydexterous thieves, but of a docile and pacific dis-position. In 16.64; some of them were reduced into

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wliich there is a bank of fine sand, extending amile into the sea, and affording good anchorage.Lat. 1° 59' n. Long. 157° 35' w.]

[Christmas Sound, in Tien a del Fuego, S.America. Lat. 55° 21' n. Long. 69° 48' tw.]

CHRISTOVAL, San, atown of the government and jurisdiction of Maracaibo in the Nuevo Rey no de Granada; foundedby Captain Juan de Maldonado in 1560. It is of•a hot but healthy temperature, produces abundanceof sugar-canes, of which are made honey, sugar,and conserves, in immense quantities ; also a greatproportion of smoking tobacco, which is carried toMaracaibo. It has a good church and a conventt)f St. Augustin, which latter has fallen much todecay with regard to its establishment. The po-pulation of the town consists of 400 housekeepers.It lies 20 leagues n. e. of Pamplona, from the juris-diction of which it is divided by the river Pam-plonilla. It is the native place of Don Gregoriode Jaimes, archdeacon of Santa Fe, and bishop ofSanta Marta.

Same name, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Lipes, archbishopric of Char-cas in Peru ; in which took place the following ex-traordinary occurrence: The curate of this placegoing to confess a sick person in the settlement ofTahisa of the province of Paria, which was annexedto this, sunk into a spring of water in the pampasor llanos dela Sal, when he was drowned, and withthe two Indians who accompanied him on horse-back, never more appeared, nor were any vestigesever found of them : this was the reason why thelatter settlement has since been disunited from thecuracy of San Christoval.

Same name, a capital city of the provinceand captainship of Sergipé in the kingdom of Bra-zil ; being also known by that name. It is foundedon the sea-shore, and has a fine and well defendedport. It has a magnificent parish church with thetitle of Nuestra Senora de la Victoria ; two fineconvents, the one of the order of the Franciscans,and the other of the Carmelites ; also a chapel ofdevotion of the Virgin of the Rosary. The council-house is a very fine edifice, and in the suburbs isa hermitage of San Gonzalo, which is frequentedas a pilgrimage by this and other settlements of thejurisdiction. In this city resides the chief captain,who governs this province, and who is attended bya company of troops as a body-guard. In earlytimes it was filled with nobility, descended from thefirst families in Portugal; but it is now reduced to600 housekeepers. in its district, towards thepart called Coninquiva, is a parish with fourchapels, and towards the river Vaza-Barris fiveothers. It has also 25 engines, by which abundanceof sugar of an excellent quality is manufactured ;this article affords a great commerce w ith t!ic bayof Todos Santos. Lat. ll°40's. Long. ST'* SO' tw.

Same name, an island of the N. sea ; oneof the Antilles, discoverctl by Admiral Christoj)herColumbus, who gave it his name, in 149S. It isfive leagues in circumference, and is very fertile,and abounding in productions, particularly in cot-ton, tobacco, indigo, sugar, and brandy ; by allof which it carries on a great commerce. Here arcsome good salines, and in the mountains are somewoods of fine timber, well adapted for the buildingof ships. The English and the French both esta-blished themselves here in 1625, holding a dividedpossession, when they were driven out by the Spa-niards. After this the former again returned andre-established themselves in the greatest part of theisland, leaving, however, a small share to theFrench, until the year 1713, when the latter, inconjunction with the Spaniards themselves, cededit entirely to the English, who from that time haveheld it and kept it well fortified. [St. Christopher,situate in lat. 17° 21', long. 62° 48' ze. was calledby its ancient possessors, the Charibes, Liamuiga,or the Fertile Island. It was discovered in Novem-ber 1493 by Columbus himself, who was so pleasedwith its appearance, that he honoured it with hisown Christian name. But it was neither plantednor possessed by the Spaniards. It was, however,(notwithstanding that the general opinion ascribesthe honour of seniority to Barbadoes), the eldest ofall the British territories in the \V. Indies, andin truth, the common mother both of the Englishand French settlements in the Charibean islands.A Mr. Thomas Warner, an Englishman, asso-ciated himself Avith 14 other persons in the year1622, and with them took his passage on board aship bound to Virginia. From thence he and hiscompanions sailed from St. Christopher’s, wherethey arrived in January 1623, and by the monthof September following had raised a good crop oftobacco, which they proposed to make their staplecommodity. By the generality of historians whohave treated of the affairs of the W. Indies, it isasserted that a party oflhe French, under the com-mand of a person of the name of D’Esnambuc,took possession of one part of this island, on thesame day that Mr. Warner landed on the other;but the truth is, that the first landing of Warnerand his associates happened two years before thearrival of D’Esnambuc; who, it is admitted byDu Tertre, did not leave France until IG25. Un-fortunately the English settlers, in the latter end of

1623, had their plantations demolished by a dread- j

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belongs to the bishopric of La Paz, and is so situateas to have a fine view of the lake. It is a settle-ment at once the most pleasant and convenient,fertile, and abounding in fruits and cattle, butits temperature is excessively cold. It has twoparishes, with the dedicatory title of Santo Do-mingo and La Asuncion, and two hermitages de-dicated to St. Barbara and St. Sebastian. Theother settlements are,

Asiento de Minas de Mi- Asiento del Desagua-

chacani, dero,

Asiento de San Ante- Acora,

nio de Esquilache, Hi lave,

Pomata, *July,

Asiento de Huacullani, Santiago,

Zepita.

Same name, The lake of, which, although it bethus called, is also known by the name of Titicaca,is 51 leagues in length from n. w. to s. e. and 26in width, although in some parts less. On its shoresare six provinces or corregimientos^ which are.The province of this Paucarcolla,name, Lampa,Pacages, Asangaro.Omasuyos,This lake is of sufficient depth for vessels ofany size, since in many bays not far in from itsshores there are from four to six fathoms of water,and within it, some places from 40 to 50. It is, asfar as is ascertained, without any shoals or banks.Near it grow some herbs, called clacchos, eaten bythe cows and pigs ; also a great quantity of theherb called totora, or cat’s tail, which in someparts grows to the length of a yard and an half.Of this the Indians make rafts, not only for fishingbut for carrying to and fro the cattleand productionsof the harvest and crops growing in the variousislands lying in this lake. Some of these islandsare so covered and hemmed in with the herb totorathat it requires much force and labour to cut a pas-sage through it. In one of the largest of theseislands the Incas had a magnificent temple, dedi-cated to the sun, the first that was ever built. Thislake is not without its tempests and squalls ; theyare, on the contrary, frequent, and have at timescaused no inconsiderable mischief. Its watersare thick, but are nevertheless drank by the cattle,and even the Indians ; particularly by those ofthe nation of the Uros, who are a poor ignorantpeople, who formerly lived upon the islands ingreat wretchedness, and who by dint of great solici-tations have been prevailed upon to leave them forthe mainland^ where they now reside in some mi-serable caves, excavated places, or holes in theearth covered over with fiags of totora^ maintain-

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ing themselves by fishing. This lake containslikewise various kinds of fish, such as trout,ormantos, cuches, anchovies, and boquillas inabundance; these are, for the most part, aboutthe length of a man’s hand, and three fingersthick. The Indians of Yunguyo take upwardsof 700 yearly, and sell them at four and six dollarsthe thousand. They also catch some small peje-reyesy and an infinite variety of birds, which aresalted, and afford excellent food. It is confidentlyand repeatedly asserted by the Indians, that thegreater part of the riches of the country was throwninto this lake when the Spaniards entered it at thetime of the conquest ; and amongst other valuablesthe great gold chain made by the order of theInca Huayanacap, which was 2S3 yards in length,and within which 6000 men could dance.

CHUCURPU, an ancient settlement of warlikeIndians of the province and corregimiento ofCuzco in Peru. It lies to the e. of this city, andwas subjected and united to the empire after along resistance by Pachacutec, emperor of theIncas.

CHUCUTI, a river of the province and go-vernment of Darien in the government of TierraFirme. It rises in the mountains towards the e.and following this course, enters the Taranena at asmall distance from its source.

CHUDAUINAS, a barbarous nation of Indians of the kingdom of Quito, to the s, e. ofthis city. They inhabit the part lying s. w. ofthe river Pastaza, and are bounded on the s. e, bythe Ipapuisas, and w. by the Xibaros. They arenot numerous, owing to the continual wars whichthey have maintained with their neighbours ; andthough of a martial spirt, they are of a docile andhumane disposition. Some of them have 'Unitedthemselves with the Andoas, in the settlement ofthis name, which lies upon the w. shore of theriver Pastaza.

CHUECA, San Agustin de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Lipes, and archbi-shopric of Charcas, in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of San Christoval.

CHUETI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Choco. It rises in the sierras of Abide,runs w. and enters the Paganagandi.

CHUFIAS, a barbarous nation of Indians whoinhabit the e. of the river Aguaricu, bounded onthe n. w. by the nation of the Encabellados, withwhom they are in continual warfare.

CHUGOD, Santa Catalina de, a settlementof the province and corregimiento of Caxamarcain Peru, annexed to the curacy of Chetu.

CHUI, a river of the province and captainship3 o

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