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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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It is of a mild temperulurcj but rather inclined tocold than heat. It contains 264 families of In-dians, and a convent of the religious order of St.Domingo, and in its district are various estates, inwhich, and in the 10 settlements of which its dis-trict consists, are collected scarlet dje, seeds, fruits,coal, woods, and timber. It is two leagues s. e. ofthe capital.

CUILOTO, a river of the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, It rises in the mountains of Bogota,runs e. through the llanos or plains of Casanare andMeta, and afterwards enters the river Meta. Somebarbarian Indians, the liraras and Chinalos, liveabout its borders, dispersed amongst the woods.

CUIQUE, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela ; situate on the shore of thelake Tacarigua, towards the s.

CUIQUILA, Santa Maria de, a settlementand head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Tepozcolula in Nueva Espana. It is of a cold tem-perature, contains 76 families of Indians, whoseonly employment is that of making stone flags ;and these in sufficient quantity to supply the wholeprovince. Is nine leagues s.w. of its capital.

CUISILLO, San Francisco de, a settlementand head settlement of the alcaldia mayor of thetown of Leon, in the province and bishopric ofMechoacan, contains S3 families of Indians, whoemploy themselves in the cultivation of maize andmany fruits. It is very close to its capital.

CUITES, a settlement of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province and govetument of Cinaloaof Nueva Espaila.

CUITI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Darien, of the kingdom of Tierra Firme.It rises in the mountains towards the n. and entersthe sea between the islands Palmas and Pinos.

CUITINA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; situate in the llanura of Sogamoso, be-tween the settlement of this name and that of Tota.It is of a cold temperature, produces wheat, maize,papas, and the other fruits of a cold climate. Itcontains 60 housekeepers, and as many Indians ;lies eight leagues to the n. of Tunja.

CUIXTLAHUACA, San Juan de,, a settle-ment of the alcaldia mayor of Yanguitlan in NuevaEspaila. It contains 604 families of Indians, withthose of the wards of its district. It is of a hottemperature, and lies 16 leagues s. w. of its capi-tal. It produces some scarlet dye and seeds,

CUIXTLAHUACA, San Juan de, another settle-ment, of the alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in the samekingdom. It contains 15 families of Indian’s,

VOE. 1.

CUJENA, Cano de, an arm of the river Negro,in the country of Las Amazonas. It runs nearlydue s. and joins the Parime.

CUJILLOS, a settlement of province and go-vernment of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdomof Quito ; situate on the shore of the river Ma-railon.

[CUJO. See Cuva.]

CUL DE Sac, a settlement and parish of theFrench, in the part possessed by them in theisland of St. Domingo. It is in the head of the w.and upon the w. coast, on the shore of a river be-tween port Principe and the river of Naranjos orOranges.

Cul de Sac, another settlement and parish inthe island of Guadalupe. It lies on the shore ofthe bay of its name, between the rivers Vondi-piques and Testu. There is also another settle-ment in the same bay, between the rivers Lezardand Sarcelles.

CUL DE SAC, a large bay and convenient portof the same island (Guadalupe), which is the principal of thewhole island, and in which are many smallerislands. There is also another close to it, dis-tinguished by the title of Cul de Sac Petit ; andthese are divided by an isthmus of land, which al-lows a communication to the same lakes by a nar-row channel.

CULATAS, a small settlement of the districtand jurisdiction of the town of San Gil, in the cor-regimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra-nada ; annexed to the curacy of Oiba, It lies be-tween the settlements of Socorro and Charala,

CULAUI, a river of the island of La Laxa, inthe kingdom of Chile. It runs w. forming a bendbetween those of Huaque and Duqueco, and entersthe Biobio.

CULCHE, a settlement of Indians, of the dis-trict of Guadalabquen, and kingdom of Chile;situate at the source of the river Valdivia.

CULEBRAS, Rio de, a river on (he coast ofthe province and government of Costarica, of tliekingdom of Guatemala. It runs into tlie N. sea,between the river Bocaes and the bay of Almi-rante.

CuLEBRAs, Rio de, another river in the pro-vince and kingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises inthe mountains of the n. coast, and point of SanBias, and runs into the sea to the w.

CULEBRAS, Rio de, another, of the island ofSanto Domingo, in the e. head ; runs into thesea in the great bay of Samana, between the riversMagua and Yaina.

CULEBRAS, Rio de, a lake of the province andgovernment of Venezuela, between the river of Sa-4 B

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linas and that of Chirgua, in the space left bythese rivers as they run to enter the Portuguesa.

CULEBRAS, rio de, a settlement of the sameprovince and government (Venezuela) as is the former lake ;situate on the sliore of the river Yaraqui, to the e.of the town of San Felipe.

CULEBRAS, RIO DE, an island of the N. sea,near the coast of the province and government ofCartagena, at the entrance of the large river of LaMagdalena.

CULEBRILLAS, a small island of the S. sea,in the bay of Panama, of the province and go-vernment of Tierra Firme; is one of thosewhich Ibrm with that of Perico the port of thisname. .

CULIACAN, a province and alcald'm mayorof the kingdom of Nueva Galicia ; bounded n.and n. e. by the province of Cinaloa, s. by that ofCopala, s. w. by the kingdom of Niieva Fizcaya,s. by that of Chiamatlan, and w. by the gulf ofCalifornia. It is 60 leagues in length and 50 inAvidth. It is fertile, apd abounds in all sorts ofproductions; is watered by various rivers, par-ticularly the Umaya, Avhich is very large, and inwhich are caught great quantities offish. It emp-ties itself into the S. sea, in the port of Navitoos.It abounds in various earths, salt, and silvermines, and in many settlements of Mexican In-dians, reduced by the missionaries of the religionof St. Francis. The capital is of the same name.Lat.24°58'??.

CULIACAN, with the dedicatory title of San Mi-guel, a town which was founded by Nunez deGuzman in 1531 ; situate on the banks of a smallriver, Avhich afterwards unites itself Avith theUmaya. It is 160 leagues from Guadalaxara,and 260 from Mexico. The other settlements ofthis province are,

Cozela Real de Minas==, ==Binapa,Tacuchameta==, ==Baita.

Buya,

CULIACAN, a settlement of the intendancyof Sonora in Nueva Espana, celebrated in theMexican history under the name of Hueicol-huacan. The population is estimated at 10,800souls.]

CULIACAN, a river of this province (Sonora), which di-vides the jurisdiction of the same from that of Ci-naloa. It runs into the sea at the entrance of thegulf of California, or Mar Roxo de Cortes. At itsmouth or entrance are some very dangerous shoalsof the same name. See St. Michael.

CULLI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Canta in Peru j annexed to the cu-racy of Pari.

CULLOUMAS, a settlement of Indians, of thsprovince and colony of Georgia ; situate on theshore of the river Apalachicola.

CULLOUMAS, a settlement of the province andcorregirnienlo of Canta in Peru ; annexed to the-curacy of San Buenaventura.

CULLUE, a large lake of the province andcorregimiento of Tarma in Peru. From it isformed the canal Avhich empties itself into theriver Paria.

CULLURI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Paria in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Toledo.

CULLURQUI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cotabambas in Peru, in the vici-nity of which, in an estate for breeding cattle, is apoor chapel of Santa Rosa, and near to this twovery large rocks, Avhich, being touched with smallstones, send forth a sound similar to bells of thebest temper and metal.

CULPEPPER, a county in Virginia, betweenthe Blue ridge and the tide waters, which con-tains 22,105 inhabitants, of whom 8226 are slaves.The court-house of this county is 45 miles fromFredericksburg, and 95 from Charlottesville.]

CULTA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Paria in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of Condocondo.

CULTEPEQUE, a settlement of the real ofthe silver mines of the province and alcaldiamayor of Tlaxcala in Nueva Espana.

CULUACAN, San Lucas de, a settlement ofthe head settlement and alcatdia mayor of Yzucárin Nueva Espana. It contains 50 tamilies of In-dians, and Avas formerly the capital of the juris-diction. Here there still remain some baths ofwarm water, celebrated for the cure of many in-firmities. It is two leagues to the s. Avith a slightinclination to the 5. e. of its head settlement.

CUMA, San Antonio de, a town of the pro-vince and captainship of Marañan in Brazil. Itcontains a good parish-church, two convents ofmonks, one of the order of Carmen, and the otherof La Merced ; and at a short distance from thetown is a house Avhich was the residetice of the re-gulars of the company of .Jesuits. This town be-longs to the lordship of the house of Antonio Al-burquerque Coello de Carballo. It is three leaguesfrom its capital.

CUMA, San Antonio de, another settlement inthis province and kingdom (Marañan Brazil); situate near the coastand the cape of its name.

CUMA, San Antonio de. This cape is .alsoin the same captainship^ (Marañan) between a bar and thebay of Cabelo de Yelha. The aforesaid bar is a

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>v1io inhabit the woods lying near the river Cuclii-gara, bomided by the nation of the Cunmnaes, Itis but little known.

CUMBA, a settlement of tlie province andcorregimicnto of Luya and Chillaos in Peru.

CUMBAL, a settlement of the province and jcorregimknlo of Pastos in the kingdom of Quito.

CUMBAL, a very lofty mountain of this pro-vince (Pastos), always covered with snow ; from it rises theriver Carlosama, which runs e. and the Mallama,which runs n. In Lat. .54° n.

CUMBAYA, a settlement of the kingdom ofQuito, in the corregimiento of the district of LasCinco Leguas de su Capital.

CUMBE. See Chumbe.

CUMBERLAND, Bay of, on the most «.coast of America. Its entrance is beneath thepolar circle, and it is thought to have a commu-nication with Batlin’s bay to the n. In it are se-veral islands of the same name. The bay wasthus called by the English, according to Marti-niere, who, however, makes no mention of theislands.

Cumberland, a port of the island of Cuba,anciently called Guantanamo; but the AdmiralVernon and General Werabort, who arrived herein 1741 with a strong squadron, and formed anencampment upon the strand, building at the sametime a fort, gave it this name in honour to theDuke of Cumberland. It is one of the best portsin America, and from its size capable of shelter-ing any number of vessels. The climate is salu-tary, and the country around abounds in cattleand provisions. Here is also a river of very goodfresh water, navigable for some leagues, andnamed Augusta by the said admiral. It is 20leagues to the e. of Santiago of Cuba, in lat. 20°71. and long. 75° 12' w.

Cumberland, another bay, of the island ofJuan Fernandez, in the S. sea. It lies betweentwo small ports, and was thus named by AdmiralAnson. It is the best in the island, although ex-posed to the n, wind, and insecure.

Cumberland Cumberland, an island of the province andcolony of Georgia, in N. America, near 20 milesdistant from the city of Frederick. It has twoforts, called William and St. Andrew. The first,which is at the s. extremity, and commands theentrance, called Amelia, is well fortified, and gar-risoned with eight cannons. There are also bar-racks for 220 men, besides store-houses for arms,provisions, and timber.

[Cumberland, a harbour on the e. side ofWashington’s isles, on the n, is, coast ofN. Ame-

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rica. It lies s. of Skitikise, and n. of Cumma-shawaa.J

[Cumberland House, one of the Hudson’s baycompany’s factories, is situated in New SouthWales, in N. America, 158 miles e. n. e. of Hud-son’s 'house, on the s. side of Pine island lake.Lat. 53° 58' 7i. Long. 102° w. See NelsonRiver.]

[Cumberland, a fort in New Brunswick ;situated at the head of the bay of Fundy, on thee. side of its n. branch. It is capable of accom-modating 300 men.]

[Cumberland, a county of New Brunswick,which comprehends the lands at the head of thebay of Fundy, on the bason called Chebecton,and the rivers which empty into it. It has seve-ral townships ; those which are settled are Cum-berland, Sackville, Amherst, Hillsborough, andHopewell. It is watered by the rivers Au Lac,Missiquash, Napan Macon, Memrarncook, Pet-coudia, Chepodi^, and Herbert. The three firstrivers are navigable three or four miles for ves-sels of five tons. The Napan and Macon areshoal rivers ; the Herbert is navigable to its head,12 miles, in boats ; the others are navigable fouror five miles.]

[Cumberland, a town of New Brunswick, inthe county of its own name. Here are coal mines.]

[Cumberland, County, in the district of Maine,lies between Y ork and Lincoln counties ; has theAtlantic ocean on the s. and Canada on the w.Its sea-coast, formed into numerous bays, and linedwith a multitude of fruitful islands, is nearly 40miles in extent in a straight line. Saco river, whichruns s. e. into the ocean, is the dividing line be-tween this county and York on the s.w. CapeElizabeth and Casco bay are in this county. Cum-berland is divided into 24 townships, of whichPortlatid is the chief. It contains 25,450 inha-bitants.]

[Cumberland County`, in New Jersey, isbounded s. by Delaware bay, 7i. by Gloucestercounty, s. e. by cape May, and w. by Salemcounty. It is divided into seven townships, ofwhich Fairfield and Greenwich are the chief;and contains 8248 inhabitants, of whom 120 areslaves.]

[Cumberland, the «. easternmost township ofthe state of Rhode Island, Providence county.Pawtucket bridge and falls, in this town, are fourmiles 71. e. of Providence. • It contains 1964 inha-bitants, and is the only town in the state whichhas no slaves.]

[Cumberland County, in Pennsylvania,, is

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Ostimiiri in Nueva Espana ; situate 45 leaguesfrom the river Chico.

CUMPLIDA, an island of Paraguay, in theprovince and government of this name. It issuesfrom an arm thrown out on the w. side of the river,and forms the lake Jayba.

CUMPLIDA, another island, of the Itenes orGuapore, in the province and country of LasAmazonas.

CUMPLIDO, Cayo, an inlet of the N. sea,near the coast of the island of Cuba, the Cayo Ro-mano, and the Cayo de Cruz.

[CUNCHES, Indians of Chile. See index toadditional history respecting that country, chap.

CUNDAUE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Antioquia in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada.

CUNDINAMARCA. See Granada.

Cundurmarca|CUNDURMARCA]], a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Caxamarquilla in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of its capital.

CUNEN, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Zacapula in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CUNGAYO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Angaraez in Peru.

CUNGIES, a barbarous nation of Indians, whoinhabit the «. of the river Napo, between therivers Tambur to the e. and the Blanco, a smallriver, to the w. These infidels are bounded n. bythe Ancuteres, and dwell near to the Abijiras andthe Icahuates.

[Cuniue|CUNIUE]], a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cuenca in the kingdom of Quito ;in the district of which are many estates, as thoseof Pillachiquir, Guanacauri, Tianorte, Pugni,Tambo de Marivina, Alparupaccha, and Chi-nan.

CUNIUOS, a barbarous and ferocious nationof the province and country of Las Amazonas, tothe c. of the river Ucayale, and to the s. of theMaranon. It is very numerous, and extends asfar as the mountain of Guanuco, and the shore ofthe river Beni. These Indians are the friends andallies of the Piros, and were first converted by theregulars of the company of Jesuits, the mission-aries of the province of Maynas ; but in 1714 theyrose against these holy fathers, and put to deaththe Father Bicter, a German, and the LicentiateVazquez, a regular priest, who accompanied thesaid mission.

[Cuntuquita|CUNTUQUITA]], a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Carabaya ; annexed to thecuracy of Coaza.

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CUNUMAL, San Geronimo de, a settle-ment of the province and corregimiento of Luyaand Chillaos in Peru ; annexed to the curacy ofOlto.

[Cunuri|CUNURI]], a settlement of the province andgovernment of Guayana, one of those belongingto the missions held there by the Capuchin fathers.It is on the shore of the river Y uruario, near thesettlement of San Joseph de Leonisa.

CUNURIS, a river of the same province as theabove settlement (Guyana). It rises in the mountain of Oro,or of Parima, and runs s. until it enters the Mara-non, in lat. 2° SO' s. It takes its name from thebarbarous nation of Indians who live in the woodsbordering upon its shores.

CUPALEN, a river of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Ayres. It runs e. and entersthe Uruguay, between the rivers Gualeguay andSaspoy.

CUPANDARO, Santiago de, a settlementof the head settlement and alcaldia mayor ofCuiceo in Nueva Espana ; situate on the shore ofthe lake. It contains 33 families of Indians, whohave the peculiarity of being very white and goodlooking ; they live by fishing in the same lake.The settlement is two leagues from its capital.

CUPE, a large and abundant river of the pro-vince and government of Darien, and kingdom ofTierra Fir me. It rises in the mountains in theinterior, runs many leagues, collecting the watersof other rivers, and enters the Tuira.

CUPENAME, a river of the province andgovernment of Guayana, or country of the Ama-zonas, in the part of the Dutch colonies.

CUPl, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Chumbivilcas in the same kingdom ;annexed to the curacy of Toro.

[CUPICA, a bay or small port to the s. e. ofPanama, following the coast of the Pacific ocean,from cape S. Miguel to cape Corientes, Thename of this bay has acquired celebrity in thekingdom of New Granada, on account of a newplan of communication between the two seas. FromCupica we cross, for five or six marine leagues, asoil quite level and proper for a canal, whichwould terminate at the Embarcadero of theRio Naipi ; this last river is navigable, and flowsbelow the village of Zatara into the great RioAtrato, which itself enters the Atlantic sea. Avery intelligent Biscayan pilot, M. Gogueneche,was the first rvho had the merit of turning theattention of government to the bay of Cupica,which ought to be for the new continent whatSuez was formerly for Asia. M. Gogueneche pro-posed to transport the cacao of Guayaquil by the4 c

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[tion for privateers, and in the war of 1780 thecruisers from Cura^oa greatly annoyed the Eng-lish W. India trade ; so that tliere was a balanceaccounted for by the treasury of 190,000 francs,(about 17,275/.), arising from the duties on theprize-cargoes. This had been invested on mort-gage for the benefit of the company. The governorshould be a milhary man ; the mixed nature ofthe inhabitants renders a strict and more arbitraryform of government necessary here than in theotlier colonies. Excepting a tew merchants, thereare scarcely any white inhabitants at the chieftown, Williamstad, or on the opposite side of theharbour; such as have any lands live upon them,and the public officers and servants of the com-pany reside in or near the fort. The town’s peopleare a mixture of Jews, Spaniards, sailors, freeMulattoes, free Negroes, Musquito and otherIndians. I'he licentiousness of the Negro slavesis very great here, and attributable to variouscauses ; they are nevertheless worse off than inother colonies, as, in case of a scarcity of provi-sions, the distress falls chiefly on them. Themanumission of slaves, as practised here, is verypreposterous ; for it is generally when they aretoo old to work, that their proprietors pay a smallfine to government to emancipate them, and thenthey must either acquire a precarious subsistenceby begging, or are exposed to perish by want, asthere is no provission for such objects. There arestill at Bonaire a few remaining of the original in-habitants, and three or four aged people at Cura-50 a ; with these exceptious the natives have be-comeextinct. There are hardly half a dozen familiesof whites who have not intermarried with Indiansor Negroes on the intermediate coasts. AtWilliamstad there is a Dutch reformed church, aLutheran church, a Roman Catholic chapel, and^ Jewish synagogue ; houses are built so near thewalls of the fort, that a ladder from the upperstories would be sufficient to get within the] walls.A remarkable blunder of the engineer is noticed,who, in building a stone battery, turned the em-brasures inwards instead of outwards. In thefront of that battery of the fort which is intendedto command the entrance of the harbour, a rangeof warehouses has been built, which are not onlythemselves exposed to the fire of an enemy, butimpede the use of the guns of the fort, whichwould first have to level those warehouses to acertain height before their shot could reach ahostile force. The powder magazine was placedat a distance from the fort, and in such a situa-tion as to expose the road or access to it, to thefire of any ship coming round on that side. The

town, harbour, and fort, are however capable ofbeing made impregnable by any force attackingthem from the sea-side ; yet they would be greatlyexposed on the land-side, and there are severalplaces on the shores of the island where an enter-prising enemy might find means to effect a landingwith small craft ; these spots ought, therefore,likewise to be fortified, and a garrison ought to bemaintained, numerous enough to dispute theground foot by foot, which, in such a rockyisland, abounding with difficult passages and de-files through the broken rocks, could easily bedone; and an enemy, however strong at theirlanding, if they should effect it, would be exhaust-ed by a well contested retreat, before they couldreach the chief settlement. Cura 9 oa is in lat. 12 °6 '. Long. 69° 2'.]

CURAÇOA. This beautiful city is well situated ;its buildings are large, convenient, and magnificent ;is full of store-houses and shops well provided withevery species of merchandise, and of all kinds of ma-nufactories ; so that you may see at one glance avessel building, the sails and rigging, and all itsother necessary equipments preparing, and eventhe articles being macufactured with which it is tobe laden. It has a good port, in which vesselsfrom all parts are continually lying ; its entranceis defended by a castle, but dangerous and difficultto be made, and to effect it, it is necessary to makefast a cable to the same castle, although a vessel,when once in, will lie very safe. It has a synagoguefor the convenience of the many Jews who inhabitthe city, and who are the principal merchants. TheFrench, commanded by M. Caissar, bombarded itin 1714: ; but the commanding ship of his squa-dron was wrecked upon the coast.

CURAGUATE, a river of the island and go-vernment of Trinidad. It runs to the w. extremity,and enters the sea in the n. coast, near the capital,San Joseph de Oruna.

CURAGUATA, a point of the n. coast of the sameisland (Trinidad), close to the port Maracas.

CURAGUE, a small river of the island of LaLaxa in the kingdom of Chile. It runs n. n. w. andenters the Huaque, opposite the mouth of the Ra-ninco. On its shores the Spaniards have built ^fort, called De los Angeles, to restrain the incur-sions of the Araucanos Indians.

CURAHUARA de Carangas, a settlementof this province and corregimiento (Chile), and of the arch-bishopric of Charcas in Peru.

CURAHUARA DE Carangas, another settle-ment, with the additional title of Pacajes, to dis-tinguish it from the former; belonging to the aboveprovince and corregimiento (Chile).

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CURAHUARI an ancient province of Peru, tothe n. of Cuzco. The Inca Capac Yupanqui,fifth Emperor, conquered and united it to the em-pire.

CURAHUASI, a settlement of tlie provinceand con eginiietito of Abancay in Peru, S3 leaguesdistant from the city of Cuzco.

CURAI, a settlement of the province and cor~regimiento of Caxatarabo in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Churin.

CURAL, a settlement of the province and cap-tainship of Rio Janeyro in Brazil ; situate on thecoast, opposite the Isla Grande.

CURAMA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Guayana. It enters the Meta, and losesits name.

CURAMPA, an ancient settlement of the pro-vince of Chinchasuyu in Peru. The Prince Ya-huar Huacar, eldest, son of the first Emperor, theInca Roca, took it by force of arms, and subjectedit to the crown. It was then one of the strongplaces of the province.

CURANARIS, a barbarous and numerous nationof Indians, divided into bodies of militia, who in-habit the woods near the river Bayari to the s. ofthe Maranon.

CURANTA, an islet or rocky shoal of thecoast of the kingdom of Chile, close to the point ofXosH umos.

CURAPO, a settlement of the missions whichare held by the religious Capuchins, in the pro-vince and government of Guayana.

CURAUAUA, a river of the kingdom of Chile,in the district and jurisdiction which belonged tothe city Imperial. It runs w. and forms Avith theEyou the great lake of Puren, out of which it runson the 5. w. side, uniting itself with the Cauten,or the Imperial.

CURASAY a large and navigable river of theprovince and government of Maynas in the king-dom of Quito. It rises in the paramos of 'i'a-cunga, and after running e. for more than 90leagues, enters the Napo ; first collecting the wa-ters of the Soetuno, Noesino, and Turibuno, onthen, and on the s. the Villano. The woods onthe s. are inhabited by some barbarous nations ofIquitos, Ayacores, and Scimugaes Indians, and the«. parts by the Yates and Zaparas.

CURARICARU, a river of the province andgovernment of Guayana. It rises in the countryof the Maraucotos Indians, runs e. and turning itscourse enters the Parime or Puruma.

CURASANA, a river of the province of Barcelona, and government of Cumana. It rises neartlie settlement of Cari, towards the c. runs s. and

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enters the Orinoco, near the Angostura, or narrowpart.

CURASCO, a settlement of the province andcorregimieyito of Cochabamba in Peru ; annexed tothe coracy of Ayruhanca.

CURASENI, a small river of the province andgovernment of San Juan de los Llanos in theNuevo Reyno de Granada. It runs e. and entersthe Orinoco between the settlements of the missionsAvhich were held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits, called Santa Teresa, and San Ignacio.

CURASIRI, a small river of the province andgovernment of Cumana. It rises in the serraniaof Ymataca, runs s. and enters the Cuyuni on then. side.

CURATAQUICHE, a settlement of the pro-vince of Barcelona and government of Cumana ;situate on the shore of the river Nevery, to the s.of the city of Barcelona.

CURAZAICILLO, a small river of the pro-vince and government of Mainas in the kingdomof Quito. It rises in the country of the AbijirasIndians, runs e. and turning afterwards to the n.enters the Napo, close to the settlement of Oravia.

CURAZILLO, or Curaza Chico, or Little,a small island of the N. sea, near the coast ofTierra Firme, and close upon the e. side of Cu-ra^oa.

CURBA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimknio of Larecaxa in Peruj annexed to thecuracy of Charazani.

CURBATI, a small settlement of Indians ofthe province and government of Maracaibo; an-nexed to the curacy of the city of Pedraza. Itsnatives, although few, are docile and well in-clined.

CURE River of, in the island of Guadalupe,one of the Antilles or Windward isles. It rises inthe mountains to the e. and enters the sea betweenthe bay of La Barque and the port of Las Gpa-yabas.

CURECA, a river of the province and captain-ship of Para in Brazil. It runs nearly due n.and enters that of Las Amazonas.

[CURIACO, a bay in Tierra Firme, S. Ame-rica, on the N. sea.]

CURIANCHE, an habitation or palace, builtby the first Emperor of the Incas, Manco Capac,of very large stones, and covered with straAv; fromAvhence the city of Cuzco has its origin. Thispalace was afterwards dedicated to the sun, andbecame converted into a temple, being the mostbeautiful and rich structure of any in Peru, in thetime of the Indians; the inside of it being casedAvitb gold, and the outside with silver, these metals

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CURCURIBISA, a river of the province and government of Quijos and Macas, in the district of *he second, and in the kingdom of Quito. It rises in the country of the Xibaros Indians, runs inclining to the s. e. and enters the Santiago. CURICO, San Joseph de, a town of the province and corregimiento of Maule in the kingdom of Chile ; situate on the shore of the river Huaico. It is small, and but thinly peopled, its inhabitants being for the most part composed of people of colour. [The metal of the mine lately discovered here has obtained the name of natural avanturine, from its being filled with brilliant particles that give it a beautiful appearance. This metal is used by the goldsmiths for rings, bracelets, and other ornaments of jewellery.] CURICURARI, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, in the part possessed by the Portuguese. It runs e. between the rivers Cicayuri and Yurubechi, and enters the Negro. CURIEPE, a settlement of the province and government of Venezuela ; situate on the coast, near the point or cape of Codera, on the shore of the river of its name. Curiepe. This river rises in the mountains near the coast, runs e. and enters the sea in the bay formed by the cape Codera.

CURIES, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Yea in Peru ; annexed to one of the curacies of the Indians of its capital. CURIGUACURU, a river of Nueva Andalucia, Austral or Inferior, in the province of Guayana. It flows down from the mountains of the Caribes Indians to the n. and. running s. and increasing its waters by many other streams, enters the Maranon. CURIGUIMAR, a lake of the province and government of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia, on the shore of the river Orinoco, close to the town of Sanchez. CURIGUIRES, a barbarous nation of Indians, who inhabit the woods bordering upon the source of the river Cuchigaras, and bounded by the Indians of this name, as also by the Cumavaris. Some of these Indians are warlike, and of gigantic stature. CURIMON, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Aconcagua in the kingdom of Chile in the district of which is a convent of the religious recollects, or strict observers of the order of St. ■ Francis, bearing the title of Santa Rosa de Vfr terbo. CURINAS, a barbarous nation of Indians, who inhabit the s. part of the river Maranon. It is but little known, and all that is traced of them is, that they are in continual warfare with the Aguas ; so that their numbers are gradually diminishing. CURIPANA, a port of the coast of the N. sea, in the province and government of Cumana, to the s. of the city of Cariaco. CURIQUAXES, S. Francisco de los, a settlement of the province and government of Quixos and Macas in the kingdom of Quito. It belongs to the district of the former, and is one of those which compose the reduccion of the Sucurabos Indians, held at the charge of the regulars of the company of Jesuits. CURITI, a small settlement of the jurisdiction of the town of San Gil, and corregimiento of Tunja, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; annexed to the curacy of Guane. It is of a very wood temperature, pleasant and agreeable. Its natives, who should amount to 30 or 40 Indians, are docile, mild, and of good dispositions. CURITIMI see CorentinCURITUBA, a town of the province and captainship of Rey in Brazil ; situate near the coast. Curitcjba, a river, called also Yguazii, in the province and government of Paraguay. It runs w. collecting the waters of many other rivers, and enters with a large stream into the Parana. See Yguazu.

CURU, a river of the province and captainship of Seara in Brazil. It runs n. and enters the sea, between the coast of Los Humos and the point of Los Baxos or Arricifes. CURUA, a river of the province and captainship of Para in Brazil. It rises in the country of the Aritues Indians, runs to the n.n.e. and enters the river of Las Amazonas on the 5. side. CURUARI, a river of the kingdom of Brazil, in the territory of the Cayapos Indians. It rises in its mountains, runs s.s.e. and enters the n. side of the large river Parana. CURUAT, a small river of the province and government of Guayana. It runs nearly parallel with the river Caroni, collecting the waters of many others in its course, until it enters this river. CURUAU, an island of the N. sea ; situate at the mouth or entrance of the river of Las Amazonas, to the s. of the island of La Penitencia. CURUA-UASU, a village and settlement of the Portuguese, in the kingdom of Brazil ; situate on the shore of a small river which enters the Sono.

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CURUCAG, a small river of the province and government of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia. It rises to the w. of the settlement Murucuri, runs w. and afterwards turning; n. enters the Orinoco opposite the mouth of the Curusama. CURUCAY, a river of the province and captains/u'p of San Vicente in Brazil. It rises near the coast, and runs to the w. CURUCUANES, a barbarous nation of Indians but little known, who inhabit the shores of the river Paraguay towards the w. CURUGUATI, a settlement of the province and government of Paraguay ; situate on the shore of the river Xexuy. It was in former times very considerable, but at present reduced to a scanty population of people of colour, who live in a miserable way. [About 39 leagues n. e. of Asuncion. Lat. 24° 28' 10". Long. 55° 54' 25" a>.] CURULAUA, a valley or llanura of the kingdom of Chile, in the country and territory of the Araucanos Indians ; celebrated for their having here surprised the Spaniards, and having at the same time put to death the governor Don Martin Garcia Ofiez de Loyola, with 50 others who accompanied him. CURUMA, a settlement of the province and government of Valparaiso in the kingdom of Chile; situate on the coast and at the point of its name. Curtima, a river of the province and government of Cutnana. It rises in the serrania of Ymataca, runs 5. and unites itself with the Tucupu to enter the Cuyuni.

CURUME, an ancient and large province of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, to the w. of the river Cauca : discovered by the Marshal George Robledo. The Indians who inhabited it, and who were called Curumenes, have become extinct, notwithstanding that they were in great numbers at the time of the entrance of the Spaniards in 1542. Some believe that they have retired within the woods, and to the mountains of Darien. This province, which is bounded by that of Popayan, and is at the present day contained in the same, is mountainous, rough, barren, and of an unhealthy climate ; and although rich in gold mines, these are not worked. Curume, a small town of the same province ; situate in an extensive valley, which also takes this denomination, near the river Tonusco.

GURUPA==, or ==Coropa, a settlement of the province and captainship of Para in Brazil « situate "on the shore of the river Maranon. CurupAj a river of the province and govern- cus ment of Buenos Ayres, which runs e. and enters the Aguapey.

CURUPARER, a small river of the province and government of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia. It rises in the country of the Parecas Indians, near the settlement of San Joseph de Otomacos, runs n. and enters the Orinoco to the w. of the settlement of Encaramada. CURUPI, a river of the province and government of San Juan de los Llanos, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It rises near the Curaseni, runs e. and nearly parallel to the same river, and enters the Orinoco. CURUPUTUBA, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, or part of Guayana possessed by the Portuguese. It rises in the sierra of Tumucuraque, runs s. many leagues, between the rivers Ubuquara to the e. and Tombetas to the w. and enters the Maranon on the n. side, in lat. 1°52' s. The infidel Curuputubas Indians live more than 40 leagues to the n. of the river, near the mouth of the Topajocos. Curuptjtuba, a settlement of the Portuguese, being a reduction of Indians of this name; situate on the shore of the above river, after which it is called.

CURURU, a small river of the province and captainship of Pernambuco in Brazil. It rises near the coast, runs s. s. e. and enters the sea between the Ypoba and the Yquen. CURUTUTE, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, which, according to Mr. Bellin, runs s. s. e. and enters the Maranon, between the rivers Uruparate and Putumayo.

CURUZICARIS== or ==Yumaguaris, which signifies Founder of Metals, a barbarous and numerous nation of Indians, who inhabit the woods near the river Maranon, towards the y. and extending as far as the mountains to the w. of the kingdom of Brazil. The same extract from the mines great quantities of gold. They have some sort of civil government, are industrious, and fond of labour. CUSABATAY, a river of the province and government of Mainas in the king- e. for many leagues, and dorn of Quito, runs enters the Ucayale. CUSAHUAYA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Ambana. [CUSCO==. ==See Cuzco.]

CUSCOPANG==, a river of the province and colony of N. Carolina. It runs n. and enters the sea in the strait of Albemarle. [CUSCOWILLA, in E. Florida, is the capital of the Aluchua tribe of Indians, and stands in

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the most pleasant situation that could be desired, in an inland country, upon a high swelling ridge of sand hills, within 3 or 400 yards of a large and beautiful lake, abounding with fish and fowl. The lake is terminated on one side by extensive forests, consisting of orange groves, overtopped with grand magnolias, palms, poplar, tilia, liveoaks, &c. ; on the other side by extensive green plains and meadows. The town consists of 30 habitations, each of which consists of two houses, nearly of the same size, large, and convenient, and covered close with the bark of the cypress tree. Each has a little garden spot, containing corn, beans, tobacco, and other vegetables. In the great Alachua savannah, about two miles distant, is an inclosed plantation, which is worked and tended by the whole community, yet every family has its particular part. Each family gathers and deposits in its granary its proper share, setting apart a small contribution for the public granary, which stands in the midst of the plantation.]

CUSE, a river of the kingdom of Peru. It rises in the mountains of the province of Moxos, and runs e. w. from the river and lake of Sara to the river Ubay. It follows its course to the n. and enters the last mentioned river. [CUSHAI, a small river which empties into Albemarle sound, between Chowan and the Roanoke, in N. Carolina.] [CUSHETUNK Mountains, in Hunterdon county, New Jersey.]

[CUSHING, a township in Lincoln county, district of Maine, separated from Warren and Thoraaston by St. George's river. It was incorporated in 1789, contains 942 inhabitants, and lies 216 miles w. by n. of Boston.] CUSHNOE, a waterfal of the river Kenebec, in the province of Sagadahoc, opposite fort Wertern. CUSI, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Yauyos in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Pampas. CUSIANA, a settlement of the jurisdiction of Santiago de las Atalayas, and government of San Juan de los Llanos, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; annexed to the curacy of Santiago. It is much reduced and very poor, of a hot temperature, and producing only maize, yucas, plantains, &c. Cusiana, a river of the same province (San Juan de los Llanos). It rises from a small lake near the settlement of Gameza, in the jurisdiction and corregimiento of Tunja, and there enters the Mcta.

CUSIBAMBA, a river of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru. It rises in the cordillera of the Andes, runs w. and en- e u t iers the Apurimac, opposite the settlement of Curaguasi. Cusibamba, a valley of this province.

CUSICAS, a barbarous nation of Indians, who dwell to the e. of the nation of the Chiquitos, and to the n. of the settlement of San Juan Bautista de los Xamoros. All that is known of them is, that they are numerous and ferocious. CUSITAS, a settlement of Indians of the province and colony of Georgia ; situate on the shore of the river Apalachicola. CUSMO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Santa in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Guarmey. [CUSSENS, a small river in Cumberland county, Maine, which runs a s. e. course to Casco bay, between the towns of Freeport and N. Yarmouth.] [CUSSEWAGA, a settlement in Pennsylvania.] CUSSIA, a settlement of the Salivas Indians, forming the greater part of this nation, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; situate near the river Sinaruco, in the llanuras or plains of the Orinoco. The Caribes destroyed and burnt it in 1684. CUSSIQUINA, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, which laves the territory of the Mayorunas Indians, who live upon its borders to the s. This river, after running many leagues to the n, e. enters the said territory, in lat. 3° 20' *.

[CUSSITAH, an Indian town in the w. part of Georgia, 12 miles above the Broken Arrow, on Chattahoosee river.] CUSTODIO, a river of the kingdom of Brazil. It runs n. n. w. is small, and enters the Tocantines, between that of San Elias and the river Preto or De la Palma. CUSUMPE, a small lake of the province of Hampshire; one of those of New England, between the rivers Pennycook and Pygwaket. CUTACO, a river in a narrow vale of the Andes, the bed of which was ascertained by Humboldt, in 1802, to be at the vast depth of 4200 feet. On its banks are many plantations of sugarcanes. CUTAGOCHI, a settlement of Cherokees Indians, in the province, and colony of S. Carolina ; situate at the source of the river Eu phase, where the English have a commercial establishment. CUTAWA, or Catawba, a river of N. Carolina. It runs n. and enters the Ohio ;. its waters are always full of coal.

CUTERUO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed to' the curacy of Huambos.

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CUTI, a river of the province and captainship of Maranan in Brazil. CUTIGUBAGUBA, a settlement of the Portuguese, in the province and captainship of Para in Brazil; situate on the shore of the river of Las Amazonas ; to the n. of the city of Para. Cutiguba, an island of the river of Las Amazonas, opposite the city of Para.

CUTIMERIN, a river of the province and cap- . tainship of Maranan in Brazil.

CUTINANAS, Santo Tome de los, a settlement of the missions which were held by the regulars of the company of Jesuits, in the province of Mainas and kingdom of Quito.

CUTQUISCANAS, a barbarous and ferocious nation of Indians, who inhabit the n. e. of the ancient province of Los Panataguas. They are few, and little more is known of them than their name.

CUTTS Island, a small island on the coast of York county, Maine. See Neddock River.]

CUTUBUS, a settlement of the province and government of Sonora in Nueva Espana ; situate on the shore of the river Besani. CUTUCUCHE, a river of the province and government of Tacunga in the kingdom of Quito. It flows down on the s. side of the skirt of the mountain and volcano of Cotopacsi, and united with the Alaques, forms the San Miguel, which laves part of the llanura of Callo, runs near the settlement of Mulahalo, and by a country seat and estate of the Marquisses of Maenza, who have here some very good cloth manufactories. This river runs very rapid, and in 1766, owing to an eruption of the volcano, it inundated the country, doing infinite mischief; again it was, a second time, thrown out of its bed, though the damage it then did was nothing like what it was on the former occasion.

CUTUN, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Coquimbo in the kingdom of Chile. COTUNLAQUE, a pass of the road which leads from the city of Quito to Machache, almost impracticable in the winter time, and only noted for being a place of infinite difficulty and vexation to such as are obliged to travel it. CUTUPITE, Cano de, an arm of the river Orinoco, in the province and government of Guayana, one of those which form ifs different mouths or entrances; it is that which lies most close to the coast of Tierra Firme, aud which, with the coast, forms part of the canal of Manao.

CUXUTEPEC, a settlement of the province and akaldia mayor of San Salvador in the kingdom of Guatemala. vol. i.

CUYO, Cotio, or Cujo, a large province of the kingdom of Chile, and part of that which is called Chile Oriental or Tramontano, from its being on the other side of the cordiUera of the Andes; bounded e. by the country called Pampas ; n. by the district of Rioxa, in the province and government of Tucuman ; *. by the lands of Magellan, or of the Patagonians; and®, by the cordillera of the Andes, which is here called the Western, Cismontana, part of those mountains. It is of a benign and healthy climate ; and although in the summer, the heat on the llanuras is rather oppressive, extremely fertile, and abounding, independently of the fruits peculiar to the country, in wheat, all kinds of pulse, wine, and brandies, which were formerly carried to the provinces of Tucuman aud Buenos Ayres, although this traffic has of late fallen into decay, from the frequent arrivals of vessels from Spain. It abounds in all kinds of cattle, and in the cordiUera, and even ia the pampas, are large breeds of vicunas, huanacos, vizcachas, turtles, two kinds of squirrels, ostriches, tigers, leopards, and an infinite quantity of partridges, pigeons, and turtledoves. The flesh of the swine and mules is esteemed the best in all America; and, generally speaking, victuals areso cheap that it may be procured at little or no expence. The skirts of the mountains are covered with beautiful woods, and their tops are overspread with snow. Throughout nearly the whole province is found a great quantity of glasswort, and in the cordiUera are some mines of silver, especially in the valley of Iluspallata, which were formerly worked by fusion, to the great detriment of the metal, but which are to this day worked in the same manner as those of Peru, and consequently afford greater emolument. Here are also some gold mines, and others of very good copper. The rivers which water this province all rise in the cordiUera, and the most considerable of them are the Tunuyan, which is the first to the s. those of Mendoza, San Juan, Jachal, and the Colorado to the n. e. In the cordiUera, near the high road leading from Santiago to Mendoza, is the great lake of the Inca, wherein are said to be great treasures deposited by the Incas at the beginning of the conquest, to keep them from the Spaniards. This lake is bottomless, and it is thought to be formed of the snows melted and flowing down from the mountainous parts of the district. On the side towards Chile the lake has a vent by six or seven small branches, forming the river of Aconcagua ; and from the opposite side issue some other streams in a contrary direction, and form the Mendoza. In the very heat of summer this

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lake is as cold as snow itself, This province, like all the others of the kingdom which lie to the s. e. of the cordilfcra, is ever subject to terrible tempests of thunder and lightning, accompanied with boisterous winds and rains from October to March; the same not happening in the provinces which lie to the to. The Indians of this province are of a darker complexion than those of any other ; but they are also of loftier stature, better made, agile, and extremely addicted to the chase, in which they greatly excel, and more particularly in the taking of ostriches, which abound in the llanuras to \X\cs. ; and by all of these exercises they become so light and active as to be able to keep pace with a horse. These Indians are generally known here by the name of Guapes, and are descendants of the Pampas, their neighbours to the e. with whom they trade in the fruits of the country in exchange for clothes and other articles, money not being known amongst any of these barbarians. The Guapes are of a docile and generous disposition, but of great spirit, and very warlike, robust, and well formed. This country, considering its extent, is but thinly peopled, since its inhabitants amount to only 25,000 of all sexes and ages, according to the latest calculation. The capital is the city of Mendoza. [See Chile.] _ _

CUYO, a shoal formed by two rocks in the N. sea, near the coast of the province and government of Yucatan, close to the cape of Cotoche.

[ CUYOACAN, a settlement of the intendancy of Mexico, containing a convent of nuns founded by Hernan Cortes, in which, according to his testament, this great captain wished to be interred, " in whatever part of the world he should end his days." This clause of the testament was never fulfilled.] CUYOCUYO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Carabaya in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of its capital. CUYOTAMBO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Quispicanchi in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Quishuares. CUYOTEPEC, San Bartolome de, a head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Antequera, in the province and bishopric of Oaxaca in Nueva Espana. It is of a middle temperature, contains 358 families of Indians, and a convent of the religious order of St. Dominic. In its district are sown in abundance various kinds of seeds and American aloes, of which is made pulque: Four leagues s. of its capital. CUYUANA, an island of the province and country of Las Amazonas, in the territory of the Portuguese, formed by two arms of the river Cudiivara or Purus, which separate before they c u z enter the Maranon. It is large, and of an irregular square figure. CUYUM, or Cuyuni, a large river of the province of Guayana, and government of Cumana. Its origin is not known for certain ; but, from the accounts of the Caribes Indians, it is somewhere near the lake Parime, in the interior of the province, and to the n. e. of the said lake. It runs nearly due from n. to s. making several turnings, until it enters the Esquivo. By this river the Dutch merchants of this colony, assisted by the Caribes, go to entrap the Indians, to make them labour in the estates ; and they have built two forts on either side of the mouth of this river.

CUZABAMBA, a large settlement of the province and corregimiento of Lamas in Peru ; close to which passes a small river of the same name, and which afterwards unites itself with the river Moyobamba. Cuzabamba, another settlement in the province and corregimiento of Tacunga, of the kingdom of Quito.

CUZALAPA, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Ayotitlan, and alcaldia mayor of Amola, in Nueva Espana. Its population is very small, and its inhabitants employ themselves in the cultivation of seeds and breeding of cattle. Nine leagues to the w. of its head settle ment. CUZAMALA, a head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Azuchitlan in Nueva Espana, lying 10 leagues to the n. of its capital, and being divided from the same by two large rivers. It is of a hot and dry temperature ; its population is composed of 36 families of Spaniards, 30 of Mustees, 48 of Mulattoes, and 53 of Indians, who speak the Taracan language. The trade here consists in large cattle, in the cultivation of maize, and making cascalote. Some emolument also is derived from renting the lands belonging to the capital and the neighbouring settlements. CUZCATLAN, a settlement of the province and alcaldia mayor of San Salvador in the kingdom of Guatemala. CUZCO, as it is called by the Indians, a city, the capital of a corregimiento in Peru, the head of a bishopric, erected in 1536, founded by the first Emperor of the Incas, Manco Capac, in 1043, who divided it into Hanam Cozco and Hurin Cozco, which signify Cuzco Lofty and Low, or Superior and Inferior ; the former towards the n. and the second towards the s. It is situate upon a rough and unequal plain formed by the skirts of various mountains, which are washed by

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s;iges the walls were cut Tery crooked, admittingfor a certain space only one person to pass at atime, and this sidewise, and with great difficulty,when shortly afterwards two raio^ht pass abreast.The exit was by a rock, worked in the same nar-row manner on the other side ; and this was alto-gether a plan adopted through prudence, and forthe better security against any sudden assault,since here a single man might defend himselfagainst a great number. In a magnificent chapelof the cathedra! is venerated a miraculous crucifix,which was presented by the Emperor Charles V.and which is called De los Temblores, from thecity having invoked it as a patron in the tremen-dous earthquake which happened here in 1590;also an image of Nuestra Senora de Helen, whichthey call La Linda, (the Beautiful), the gift of thesame royal hand. It is the second city of Peru,and inferior only to the capital of the kingdom.It was governed, after the time of the conquestsmade by the Spaniards, by a secular cabildo, com-posed of two ordinary alcaldes, a royal ensign,an alguaxil mayor, a provincial alcalde, a depo-sitor-general, 12 perpetual regidors, two alcaldesof the inquisition, and a regidor, nominated an-nually, with the title of judge of the natives, whois entrusted with the causes of the Indians; thesehaving also a protector, nominated every twoyears by the viceroy of Lima. This cabildo main-tains, through the grant of the Emperor CharlesV. the same privileges as the cabildo of Burgos.The city has also many other prerogatives, withthe title of Gran Ciudad, and Cabeza, or head ofthe kingdoms and provinces of Peru, in rewardfor its having supported the crown against thetraitor Diego de Almagro, in the conflicts that hemaintained with Francis Pizarro, and from itsliaving taken him prisoner in 1553, in the cele-brated battle of Las Salinas, a league from Cuzco ;also from its having refused to acknowledge thetitle of governor of Peru, assumed by Diego deAlmagro the younger, supporting, in preference,the legitimate government. Again, when the Li-centiate Christoval Vaca de Castro arrived, think-ing to be governor, the people of Cuzco took himprisoner, under the orders of the lieutenant-gover-nor, Diego Salazar de Toledo, and the ordinaryalcalde, Antonio Ruiz de Guevera, and kept himin confinement until he was beheaded in that placeby the same person that executed his father. Forthese services, and for the valuable presents,which on several occasions it has made to thecrown, this city was allowed to be by the laws ofthe Indies, and, as appears by its records, one ofthe first cities in all Castilla, having a priority of

vote ; and in 1783, it was ordered by the king ofSpain, that in consideration of the resistance itoffered in the late rebellion of the Indians of theprovince of Tinta and the other immediate pro-vinces, it should be endowed with the title ofMost Noble, Most Loyal, and Most Faithful, andthat it should enjoy the same privileges as Lima.In 178i, the office of corregidor was extinguished,and his Majesty established an intendant and go-vernor vice-patron; and in 1787, the tribunal ofroyal audience, composed of a president, fouroidors, and aJiscaL It has for arms a golden castleupon a blue field, with various trophies andcolours on the sides, and an eagle at the top. Ithas been the native place of many illustrious men,and of these are,

Don Bernardo de Aviza y Ugarte, oidor ofPanama, bishop of Cartagena and Truxillo, andelected archbishop of Charcas.

Don Cayetano Marcellano y Agramont, bishopof Buenos Ayres, and archbishop of Charcas.

Don Gabriel de Ugarte, royal ensign of the saidcity.

Don Diego Esquivel and Navia, dean of itschurch.

Don Ignacio de Castro, curate of San Geronimoand rector of the university.

Don Francisco Espinosa and Medrano, alias ElLunarejo, magistral canon of its church,

Don Francis Xavier de Lagos, penitentiarycanon.

The Father Maestro Fray Pedro de la Sota, ofthe order of La Merced ; a subject who was oftenconsulted by the viceroys in matters of the utmostimportance.

The Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, a celebratedhistorian of Peru.

Its jurisdiction, although it may retain the titleof province, is so reduced as to extend merely asfar as the district of the city, notwithstanding itformerly comprehended all the neighbouring pro-vinces, until the president, Lope Garcia de ()astro,established in each of these separate corregidors.Its principal commerce consists in the very largequantity of sugar which is made in the neighbour-ing jurisdictions, and where the inhabitants havemany sugar plantations ; that of San Ignacio dePachachaca, in the boundaries of the jurisdictionof Abancay, and formerly belonging to the re-gulars of the extinguished company of Jesuits,being the most celebrated. Tliere is made here avast quantity of baize and ordinary cloth, calledpanete, woven stuffs, saddles, floor-carpets, andtucuyo, which is an ordinary kind of linen usedas clothing by the poor; galloons of gohl, silver,

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