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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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Luis de Cabrera, to make an cfl’ecliial discoveryof this nation, but he did not succeed. In 1662the innermost part of this country was penetratedby Fatlier Geronimo Montemayor, of the extin-guished company of Jesuits. He discovered anation of Indians, whose manners correspondedwith this ; but he did not succeed in establishingmissions, for want of labourers, and from other ob-stacles which arose.

CEUADAS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Riobamba in the kingdom ofQuito. On its n. side is a large estate calledZeogun.

Ceuadas, a very abundant river of the sameprovince and kingdom, from which the above set-tlement borrowed its title. It rises from the lake ofCoraycocha, Avhich is in the desert mountain or"pararno of Tioloma. It runs n. and passing bythe former settlement, becomes united witli anotherriver, formed by two streams flowing down fronrtheparamo of Lalangiiso, and from the waste watersof the lake Colta ; it then passes through the set-tlement of Pungala, its course inclining slightly tothe e. and at a league’s distance from the settlementof Puni, is entered by the Riobamba near the Cu-bigies, another river which flows down from themountain of Chimborazo, and following its courseto the«. for some distance, turns to the c.as soon asit reaches the w. of the mountain of Tungaragua,and at last empties itself into the Maranon ; rvhenit passes through the settlement of Penipe, it flowsin so large a body that it can be passed only bymeans of a bridge, which is built there of reeds ;and before it reaches the ba/ios or baths, it col-lects the Avaters of the Tacunga, Ambato, and otherrivers, Avhich flowing doAvn from the one and theother cordillera, have their rise in the s. summitof Eiinisa, and in the s. part of Ruminambi andCotopasci.

CEUALLOS, Morro de los, an island ofthe river Taquari, formed by this dividing itselfinto two arms to enter the river Paraguay, in theprovince and government of this name.

CEUICO, a small river of the island of St.Domingo. It rises in the mountains of the e. head,runs n. n. e. and enters the grand river Juna, a littlebefore it runs into the sea.

CHABACONDE, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Callahuas in Peru.

(CHABAQUIDDICK Isle belongs to Duke’scounty, Massachusetts. It lies near to, and extendsacross the e. end of Martha’s Vineyard island.)

CHABIN, a river of the province and corregi-miento of Valdivia in the kingdom of Chile. It

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runs from w. to e. being navigable by small vesselstill it enters the S. sea.

CHABUCO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Valdivia in the kingdom of Chile.

CHACAIAM, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tarma in Peru.

CHACAICO, a settlement of Indians of theisland of Laxa in the kingdom of Chile ; situate atthe source and on the shore of the river Renayco.

CHACALTANGUIS, a settlement and headsettlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofCozamaloapan in Nueva Espana, is of a moisttemperature, and situate on the shore of the largeriver Alvarado. It contains seven families of Spa-niards, 18 of Mulattoes and Negroes, and 75 ofPopolucos Indians. Within its district are 19 en-gines or mills for making refined sugar ; and itsterritory produces maize and cotton in abundance ;is three leagues to the e. of its capital.

CHACALTONGO , Natividad de, a settlementand head settlement of the district of the alcaldiamayor of Tepozcolula, is of a cold temperature,and surrounded by eight wards within its district ;in all of which there are 160 families of Indians,who cultivate much maize and wheat ; is sevenleagues between the e. and s. of its capital.

CHACANORA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Caxamarca in the samekingdom.

CHACAO, a city of the island of Chiloe in thekingdom of Chile. It is the residence of the go-vernor, is garrisoned with a small guard, and hasthe best port in the island. Lat. 41° 50' s.

CHACAPA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Challana.

Chacapa, another settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chicas and Tarija, in the dis-trict of the former ; annexed to the curacy ofTupisa.

CHACAPALAPA, a settlement of the head set-tlement and alcaldia mayor of Ygualapa in NuevaEspana, is three leagues to the n. of that place.

CHACAPALPA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Guarochiri in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Santa Olaya.

(CHACAPOYAS. See Chachapoyas.)

CHACARACUIAN, a settlement of the pro-province and government of Cumaná in thekingdom of Tierra Firme ; situate in the mid-dle of the serrania of that province. It isunder the care of the Catalanian Capuchin fa-thers ; and, according to Cruz, on the coast ofthe sea of Paria.

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CHILE.

of declaring war is by sending from town to townan arrow clenched in a dead man’s hand,which they call comocatoria; and this they didin the year 1723, making terrible havoc andslaughter. This kingdom is evidently, fromwhat has been asserted, the most fertile, abun-dant, rich, and delightful region of all America ;to which Nature has granted, in profusion, allthat she has given to others, either with a sparinghand, or at too high a price. The people areliealthy and robust. The wind which generallyprevails is thes. w. and the Puelche, which comesfrom the cordillera, is somewhat troublesome. [ThePuelche wind takes its name from some Indians socalled, and from whose country it blows.] Chileis divided into two bishoprics, suffragan to thearchbishopric of Lima ; and these are of Santiagoand La Concepcion. It is governed by a president,governor, and captain-general, which title wasfirst possessed by Doii Melchor Bravo de Saravia,and its government is divided into 18 provincesor districts, which are,

Cuyo,

Copiapo,

l-a Serena or CoquimbiQuillota,

Aconcagua,

Santiago,

Melipilla,

Rancagua,

Colchagua,

And the islands of Juatal is Santiago.

Catalogue of the barbarous Nations and principalPlaces in the kingdom of Chile.

Nations. Mountains.

Chacao,

Chilian,

Concepcion.

Confines,

Copiapo,

Coquimbo or La Se-

rena,

Imperial,

Loyola,

Mendoza,

Osorno,

Santiago,

San Juan de la Fron-tera,

San Luis de Loyola,Valdivia,

Valparaiso,

Villarica.

Forts.

Arauco,

Los Angeles,

Eyou,

Guasco,

Y tata,

Labapi,

Laxa,

Lebo,

Ligua,

Liman,

Limathi,

Longatoma,

Mapocho,

Mataquito,

Maule,

Maypo,

Nubbe or Nuble,Pereroa,

Poangue,

Queule,

Ralemo,

Salado,

Teno,

Maule,

Tucapel,

Tongoy,

Ytata,

Yumbel.

Topocalma,

Chilian,

Promontories.

Turuyan,

Estancia del Rey or

Ballena,

Uten.

Rede,

Carnero,

Ports.

Puchacay,

Cauten,

Castro,

La Concepcion,

Changui,

Cauten,

Valdivia,

Feliz,

Cerrito Verde,

Chiloe,

Villiva,

Chacao,

Fernandez. The capi-

Rivers.

Andalie,

Cumberland,

Guasco,

Antallis,

Araucanos,

Cauquis,

Chauracabis,

Guarpes,

JUncos,

Pequenches,

Pevinges,

Pincus,

Poyas,

P niches,Yanacunas.

Lakes.

Aguas Calientes,Guanacache,Mallabauquen,Padaguel,

Puren.

Antojo,

Chilian, vole.

Chuapa, vole.

Estancia de Rey, gold,Larapangui, silver,Ligua, vole.

Llaon, gold,Llupangui, gold,Notuco, vole.

Payen, lead,

Peteroa, vole.

Petorca, gold,Quillacoya, gold,Sinn, vole.

Yapel, gold.

Cities.

Calbuco,

Canetej

Castro,

Arancagua,

Biobio,

Buono,

Cachapoal,

Cauquenes,

Cauren,

Cauten,

Chavin,

Civapa,

Claro,

Copiapo,

Curarahua,

De Lora,

De la Sal,

Paracas,

Quillin,

Talcaguano,

Tome,

Tongoy.

Isles.

Chiloe,

Clones,

Farallones,

Fernandez,

Guaiteca,

Moche,

Quiriquina,

Santa Maria.

Catalogue of the Presidents, Governors, and Cap-tains-general of the Kingdom of Chile.

1. The Adelantado Pedro de Valdivia, conquer-or of the kingdom; he served much, and withgreat valour, in the conquest of Peru, was a colo-nel of foot under Francis Pizarro, entered in theyear 1537, founded the first towns, and governeduntil the year 1551 ; he was made prisoner, fight-

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kingdom of Chile. It rises from one of the lakesof Avendafio, runs w. and then turning s. entersthe river Laxa. On its shore the Spaniards havea fort, called Yumbel, or Don Carlos de Austria,to restrain the Araucanos Indians.

Same name, another river in the province and cor-regimiento of Maule of the same kingdom. It runsw. and enters the Maule.

Same name, another river of the province and go-vernment of Mariquita in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada. It rises in the valley of Corpus Christi,and running through it, enters the great riverMagdalena.

Same name, another, a small river of the provinceand government of Paraguay. It runs w. and en-ters the Mbotetei.

Same name, another small river of the kingdom ofBrazil, which also runs w. and enters the Preto orPalma, opposite the Benito.

Same name, another (river) of the same kingdom of Brazil,distinct from the former. It rises in the country ofthe Araes Indians, runs n. n. e. and enters theParcuipasa, to the w. of the toM'n Boa.

Same name, a port of the coast of the South sea, in theprovince and government of Choco in the kingdomof Tierra Firme. It lies between the port Quemadoand the bay of San Francisco Solano.

CLAUCAC, a settlement of the head settlementof Xonacatepec, and alcaldia mayor of Cuernavaca,in Nueva Espana.

CLAUDIO, San, a small island of the North sea,near the e. coast of Nova Scotia in N. America,in the strait which this coast forms with the islandof San Juan.

[CLAVERACK, a post-town in Columbiacounty. New York, pleasantly situated on a largeplain, about two miles and a half e. of Hudsoncity, near a creek of its own name. It containsabout 60 houses, a Dutch church, a court-house,and a goal. The township, by the census of 1791,contained 3262 inhabitants, including 340 slaves.By the state census of 1796 tkere appears to be412 electors. It is 231 miles from Philadelphia. 1

CLAYCAYAC, a head settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Zultepec in Nueva Espana ; annexedto the curacy of Teraascaltepec. It contains 84families of Indians, and is four leagues s. of itscapital.

CLEAUER, a settlement of the island of Barbadoes, in the district of the parish of San Juan.

CLERC, Ensenada de, a bay of the n. coastand w. head of the island of St. Domingo, in theFrench possessions, between the bay of Los Cai-raitos and the Agujero or Trou of Jeremias.

[CLERK’S Isles lie s, w. from, and at theentrance of Behring’s straits, which separate Asiafrom America. They rather belong to Asia, beingvery near, and s. s. w. from the head-land whichlies between the straits and the gulf of Anadir inAsia. They have their name in honour of thatable navigator, Captain Clerk, the companion ofCaptain Cook. In other maps they are called St.Andrea isles.]

[CLERMONT, a post-town in Columbia coun-ty, New York, six miles from Red hook, 15from Hudson, 117 miles n. of New York, and212 from Philadelphia. The township contains867 inhabitants, inclusive of 113 slaves.]

[Clermont, a village 13 miles from Camden,S. Carolina. In the late war, here was ablock-house encompassed by an abbatis; it wastaken from Colonel Rugely of the British militia,in December 1781, by an ingenious stratagem ofLieutenant-colonel W ashington.]

CLEYALI, a settlement of Indians of South Carolina ; situate on the shore of the river Alabama.

[CLIE, Lake Le, in Upper Canada, about 38miles long and 30 broad; its waters communicatewith those of lake Huron,]

[CLINCH Mountain divides the waters ofHolston and Clinch rivers, in the state of Tennessee.In this mountain Burk’s Garden and MorrisesNob might be described as curiosities.]

[Clinch, or Peleson, a navigable branch ofTennessee river, which is equal in length to Hol-ston river, its chief branch, but less in width. Itrises in Virginia, and after it enters into the stateof Tennessee, it receives Powel’s and Poplar’screek, and Emery’s river, besides other streams.The course of the Clinch is s. w. and s. w. by w . ;its mouth, 150 yards wide, lies 35 miles belowKnoxville, and 60 above the mouth of the Hiwasse.It is beatable for upwards of 200 miles, andPowel’s river, nearly as large as the main river, isnavigable for boats 100 miles.]

[CLINTON, the most n. county of the state ofNew York, is bounded n. by Canada, e. by thedeepest waters of lake Champlain, which line se-parates it from Vermont, and s. by the county ofWashington. By the census of 1791, it contained16 14 inhabitants, including 17 slaves. It is di-vided into five townships, viz. Plattsburgh, thecapital. Crown Point, Willsborough, Champlain,and Peru. The length from n. to s. is about 96miles, and the breadth from e. to w. including theline upon the lake, is 36 miles. The number ofsouls was, in 1796, estimated to be 6000. By thestate census, in Jan. 1796, there were 624 personsentitled to be electors. A great proportion of thelands are of an excellent quality, and produce

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Cold spring is 4200 feet above the level of the sea ;and few or none of the tropical fruits will flourishin so cold a climate. The general state of thethermometer is from 55° to 63° ; and even some-times so low as 44° : so that a fire there, even atnoon-day, is not only comfortable, but necessary,a great part of the year. Many of the Englishfruits, as the apple, the peach, and the strawberry,flourish there in great perfection, with several othervaluable exotics, as the tea-tree and other orientalproductions.)

(Cold Spring Cove, near Burlington, New Jer-sey, is remarkable for its sand and clay, used inthe manufacture of glass ; from whence the glassworks at Hamilton, 10 miles w. of Albany, are sup-plied with these articles.)

COLE, a settlement of the island of Barbadoes,in the district of the parish of St. George, distinctfrom the other of its name in the same parish.

COLEA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Maynas in the kingdom of Quito. It runss. and enters the Tigre.

(COLEBROOKE, in the «. part of New Hamp-shire, in Grafton county, lies on the e. bank ofConnecticut river, opposite the Great Monadnock,in Canaan, state of Vermont ; joining Cockburneon the s. and Stuartstown on the n. ; 126 miles n.w. by «. from Portsmouth.)

(COLEBROOKE, a Tougb, hilly township on then. line of Connecticut, in Litchfield county, 30miles n. w. of Hartford city. It was settled in1736. Here are two iron works, and several mills,on Still river, a n. w. water of Farmington river.In digging a cellar in this town, at the close of theyear 1796, belonging to Mr. John Hulburt, theworkmen, at the depth of about 9 or 10 feet, foundthree large tusks and two thigh-bones of an animal,the latter of which measured each about four feetfour inches in length, and 12|; inches in circum-ference. When first discovered they were entire,but as soon as they were exposed to the air theymouldered to dust. This adds another to themanj^ facts which prove that a race of enormousanimals, now extinct, once inhabited the UnitedStates.)

(COLERAIN, a township in Lancaster county,Pennsylvania.]

(COLERAIN, a town on the». bank of St. Mary’sriver, Camden county, Georgia, 40 or 50 milesfrom its mouth. On the 29th of June 1796, atreaty of peace and friendship was made and con-cluded at this place, between the president of theUnited States, on the one part, in behalf of theUnited States, and the king’s chiefs and warriorsof the Creek nation of Indians, on the other. By

this treaty, the line between the white people andthe Indians was established to run from theCurrahee mountain to the head or source of themain s. branch of the Oconee river, called by thewhite people Appalatohee, and by the IndiansTulapoeka, and down the middle of the same.”Liberty was also given by the Indians to the pre-sident of the United Stutes to “ establish a tradingor military post on the s. side of Alatamaha,about one mile from Beard’s bluff', or any wherefrom thence down the river, on the lands of theIndians and the Indians agreed to “ annex tosaid post a tract of land of five miles square ;and in return for this and other tokens of friendshipon the part of the Indians, the United States stipu-lated to give them goods to the value of 6000dollars, and to furnish them with two blacksmithswith tools.)

COLGUE, a settlement of the island of Laxa inthe kingdom of Chile ; situate on the shore of theriver Tolpan.

COLIMA, the alcaldia mayor and jurisdictionof the province and bishopric of Mechoacán inNueva Espana. It is bounded e. by the jurisdic-tion of Zapotlan, s. by that of Mortincs, n. by thatof Tuzcacuesco, and w. by that of Autlan, and theport of La Navidad in the kingdom of Nueva Ga-licia. It carries on a great trade in salt, collectedon the coasts of the S. sea, where there are wellsand salt grounds, from which great emolumentis derived, supplying, as they do, the inlandprovinces with this article. Formerly the best

cocoa wine of any in the kingdom was made here,from the abundance of this fruit found in all thepalm estates ; but the art of bringing it to perfec-tion was lost, and this branch of commerce diedaway, from the additional cause, that the making ofthis liquor was prohibited by the viceroy, the Dukeof Albuquerque, as being a drink calculated toproduce great inebriety. The capital is of the samename ; and the settlements of this district are,Almoloioyan, Zinacantepec,

Comala, Totolmoloyan,

Zaqualpa, Caxitlan,

Xulua. Tecoman,

Xilotlan, Ixtlahuaca,

Guezalapa, Tomala,

Nagualapa, Cuatlan. ,

Cochimatlan,

The capital is a town sitimteupon the coast ofthe S. sea, near the frontiers ofXalisco, in themost fertile and pleasant valley of Nueva Espaiia.It abounds in cacao and other vegetable produc-tions ; is of a hot temperature, and the air is verypure. Its buildings are regular and handsome,3 R 2

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