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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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CONGACA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Angaraes in Pern ; annexed to theuracy of Yulcamarca.

CONGARI, a large river of S. Carolina. Itruns s. e. taking various names, till it enters thesea. It is first called Trente Milles, or ThirtyMiles, then Congari, and afterwards Santi.

CONGAS, a settlement of the province and ror-regimiento of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Ocros.

CONGER, Rock of, a small island or rock,close to the e. coast of the island of Barbadoes.

CONGO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Darien, and kingdom of Tierra N ueva ;situate on the shore of a river, which gives itits name, and of the coast of the S. sea, withinthe gulf of S. Miguel.

CONGOHAS, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Espiritu Santo in Brazil ; situate tothe w. of the Villa Rica.

CONGURIPO, Santiago de, a- settlement ofthe head settlement of Puruandiro, and alcaldtamayor of Valladolid, in the province and bishopricof Mechoacan ; situate on a plain or shore of theRio Grande. It is of a hot temperature, and con-tains 12 families of Spaniards and Mustees^ and 57of Indians. Twenty-six leagues from the captitalPasquaro.

CONHAWAY, a large river of N. Carolina.It runs many leagues ; first n. e. then n. and after-wards n. w. and enters the Ohio. It is called alsoWood river and New river.

CONHAWAY, another, in the province and colonyof Virginia, with the additional title of Petit, orLittle. It also runs n. w, and enters the Ohio.

(CONHOCTON Creek, in New York, is then. head water of Tioga river. Near its mouth isthe settlement called Bath.)

CONICARI, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cinaloa in Nueva Espana ; situateon the shore and at the source of the river Mayo.It is a reduccion of the missions which were heldby the regulars of the company of Jesuits.

CONIGUAS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe province and government of Tarma in Peru,who inhabit the mountains of the Andes, unitedwith the Cunchos, and of whom but little is known.

CONIL, Bocas de, entrances which the seamakes upon the coast of the province of Yucatán,between the river Lagartos, and the baxos or shoalsof Cuyo.

CONILABQUEN, a small river of the districtof Tolten Alto in the kingdom of Chile. It runs s.and enters the Token.

CONIMA, a settlement of the province and cor-

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regimiento of Paucarcolla in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Moxo.

CONNECTICUT, a county of the provinceand colony of New England in N. America. It isbounded w. by New York and the river Hudson ;is separated from the large island by an arm of thesea to the s. ; has to the e. Rhode island, with partof the colony of Massachusetts, and the other partof the same colony to the n. It is traversed by ariver of the same name, which is the largest of thewhole province, and navigable by large vessels for40 miles. This province abounds in wood, tur-pentine, and resins ; in the collecting of whichnumbers of the inhabitants are occupied, althoughthe greater part of them are employed in fishing,and in hewing timber for the building of vesselsand other useful purposes. The merchants of theprovince once sent to King Charles II. some tim-ber or trees, of so fine a growth as to serve formasts of ships of the largest burthen. The greattrade of woods and timbers carried on by meansof the river has much increased its navigation.This territory is not without its mines of metal,such as lead, iron, and copper: the first of thesehave yielded some emolument, but the othershave never yet produced any thing considerable,notwithstanding the repeated attempts which havebeen made to work them. This county is wellpeopled and flourishing, since it numbers upwardsof 40,000 souls, notwithstanding the devastationsthat it has suftered through the French, the In-dians, and the pirates, in the reign of Queen Anne,when all the fishing vessels were destroyed.When this colony was first founded, many greatprivileges were given it, which have always beenmaintained by the English governor, throughthe fidelity which it manifested in not joiningthe insurrection of the province of Massachusetts,until, in the last war, it was separated from themetropolis, as is seen in the article U n ited StatesOF America.

(Connecticut, one of the United States ofNorth America, called by the ancient nativesQunnihticut, is situated between lat. 41° and 42°2' n. and between long. 71° 20' and 7.3° 15' w. Itsgreatest breadth is 72 miles, its length 100 miles;bounded «. by Massachusetts ; e. by Rhode island ;s. by the sound which divides it from Long island ;and w. by the state of New York. This statecontains about 4674 square miles; equal to about2,640,000 acres. It is divided into eight counties,viz. Fairfield, New Haven, Middlesex, and NewLondon, which extend along the sound from w. toc. : Litchfield, Hartford, Tolland, and Windham,extend in the same direction on the border of the]3 T 2

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(state of Massachusetts. The counties are dividedand subdivided into townships and parishes ; ineach of which is one or more places of publicworship, and school-houses at convenient distances.The number of townships is about 200. Eachtownship is a corporation invested with powers suf-ficient for their own internal regulation. Thenumber of representatives is sometimes 180; butmore commonly about 160 ; a number fully ade-quate to legislate for a wise and virtuous people,well informed, and jealous of their rights ; andwhose external circumstances approach nearer toequality than those, perhaps, of any other peoplein a state of civilization in the world.

The principal rivers in this state are, Connecti-cut, Housatonick, the Thames, and their branches,which, with such others as are worthy of notice,are described under their respective names. Thewhole of the sea-coast is indented with harbours,many of which are safe and commodious ; thoseof New London and New Haven are the most im-portant. This state sends seven representatives tocongress. Connecticut, though subject to the ex-tremes of heat and cold, in their seasons, and tofrequent sudden changes, is very healthful. It isgenerally broken land, made up of mountains,hills, and valleys ; and is exceedingly w'ell-watered.Some small parts of it are thin and barren. Itsprincipal productions are Indian corn, rye, wheatin many parts of the state, oats, and barley, whichare heavy and good, and of late buck-wheat, flaxin large quantities, some hemp, potatoes of severalkinds, pumpkins, turnips, peas, beans, &c. &c. ;fruits of all kinds which are common to the cli-mate. The soil is very well calculated for pas-turage and mowing, which enables the farmers tofeed large numbers of neat cattle and horses.

The trade of Connecticut is principally with theW. India islands, and is carried on in vessels from60 to 140 tons. The exports consist of horses,mules, oxen, oak-staves, hoops, pine-boards, oak-plank, beams, Indian corn, fish, beef, pork, &c.Horses, live cattle, and lumber, are permitted inthe Dutch, Danish, and French ports. A largenumber of coasting vessels are employed in carry-ing the produce of the state to other states. ToRhode island, Massachusetts, and New Hamp-shire, they carry pork, wheat, corn, and rye ;to N. and S. Carolina, and Georgia, butter,cheese, salted beef, cider, apples, potatoes, hay,&c. and receive in return, rice, indigo, and money.But as New York is nearer, and the state of themarkets always well known, much of the produce ofConnecticut, especially of the w. parts, is carriedthere ; particularly pot and pearl-ashes, flax-seed.

beef, pork, cheese and butter, in large quantities.Most of the produce of Connecticut river from theparts of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Ver-mont, as well as of Connecticut, which are adja-cent, goes to the same market. Considerablequantities of the produce of the e. parts of thestate are marketed at Boston, Providence, andNorwich. The value of the whole exported pro-duce and commodities from this state, before theyear 1774, was then estimated at about 200,000?.iav/ful money annually. In the year ending Sept.SO, 1791, the amount of foreign exports was710,340 dollars, besides articles carried to differ-ent parts of the United States, to a great amount.In the year 1792, 749,925 dollars; in the year1793, 770,239 dollars ; and in the year 1794,806,7'46 dollars. This state owns and employs inthe foreign and coasting trade 32,897 tons ofshipping.

The farmers in Connecticut, and their fami-lies, are mostly clothed in plain, decent, home-spun cloth. Their linens and woollens are manu-factured in the family way ; and although theyare generally of a coarser kind, they are of astronger texture, and much more durable thanthose imported from France anrl Great Britain.Many of their cloths are fine and handsome. Hereare large orchards of mulberry-trees ; and silk-worms have been reared so successfully, as to pro-mise not only a supply of silk to the inhabitants,buta surplnssagefor exportation. In New Haven arelinen and button manufactories. In Hartford a wool-len manufactory has been established ; likewise glassworks, a snuft' and powder mill, iron works, and aslitting mill. Iron-works are established also at Sa-lisbury, Norwich, and other parts of the state. AtStafford is a furnace at which are made largequantities of hollow ware, and other ironmongery,sufficient to supply the whole state. Paper is ma-nufactured at Norwich, Hartford, New Haven,and in Litchfield county. Ironmongery, hats,candles, leather, shoes, and boots, are manufac-tured in this state. A duck manufactory has beenestablished at Stratford. The state of Connecticutis laid out in small farms, from 50 to 300 and 400acres each, which are held by the farmers in feesimple; and are generally well cultivated. Thestate is chequered with innumerable roads or high-ways crossing each other in every direction. Atraveller in any of these roads, even in the mostunsettled parts of the state, will seldom pass morethan two or three miles without finding a house orcottage, and a farm under such improvements asto afford the necessaries for the support of a family.The whole state resembles a well cultivated garden,)

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(which, with that degree of industry that is neces-sary to happiness, produces the necessaries andconveniences of life in great plenty. The inhabi-tants are almost entirely of English descent. Thereare no Dutch, Phench, or Germans, and very fewScotch or Irish people, in any part of the state.The original stock from which have sprung all thepresent inhabitants of Connecticut, and the nume-rous emigrants from the state to every j)art of tlieUnited States, consisted of 3000 souls, who settledin the towns of Hartford, New Haven, Windsor,Guilford, Milford, and Weathersfield, about theyears 1635 and 1636. In 1756, the population ofthe state amounted to 130,611 souls ; in 1774, to197,856; in 1782, to 202,877 whites, and 6273Indians and Negroes; in 1790, to 237,946 per-sons, of whom 2764 w'ere slaves ; and by the cen-sus of 1810, to 261,942 souls. The people ofConnecticut are remarkably fond of having alltheir disputes, even those of the most trivial kind,settled according to law. The prevalence of thislitigious spirit affords employment and support fora numerous body of lawyers. That party spirit,however, which is the bane of political happiness,has not raged with such violence in this state as inMassachusetts and Rhode Island. Public pro-ceedings have been conducted generally with 'nuclicalmness and candour. The people are well in-informed in regard to their rights, and judicious inthe methods they adopt to secure them. Tiiestate enjoys an uncommon share of political tran-quillity and unanimity.

All religions, that are consistent with the peaceof society, are tolerated in Connecticut : and aspirit of liberality and forbearance is increasing.There are very few religious sects in this state.The bulk of the people are Congregationalists.Besides these, there are Episcopalians andBaptists.

The damage sustained b}’- this state in the latewar was estimated at 461,235/. I6s. Id. To com-pensate the sufferers, the general court, in May1792, granted them 500,000 acres of the w. part ofthe reserved lands of Connecticut, which lie w.of Pennsylvania. There are a great number ofvery pleasant towns, both maritime and inland, inConnecticut. It contains five cities, incorporatedwith extensive jurisdiction in civil causes. Twoof these, Hartford and New Haven, are capitals ofthe state. The general assembly is holden at theformer in May, and at the latter in October, an-nually. The other cities are New London, Nor-wich, and Middleton. Weathersfield, Windsor,Farmington, Litchfield, Milford, Stratford, Fair-field, Guilford, Stamford, Windham, Suffieid, and

Enfield, are all considerable and very pleasanttowns. In no part of the world is the educationof all ranks of people more attended to than inConnecticut. Almost every town in the state isdivided into districts, and each district has a pub-lic school kept in it a greater or less part ofevery year. Somewhat more than one-third of themoneys arising from a tax on the polls and rateableestate of the inhabitants is appropriated to the sup-port of schools in the several towns, for the educa-tion of children and youth. The law directs thata grammar-school shall be kept in every countytown throughout the state. Yale college is aneminent seminary of learning, and was foundedin the year 1700. See Yace College. Acade-mics have been established at Greenfield, Plain-field, Norwich, Windham, and Pomfret, some ofwhich are flourishing.

The constitution of Connecticut is founded ontheir charter, which was granted by Charles II. in1662, and on a law of the state. Contented withthis form of government, the people have not beendisposed to run the hazard of framing a new consti-tution since the declaration of independence.Agreeable to this charter, the supreme legislativeauthority of the state is vested in a governor, de-])iity-governor, twelve assistants, or counsellors,and the representatives of the people, styled thegeneral assembly. The governor, deputy-gover-nor, and assistants, are annually chosen by thefreemen in the month of May. The representa-tives (their number not to exceed two from eachtown) arc chosen by the freemen twice a-year, toattend the two annual sessions, on the secondTuesdays of May and October. The general as-sembly is divided into two branches, called the up-per and lower houses. The upper house is com-posed of the governor, deputy-governor, and as-sistants ; the lower house of the representativesof the people. No law can pass without the con-currence of both houses.

Connecticut has ever made rapid advances inpopulation. There have been more emigrationsfrom this than from any of the other states, andyet it is at present full of inhabitants. This in-crease may be ascribed to several causes. Thebulk of the inhabitants are industrious, sagacioushusbandmen. Their farms furnish them with allthe necessaries, most of the conveniences, and butfew of the luxuries of life. They, of course, mustbe generally temperate, and if they choose, cansubsist with as much independence as is consistentwith happiness. The subsistence of the farmer issubstantial, and does not depend on incidentalcircumstances, like that of most other professions.)

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