LatAm Digital Edition and Gazetteer

OverviewStatisticsSubjects

Search for bridge*

The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

525

COT

COT

525

the province and captainship of Marañan, betweenthe rivers Camindes and Paraguay.

Costa-Desierta, a large plain of the At-lantic, between cape S. Antonio to the n. and capeBlanco to the s. It is 80 leagues long, and has onthe n. the llanuras ox pampas of Paraguay, on theetJ. the province of Cuyo, of the kingdom of Chile,on the s. the country of the Patagones, and on tliec. the Atlantic. It is also called the Terras Ma-gellanicas, or Lands of Magellan, and the wholeof this coast, as well as the land of the interior terri-tory, is barren, uncultivated, and unknoAvn.

Costa-Rica, a province and government ofthe kingdom of Guatemala in N. America ; boundedn. and w. by the province ot Nicaragua, e. bythat of Veragua of the kingdom of Tierra Firme ;s. w. and n. w. by the S. sea, and n. e. by the N.sea. It is about 90 leagues long e. w. and 60 n. s.Here are some gold and silver mines. It has portsboth in the N. and S. seas, and tAVO excellent bays,called San Geronimo and Caribaco. It is for themost part a province that is mountainous and fullof rivers ; some of which enter into the N. sea, andothers into the S. Its productions are similar tothose of the other provinces in the kingdom ; butthe cacao produced in some of the llanuras hereis of an excellent quality, and held in much esti-mation. The Spaniards gave it the name ofCosta-Rica, from the quantity of gold and silvercontained in its mines. From the mine calledTisingal, no less riches have been extracted thanfrom that of Potosi in Peru ; and a tolerable tradeis carried on by its productions with the kingdomof Tierra Firme, although the navigation is not al-way« practicable. The first monk Avho came hi-ther to preach and inculcate religion amongst thenatives, was the Fra_y Pedro de Betanzos, of theorder of St. Francis, who came hither in 1550,when he was followed by several others, whofounded in various settlements 17 convents of theabove order. The capital is Cartago.

Costa-Rica, a river of the province ancT go-vernment of Nicaragua in the same kingdom,which runs n. and enters theDesaguadero, or W asteW ater of the Lake.

COSTO, a settlement of the English, in theisland of Barbadoes, of the district and parish ofSantiago ; situate near the w. coast.

COTA, a settlement of the corregimiento of i-paquira in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It is ofa very cold temperature, produces the fruits pecu-liar to its climate, contains upwards of 100 In-dians, and some white inhabitants ; and is fourleagues from Santa Fe.

Cota, a small river of the province and govern-

ment of Buenos Ayres in Peru. It rises in thesierras, or craggy mountains, of Nicoperas, runsw. and enters the Gil.

COTABAMBAS, a province and corregimientoof Peru ; bounded n. by the province of Abancay,s. w. and s. and even s. e. by that of Chilques andMasques or Paruro, w, by that of Chumbivilcas,and n. w. by that of Aimaraez. It is 25 leagueslong e.w. and 23 wide n.s. It is for the mostpart of a cold temperature, as are the other pro-vinces of the sierra; it being nearly covered Avithmountains, the tops of which are the greatest partof the year clad Avith snoAV. In the Ioav lands aremany pastures, in Avhich they breed numerousherds of cattle, such as cows, horses, mules, andsome small cattle. Wheat, although in no greatabundance, maize, pulse, and potatoes, also groAvhere. In the broken, uneven hollows, near whichpasses the river Apurimac, and which, after passingthrough the province, runs into that of Abancay,groAV plantains, figs, water melons, and other pro-ductions peculiar to the coast. Here are abund-ance of magueges', which is a plant, the leaves ortendrils of which, much resemble those of thesavin, but being somewhat larger ; from them aremade a species of hemp for the fabricating ofcords, called cahuyas, and some thick ropes usedin the construction of bridges across the rivers.The principal rivers are the Oropesa and the Chal-huahuacho, Avhich have bridges for the sake ofcommunication Avith the other provinces. Tliebridge of Apurimac is three, and that of Churuc-tay 86 yards across ; that of Churuc, Avhich is themost frequented, is 94 yards ; and there is anotherwhich is much smaller : all of them being built ofcords, except one, called Ue Arihuanca, on theriver Oropesa, which is of stone and mortar, andhas been here since the time that the ferry-boat wassunk, Avith 15 men and a quantity of Spanishgoods, in 1620. Although it is remembered thatgold and silver mines have been worked in thisprovince, none are at present ; notAvithstanding thatin its mountains are manifest appearances of thismetal, as well as of copper, and that in a part ofthe river Ocabamba, Avhere the stream runs witligreat rapidity, are found lumps^ of silver, whichare washed off from the neighbouring mountains.The inhabitants of the whole of the provinceamount to 10,000, who are contained in the 25following settlements ; and the capital is Tambo-bamba.

Cotabambas,

Totora,

Cullurqui,

Huaillati,

1

Palpakachi,

Llikehavilea,

Corpahuasi,

Pituhuanca.

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
530

530

C R A

C R A

Oaxaca. It contains only 20 families of Indians,wbo live by the cultivation of the cochineal plantand seeds.

COZCATLAN, a settlement and head settle-ment of the alcaldia mayor of Tasco in NuevaEspana. It contains 200 families of Indians, andis five leagues c. of its capital.

COZEL, a settlement of the jurisdiction andaknld'ia mayor of Culiacan in Nueva Espaila.

COZINAS, a bay of the coast of the provinceand government of Yucatán.

COZINERA, a shoal of rocks on the coast ofthe S. sea, of the province and government ofTierra Firme, very near the point of Paytilla, inthe bay of Panama.

COZOCOZONQUE, a settlement of the headsettlement of Puxmecatan, and alcaldia mayor ofViUalta, in Nueva Espana. It is of a hot tem-perature, contains 85 families of Indians, and is29 leagues to the e. of its capital.

COZTLA, San Miguel de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Coronango, and alcaldiamayor of Cholula, in Nueva Espana. It contains48 families of Indians, and is two leagues to the n.of the capital.

COZUMEL, an island of the N. sea, oppositethe e. coast of Yucatan, to the province and go-vernment of which it belongs. It is 10 leagueslong n. w.f s. w. and from four to five wide. It isfertile, and abounds in fruit and cattle, and iscovered with shady trees. The Indians call it Cu-zamel, which in their language signifies the islandof swallows. Here was the most renowned sanc-tuary of any belonging to the Indians in this pro-vince, and a noted pilgrimage, and the remains ofsome causeways over which the pilgrims used topass. It was discovered by the Captain Juan deGrijalba in 1518, and the Spaniards gave it thename of Santa Cruz, from a cross that was de-posited in it by Hernan Cortes, when he demolishedthe idols, and when at the same time the first massever said in this kingdom of Nueva Espana, wascelebrated by the Fray Bartolome de Olrnedo, ofthe order of La Merced, At present it is inhabitedby Indians only. It is three leagues distant fromthe coast of Tierra Firme.

(CRAB-ORCHARD, a post-town on Dick’sriver, in Kentucky, eight miles from Cumberlandriver, and 25 miles s. e. of Danville. The roadto Virginia passes through this place.)

CRABS, or Boriquen, an island of the N. sea ;situate on the s. side of the island of St. Domingo,first called so by the Bucaniers, from the abundanceof crabs found upon its coast. It is large andbeautiful, and its mountains and plains arc covered

with trees. The English established themselveshere in 1718, but they were attacked and drivenout by the Spaniards of St. Domingo in 17^0, whocould not suffer a colony of strangers to settle sonear them. The women and children were, how-ever, taken prisoners, and carried to the capital andPortobelo. See Boriquen.

CRAMBERRI, a small river of the provinceand colony of N. Carolina. It runs s. and entersthe source of the Conhaway.

CRAMBROOK, a river of the province andcolony of Pennsylvania in N. America.

(CRANBERRY, a thriving town in Middlesexcounty. New Jersey, nine miles e. of Princeton,and 16 s. s. w. of Brunswick. It contains a hand-some Presbyterian church, and a variety of manu-factures are carried on by its industrious in-habitants. The stage from New York to Phila-delphia passes through Amboy, this town, andthence to Bordentown.)

(Cranberry Islands, on the coast of the dis-trict of Maine. See Mount Desert Island.)

(CRANEY, a small island on the s. side ofJames river, in Virginia, at the mouth of Eliza-beth river, and five miles 5. w. of fort George, onpoint Comfort. It commands the entrance of bothrivers.)

(CRANSTON is the s. easternmost townshipof Providence county, Rhode Island, situated onthe w. bank of Providence river, five miles s. ofthe town of Providence. The corajiact part of thetown contains 50 or 60 houses, a Baptist meetinghouse, handsome school-house, a distillery, and anumber of saw and grist mills^and is called Paw-tuxet, from the river, on both sides of whose mouthit stands, and over which is a bridge connectingthe two parts of the town. It makes a pretty ap-pearance as you pass it on the river. The wholetownship contains 1877 inhabitants.)

CRAVEN, a county of the province and colonyof Carolina in N. America, situate on the shore ofthe river Congaree, which divides the provinceinto South and North. It is filled with English andF'rench protestants. The latter of these disem-barked here to establish themselves in 1706, butwere routed, and the greater part put to death bythe hands of the former. The river Sewee watersthis county, and its first establishment was owingto some families wlio had come hither from NewEngland. It has no large city nor any considerabletown, but has two forts upon the river Saute, theone called Sheuinirigh fort, which is 45 miles fromtlie entrance or mouth of the river, and the othercalled Congaree, 65 miles from the other. [It con-tains 10,469 inhabitants, of whom S658are slaves.}

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
533

C R O

C R O 533

moiily called Acklin’s island), and Long Kej, (orFortune island), are tlie principal, Castle island(a very small one) is the most s. and is situated atthe s. end of Acklin’s island, which is the largestof the group, and extends about 50 miles in length ;atthew. extremity it is seven miles in breadth,but grows narrow towards the s. N. Crookedisland is upwards of 20 miles long, and from two tosix broad; Long Key, about two miles in length,l)ut very narrow : on this latter island is a valuablesalt pond. Near Bird rock, which is the mostw, extremity of the group, and at the w. point ofN. Crooked island, is a reef harbour, and a goodanchorage ; a settlement has been lately establishedthere, called Pitt’s Town, and this is the placewhere the Jamaica packet, on her return to Eu-rope through the Crooked island passage, leavesonce every month the Bahama mail from England,and takes on board the mail for Europe ; a port ofentry is now established there. There is likewisevery good anchorage, and plenty of fresh water atthe French w'ells, which lie at the bottom of thebay, about half-way between Bird rock and thes.end of Long Key. There is also a good harbour,(called Atwood’s harbour) at the w. end of Acklin’sisland, but fit only for small vessels, and anotherat Major’s Keys, on the n. side of N, Crookedisland, for vessels drawing eight or nine feet water.The population in ISOtf amounted to about 40whites, and 950 Negroes, men, women, andchildren; and previous to May 1803, lands weregranted by the crown, (o the amount oi 24,2 18 acres,for the purpose of cultivation. The middle of theisland lies in lat. 22^ 30' «. ; long. 74° tii). SeeBahamas.)

(Crooked Lake, in the Genessee country,communicates in an e, by n. diiection with Senecalake.)

(Crooked Lake, one of tlie chain of small lakeswhich connects the lake of tiie Woods with lakeSuperior, on the boundary line between the UnitedStates and Upper Canada, remarkable for its rug-ged cliff, in the cxacks of which are a number ofarrow's sticking.)

(Crooked River, in Camden county, Georgia,empties into the sea, opposite Cumberland island,12 or 14 miles n. from the mouth of St. Mary’s.Its banks are well timbered, and its course is e.by ??.)

(CROSS-CREEK, a township in Washingtoncounty, Pennsylvania.)

(Cross-Creeks. See Fayettevilee.)

(Cross-Roads, the name of a place in N. Caro-lina. near Duplin court-house, 23 miles from

Sampson court-house, and 23 from S. Washing-ton.)

(Cross-Roads, a village in Kent county, Mary-land, situated two miles s. of Georgetown, onSassafras river, and is thus named from four roadswhich meet and cross each other iu the village.)

(Cross-Roads, a village in Chester county,Pennsylvania, where six ditferent roads meet. Itis 27 miles s. e. of Lancaster, 11 n. by w. of Elk-ton in Maryland, and about 18 w.n.w. of Wil-mington iu Delaware.)

CROSSING, a settlement of the island of Bar-badoes, in the district of the parish of San Juan.

(CROSSWICKS, a village in Burlingtoncounty, New Jersey; through which the line ofstages passes from New York to Philadelphia.It has a respectable Quaker meeting-house, fourmiles 5. ti;. of Allen town, eight s. e. of Trenton,and 14 s. w. of Burlington.)

(CROTON River, a n. e. water of Hudsonriver, rises in the town of New Fairfield in Con-necticut, and running through Dutchess county,empties into Tappan bay. Croton bridge is thrownover this river three miles from its mouth, on thegreat road to Albany ; this is a solid, substantialbridge, 1400 feet long, the road narrow, piercingthrough a slate hill; it is supported by 16 stonepillars. Here is an admirable view of Croton falls,where the water precipitates itself between 60 and70 feet perpendicular, and over high slate banks,in some places 100 feet, the river spreading intothree streams as it enters the Hudson.)

(CROW Creek falls into the Tennessee, fromthe n. w. opposite the Crow town, 15 miles be-low Nickajack town.)

(Crow Indians, a people of N. America, di-vided into four bands, called by themselves Ahah'-ar-ro-pir-no-pah, No6-ta, Pa-rees-car, and E-liart'-sar. They annually visit the Mandans, Me-netares, and Ahwahhaways, to whom they barterliorses, mules, leather lodges, and many articlesof Indian apparel, for which they receive in re-turn guns, ammunition, axes, kettles, awls, andother European manufactures. When they re-turn to their country, they are in turn visited bythe Paunch and Snake Indians, to whom they bar-ter most of the articles they have obtained from thenations on the Missouri, for horses and mules, ofwhich those rrations have a greater abundance thanthemselves. They also obtain of the Snake In-dians bridle-bits and blankets, and some otherarticles, which those Indians purchase from theSpaniards. Their country is fertile, and wellwatered, and in many parts well timbered.

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
534

534

C R U

(Crow’s Meadows, a river in the n.w. ter-ritory, which runs n. w. into Illinois river, oppo-site to which are fine meadows. Its mouth is 20yards wide, and 240 miles from the Mississippi.It is navigable between 15 and 18 miles.)

(CROWN Point is the most s. township inClinton county, New York, so called from thecelebrated fortress which is in it, and which wasgarrisoned by the British troops, from the time of itsreduction by General Amherst, in 1759, till the laterevolution. Itwastakenby the Americans the I4thof May 1775, and retaken by the British the yearafter. The point upon which it was erected bythe French in 1731, extends n. into lake Champ-lain. It was called Kruyn Punt, or Scalp Point,by the Dutch, and by the French, Pointe-a-la-Chevelure ; the fortress they named Fort St. Fre-derick. After it was repaired by the British, itwas the most regular and expensive of any con-structed by them in America ; the walls are ofwood and earth, about 16 feet high and about 20feet thick, nearly 150 yards square, and surround-ed by a deep and broad ditch dug out of the solidrock ; the only gate opened on the n. tow'ards thelake, where was a draw-bridge and a covert way,to secure a communication with the waters of thelake, in case of a siege. On the right and left, asyou enter the fort, is a row of stone barracks, notelegantly built, which are capable of containing2000 troops. There were formerly several out-works, which are now in ruins, as is indeed the casewith the principal fort, except the walls of thebarracks. The famous fortification called Ticon-deroga is 15 miles s. of this, but that fortress isalso so much demolished, that a stranger wouldscarcely form an idea of its original construction.The town of Crown Point has no rivers ; a fewstreams, however, issue from the mountains, whichanswer for mills and common uses. In the moun-tains, which extend the whole length of lakeGeorge, and part of the length of lake Champlain,are plenty of moose, deer, and almost all the otherinhabitants of the forest. In 1790 the town con-tained 203 inhabitants. By the state census of1796, it appears there are 126 electors. Thefortress lies in lat. 43° 56' n. ; long. 73° 2Pw.)

(CROYDEN, a township in Cheshire county,New Hampshire, adjoining Cornish, and about 18miles n. e. of Ciiarlestown. It was incorporatedin 1763 ; in 1775 it contained 143, and in 1790,537 inhabitants.)

CRUAIRE, a settlement of the province ofVenezuela, and government of Maracaibo; situate

C R U

on the coast, between cape San Roman and thePunta Colorada.

CRUCERO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Carabaya in Peru ; annexed tothe curacj" of Coaza. It has a sanctuary where animage of Nuestra Seilora del Rosario is held inhigh veneration.

CRUCES, a settlement of the province andkingdom of Tierra Firme ; situate on the shore ofthe river Chagre, and in a small valley surroundedby mountains. It is of a good temperature andhealthy climate, and is the plain from whencethe greatest commerce was carried on, particularlyat the time that the galleons used to go to TierraFirme, the goods being brought up the river asfar as this settlement, where the royal store-housesare established, and so forwarded to Panama,Avhich is seven leagues distant over a level road.The alcaldia mayor and the lordship of this set-tlement is entailed upon the eldest son of the illus-trious house of the Urriolas; which family is es-tablished in the capital, and has at sundry timesrendered signal services to the king. The Englishpirate, John Morgan, sacked and burnt it inJ670.

Cruces, another settlement, of the provinceand government of Cartagena ; situate on the sameisland as is the city, and on the shore of the greatriver Magdalena.

Cruces, another, of the province and corre-gimiento of Paria in Peru ; annexed to the curacyof Toledo.

Cruces, another, of the missions belonging tothe religious order of St. Francis, in the provinceof Taraumara, and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya.Twenty-nine leagues to the n. w. of the town andreal of the mines of San Felipe de Chiguagua.

Cruces, another, of the province of Tepe-guana, and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya.

Cruces, another, of the province and eorregf-miento of Cuyo in the kingdom of Chile ; situatee. of the city of San J uan de la Frontera, and uponthe shore of one of the lakes of lluanacache.

Cruces, another, in the same kingdom ; situateon the shore of the river Biobio.

Cruces, a river in the district of Guadalabquenof the same kingdom. It is an arm of tlie Calla-calla, which enters the Valdivia, and forms theisland of Las Animas.

CRUILLAS, a town of the province and go-vernment of La Sierra Gorda in the bay of Mexico,and kingdom of Nueva Espana, founded in 1764,by order of the Marquis of this title and viceroy'of these provinces.

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
557

C U M A N A.

The elevation of the city above the level of thesea is 53 feet. In July, Duluc’s hydrometer ge-nerally indicates from 50° to 53° of humidity.

The maximum, 66°.

The minimum, 46°.

By Seaussure’s cyanometer, there are 24|° ofblue in the sky, whilst at Caracas there are only18, and in Europe generally 14.

The seat of the government of the two pro-vinces is at the city of Cnmana. The governor,nominated for five years, is also vice-patron, andin this capacity nominates to all vacant cures, andfills all the church offices, the appointment towhich forms a part of the prerogative of the crown.He has the administration of the finances of hisdepartment, as deputy of the intendants ; and inthis capacity he superintends the levying of thetaxes, decides disputes, directs the ordinary ex-pences, and receives the accounts of the offices ofadministration ; but the political relations Avith fo-reign colonies, and all military matters, depend onthe captain-general of Caracas. The governor isalso under the orders of the intendant in his fis-cal regulations and commercial measures. To the«. of the city of Cumana lies the gulf of Cariaco.The river Mansanares, which separates on thes. the city from the suburbs inhabited by theGuayqueris Indians, surrounds the s. and the ay.sides of the town. This is the only water that theinhabitants of Cumana drink. It has the inconve-nience of often being not limpid, though rarelyunwholesome. The city enjoys a healthy, butscarcely ever a fresh air ; the heat is continual.The sea-breeze is nevertheless very regular, andmoderates, during a great part of the day, theblaze of the sun. The only defence that , Cu-mana has is u fort, situated on an elevation rang-ing along the back of the city. The city itselfhas but a garrison of 231 troops of the line, and acompany of artillery. The militia increases thepublic force in time of Avar. The total number ofinhabitants is 24,000. The city is now four timesas large as it Avas fifty years ago. It increases Avithso much rapidity that the ancient boundaries notaffording convenient space for ncAv houses, peoplehave been obliged, within this short time, to buildupon the left bank of the Mansanares, to the w. ofthe village of the Guayqueris. These ncAv housesare already so numerous as to form a village com-municating Ay'ith the city by a bridge : and the in-habitants, for their convenience, had built, in1803, a church. The first street that was formedwas named Emparau, in honour of the governorof this name. All the houses of Cumanti are loAV,and rather solidly built. The frequent earthquakes

557

experienced here since these ten years, haveobliged them to sacrifice beauty and elegance topersonal safety. The violent shocks felt in De-cember 1797, thrcAV down almost all the stonebuild-ings, and rendered uninhabitable those that wereleft standing. The earthquake experienced herein November 1799, caused a variation of the needleof 45 minutes. According to M. de Humboldt,Cumana is exposed to these earthquakes in con-sequence of its proximity to the lake of Cariaco,Avhich appears to have some communication Aviththe volcanoes of Cumucuta, which vomit hydrogengas, sulphur, and hot bituminous water. It isobserved that the earthquakes happen only afterthe rains, and then the caverns of the Cuchivanovomit during night inflammable gas, which isseen to blaze 200 yards high. It is probable thatthe decomposition of the water in the slate marl,Avhich is full of pyrites, and contains hydrogenousparticles, is one of the principal causes of this phe-nomenon. The population of Cumana, amount-ing to 80,000 souls, is a great part composed ofwhite Creoles, amongst Avhom much natural capa-city is discovered. They are very much attachedto their native soil, and generally give themselvesup entirely to the occupation IhatEirth or fortunehas assigned them. Some are employed in agri-culture, commerce, and navigation, and others infishing. The abundance of fish found about Cu-mana enables them to salt an astonishing quantity,Avhich they send to Caracas and the other cities ofthese provinces, as well as to theWindAvard islands,from whence they import in return iron tools forhusbandry, provisions, and contraband merchan-dise. The cargoes are ahvays of little value.They are satisfied with small profits, Avhich theyaugment by the frequency of the voyages. Capi-tals of 4 or 5000 dollars, which in other placesAvould appear insufficient for any' commercialenterprise, support five or six families at Cu-mana. Activity and perseverance form almostthe only source of the comfort that reigns here.The Creoles of CumaiiciAvho engage in literary pur-suits are distinguished by their penetration, judg-ment, and application. They have not e.xactlythe vivacity' observable in the Creoles of Mara-caibo, but they compensate for this by superiorgood seiise and solidity of parts. The retail tradesof Cumana are carried on by Catalonians andpeople from the Canaries. Among the produc-tions in which this cit^ trades, the racno and cacuo-oil deserve to be mentioned. Medicinal plantsmight also form an important article of commerce,,were not the inhabitants ignorant of their qualities,and the manner of preparing them. There is-

Last edit over 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
559

CUM

>v1io inhabit the woods lying near the river Cuclii-gara, bomided by the nation of the Cunmnaes, Itis but little known.

CUMBA, a settlement of tlie province andcorregimicnto of Luya and Chillaos in Peru.

CUMBAL, a settlement of the province and jcorregimknlo of Pastos in the kingdom of Quito.

CUMBAL, a very lofty mountain of this pro-vince (Pastos), always covered with snow ; from it rises theriver Carlosama, which runs e. and the Mallama,which runs n. In Lat. .54° n.

CUMBAYA, a settlement of the kingdom ofQuito, in the corregimiento of the district of LasCinco Leguas de su Capital.

CUMBE. See Chumbe.

CUMBERLAND, Bay of, on the most «.coast of America. Its entrance is beneath thepolar circle, and it is thought to have a commu-nication with Batlin’s bay to the n. In it are se-veral islands of the same name. The bay wasthus called by the English, according to Marti-niere, who, however, makes no mention of theislands.

Cumberland, a port of the island of Cuba,anciently called Guantanamo; but the AdmiralVernon and General Werabort, who arrived herein 1741 with a strong squadron, and formed anencampment upon the strand, building at the sametime a fort, gave it this name in honour to theDuke of Cumberland. It is one of the best portsin America, and from its size capable of shelter-ing any number of vessels. The climate is salu-tary, and the country around abounds in cattleand provisions. Here is also a river of very goodfresh water, navigable for some leagues, andnamed Augusta by the said admiral. It is 20leagues to the e. of Santiago of Cuba, in lat. 20°71. and long. 75° 12' w.

Cumberland, another bay, of the island ofJuan Fernandez, in the S. sea. It lies betweentwo small ports, and was thus named by AdmiralAnson. It is the best in the island, although ex-posed to the n, wind, and insecure.

Cumberland Cumberland, an island of the province andcolony of Georgia, in N. America, near 20 milesdistant from the city of Frederick. It has twoforts, called William and St. Andrew. The first,which is at the s. extremity, and commands theentrance, called Amelia, is well fortified, and gar-risoned with eight cannons. There are also bar-racks for 220 men, besides store-houses for arms,provisions, and timber.

[Cumberland, a harbour on the e. side ofWashington’s isles, on the n, is, coast ofN. Ame-

C U M 559

rica. It lies s. of Skitikise, and n. of Cumma-shawaa.J

[Cumberland House, one of the Hudson’s baycompany’s factories, is situated in New SouthWales, in N. America, 158 miles e. n. e. of Hud-son’s 'house, on the s. side of Pine island lake.Lat. 53° 58' 7i. Long. 102° w. See NelsonRiver.]

[Cumberland, a fort in New Brunswick ;situated at the head of the bay of Fundy, on thee. side of its n. branch. It is capable of accom-modating 300 men.]

[Cumberland, a county of New Brunswick,which comprehends the lands at the head of thebay of Fundy, on the bason called Chebecton,and the rivers which empty into it. It has seve-ral townships ; those which are settled are Cum-berland, Sackville, Amherst, Hillsborough, andHopewell. It is watered by the rivers Au Lac,Missiquash, Napan Macon, Memrarncook, Pet-coudia, Chepodi^, and Herbert. The three firstrivers are navigable three or four miles for ves-sels of five tons. The Napan and Macon areshoal rivers ; the Herbert is navigable to its head,12 miles, in boats ; the others are navigable fouror five miles.]

[Cumberland, a town of New Brunswick, inthe county of its own name. Here are coal mines.]

[Cumberland, County, in the district of Maine,lies between Y ork and Lincoln counties ; has theAtlantic ocean on the s. and Canada on the w.Its sea-coast, formed into numerous bays, and linedwith a multitude of fruitful islands, is nearly 40miles in extent in a straight line. Saco river, whichruns s. e. into the ocean, is the dividing line be-tween this county and York on the s.w. CapeElizabeth and Casco bay are in this county. Cum-berland is divided into 24 townships, of whichPortlatid is the chief. It contains 25,450 inha-bitants.]

[Cumberland County`, in New Jersey, isbounded s. by Delaware bay, 7i. by Gloucestercounty, s. e. by cape May, and w. by Salemcounty. It is divided into seven townships, ofwhich Fairfield and Greenwich are the chief;and contains 8248 inhabitants, of whom 120 areslaves.]

[Cumberland, the «. easternmost township ofthe state of Rhode Island, Providence county.Pawtucket bridge and falls, in this town, are fourmiles 71. e. of Providence. • It contains 1964 inha-bitants, and is the only town in the state whichhas no slaves.]

[Cumberland County, in Pennsylvania,, is

Last edit over 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
Untitled Page 573

CUZCO.

571

tlie small river Guatanay ; the same being nearlydry, save in the months of January, February,and March ; though the little water found in itjust serves to irrigate the neighbouring plains.The grandeur and magnificence of the edifices,of the fortress, and of the temple of the sun, struckthe Spaniards with astonishment, when, at the con-quest, they first beiield them, and upon their en-tering the city.j in 1534, when the same was takenpossession of by Don Francisco Pizarrro, forCharles V^. It was then the capital of the wholeempire of Peru, and the residence of the empe-rors. Its streets were large, wide, and straight ;though at the present day Lima stands in compe-tition with it in regard to grandeur. The housesare almost all builtofstone, and of fine proportions.The cathedral, which has the title of La Asun-cion, is large, beautiful, rich, and of very goodarchitecture, and some even prefer it to the cathe-dral of Lima. Here are three curacies in thechapel of the Sagrario, two for the Spaniards, andanother for the Indians and Negroes ; and the pa-rishes are Nuestra Senora de Belen, San Christo-yal, Santa Ana, San Bias, S:intiago, and the hos-pital ; besides two others, which are without thecity, called San Geronirno and San Sebastian.Here are nine convents of the following religiousorders ; one of St. Dominic, founded on the spotwhere the Indians had their celebrat^sd temple ofthe sun ; two of St. Francis, one of the Observers,and another of the Recoletans, one of St. Au-gustiti, one of La Merced, two colleges whichbelonged to the regulars of the extinguished com-pany of Jesuits, the principal, in the part lyingtowards the c. being destined, at the present time,for an armoury ; and the other at the back of thesame, in which was the house for noviciates andstudents, serving now as barracks for the troops ;add to these the chapel of ease to the cathedral.Here are four hospitals ; the first and most ancientis that of the Espiritu Santo, in which are receivedIndians of both sexes, subject to the patronageof the secular cabildo, and governed by a junta ofS3 persons, the president of whom, the alcalde,has the first vote, and after him the administratoror first brother. It has two chaplains and veryample revenues ; one of the sources being the du-ties paid upon all effects passing over the bridgeof Yipuriraac, the which droits belonged to theroyal exchequer until the year 1763, at whichtime, at the instance of the king’s ensign, DonGabriel de Ugarte, they were conceded by theking to the hospital, together with the right andproperty of the bridge, in redemption of somecrown grants which were left to the hospital by

Rodrigo de Leon, in Seville ; and it was by thismeans that the hospital, having become so wellendowed, has now no less than 250 beds. A jubi-lee has been granted by the apostolical see to itschapel; and this is celebrated at the octave ofPentecost with much solemnity, and by an unusu-ally great concourse of people, and was once the bestobserved jubilee of any in America. The se-cond hospital, being of the religious order of SanJuan de Dios, is for the men, and has 50 beds;the third, called. Of Nuestra Senora de la Almu-dena, is for all descriptions of individuals, andhas also 50 beds ; the tburih, called San rlndres,has 30 beds for Spanish women. Here are threemonasteries of nuns ; the first of Santa Catalina dcSena, founded where the Incas kept the virginsdedicated to the sun ; and the others are of SantaClara and the bare-tboted Carmelites. Here arealso four other religious houses, which are that^ofthe Nazarenes, thatof Nuestra Senora del Carmen,that of Santiago, and that of San Bias ; three col-leges, which are, that of San Bernardo, whereinare taught grammar, philosophy, and theology,and was founded by a Aizcayan for the sons of theconquerors, having been formerly under thecharge of the regulars of the company of Jesuits,and at present under an ecclesiastical rector ; thatof San Borja, for the sons of the Indian caciques,where they are initiated in their letters, and in therudiments of music, at least as many of them asshow any disposition to this science, (this accom-plishment having been formerly taught by thesame regulars of the company) ; and that of SanAntonio Abad, which is a seminary and univer-sity, and is a very sumptuous piece of architec-ture. This city preserves many monuments of itsancient grandeur ; and amongst the rest, thegreat fortress built for its defence, which, althoughinjured by time, bears testimony to the powers ofthe Incas, and excites astonishment in the mindof every beholder, since the stones, so vast andshapeless, and of so irregular a superficies, areknit together, and laid one to fit into the other withsuch nicety as to want no mortar or other materialwhereby to fill up the interstices ; and it is indeeddifficult to imagine how they could work them inthis manner, when it is considered that they knewnot the use of iron, steel, or machinery for thepurpose. The other notable things are the baths ;the one of warm and the other of cold water ; theruins of a large stone-way, which was built by or-der of the Incas, and which reached as far aswhere Lima now stands ; the vestiges of some sub-terraneous passages which led to the fortress fromthe houses or palaces of the Inca, and in which pass-4 n ?

Last edit over 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
Records 31 – 37 of 37