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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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ABACU, a point of land on the S coast of the island of St. Domingo.

ABADES, a settlement of the province and government of Popayan, in the district and jurisdiction of San Juan de Pasto.

ABANCAY, a province and corregimiento of Peru, bounded on the E by the large city of Cuzco, (its jurisdiction beginning at the parish of Santa Ana of that city), and on the W by the province of Andahuailas; N by that of Calcaylares, forming, in this part, an extended chain of snowcovered mountains ; S by the provinces of Cotabamba and Aimaraez; S W by Chilques and Masques. It extends 26 leagues from E to W and is 14 broad. Its most considerable river is the Apurimac, which is separated from it at the N W and bends its course, united with other streams, towards the mountains of the Andes. This river is crossed by a wooden bridge of 80 yards long and 3 broad, which is in the high road from Lima to Cuzco, and other provinces of the sierra. The toll collected here is four rials of silver for every load of goods of the produce of the country, and twelve for those of the produce of Europe. The temperature of this province is mild, and for the most part salubrious, with the exception of a few vallies, where, on account of the excessive heat and humidity, tertian agues are not uncommon. It produces wheat, maize, and other grain in great abundance, and its breed of horned cattle is by no means inconsiderable; but its principal production is sugar, which they refine so well, that it may challenge the finest European sugars for whiteness : this is carried for sale to Cuzco and other provinces, and is held in great estimation. It also produces hemp, cloth manufactures of the country ; and in its territories mines of silver are not wanting, especially in the mountain which they call Jalcanta, although the natives avail themselves not of the advantages so liberally held out to them. Its jurisdiction comprehends 17 settlements. The repartimento, quota of tribute, amounted to 108,750 dollars, and it rendered yearly 870 for the alcabala. The following are the 17 settlements : The capital, Limatambo, Huanicapa, Mollepata, Curahuasi, Pantipata, Cachora, Pibil, Antilla, Chonta, Anta, Pocquiura, Ibin, Surite, Chachaypucquio, Huaracondo. Sumata,

Abancay, the capital of the above province, founded in a spacious valley, which gives it its title: it is also so called from a river, over which has been thrown one of the largest bridges in the kingdom, being the first that was built there, and looked upon as a monument of skill. In the above valley the jurisdiction of this province, and that of Andahuailas, becomes divided. It is also memorable for the victories gained in its vicinity by the king's troops against Gonzalo Pizarro, in the years 1542 and 1548. It has a convent of the religious order of St. Dominic ; this order being the first of those which established themselves in Peru. 20 leagues distant from the city of Cuzco. Lat. 13° 31' 30" S Long. 72° 26' W.7

Abancay, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Cuenca, in the kingdom of Quito, situate on the shore of the river Paute.

ABANES, a barbarous nation of Indians, of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, in the plains of San Juan, to the N of the Orinoco. They inhabit the woods on the shores of this river, as well as other small woods ; and are bounded, E by the Salivas, and W by the Caberres and Andaquies. They are docile, of good dispositions, and are easily converted to the Catholic faith.

ABANGOUI, a large settlement of the province and government of Paraguay. It is composed of Indians of the Guarani nation, and situate on the shore of the river Taquani. It was discovered by Alvar Nuñez Cabezade Vaca, in 1541.

ABARANQUEN, a small river of the province and government of Guayana, or Nueva Andalusia. It rises in the country of the Quiriquipas Indians, runs from S to N and enters the Aruy.

ABARY, a small river of Guayana, between the Berbice and the Demerary. See Mahaica.

ABBEVILLE County, in Ninetysix district, S. Carolina, bounded on the N E by the Saluda, and on the SW by the Savannah, is 35 miles in length and 21 in breadth ; contains 9197 inhabitants, including 1665 slaves.

ABBOTS, a small river of N. Carolina, which runs S W and enters the Pedi, at a little distance from the source of this river, in the territory of the Granville limits.

ABECOCHI, a settlement of Indians of S. Carolina, situate on the shore of the river Cousa. The English have a settlement here, with a fort for its defence.

ABEICAS, a nation of Indians of New France, bounded on the N by the Alibamis, and E by the Cheraquis. They live at a distance from the large rivers, and the only produce of their territory is some canes, which are not thicker than a finger, but of so hard a texture, that, when split, they cut exactly like a knife. These Indians speak the Tchicachan language, and with the other nations are in alliance against the Iroquees.

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are the ruins or some well made benches in the shape of couches, which have been much injured by time, and were there before the corning of the Spaniards. Lat. 13° 16' 30" s. Long. 74° 32' 30" w.

another settlement, of the same name in the province and corregimiento of Jauja, annexed to the curaey of Cochangara.

another settlement of the province and corregimiento of Tarma.

ACOBIMBILLA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Angaraes in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Conaica.

ACOCHALA, a very lofty mountain of the province and corregimienento of Lipes, in the arch- bishopric of Charcas, where there are some very fine silver mines, which are, however, little worked for want of hands.

ACOLA , a settlement of the province and cor- regimiento of Lucanas in Peru, annexed to the curacy of its capital.

ACOLMAN, San Agustin de , a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tez- coco, in Nueva Espana, situate in a pleasant valley of a benign temperature. There are some wards united to its district, and the number of its inhabitants, including these wards, amounts to 240 Indian families, besides a convent of monks of the order of St. Augustin.

ACOMA , a settlement of Nuevo Mexico, situ- ate on the shore of a river which enters the Grande of the N. between the settlements of San J uan and La Laguna. [It is on a high mountain, with a strong castle, and is the capital of the province. [Lat, 35° 24' «. Long. 106° 10'

ACOMACK , a county of the province and colony of Virginia, which preserves its Indian name. It is the largest county of the province, containing 200,925 acres of ground ; but not so well peopled as the others, and has only one parish, which is of the same name. Different rivers take their rise here ; among the most noted is the Clif>- sonossea,

ACOMAIO, a settlement of the province, and corregimiento of Huanuco in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Santa Maria del Valle, situate on the confines of the infidel Panataguas Indians.

another settlement of the province and corregimiento of Quispicanchi in Peru.

ACOMARCA, a settlement of the province and corregimityito of Vilcas Huaman in Peru, arinexed to the curacy of Vilcas.

ACOMES, a fall of the river Amariscoggin, in the prov'ince of Continent, one of the four w hich compose the colony of New England.

ACOMULCO, a settlement of the head settle- ment and alcaldia mayor of Zochicoatlan in Nueva Espana. It contains 12 Indian families, and is two leasrues to the w. of its capital.

ACONCAGUA, a province and corregimiento of the kingdom of Chile ; bounded n. by a part of the province of Quillota, e, by the Cordillera, s. by the valley of Colina, of the jurisdiction of Santiago, w. by the province of Quillota. Its territory is level and well watered. It is divided into two parts by a large river of the same name, having a bridge built of stone and mortar, w ith two arches. It produces abundance of wheat and much wild marjoram, which is carried to Peru, and forms the principal branch of its commerce. In this province is the royal road, lying through the Cordillera in the way to Mendoza, which is very rough and dangerous, on account of the many slopes and steep declivities towards the river ; the path is very narrow, and in various places it is necessary to open a pass by means of a pick-axe ; so that, if at any time the mules should crowd together, they would push each other into the river, w hich has not unfrequently been the case. The royal treasures are carried by this road from the month of Novem- ber to April and part of May. A few years since, some small houses of brick and mortar have been built on one or other side of the Cordillera, which they call casuchas (miserable huts) ; in these they put, in the winter time, some coal, biscuit, and hung beef, so that the couriers, providing them- selves with the keys of the doors at Mendoza, or, on the other side, at the Guardia of Aconcagua, may have something to live upon, incase they should be stopt by a fall of snow on their journey ; and with this precaution, a courier goes every month to Santiago, carrying with him the mails brought by the ships from Europe. In the winter it is customary to walk on foot over the snow, from Paramillo, which is three leagues from the top of the Cordillera, and four from its descent to tlie place which is called Los Ojos de Agua, through the valley of Putaendo ; but towards the ??. there is another way, which they call De Los Patos, which is the road generally taken in going to the city of San Juan ; but the Cordillera being more lofty here, it is only passable in the months of February and March. The inhabitants of this province amount, on an average, to 8000 souls. The capital' is San Felipe el Real. [Lat. 32° II' s. Long. 70° 12' 30" w. j

ACONCAGUA, a large river which runs through the above province, rising in the mountains of the Cordillera, and running through it by the side of the road which leads to Buenos Ayres : hrarcliing

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the same being the case with regard to the numerous rivers which intersect and fertilize the province ; all of them entering and augmenting the already abundant stream of the Mississippi. In the middle of the lake is a pyramidical mount, of above 100 yards in circumference, composed of a stone similar to crystal, and being the loftiest of any in the province. Its borders abound with cattle, called cibolas, a sort of wild cow, having the neck well covered with a long and soft wool, and affording delicious food to the natives. By the fat which they procure from the numerous anteaters, which breed here, they supply {he want of oil. There are also some castors, and other kinds of mountainanimals. Two leagues from the garrison.

Adaes, a river of the above province, which runs 5. e. in the district or country of the Indians, who give it the denomination ; and enters the river Mexicano.

[ADAIZE are Indians of N. America, who live about 40 miles from Natchitoches, below the Yattasses, on a lake called Lac Macdon, which communicates with the division of Red river that passes by Bayau Pierre. They live at or near where their ancestors have lived from time immemorial. They being the nearest nation to the old Spanish fort, or mission of Adaize, that place was named after them, being about 20 miles from them to the s. There are now but 20 men of them remaining, but more women. Their language differs from all others, and is so difficult to speak or understand, that no nation can speak ten Avoids of it; but they all speak Caddo, and most of them French, to whom they were always attached, and join them against the Natchez Indians. After the massacre of Natchez, in 1798, while the Spaniards occupied the post of Adaize, their priests took much pains to proselyte these Indians to the Roman Catholic religion, but, we are informed, were totally unsuccessful.]

[ADAMS, a township in Berkshire county, Massachusetts, containing 2040 inhabitants, is about 140 miles n. w. of Boston. In the n. part of this town is a great natural curiosity. A pretty mill stream, called Hudson's brook, which rises in Vermont, and falls into the n. branch of Hoosuck river, has, for 30 or 40 rods, formed a very deep channel, in some places 60 feet deep, through a quarry of white marble. Over this channel, where deepest, some of the rocks remain, and form a natural bridge. From the top of this bridge to the water is 62 feet ; its length is about 12 or 15, and its breadth about 10. Partly undcrthis bridge, and about 10 or 12 feet below it, is another, Which is wider, but not so long ; for at the e. end they form one body of rock, 12 or 14 feet thick, and under this the water flows. The rocks here are mostly white, and in other places clouded, like the coarse marble common at Lanesborough, and in other towns in Berkshire county.]

ADAMSTOWN, a town in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, containing about 40 houses; 20 miles n. e. of Lancaster.]

ADAUA, a river of the province and government of St. Juan de los Llanos, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It rises between the Meta and Meteta, runs e. and enters the Orinoco in the port of San Francisco de Borja.

ADAUQUIANA, a small river of the province and government of Guayana, or Nueva Andalucia, which rises near the sierra of Parime ; and running from to. to e. enters the sources of the Cauca.

ADA YES. See Mexicano River.]

ADDI, a settlement of the province and government of Sonora in Nueva Espana ; situate on the shore of a small river, between the settlements of Uquitoa and Tibutana.

ADDIS, a settlement of the island of Barbadoes, one of the Antilles ; situate in the district of the parish of Christ Church, on the s. coast.

ADDISON, a township of the district of Maine in Washington county, 10 miles s. w. of Machias, on the seaboard, between Englishmen's bay and Pleasant river. It was called No. 6. until it was incorporated in Feb. 1797.]

[Addison County], in Vermont, is on the e, side of lake Champlain, and is divided nearly int© equal parts by Otter creek ; has Chittenden county on the n. and Rutland county on the s. and contains 6449 inhabitants, dispersed in 21 townships. It is about SO miles by 27. A range of the green mountains passes through it. Chief town Middlebury, granted Nov. 1761.]

Addison, a town of the above county (Addison County), containing 401 inhabitants. It lies on lake Champlain, and is separated from Newhaven, on the e. by Otter creek. Snake mountains on the s. e. lie partly in this township, granted 1761.1

ADEQUATANGIE Creek, in New York state, is the eastern headwater of Susquehannah river.]

ADICONI, a port on the coast of the N. sea, in the province and government of Venezuela. It is e. of the peninsula of Paraguana.

[ADMIRALTY Bay, and Port Mulgrave, on the n. w. coast of America, lie in Lat. 59° 31' n. Long. 140° 18'.]

ADOLES, a settlement of Indians, of the pro-

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from which they are enabled to make sugar. It isintersected by three rivers, which are of no usewhatever to it, being too low in their beds ; but theyunite and form the Pachachaca, which enters theprovince of Abancay, and has more than 40 bridgesof wood and cord thrown over it in different parts.There are innumerable veins of gold and silver orein this province, which are not worked, from thewant of energy, and from the poverty existingamong the inhabitants ; and thus only some tri-fling emoluraeul is now and then derived from oneor the other. It was otherwise in former times,but these mines are now almost all filled with water.Some mines of quicksilver have been discovered,but the working of them has been forbid. Hereis little of the cattle kind, and no cloth manufac-tures peculiar to the country arc made here, withthe exception of a sort of thick quilt, which theycall Chuces ; and a kind of grain is gathered here,known by the name of Maino. This province wasunited to the empire of Peru by Capac Yupan-qui V. Emperor of the Incas. The language of thenatives is the same as that which is most universalthroughout the kingdom. The capital formerlyconsisted of a large and w ell ordered settlement,which was called Tintay, but which is at presentbut thinly inhabited, on account of the scarcity ofwater, and from a plague, in which almost all itsinhabitants perished. The number of souls in thewhole of the province may amount to 15,000. Iteontains 50 settlements within its jurisdiction. Theyearly tribute received by the corregidor used toamount to 800,100 dollars, and the duties paidupon the alcavahif (a centage on goods sold), to688 dollars.

The settlements of its jurisdiction are ;

Chaluanca. Ayahuasa.

Colca. Huancaray.

Mollebamba. Sabaino.

Carabaniba. Catarosi.

Matara. Antilla.

Antabamba. Huaquirca.

Oropesa. Pocoanca.

Totora. Tapairihua,

Traparo. ChalvauL

Chacoche. Caypi.

Caleauzo. Caracara.

Viru Sanaica.

Pampamarca. Huaillaripa.

Silco. Pichihua.

Atuncama. Amoca.

Chacna. Yanaca,

Capaya. Saraico.

Muitu. Subyunca.

Pachaconas. Lucre.

Sirca.Pichurhua.Colcabamba.Soraya.Huairahuacho.Toraya.

ChuquiBga.

Ancobainba.,

Pampayacta.

Chaj>imarca.^

Lambrama*

Pairaca.

AIMAHAPA, a small river of the province andcolony of Surinam, in the part of Guayana pos-sessed by the Dutch. It is one of those which en-ter the Cuyum near where it joins the Esquivo.

AINACA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Caxatambo in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Cochamarca.

AINACOLCA, a gold mine of the province andcorregimiento of Arequipa in Peru. It is famousfor the excellent quality of this metal, but it is verydifficult to be worked, on account of the hardnessof its stone.

AIO, a settlement of the province and corregUmiento of Condensuyos de Arequipa in Peru, an-nexed to the curacy of Chichas.

AIOAIO, a settlement of the province and cor-regirniento of Sicasica in Peru, eight leagues fromits capital.

AIOCUESCO, Santa Maria de, the headsettlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofAntequera, in the province and bishopric of Me-choacan in Nueva España. It is of a hot tem-perature, contains a convent of the religious orderof Santo Domingo, and 400 Indian families, whocarry on some commerce in the cochineal, (theplant producing which they cultivate), and a veryconsiderable one in the manufacture of Pulgues^on account of the abundance of Magueyes whichare found here. Seven leagues s. of its capital.

AIOTITLAN, the head settlement of the dis-trict of the alcaldia mayor of Amola in NuevaEspana, immediately upon the coast of the S. sea,and situate between two deep ravines. Its tem-perature is very hot and troublesome to live in, onaccount of the various venomous animals and in-sects that abound in its territory. It contains 76Indian families, whose trade consists in makingtroughs and trays very finely painted. This set-tlement, in which there is a convent of the orderof St. Francis, is beautifully surrounded withplantations. Fifteen leagues distant from its capital.

AIONANTOU, a settlement of Indians of NewFrance, situate in the county of Canahoque, on theshore of one of the salt marshes that are foundthere.

AIOZINAPA, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Olinala, and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa, inNueva España, of a hot and moist temperature,?,ijd abounding in cochineal, fruit, and pulse, with2

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ALACLATZALA, a branch of the head set-tlement of the district of S. Luis, of the coast andalcaldia mayor of TIapa in Nueva España. Itcontains 125 Indian families, and is one leaguefrom the settlement of Quanzoquitengo.

ALACRANES, some islands, or rather somehidden rocks, of the N. sea, in the bay of Mexico,opposite the coast of Yucatan. Those who navi-gate these parts are accustomed to pass round be-yond them for fear of venturing amongst them, al-though there are some good cliannels among them,and withgood soundings. They are for the most partbarren, producing nothing beyond a herb calledmoron, -And deficient in fresh water ; neither do theyproduce any animal except the mole, which isfound here in prodigious numbers. There are,however, a quantity of birds, of three distinct sorts,each forming a community of itself, and entirelyseparated from the other two ; and it has beenobserved, that if one party may have fixed uponany place for building their nests, the others neverthink of disturbing them, or driving them from it ;but the noise these birds make is so great, that onecannot pass near them without suffering consider-ably from their united clamours.

[ALADAS, a parish situate about 14; leaguess. e, of Corrientes, in Lat. 28° 15' 20" s. Long. 58°SO' e».]

ALAHUIZTLAN, San Juan de, a branchof the head settlement of the district of Escateopan,and alcaldia mayor of Zaqualpa, in Nueva España.It contains 270 Indian families.

ALAIN, a river of the province and govern-ment of Mainas in the kingdom of Quito. It risesin the country of the Locamas Indians, runs fromj. to n. and turning to the n. n. e. enters the Pucaré.

ALAMEDA, a settlement of the missions be-longing to the religious of St. Francis in NuevoMexico.

ALAMILLOS, a settlement of the province ofTaraumara and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya ; oneof the missions which belonged to the religious ofSt Francis. It is close to the town and real ofthe mines of Santa Eulalia.

ALAMO, a settlement of the province andgovernment of the new kingdom of Leon, situ-ate 15 leagues to the s. e. of the Point.

ALAMOS, Real de Los, Real de Los, a settlement andreal of the mines of the province of Sinaloa inNueva España. It is situate s. e. of the SierraMadre, and surrounded by rich silver mines,which would produce abundantly but for want oflabourers. There are in its district five estatesthat are fertile in maize, French beans, and sugar-cane. The spiritual concerns of all these parts

are under the direction of a curate, whose jurisdic-tion extends as far as the river Mayo, which flowsdown from the sierra. It is 20 leagues distantfrom the town of Tuerte, and between these liesthe valley of Maquipo. [Population 7900 souls]

Alamos, with the dedicatory title of S. Jorge,a town of the province and captainship of Para inBrazil, founded by Jorge del Alamo, who gaveit his name, in a place called La Vigia. It has amagnificent parish church, with the title of NuestraSenora de Nazareth, with a large and good fort,and well furnished with artillery. Also, at the dis-tance of a league and an half from the settlement,is a house of charity belonging to the religiousorder of the Capuchins of La Piedad.

Alamos, another town of the province and go-vernment of Sonora, in the line that divides theconfines of this jurisdiction and the province ofOstimuri, between the rivers Hiaqui and LaSonora.

Alamos (Sonora near Coro de Guachi), another settlement of the same pro-vince and government as the former, situate tothe s. of the garrison of Coro de Guachi.

Alamos, another of the missions belonging tothe abolished society of Jesuits, in the provinceof Taraumara and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya.It is 27 leagues s. w. and a quarter of a league s.of the real of the mines and town of S. Felipe deChiguaga.

Alamos, another settlement and real of thesilver mines of the province and government ofCinaloa.

ALANGASI, a settlement of the kingdom ofQuito, in the district of the corregimiento of theCinco Leguas de la Capital. In its territory is afountain of hot medicinal waters.

Alangasi, a river of the above corregimiento,and rising in the desert mountain of Sincholagua ;over it there is a large bridge, composed of a singlearch, but so strong, that when, in 1660, a partof the mountain fell upon it, and precipitated onehalf of it into the stream, the other half still re-mained firm and immoveable. This bridge isbuilt of mud and stone.

ALANIS, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Maracaibo, in the district of the cityof Merida, situate in the way whicE leads fromthis city to the new kingdom of Grenada.

ALANGI, Santiago de, a city and headsettlement of the district of the province of Chi-riqui and government of Santiago de Veragua,in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. It is small, butabounding in fruits and cattle ; in which a regulartrade is carried on for supplying the city of Pa-nama. This trade consists principally in pigs.

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nardo. On the shore at its mouth the French,under Robert la Sale, made their first establish-ment in the year 1683.

(CANELON, a town of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Ayres, situate on a branch ofthe river of the same name, about seven leaguesn. of Monte Video. Lat. 34° 35' 23" s. Long.56° 15' w.)

CANELONES, River of the, in the provinceand government of Buenos Ayres. It runs to thes. and enters the sea on the coast of the Rio de laPlata, on the side of Monte Video.

CANELOS, a large province of the kingdomof Quito, discovered by Gonzalo Pizarro in theyear 1540, who gave it this name on account ofthe quantity of cinnamon trees found in it, whichgrow very strong, shedding an odour somethinglike camphor, and very pungent. This cinnamon,which is called raspado, is carried to Quito, andsold at six reals a pound, being made use of in-stead of the fine cinnamon. A small viper is fre-quently met with in it of the same colour as thecinnamon, and extremely venomous. This pro-vince is uncultivated, full of impenetrable forestsand rivers, and contains only one settlement of thesame name, on the n. shore of the river Bobonaza,in which is the port of Canoas, and the residenceof a religious Dominican, who is the curate ofthose few miserable Indians. In lat. 1° 32' 20" s.

CANES AND Canches, a province and cor-regiminto of Peru, bounded on the e. by Cara-baya, towards the town of Mauclani, on the s. e.by Lampa in the cordillera of Villacanota, onthe s. by Cailloma, s. e. by a part of the provinceof Condesuios of Arequipa, w. by Chumbivilca,being divided by the river Apurimac, and n. w.by Quispicanchi. It is in length from n. to s.30 leagues, and 15 in width : Its climate is, forthe greater part, extremely cold, on account ofits being nearly covered with mountains of snow ;nevertheless they cultivate here barley, maize,potatoes, cavi, and quinoa; and in the warm parts,which consist of uneven and broken grounds nearthe rivers, some kinds of fruit, though in no abun-dance. Here also are great quantities of animalswhich breed upon the mountains from the luxu-riance of the pastures ; and of these are the vigog-nes, huanacos, and viscachas, which latter are aspecies of hare or rabbit ; deer also, and par-tridges, abound here. In the rivers are foundbagres a foot in length. The principal riverswhich water this province, are the Vilcamayo,which runs from the province of Quispicanchi,into which runs another flowing down from thesnowy sierras on the e. part called Combapata.

This river has a stone bridge, and descends fromthe heights of Cailloma. This province has manylakes, which are filled with water-fowl, such asducks, widgeons, and others ; these birds arefound more particularly in lake Lanchug, which isthree leagues long and one and a half broad, andin it there is also found the load-stone. Linencloth is fabricated here. In the district of SanPedro de Cacha, in a place called Rache, there isan ancient and grand edifice with nine gates, halfof the walls of which, as high as the first stories,are made of carved stone ; the rest of the edificebeing of earth upon five galleries of stone, formingas it were so many other walls. This building issaid to have served as a temple in Viracocha in thetime of the gentilism of the Indians. At a smalldistance there is an artificial lake with aqueductswhich keep it always at a proper height ; thislake is situate upon a black mountain, which maybe about two leagues in circumference ; also inthe same vicinity are vestiges of a considerablepopulation, and here is found a mineral earthfrom which they fabricate jars, large pitchers, and other vessels, which are carried to be sold in theneighbouring provinces. In this province aremany mines of silver, but they are not worked, onaccount of their being some of them filled withwater, and some of them broken in, with the ex-ception, however, of those of Condoroma, which,although they have experienced the former ca-lamity, do not fail to render yearly many marksof gold, a pretty good testimony of their riches.Great indeed have been the labour and expence inthe attempts to empty them of the water, but inthis they have not as yet succeeded. Here are alsofour good sugar-mills ; and in the jurisdiction ofthe town of Yauri, are two mines of copper, whichare worked : Some gold mines also are not wanting,although they be of little note. In the establish-ment of Condoroma it is not unusual to expe-rience, in the tempests of thunder and lightning,a sort of prickly sensation on the hands and feetand other parts of the body, which they call mos-cas, or flies, without, however, being able todiscover any of these insects ; and it should seemthat the effect is to be attributed to the state of theatmosphere, since the heads' of canes, buckles,and silver or gold galloons, though during suchtimes highly affected by the electric matter, ceaseto be so on the cessation of the tempest. The in-habitants of this province amount to 18,000 souls, dwelling in 24 settlements, which are,

Sicuani, Tunganuca,

San Pablo, Yanacoa,

Chacuyupi, Layo,

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300

CARACAS.

years after Cumana, 39 after Coro, 33 afterBarcelona, and 15 after Barquisimeto.

2. Ils privileges.— It is the capital, not only ofthe province of Venezuela, but likewise of thatimmense extent of country occupied by the go-vernments of Maracaibo, Barinas, Guayana, Cu-mana, and the island of Margareta ; since it is theseat as well of the captain-generalship, the political 'and military authority of which extends over allthese provinces, as of the royal audience, of theintendancy, and of the consulate, the jurisdictionof which extends as far as the captain-general-ship.

3. Temperature.— Its temperature does not atall correspond with its latitude ; for, instead ofinsupportable heat, which, it would appear,ought to reign so near the equator, it, on thecontrary, enjoys an almost perpetual spring. Itowes this advantage to its elevation, which is 460fathoms above the level of the sea. Thus, al-though the sun has the power usual in such a lati-tude, the elevated situation of Caracas counter-balances its influence. The transitions from heatto cold are great and sudden, from whence nume-rous diseases arise; the most common of which arecolds, called by the Spaniards catarros.

4. Meteorology.— Height of Fahrenheit’s ther-

mometer at Caracas.

In the winter.

Generally at 6 A. M 58°

2 P. M. ' ... 73

10 P. M 68

The maximum .... 76The minimum . . . .52

In the summer.

Generally at 6 A. M 72°

2 P. M 79

10 P. M 75

Maximum . . . . .85

Minimum ..... 69Humidity, according to the hydrometer of Duluc.

Generally 47

Maximum 58

Minimum 37

The mercury, which rises in the most s. partsof Europe, and in the variations of the atmo-sphere to 1 l-12ths of the Paris inch, ascends only2-12ths in the e. parts of Tierra Firme. They ob-serve at Caracas, in all the seasons, four small at-mospherical variations every 24 hours, two in theday, and two in the night.

5. Blue of the skies by the cyanometer of Seaus-sure.

Generally .... 18

6. Oxigen and nitrogen gas. — Of 100 parts, 28of oxj'^gen and 72 of nitrogen.

The maximum of the first is 29The minimum . . . 27f

7. Variation of the needle.

Sept. 27th, 1799 . . 4° 38' 45"

8. Inclination of the dipping needle. Generally^^4-so- Oscillation of the pendulum : in 15 minutes,1270 oscillations.

9. Situation. — The city of Caracas is built in avalley of four leagues in length, in a direction frome. to w. and between that great chain of mountainsAvhich runs in a line with the sea from Coro to Cu-mana. It is, as it were, in a basin or hollow form-ed by this chain ; for it has mountains of equalheight to the n. and to the s. The city occupies aspace of 2000 square paces ; the ground on whichit stands remains as nature formed it, art havingdone nothing towards levelling it, or diminishingits irregularities. The declivity is every wheredecidedly from the s. : the whole of it is 75 fa-thoms perpendicular from the gate De la Pastorato the n. unto the river Guaire, which bounds thecity to the s.

10. Its waters. — It derives its waters from foursmall rivers. The first, which is called Guaire,bounds it entirely on the s. part without pene-trating into the city. Although this be scarcelyconsiderable enough to deserve the name of a river,it is too large to pass by the name of a rivulet. Thesecond, which bears the name of Anauco, watersthe e. side of the town ; and the part where it ap-proaches nearest is called Candelaria, where thereis built a handsome bridge, facilitating the com-munication with the valley of Chacao. The thirdis the Caroata : its course is from n. to s. throughall the w. part of the city, and separates it fromthe quarter called St. John, which parts are unitedby a stone bridge of a sufficiently solid construc-tion, but the regularity of which does not equalthat of the Candelaria. The fourth is named Ca-tucho, to which the city owes the waters of an in-finite number of public and private fountains ; yetthe inhabitants of Caracas, insensible to its bene-fits, suffer it to run in the same channel that timehas made for it, and amidst all the deformitieswhich the rains have occasioned ; for the fourbridges of communication which are thrown acrossit are rather to be considered the offsprings of ne-cessity than as objects of ornament. These fourrivers, after having served all the domestic uses ofthe city, run in one single channel across the valleyof Chacao, which is covered Avith fruits, provi-sions, and merchandize ; and, mixing their wa-]

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[crowded with poor of both sexes, who Iiave noother subsistence than what tliey derive from alms,and who prefer these means of living to that oflabour. It is feared that the indiscriminate cha-rity exhibited liere is productive of the worst ef-fects ; that it affords to vice the means of remain-ing vicious. The police are indeed acquaintedwith these abuses, but cannot repress them withoutthe imputation of impiety. To form a correct ideaof the number of mendicants that wander in the.streets, it is but necessary to know that the arch-bishop distributes generally alms every Saturday ;that each mendicant receives a half-escalin, orl-16th of a dollar ; and that at each of these piousdistributions there is given a sum of from 75 or 76dollars, wliich should make the number of beggarsat least 1200 ; and in this list are not included thosewho are ashamed to beg publicly, and to whomthe worthy prelate D. Francis d’lbarra, a Creoleof Caracas, distributes certain revenues in secret.The cabildo^ composed of 22 members, and se-conded by the alcaldes de barrio, who are magis-trates distributed throughout the wards of the city,would be more than sufficient to manage the af-fairs of the police ; but the presence of the higherauthorities, who wish to share the prerogatives ofcommand, has made a division of all matters ofpolice between the governor, the lieutenant-go-yernor, and a member of the audience, who, underthe title of judge of the province, exercises its func-tions in conjunction with the authorities just men-tioned.

25. Communications with the interior. — Caracas,the centre of all the political, judicial, fiscal, mili-tary, commercial, and religious concerns of its de-pendencies, is also naturally that of all the com-munication in the interior. The roads are almostevery where just traced, and nothing more. Themud and overflowing of the rivers, over whichthere are neither bridges nor passage-boats, renderthem impracticable in the rainy season ; and in nopart of the year are they convenient. They countthe distance by a day’s journey, and not by leagues :but a fair computation of a day’s journey is 10leagues, of 2000 geometrical paces each. Theorders transmitted by the governor to the severaltowns of the interior arrive there by expre.ss, andcommunications of whatever nature are returnedby the same means. There are no regular courierssetting out from the capital, excepting for Mara-caibo, Puerto Cabello, Sante Fe, Cumana, andGuayana. All the towns situate on the roads tothese four chief places enjoy the advantages of apost. The courier for Maracaibo sets out fromCaracas every Thursday evening at six o’clock ;

it carries the letters of Victoria, Tulmeco, Mara-cay, Valencia, St. Philip, Puerto Cabello, andCoro ; it is 10 days going from Caracas to Mara-caibo, and arrives from Maracaibo at Caracas ol’ vevery 15th day, but from Puerto Cabello everyTuesday. On the 6th and 22d of each month,a courier sets out from Caracas for Santa Fe ; itcarries the letters of San Carlos, Guanare, Araux,Tocayo, Barquisimeto, Barinas, Merida, Carta-gena, Santa Marta, and Peru ; and arrives, or oughtto arrive, the 4th and 20th of each month ; it isgenerally 42 days in going from Caracas to SantaFe. The courier of Cumana and Guayana arrivesat Caracas once a month ; it proceeds, or stops,according to the state of the roads and rivers.Five days after its arrival at Caracas it sets outagain. The letters for Guayana go directly fromBarcelona by a courier ; and those for Cumana andMargareta by another. This arrives at its placeof destination in 12 days, and that of Guayanain SO days.

26. With Spain . — The official letters from Spainarrive at Caracas every month. A king’s packetsails on one of the first three days of each monthfrom Coruna, touches at the Canaries to leavetheir letters, then sails for the Havanah, andleaves in its way to Puertorico the letters addresser!as well for that island as for tim government ofCaracas. The latter are immediately forwardedby one of the little vessels kept for this service.During war the mail from Spain, instead of touch-ing at Puertorico, leaves the letters for Caracasand its dependencies at Cumana, and those for thekingdom of Santa Fe at Cartagena, and finally al-ways proceeds to the Havanah, from whence itsdeparture for Spain is regular and periodical.The answers from Caracas, even those that are of-ficial, are sent to Spain by the merchant vesselswhich sail from Guaira to Cadiz.

27. Geographical and statistical notices of thecapt amship'general of Caracas, and present his-torij. — Depons’ Voyage to the e. part of TierraFirme, or the Spanish main, in S. America, com-prises an ample description of this region ; and isthe principal authority for the anterior and subse-quent notices. This territory is situate betweenthe 12th degree of«. latitude and the equinoctial.It comprehends

Venezuela, containing

500,000 inhabitants

Maracaibo,

100,000

Cumami,

80,000

Spanish Guayana,

54,000

Isle of Margareta,

14,000

728,000 ]

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CARTAGENA.

San Nicolas de laPaz,

San J uan de lasPalmas,

Pueblo Nuevo,Santero,

Lorica,

San Nicolas deBari,

San Bernardo A-bad,

Morales,

Babilla,

Tablada,

Tiquicio de Aden-tro,

Tiquicio de Afu-era,

Majagua,

Nechi,

San Marcos,

San Pelajo,

Zerete,

Zienega del Oro,San Carlos de Co-losina.

San Geronimo deBuenavista.

The capital is a large city adorned with beauti-ful buildings, founded by Pedro de Heredia in1533, on the shore of a great and very convenientbay more than two leagues in length. It was call-ed Calamari in the time of the Indians, which sig-nifies, in their language, the land of craw-fish, fromthe abundance of these found in it. It is situateon a sandy island, which forming a narrow strait,gives a communication to the part called TierraBomba ; on the left it is entered by a woodenbridge, having a suburb called Xiximani, whichis another island uniting with the continent bymeans of a bridge in the same manner as itself.It is well fortified, and is the residence of a go-vernor, with the title of captain-general, dependenton the viceroy of Santa Fe, having beeu indepen-dent till the year 1739. Besides the precinct andbastions, it has a half-moon, which defends theentrance or gate ; and at a small distance is thecastle of San Felipe de Baraxas, situate on aneminence, and on the side of the bay the castles ofSan Luis, Santa Cruz, San Joseph, San P'elipe,and Pastelillo, which were rebuilt in a modernmanner, in 1654;, by the Lieutenant-general DonIgnacio de Sala, with the names of San Fernando,San Joseph, El Angel, and El Pastelillo. Thecathedral church is magnificent, and included in itis the parish of Sagrario, besides two other pa-rishes called La Trinidad and Santo Toribo. Ithas the convents of monks of St. Francisco, St.Domingo, St. Augustin, St. Diego, La Merced,and San Juan de Dios, which is an hospital, andsituate at the top of a high mountain without thewalls of the city, at a quarter of a league’s dis-tance from the convent of the barefooted Augustins,called Nuestra Senora de la Popa ; to this con-vent vessels are accustomed to offer up a salutationas soon as they discover it at sea. It has also acollege which belonged to the society of Jesuits,a convent of Santa Clara, one of the Observersof San Francisco, and another of barefooted Car-

melites. At a small distance without the city isthe hospital of San Lazaro for lepers, which ma-lady is epidemical in the country. It has also atribunal of the inquisition, established in 1610, ofwhich there is only three in all America, and put-tingthis city, in this pointof view, onafooting withthe metropolitan cities Lima and Mexico. It is thehead of a bishopric erected in 1534 by his holinessClement VII. The bay abounds in fish of variouskinds, but it is infested by marine wolves. Theclimate of this city is very hot ; from May to No-vember, which are the winter months, thunder,rain, and tempests are very frequent, but fromthis inconvenience they derive an advantage offilling with water their cisterns, called aijibes, andwhich afford them the only supply of this inostnecessary article ; accordingly every house is fur-nished with one of these cisterns : from Decemberto April, which is the summer, the heat is exces-sive, occasioning continual perspiration, whichdebilitates the frame, and causes the inhabitants tohave a pale and unhealthy appearance, althoughthey nevertheless enjoy good health, it being notunusual to find amongst them persons exceeding80 years of age. The irregularity of this climateproduces several very afflicting disorders, as theblack vomit, which is most common amongststrangers and sea-faring people, few of whom havethe luck to escape it, but no person ever has ittwice. The inhabitants are likewise much trou-bled with the leprosy, or disease of St. Lazarus ; theculebrilla, which is an insect which breeds under theskin, and causes a swelling which is accustomed toterminate in gangrene and spasms or convulsions :besides these inconveniences, there are multitudesof troublesome insects which infest the houses,such as beetles, niguas, scorpions, centipeds, andmorcielagos. The largest trees are the caob, thecedar, the maria, and balsam ; of the first aremade canoes, out of the solid trunk, for fishing andcommerce ; the red cedar is better than the white,and the two last, not to mention their utility fromthe compactness of their timber, for their delicioussmell and beautiful colour, are the trees fromwhence are procured those admirable distillationscalled the oil of Maria and balsam of Tolu. Hereare also tamarind trees, medlars, sapotas, papai/as,cassias, and Indian apple trees, producing deli-cate and pleasant fruits ; the fruit, however, of thelast mentioned is poisonous, and many who, de-ceived by the beauty of these apples, have therashness to taste them, soon repent of their folly,for they immediately swell to a distressing degree :so if perchance any one should sleep under itsbranches, he will be afflicted in the same way.

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certain seasons of tlie year it is so filled withfish, for seven leagues from its mouth, that theIndians are accustomed to harpoon them from theshores.

Cauten, a point of land, or cape, which is oneof those which form the entrance of the formerriver.

CAUTO, a settlement of the s. coast of the islandof Cuba; situate on the shore of a river whichbears the same name.

CAUX, Montanas de, mountains in the pro-vince and government of French Guinea, whichrun along the shore of a river of the same name, be-tween the rivers Orapu and Aprovaque.

(CAVALLO, as some erroneously spell it, asea-port town in the province of Venezuela, inTierra Firme. Lat. 10'’ 28'. Long. G8° 8'. SeeCabello Pderto and Cavello Puerto.)

(CAVAILLON, a town on the s. side of thes. peninsula of the island of St. Domingo, aboutthree leagues n. e. of Les Cayes, and five w. by s.of St. Louis. Lat. 18° 18' w.)

(CAVELLO, Puerto, Borburata. Oneleague e. of Puerto Cavello, was originally the onlyresort of vessels trading to this part of Venezuela.Puerto Cavello was merely frequented by smugglers,fishermen, and the outcasts of the interior. Theold town is surrounded by tlic sea, excepting aspace of a few fathoms to tlie w. ; through whichthey have now cut a canal communicating to thesea on the n. of the town to that on the s. ; thusforming an island, the egress being by a bridgewith a gate which is shut every evening, and atwhich is placed the principal guard. This islandbeing too small for the increasing population,houses were built on a tongue of land to the w. ofthe town, which was the only part free from inun-dation ; and this has now become the residence ofthe merchants, and the principal place. The totalpopulation of Puerto Cavello is 7600, of which,excepting the military and the officers of govern-ment, none are of the nobility. The whites aregenerally employed in trade and navigation ; thechief correspondence being with the ports of thecontinent or the neighbouring colonies ; for, al-though the port has been open from 1798 to thetrade of the metropolis, there is as yet but. littlecommunication with it. Of about 60 vessels trad-ing to this place, 20 at least are from Jamaica, and20 from Cura 9 oa, whilst only four or five are fromSpain. According to the custom-house books, thecargoes of these veesels are of little value ; but therevenue is defrauded, and the vessels discharge theirlading on the coast before entering the port. Thisplace supplies all the w. part of Venezuela,

C A V

and the jurisdiction of Valencia, San Carlos, Bari-quisimeto, San Felipe, and a part of the valleys ofAragoa. About 20 Europeans engross the w holetrade. All vessels trading to the neighbourhoodresort here for repairs, and nothing but the un-wholsoraeness of the air prevents Puerto Cavellobecoming the most important port in America.This insalubrity arises from the exhalations fromthe rain water that accumulates in a clayey marshto the s. of the city. It is particularly fatal tothose who are not seasoned to the climate. In1793 a Spanish squadron anchored at Puerto Ca-vello ; but in six months of its stay, it lost one-thirdof the crew; and in 1802 a French squadron in20 days lost 16 i officers and men. It has beencomputed that 20,000 piastres fortes would be suf-ficient to drain this tatal marsh. The inhabitantsare supplied by conduits with water from a riverthat runs into the sea one- fourth of a league w. ofthe town. A military commander is also at thehead of the police, and is likewise the administra-tor of justice, his decisions being subject to an ap-peal to the royal audience. The people have de-manded the establishment of a cahildo, but withoutsuccess. They obtained in 1800 a single alcalde ywho is appointed annually ; but great inconveni-ences have been found to arise from this arrange-ment.

There is no convent, and but one church, inPuerto Cavello. The foundation of another churchwas begun, but for want of funds it has not beehcompleted. There is a military hospital, and an-other for the poor. The garrison consists of acompany of the regiment of Caracas in time ofpeace ; but daring war it is reinforced from themilitia and troops of the line. 'I'hcre arc from 300to 400 galley-slaves always employed onthepiiblicworks.

Puerto Cavello is 30 leagues from Caracas,in embarking for La Guaira, and 48 leaguesin the direction of Valencia, Maracay, Tulraero,La Victoria, atid San Pedro. Reaumur’s thermo-meter is generally in August at 26°, and in Janu-ary from 18° to 19°. Lat. 10° 20' «. Long. 70*30' w. of Paris. See Puerto Cabello.)

(CAVENDISH, a township in Windsor county,Vermont, w. of Wcathersfield, on Black river,having 491 inhabitants. Upon this river, andwithin this township, the channel has been worndown 100 feet, and rocks of very large dimensionshave been undermined and thrown down one uponanother. Holes are wrought in the rocks of va-rious dimensions and forms ; some cylindrical,from one to eight feet in diameter, and from one to15 feet in depth ; others are of a spherical form.

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CENEWINI, a port of the river Poumaron, inthe part of the province and government of Cuay-ana in the possession of the Dutch.

CENIS, a settlement of Indians of the provinceand government of Louisiana, situate in the roadwhich leads to Mexico. It has a fort whicli wasbuilt by the French when they had possession ofthe province.

CENOMANAS, a barbarous nation of Indians,descended from the Naunas, who live in the woods,and without any fixed abode, along the banks ofthe great river Magdalena.

CENOS, a barbarous nation of Indians, to then. of the river Marañon, w ho inhabit the woodsnear the river Aguarico. They are at continualwar with that of the Encabellados.

CENTA, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán. It runs from the z£. to e.and enters the Bermejo. The Fathers Antonio Sa-linis and Pedro Ortiz de Zarate, of the extin-guished company, suffered martyrdom upon itsshores whilst pn'aching to the barbarian Indians.

CENTERVILLE, the chief town of QueenAnne’s county, and on the e. side of Chesapeakbay, in Maryland. It lies between the forksof Corsica creek, which runs into Chester river,and has been lately laid out; 18 miles s. of Ches-ter, S4 s. e, by e. of Baltimore, and 93 s. xso. by s.of Philadelphia. Lat. 39° 6' n,~\

CEPEE, a small river of Nova Scotia, whichruns s. and enters the Miamis.

CEPEROUX, a French fort, called also SanLouis, in Cayenne ; situate at the mouth of theriver, and on a lofty spot commanding the en-trance of the same. It was taken by the Dutch in1676 ; and in the following year it was recoveredby the French ; which date has been mistaken byMons. Martiniere, who mentions it as having beenlost the year preceding.

CEPITA, a small settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Charcas in Peru, above thechannel of the great lake Titicaca, near the fa-mous bridge that was built by the Emperor CapacYiipanqui over the channel, and which is 160yards in length. The Indians of this settlementare diligent in keeping this bridge in repair, andassist in helping and directing the cavalcades whichare continmdly passing it,

CEQUER, a small settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Pastos in the kingdom ofQuito, to the n. of this city, and on the shore ofthe river Telembi. Its temperature is cold, and itis the direct road for such as are going to the pro-vince of Barbacoas.

CEQUIN, a mountain of the province of LosCanelos in the kingdom of Quito. Its skirts arewashed by the river Puyuc, and on the other sideby the Bobonasa : from it rise the rivers Tinguisaand Paba-yacu, which run from w. to e. until theyenter the Bobonasa. It is entirely covered withthick woods, save upon the top, where there isncifher tree nor plant.

CERCADO, a province and corregimiento ofPeru, bounded n. by that of Chancay, n.e. bythat of Canta, e. by that of Huarochiri, bythat of Cañete, and w. by the S. sea; is 13 leagueslong s. and eight wide at the widest part; is ofa very mild and kind temperature, but somewhatsickly ; and is neither subject to tempests nor highAvinds, although it is often visited by earthquakes.It only rains in the winter, and this is a speciesof small sprinkling shower which they call garua;so that they have no necessity for houses with roofs,and they are covered only with clay or mortar.The whole of its territory is fertile, and aboundsin seeds and fruits. The herb alfalfa, which isgood forage for horses, is particularly cultivated,there being a great demand for it at Lima. Hereare many estates of sugar-cane, from Avhich sugaris manufactured, as Avell as honey, and a kind ofdrink called guarape. Chica is also made here;this being the common drink of the Indiansthroughout the whole kingdom. It is irrigated bythe rivers Rinac and Lurin, which run downfrom the province of Guarochiri, and by the Car-rabayilo, which runs from the province of Canta :all three of them are small ; but in the months ofDecember, January and February, which is therainy season in the sierra^ they swell greatly. Itspopulation consists of seven parochial settlements,and as many others thereunto annexed. Its repar-timiento used to amount to 10,000 dollars, and itpaid an alcaxala of 80 dollars per annum. Thecapital is of the same name, and the other 14 set-tlements are,

Lurin,

Pachacamac,

Surco,

Chorrillos,

Magdalena,

Miraflores,

Lurigancho,

Huachipa,

Late,

Rinconada,

Carabayllo,

Laucon,

San Joseph de Bel-lavista.

Cercado, San Cristoval de, a settlementto the s. of the city of Lima, to which it is as asuburb. It is inhabited only by Indians, who aregoverned by a cazique ; and until 1776, it was acure of the regulars of the company of Jesuits,who had in it a college.

CERCELLES, a river of the island of Gua-dalupe. It rises in the mountains, runs e. and en-

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Luis de Cabrera, to make an cfl’ecliial discoveryof this nation, but he did not succeed. In 1662the innermost part of this country was penetratedby Fatlier Geronimo Montemayor, of the extin-guished company of Jesuits. He discovered anation of Indians, whose manners correspondedwith this ; but he did not succeed in establishingmissions, for want of labourers, and from other ob-stacles which arose.

CEUADAS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Riobamba in the kingdom ofQuito. On its n. side is a large estate calledZeogun.

Ceuadas, a very abundant river of the sameprovince and kingdom, from which the above set-tlement borrowed its title. It rises from the lake ofCoraycocha, Avhich is in the desert mountain or"pararno of Tioloma. It runs n. and passing bythe former settlement, becomes united witli anotherriver, formed by two streams flowing down fronrtheparamo of Lalangiiso, and from the waste watersof the lake Colta ; it then passes through the set-tlement of Pungala, its course inclining slightly tothe e. and at a league’s distance from the settlementof Puni, is entered by the Riobamba near the Cu-bigies, another river which flows down from themountain of Chimborazo, and following its courseto the«. for some distance, turns to the c.as soon asit reaches the w. of the mountain of Tungaragua,and at last empties itself into the Maranon ; rvhenit passes through the settlement of Penipe, it flowsin so large a body that it can be passed only bymeans of a bridge, which is built there of reeds ;and before it reaches the ba/ios or baths, it col-lects the Avaters of the Tacunga, Ambato, and otherrivers, Avhich flowing doAvn from the one and theother cordillera, have their rise in the s. summitof Eiinisa, and in the s. part of Ruminambi andCotopasci.

CEUALLOS, Morro de los, an island ofthe river Taquari, formed by this dividing itselfinto two arms to enter the river Paraguay, in theprovince and government of this name.

CEUICO, a small river of the island of St.Domingo. It rises in the mountains of the e. head,runs n. n. e. and enters the grand river Juna, a littlebefore it runs into the sea.

CHABACONDE, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Callahuas in Peru.

(CHABAQUIDDICK Isle belongs to Duke’scounty, Massachusetts. It lies near to, and extendsacross the e. end of Martha’s Vineyard island.)

CHABIN, a river of the province and corregi-miento of Valdivia in the kingdom of Chile. It

C H A 351

runs from w. to e. being navigable by small vesselstill it enters the S. sea.

CHABUCO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Valdivia in the kingdom of Chile.

CHACAIAM, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tarma in Peru.

CHACAICO, a settlement of Indians of theisland of Laxa in the kingdom of Chile ; situate atthe source and on the shore of the river Renayco.

CHACALTANGUIS, a settlement and headsettlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofCozamaloapan in Nueva Espana, is of a moisttemperature, and situate on the shore of the largeriver Alvarado. It contains seven families of Spa-niards, 18 of Mulattoes and Negroes, and 75 ofPopolucos Indians. Within its district are 19 en-gines or mills for making refined sugar ; and itsterritory produces maize and cotton in abundance ;is three leagues to the e. of its capital.

CHACALTONGO , Natividad de, a settlementand head settlement of the district of the alcaldiamayor of Tepozcolula, is of a cold temperature,and surrounded by eight wards within its district ;in all of which there are 160 families of Indians,who cultivate much maize and wheat ; is sevenleagues between the e. and s. of its capital.

CHACANORA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Caxamarca in the samekingdom.

CHACAO, a city of the island of Chiloe in thekingdom of Chile. It is the residence of the go-vernor, is garrisoned with a small guard, and hasthe best port in the island. Lat. 41° 50' s.

CHACAPA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Challana.

Chacapa, another settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chicas and Tarija, in the dis-trict of the former ; annexed to the curacy ofTupisa.

CHACAPALAPA, a settlement of the head set-tlement and alcaldia mayor of Ygualapa in NuevaEspana, is three leagues to the n. of that place.

CHACAPALPA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Guarochiri in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Santa Olaya.

(CHACAPOYAS. See Chachapoyas.)

CHACARACUIAN, a settlement of the pro-province and government of Cumaná in thekingdom of Tierra Firme ; situate in the mid-dle of the serrania of that province. It isunder the care of the Catalanian Capuchin fa-thers ; and, according to Cruz, on the coast ofthe sea of Paria.

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(country of the Iroquees Indians. It is handsomeand well built, on the margin of the river of thesame name, about 12 or 15 miles s. w. from Mont-real, and n. of St. John’s fort. It was taken bythe Americans, Oct. 20, 1775, and retaken by theBritish, Jan. 18, 1776. Lat. 45° 26' w.)

CHAMBO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Riobamba in the kingdom ofQuito.

Chambo, a very large river, which rises nearthe former settlement, and runs with such rapiditythat it cannot be forded ; is consequently passedover by means of various bridges made of osiers.

CHAME, a settlement of the alcaldia mayorof Natá in the province and kingdom of TierraFirme ; situate near a river, and two leagues fromthe coast of the S. sea. It produces maize, plan-tains, and other fruits ; swine, fowl, turkeys, andother birds, with which it supplies, by means ofcanoes, the markets of the city of Panama, fromwhence it is nine leagues distant.

CHAMELUCON, or Chamaleton, a river ofthe province and government of Honduras. Itruns n. and enters the sea in the gulf of this name,between La Caldera and the river Ulua.

CHAMETLA, a settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Guajuaha in Nueva España. It con-tains ISO families of Indians.

CHAMETLAN, a province and alcaldia mayorof Nueva España, also called Del Rosario ; bound-ed n. by the province of Culiacan, s. by that of Xa-lisco or Sentipac, e. and n. e. by that of Zacate-cas and Nueva Galicia, and w. by the S. sea ; is30 leagues long from e. to w. and 25 wide n. s. ;is of, a very hot temperature, and the greater partof it is a mountainous and rugged country, abound-ing in. noxious animals and insects, and on thisaccount uninhabitable in the summer and in therainy season. It was conquered by Don Juan deIbarra in 1554, has many mines of silver and gold,which were formerly worked, but which at presentare all abandoned, as well from their having filledwith water, as from the scantiness of the means ofthe inhabitants to work them. The royal mines,however, are productive of some emolument, andare in fafct the support of the place. It producessome maize, and much tobacco , and cotton, towhich article the soil is exactly suited, though notso to wheat, which yields here but sparingly. Onthe banks of the lakes formed by the sea, is left athick incrustation of salt in the month of April ;and although the inhabitants spare no pains to col-lect this valuable commodity, yet abundance of itis lost from the Avant of hands to collect it ere theheats come on, when it very quickly disappears.

Some large cattle are bred here. It is very badlypeopled, or, to speak more truly, it is as it weredesert, having only three settlements and someestates. It is irrigated by a river which flowsdown from the sierra Madre, and passes throughthe capital, the waters of which are made usefulfor the working of the mines. The same river entersthe sea two leagues from the settlement of Chamet-lan, and has abundance of fish, which are caughtwith ease, as well upon its shores as in marsheswhich it forms. Tlie capital, which is the resi-dence of the alcalde mayor, is the real del Ro-sario.

Chametlan, a settlement of the former alcaldíamayor ; from thence taking its name. It containsonly five or six Indians, and some Spaniards, Mus-tees, and Mulattoes, who, the greater part of theyear, live in the estates which they have for thebreeding of large cattle, and on the farms for thecultivation of maize and cotton.

CHAMESA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; annexed to the curacy of Nopsa. Itis of a cold temperature, and produces the fruitscorresponding to such a climate, particularlywheat, which is of the best quality. It contains100 Avhite inhabitants, and as many Indians, andis a little more than eight leagues from its ca-pital.

CHAMI, San Juan de, a settlement of theprovince and government of Chocó ; situate in thedistrict of Thatama, near the ruins of the city ofSan Juan de Rodas, to the w. of the city of San-tiago de Arma.

CHAMIANOS, a settlement of the provinceand government of Mainas in the kingdom ofQuito; situate on the shore of the river Gual-laga.

CHAMICUROS, S. Francisco Xavier de,a settlement of the missions which were held by theregulars of the company of Jesuits, in the provinceand government of Mainas, of the kingdom ofQuito ; founded in 1670 by the Father LorenzoLucero. '

CHAMILPA, San Lorenzo de, a settlementof the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Cuer-navaca in Nueva España.

CHAMPANCHIN, Sierra de, a chain ofmountains in the province and government of Tu-cumán, running s, s.e. on the shore of the riverQuarto.

(CHAMPLAIN,a township, the most n. in Clin-ton county, New York, which takes its name fromthe lake on which it lies. It was granted to someCanadian and Nova Scotia refugees, who were

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either in the service of the United States duringthe war, or fled to them for protection. The in-digence or ill habits of these people occasioned thebreaking up of the settlement, and a better sort ofinhabitants have now taken their place. The landsare fertile, and two rivers run through it, wellstored with fish. It has 575 inhabitants, and threeslaves. By the state census of 1796, 76 of the in-habitants are electors.)

CHAMPLAIN, a lake of the same province, ofmore than 20 leagues in length, and from 10 to12 in width, abounding in excellent fish. It wasdiscovered in 1609 by a French gentleman of tliename of Champlain, who gave it his name, whichit still retains. It communicates with a smallerlake called Sacrament, and the canal passing fromone side to the other of these is extremely rapidanddangerous, from the inequality of its bottom. Atthe distance of 25 leagues to the s, are some verylofty mountains, which are covered with snow, andin which are found castors and a variety 'of ani-mals of the chase; and between these mountainsand the aforesaid lake are some beautiful levelmeadows or llanuras^ which, when first discover-ed, were well peopled with Iroquees Indians ; butthese have greatly diminished in numbers, throughthe continual wars Avith the French and English.[This lake is next in size to lake Ontario, and liese. n. €. from it, forming a part of the dividing linebetween the states of New York and Vermont. Ittook its name from a French governor, who wasdrowned in it; it was before called Corlaer’s lake.Reckoning its length from Fairhaven to St.John’s,a course nearly n. it is about 200 miles ; its breadthis from one to 18 miles, being very different in diffe-rent places ; the mean width is about five miles, andit occupies about 500,000 acres ; its depth is suf-ficient for the largest vessels. There are in it abovesixty islands of different sizes : the most consider-able are North and South Hero and Motte island.North Hero, or Grand isle, is 24 miles long, andfrom two to four wide. It receives at Ticonderogathe waters of lake George from the s. s. w. whichis said to be 100 feet higher than the waters of thislake. Half the rivers and streams which rise inVermont fall into it. There are several which cometo it from New York state, and some from Cana-da ; to which last it sends its own waters a n.course, through Sorell or Chamblee river, into theSt. Lawrence. This lake is well stored with fish,particularly salmon, salmon trout, sturgeon, andpickerel, and the land on its borders, and on thebanks of its rivers, is good. The rocks in severalplaces appear to be marked and stained with theformer surface of the lake, many feet higher than

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it has been since its discovery in 160S. The wa-ters generally rise from about the 20th of April tothe 20th of June, from four to six feet ; the great-est variation is not more than eight feet. It is sel-dom entirely shut up Avith ice until the middle ofJanuary, Between the 6th and 15th of April theice generally goes off, and it is not uncomtiAon formany square miles of it to disappear in one day.]

CHAMPLE, a large unpeopled tract of theprovince of Taraumara, and kingdom of NuevaVizcaya, in which there is a mountain aboundinggreatly in silver mines. Here is also a missionAvhicli Avas established by the regulars of the com-pany for the reduction of the natives : is 12leagues n. e. of the town of Santa Eulalia.

CHAMPOTON, a river of the province andgovernment of Jucatan. It runs into the sea nearthe lake of Tenninas.

CHAMUINA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Costarica in the kingdom of Guate-mala. It empties itself into the S. sea near the li-mits of this jurisdiction, and of that of Chiriqui inthe kingdom of Tierra Firme.

CHAMULA, a settlement of the province andalcaldía mayor of Chiapa in the kingdom of Gua-temala.

CHANAR-PUGIO, a settlement of the provinceand government of Tucumán, in the district andjurisdiction of the city of Santiago del Estero, andeight leagues from the same.

CHANCAILLO, a small port of the S. sea, inthe province and corregimiento of Chancay, tothe n. of Lima ; little frequented, from lying ex-posed, and being insecure. In lat. 12° 3' 5.

CHANCAY, a province and corregimiento ofthe kingdom of Peru ; bounded n. by that of San-ta ; n. e. and n. by that of Caxatambo ; e. by thatof Cauta; and s. by the corregimiento of Cercado.It is 27 leagues in length from n. to s. and thesame in width e. w. and has on its coast some portsand creeks not remarkable for their security. Itcomprehends in its district two territories, one ofa cold temperature toAvards the cordillera, calledDe los Checras; and another of a warm tempera-ture, lying in the valleys towards the sea, calledDe Chancay. It is irrigated by two rivers, oneon the s. side, called Pasamayo, and the otherHuama, on the n. The latter has an arched bridge,which was built in the time of the viceroy, theMarquis de Montes Claros, the buttresses of whichare two rocks, through which the river passes.On the e. and in the cold part of this province,are found the productions peculiar to the cli-mate, such as papas, ocas, and some wheat andmaize. Here are also cattle, ot the fleeces of which

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at that critical moment received fresh succours,that were sent from Cuzco by his brother the Mar-quis Don Francisco Pizarro, he would have fallena sacrifice, with the whole of the Spanish army, tothat undertaking : but being invigorated by thisassistance, he succeeded in routing the Indians,and in obliging them to surrender to the Spanishgovernment. In 1539 the Marquis Don Fran-cisco Pizarro, seeing the importance of making anestablishment here, resolved upon building of atown, giving a commission to Captain Pedro Au-zures to execute the same. This person actuallyput into effect the plan suggested, founding thetown in exactly the same spot in which formerlystood the settlement of Chuquisaca. Here manyof its conquerors settled and became citizens, andthey gave it the name of La Plata, or Silver, fromsome mines of this metal which are found in themountain of Porco, which lies at a small distancefrom this city, and from which the Inca Emperorswere accustomed to extract immense emolument.Notwithstanding this name it has never lost itsoriginal title, Chuquisaca, although indeed it isbadly pronounced by the Spaniards ; since the In-dians, and with great propriety, will have it Cho-quezaca, Choquechaca, or Choquisacha; all ofwhich, however pronounced, signify, the first,moun-tains of gold ; the second, cunchos of gold, orfields of brambles with yellow twigs ; and the third,bridges of gold. Although this province is exten-sive, it is composed of various others, which weshall notice under their proper heads. This keepsits present name, from being the one of all theothers the most abounding in minerals, seeds, andcattle ; as well as being the one best peopled withIndians. It is watered by many large rivers ; andthe whole of it composes an archbishopric, towhich arc suffragan the bishoprics of La Paz,Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Tucuman, Paraguay,and Buenos Ayres. It belongs to the viceroyaltyof this latter place since the time that this waserected, and that the government was entrusted tothe royal audience established in 1559. The afore-said district comprehends in its jurisdiction allthe following provinces and corregimientos :Tomino, Cochabamba,

Porco, Chayanta,

Tarija, Paria,

Lipes, Carangas,

Amparaez, Cicasica,

Oruro, Atacama ;

Pilaya,

In which are contained 188 settlements and cura-cies, in which there were in 1651 about 100,000Indians. The capital of the whole jurisdiction is

the aforesaid city of Chuquisaca or La Plata. —[Charcas joined the new government of BuenosAyres in 1810. See La Plata,]

Those who have been Presidents in the RoyalAudience of Charcas.

1. The Licentiate Pedro Ramirez de Quinones,first president, in 1559.

2. The Licentiate Juan de Matienzo, a cele-brated jurisconsult, in 1580.

3. The Licentiate Zepeda, in 1588.

4. The Licentiate Alonso Maldonado de Torres,in 1606.

5. Don Juan de Lizarazu, knight of the orderof Santiago ; he passed over to the presidency ofQuito in 1612.

6. Don Diego de Portugal, in 1614.

7. Don Alonzo Perez de Salazar, who was pre-sident of Quito, and was promoted to this, wherehe governed until the year 1620.

8. Don Juan de Caravajal y Sande, promotedin 1633.

9. Don Dionisio Perez Manrique, knight ofthe order of Santiago, collegiate in the collegeof Los Manriques de Alcala, rector of the uni-versity there, oidor of Lima, and president ofQuito, from whence he was removed to be pre-sident of this audience of Charcas in 1646 ; whence,having exercised it till 1654, he was removed tothat of Santa Fe.

10. Don Pedro Vazquez de Velasco, who pre-sided until the year 1661.

11. Don Bartolome Gonzalez de Poveda, pro-moted in 1678 ; he was made archbishop of theholy church of Charcas, remaining in the presi-dency until 1688.

12. Don Diego Mesia, native of Lima, oidor ofits royal audience, and formerly of that of Quito ;he was promoted to the presidency of Charcas in1688.

13. Don Jorge Manrique de Lara, who wasoidor of Panama, afterwards of Charcas, as alsopresident.

14. Don Gabriel Antonio Matienzo, president in1723.

15. Don Francisco de Herboso, who was ap-pointed in 1725, and presided until 1732.

16. Don Agustin de Jauregui, knight of theorder of Santiago, and native of Lima.

17. Don Juan Francisco Pestana, adjutant-major of the regiment of Spanish guards ; he wasnominated in 1752, and presided until 1769.

18. Don Ambrosio de Benavides, who enteredin the above year, and presided until 1777.

19. Don Agustin de Pinedo, who succeededthe former, and governed until 1782.

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20. Don Ignacio de Flores, native of Quito,who had served as captain of cavalry in the regi-ment of the volunteers of Aragon, and who was go-vernor of the province of Moxos, being of the rankof colonel ; he was nominated as president by wayof reward for his services, in having been instru-mental to the pacification of the Indians of Peru,and to the succouring of the city of La Paz, whichwas besieged by rebels : he governed until 1786,when he was removed from the presidency.

Charcas, a ferocious and barbarous nation ofIndians of Peru, to the s.w. of the lakes of Aul-laga and of Paria ; conquered by Mayta Capac,fourth monarch of the Incas. At present theyare reduced to the Christian faith in the govern-ment of Chuquisaca or La Plata.

Santa Maria Charcas, a settlement, with the dedicatory titleof Santa Maria, being the real of the mines of thekingdom of Nueva Galicia, in which are markedthe boundaries of its jurisdiction, and those ofNueva Espana, the last district of the bishopric ofMechoacan. It contains a convent of the religi-ous order of St. Francis, and 50 families of Spa-niards, ilfwstees, and Mulattoes, as also many of In-dians dispersed in the rancherias and the estatesof its district: is 130 leagues to the n. J to then. w. of Mexico, 75 from Guadalaxera, and 18 tothe n. e. of the sierra of Pinos. Lat. 22° 55'.Long. 100° 40'.

Charcas, another settlement and real of themines of the province of Copala, and kingdom ofNueva Vizcaya ; situate two leagues from thecapital. In its vicinity are the estates of Panuco,in which they work with quicksilver the metals ofthe mines. To its curacy, which is adminsteredby one of the Catholic clergy, are annexed twosmall settlements of Serranos Indians, amongst whomare found some few of the Tepeguana nation.

CHARIMIZA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Mainas in the kingdom of Quito.It rises in the cordillera towards the s. and entersthe Maranon.

(CHARLEMONT, a township in Hampshirecounty, Massachusets, 16 miles w. of Deerfield,having 665 inhabitants.)

(Charles, a cape on the s.w. part of the straitentering into Hudson’s bay. Lat. 62° 40' n.Long. 75° 15' w.)

Charles, a small lake of New France, to then. of the city of Quebec, which empties itself intothe river St. Lawrence.

Charles, another cape or point of the coast ofthe country of Labrador ; one of those which formthe w. entrance or mouth of the strait of Belle-isle.

(Charles River, in Massachusetts, called an-ciently Quinobequin, is a considerable stream,the principal branch of which rises from a pondbordering on Hopkinton. It passes through Hollis-ton and Bellingham, and divides Medway fromMed field, Wrentham, and Franklin, and thenceinto Dedham, where, by a curious bend, it forms apeninsula of 900 acres of land. A stream calledlother brook runs out of this river in this town,and falls into Neponsit river, forming a naturalcanal, uniting the two rivers, and affording a num-ber of excellent mill-seats. From Dedham thecourse of the river is n. dividing Newton fromNeedham, Weston, and Waltham, passing overromantic falls ; it then bends to the n. e. and e.through Watertown and Cambridge, and passinginto Boston harbour, mingles with the waters ofMystic river, at the point of the peninsula ofCharlestown. It is navigable for boats to Water-town, seven miles. The most remarkable bridgeson this river are those which connect Boston withCharlestown and Cambridge. SeeBosxoN. Thereareseven paper mills on this river, besides other mills.][Charles County, on the w. shore of Maryland,lies between Potowmack and Patuxent rivers. Itschief town is port Tobacco, on the river of thatname. Its extreme length is 28 miles, its breadth24, and it contains 20,613 inhabitants, including10,085 slaves. The country has few hills, is gene-rally low and sandy, and produces tobacco, Indiancorn, sweet potatoes, &c.)

(Charles City County, in Virginia, lies betweenChickahominy and James rivers. It containedformerly part of what now forms Prince George’scounty. It has 5588 inhabitants, including 3141slaves.)

(Charles, a cape of Virginia, in about lat. 37°15' n. It is on the n. side of the mouth of Chesa-peak bay, having cape Henry opposite to it.]

Charles, a promontory in N. America, men-tioned by the English captain Thomas James, inhis voyage published 1663, which was made forthe sake of discovering a pass to S. America.

CHARLES. See Carlos, San.

CHARLESTON, a capital city of S. Carolina,is one of the best of N. America, excelling inbeauty, grandeur, and commerce. It is situateupon a long strip of land between two navigablerivers, which are Ashley and Cowper, and thegreater part of it upon the latter. This forms inthe city two small bays, the one to the n. and theother to the s. The town is of a regular construc-tion, and well fortified both by nature and art,having six bastions and a line of entrenchment ; onthe side of the river Cowper it has the bastions of

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Black, Granville, Craven, and a half-moon; onthe n. a line, and in front of the river Ashley thebastion of Colliton, and the covered half-moon ofJohnson, with a draw-bridge to pass the line, andanother to pass the half-moon. Besides these worksof regular fortification, it has a fort erected upona point of land at the entrance of the river Ashley,which commands the channel and the vessels : butthe bastions, the palisade, and the ditch on theland-side, having suffered much damage in anhurricane, and it being thought by the GovernorNicholson, that they were of too great an extent todefend themselves, they were by his command de-stroyed. This city is, as it were, a continual fair,being the market for the fruits of the whole pro-vince : the streets are well projected, and the edi-fices are grand and of fine architecture, especiallythe church, which is magnificent, spacious, andone of the best in all N . America : there are severalother churches belonging to different sects, and theFrench protestants have a very fine one in the prin-cipal street. The town consists of 800 housesbuilt of wood as to the greater part, although thereare some of stone ; all of them having glass win-dows, and manifesting a degree of elegance and or-nament in their structure : is the residence of thegovernor of the province, and in it is held the ge-neral assembly and the tribunal of judicature.Here are many rich nobles and opulent merchants,and almost all its inhabitants exhibit a costly ap-pearance, and live in a state of consummate luxury.It has a public library, which owes its establishmentto Doctor Thomas Bray. The liberty of con-science enjoyed in this city, and which was grantedto its inhabitants a short time after its foundation,caused it to become very populous. This effectwas further heightened by the extensive commerceit enjoyed ; and thus has it, with many other qua-lities of pre-eminence, become one of the finest set-tlements in America.

[Charleston, the metropolis of S. Carolina,is the most considerable town in the state; situatein the district of the same name, and on the tongueof land formed by the confluent streams of Ashleyand Cowper, which are short rivers, but large andnavigable. These waters unite immediately belowthe city, and form a spacious and convenient har-bour, which communicates with the ocean just be-low Sullivan’s island, which it leaves on. the n. sevenmiles s, e. of Charleston. In these rivers the tiderises in common about six feet and a half; but uni-formly rises 10 or 12 inches more during a nighttide. The fact is certain ; the cause unknown.The continual agitation which the tides occasionin the waters which almost surround Charleston,

the refreshing sea-breezes which are regularly felt,and the smoke arising from so many chimneys,render this city more healthy than any part of thelow country in the s. states. On this account it isthe resort of great numbers of gentlemen invalidsfrom the W. India islands, and of the rich plantersfrom the country, who come here to spend thesickly months, as they are called, in quest of healthand of the social enjoyments whicli the city affords ;and in no part of America are the social blessingsenjoyed more rationally and liberally than here.The following statement exhibits the greatest andleast height of Fahrenheit’s thermometer for severalyears past in Charleston.

Years.

Highest.

Lowest.

Years.

Highest.

Lowest.

1750

96

23

1759

93

28

1751

94

18

1791

90

28

1752

101

32

1792

93

30

1753

91

28

1793

' 89

SO

1754

93

22

1794

91

34

1755

90

26

1795

92

29

1756

96

27

1796

89

17

1757

90

25

1797

88

22

1758

94

25

1798

88

31

State of the weather for 1807, ending Decem-ber 31.

Thermometer, highest~ ’ lowest

92^ SO'

24°

58° 15'

30° 1' to 30° 77'

1 to 13142 inches IfN.E. S.W,

67

28

2

Ditto

Ditto meanBarometerHygrometerFall of rainPrevailing windsDays of rain

Do. of thunderDo. of snow

Unaffected hospitality — affability — ease of man-ners and address — and a disposition to make theirguests welcome, easy, and pleased with themselves,are characteristics of the respectable people ofCharleston. In speaking of the capital, it oughtto be observed, for the honour of the people ofCarolina in general, that when, in common with theother colonies, in the contest with Britain, they re-solved against the use of certain luxuries, and evennecessaries of life, those articles which improve themind, enlarge the understanding, and correct thetaste, were excepted ; the importation of bookswas permitted as formerly. The land on whichthe town is built is flat and low, and the waterbrackish and unwholesome. The streets are prettyregularly cut, and open beautiful prospects, andhave subterranean drains to carry off’ filth and keep]

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(the city clean and healthy ; but are too narrow forso large a place and so warm a climate. Theirgeneral breadth is from 35 to 66 feet. The houseswhich have been lately built are brick with tiledroofs. The buildings in general are elegant, andmost of them are neat, airy, and well furnished.The public buildings are, an exchange, a state-bouse, an armoury, a poor-house, and an orphan’shouse. Here are several respectable academies.Part of the old barracks has been handsomely fittedlip, and converted into a college, and there area number of students ; but it can only be called asyet a respectable academy. Here are two banks ;a branch of the national bank, and the S. Carolinabank, established in 1792. The houses for publicworship are, two Episcopal churches, two for In-dependents, one for Scotch Presbyterians, one forBaptists, one for German Lutherans, two for Me-thodists, one for French Protestants, a meeting-house for Quakers, a Roman Catholic chapel, anda Jewish synagogue. Little attention is paid tothe public markets ; a great proportion of the mostwealthy inhabitants having plantations, from whichthey receive supplies of almost every article ofliving. The country abounds with poultry andwild ducks. Their beef, mutton, and veal are notgenerally of the best kind ; and few fish are foundin the market. In 1787 it was computed that therewere 1600 houses in this city, and 15,000 inhabi-tants, including 5400 slaves ; and what evincesthe healthiness of the place, upwards of 200 of thewhite inhabitants were above 60 years of age. In1791 there were 16,359 inhabitants, of whom 7684were slaves. This city has often suffered muchby fire ; the last and most destructive happened aslate as June 1796. Charleston was incorporatedin 1783, and divided into three wards, which chooseas many wardens, from among whom the citizenselect an intendant of the city. The intendant andwardens form the city-council, who have power tomake and enforce bye-laws for the regulation ofthe city. The value of exports from this port, inthe year ending November 1787, amounted to505,279/. 19^. 5d. sterling. The number of vesselscleared from the custom-house the same year was947, measuring 62,118 tons; 735 of these, mea-suring 41,531 tons, were American ; theothers be-longed to Great Britain, Ireland, Spain, France, andthe United Netherlands. In the year 1794 the valueof exports amounted to 3,846,392 dollars. It is 60miles s. w. by s. of Georgetown, 150 e. by s. ofAugusta, 497 s. by w. of Richmond, 630 s. w. bys. of Washington city ; 763 s. w. by s. of Philadel-phia, and 1110 s. w. of Boston. Lat. 32° 48'.Long. 80° 2' w. Knoxville, the capital of the state

of Tennessee, is much nearer to this than to anysea-port town in the Atlantic ocean. A waggonroad of only 15 miles is wanted to open the com-munication ; and the plan is about to be executedby the state.)

Charleston, another capital city of the countyof Middlesex in New England; situate on thebank of the river Charles. It is well peopled andof a good construction, occupying the whole of thespace which lies between the aforesaid river andthat of Mystic, the former river dividing the cityfrom Boston, in the same manner as the Thamesdivides London from Southwark. It has a raft forthe traffic of the river instead of a bridge, the fareor produce of which belongs to the college of Nor-wood in the city of Cambridge, which is close by :this city is as it were the half of Boston, and itssituation, as being upon a peninsula, is very ad-vantageous. At certain times it has fairs, and isthe meeting place for the assembly of the county.It has a very large and handsome church, and amarketplace, ornamentally and conveniently situateon the river side, at which there are sold all kindsof flesh, fish, and other necessaries ; it has twolarge streets leading to it. The river is navigable,and runs through the country for many leagues. Isin Lat. 42° 24' n. Long. 71° 6' ay.

(CHARLESTOWN, the principal town inMiddlesex county, Massachusetts, called Misha-wun by the aboriginal inhabitants, lies n. of Boston,with which it is now connected by Charles riverbridge. The town, properly so called, is built ona peninsula formed by Mystic river on the e. anda bay setting up from Charles river on the w. Itis very advantageously situated for health, naviga-tion, trade, and manufactures of almost all the va-rious kinds. A dam across the mouth of the bay,which sets up from Charles river, would afford agreat number of mill-seats for manufactures. Bun-ker’s, Breed’s, and Cobble (now Barrell’s) hills,are celebrated in the history of the American revo-lution. The second hill has upon its summit amonument erected to the memory of Major-generalW arren, near the spot where he fell, among thefirst sacrifices to American liberty. The brow ofthe hill begins to be ornamented with eleganthouses. All these hills afford elegant and delight-ful prospects of Boston, and its charmingly varie-gated harbour, of Cambridge and its colleges, andof an extensive tract of highly cultivated country.It contains within the neck or parish about 250houses, and about 2000 inhabitants. The onlypublic buildings of consequence are, a handsomeCongregational church, with an elegant steepleand clock, and an alms-house, very commodious

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and pleasantly situated. Before the deslrnction oftil is town by the British in 1775, several brandiesof mannfadures were carried on to great advan-tage, some of which have been since revived : par-ticularly tlic manufacture of pot and pearl ashes,ship-building, rum, leather in all its branches,silver, tin, brass, and pewter. Three rope-walkshave lately been erected in this town, and tlie in-crease of its houses, population, trade, and naviga-tion, have been very great within a few' years past.This town is a port of entry in conjunction withBoston. At the head of the neck there is a bridgeover Mystic river, which connects Charlestown withMalden.)

CHARLESTOWN, another city of the island ofNevis, one of the Caribes, in the Antilles ; in w Inchthere are beautiful houses and shops well providedwith every thing ; is defended by a fort calledCharles. It has a market every Saturday, begin-ning at sun-rise and finishing at mid-day, whitherthe Negroes bring 'maize, names, garden-herbs,fruits, &c. In the parish of San Juan is a pieceof sulphureous land, in the upper extremity of anopening of the land, called Solfatara, or Sulphurgut, which is so hot as to be telt through the solesof the shoes when being trodden upon. At thefoot of the declivity of this same part of the city,is a small hot stream, called the Bath, which beingsupposed to rise from the aforesaid spot, loses itselfshortly in the sand. Towards the side lying nextthe sea are two fountains, one of hot water, theother of cold, and of these two are formed the lakeof Blackrock, the waters of which are of a moderatewarmth, and which lies to the n. of the city, beingnearly a quarter of a mile’s distance from the placewhere are caught eels and silver-fish, resemblingthe cod and slimgut in flavour, the latter of whichlias a head disproportioned to its body. [A prodi-gious piece ol Nevis mountain falling down in anearthquake several years ago, left a large vacuity,which is still to be seen. The altitude of thismountain, taken by a quadrant from Charlestownbay, is said to be a mile and a half perpendicular ;and from the said bay to the top, four miles. Thedeclivity from this mountain to the town is verysteep half-way, but afterwards easy of ascent.] InLat. 17° 8' u. and long. 62° 40' w.

Charlestown, another city of the island ofBarbadoes ; the situation of which is two leaguesfrom that of San Miguel. It has a good port de-fended by two castles ; the one beyoml the other,and both commanding the city and the road: inthe middle of them is a platform. Tlse inhabitantscarry on a great trade with the other islands.

(CHARLESTOWN, a township in Montgomery

county. New York, on the s. side of Mohawk river,about 32 miles w. of Schenectady. By the statecensus of 1796, 456 of the inhabitants are elec-tors.)

(Charlestown, a township in Mason county,Kentucky ; situate on the Ohio, at the mouth ofLauren’s creek. It contains but few houses, andis six miles n. of Washington, and 60 n. e. of Lex-ington. Lat. 38° 28' n.)

(Charlestown, a township in Chester county,Pennsylvania.)

(Charlestown, a post town in Cheshire county,New Hampshire, on the e. side of Connecticutriver, 30 miles s. of Dartmouth college, upwards of70 n. of Northampton, 116 n. of w. of Boston, 120w. by 71. of Portsmouth, and 431 n. n. e. of Phila-delphia. It was incorporated in 1753, and con-tains 90 or 100 houses, a Congregational church,a court-house, and an academy. The road fromBoston to Quebec passes through this town. Lat.43° 16' n. Long. 72° 23' w. A small internaltrade is carried on here.)

(Charlestown, a post town in Cecil county,Maryland, near the head of Chesapeak bay ; sixmites e. n. e. from the mouth of Susquehannahriver, 10 zo. s. w. from Elktown, and 50 s. w. by zb.from Philadelphia. Here are about 20 houses,chiefly inhabited by fishermen employed in theherring fishery. Lat. 39° 36' w.)

(Charlestown, a district in the lower countryof S. Carolina, subdivided into 14 parishes. Thislarge district, of which the city of Charleston is thechief town, lies between Santee and Combaheerivers. It pays 21,473/. 14s. 6d. sterling, taxes. Itsends to the state legislature 48 representatives and13 senators, and one member to congress. It con-tains 66,986 inhabitants, of whom only 16,352 arefree.)

(Charlestown, a village in Berkley county,Virginia ; situate on the great road leading fromPhiladelphia to Winchester ; eight miles fromShepherdstown, and 20 from Winchester.)

(Charlestown, a township in Washingtoncounty, Rhode Island state, having the Atlanticocean on the s. and separated from Richmond on the71. by Charles river, a water of Fawcatiick. Some ofits ponds empty into Fawcatiick river, otliers intothe sea. It is 19 miles /L ti:;. of Newport, andcontains 2022 inhabitants, including 12 slaves. Afew years ago there w'ere about 500 Indians in thestate ; the greater part of them resided in tin's town-ship. They are peaceable and well disposed togovernment, and s|5cak the English language.)

CHARLETON, an island situate near the e.coast of the country of Labrador, in the part of N.

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(CHEGOMEGAN, a point of land about 60miles in length, on the s. side of lake Superior.About 100 miles w. of this cape, a considerableriver falls into the lake ; upon its banks abundanceof virgin copper is found.)

CHEGONOIS, a small river of the same pro-vince and colony as the former. It runs s. w, andenters the Basin des Mines.

CHEGUEHUE, a river of the province ofSucumbios in the kingdom of Quito. It runs s. w.and enters the Aguarico, in lat. 6' n.

CHEGUIQUILLA, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Coquimbo in the king-dom of Chile ; situate to the s. of the town ofCopiapo.

CHEJANI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Carabaya in Peru ; annexed totlie curacy of Para.

CHEKOUTIMI, a settlement of Indians ofCanada, in the country of the nation of its name,on the shore of the river Saguenay.

CHELEL, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Luya and Chillaos in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Cheto.

(CHELMSFORD, a township in Middlesexcounty, Massachusetts ; situated on the s. side ofMerrimack river, 26 miles n. w. from Boston, andcontains 1144 inhabitants. There is an ingeniouslyconstructed bridge over the river at Pawtucketfalls, which connects this town with Dracut. Theroute of the Middlesex canal, designed to connectthe waters of Merrimack with those of Bostonharbour, will be s. through the e. part of Chelms-ford.)

CHELQUE, a settlement of Indians of thedistrict of Guadalabquen in the kingdom of Chile;situate on the shore of the river Valdivia.

(CHELSEA, called by the ancient natives Win-nisimet, a town in Suffolk county, Massachusetts,containing 472 inhabitants. Before its incorpora-tion, in 1738, it was award of the town of Boston,It is situated n. e. of the metropolis, and separatedfrom it by the ferry across the harbour, calledWinnisimet.)

(Chelsea, a township in Orange county, Ver-mont, having 239 inhabitants.)

(Chelsea, the name of a parish in the city ofNorwich, (Connecticut), called the Landing, situ-ated at the head of the river Thames, 14 miles n.of New London, on a point of land formed bythe junction ofShetucket and Norwich, or Littlerivers, w hose united waters constitute the Thames.It is a busy, commercial, thriving, romantic, andagreeable place, of about 150 houses, ascending

one above another in tiers, on artificial founda-tions, on the 5. point of a high rocky hill,)

Chelsea, a settlement of the English in theprovince and colony of Massachusetts, one of thefour of New England, on the shore of the port ofBoston.

CHEMIN, Croix de la Molle De, a crossin Canada, standing in the middle of the road nearthe river W abache.

(CHEMUNG, The w. branch of Susquehannahriver is sometimes so called. See Tioga River.)

(CHEMUNG is a township in Tioga county,New York. By the state census of 1796, 81 ofits inhabitants were electors. It has Newton w.and Oswego e. about 160 miles n. w. fiom NewYork city, measuring in a straight line. Betweenthis place and Newton, General Sullivan, in his vic-torious expedition against the Indians in 1779, hadadesperate engagement with the Six Nations, whomhe defeated. The Indians werestrongly entrenched,and it required the utmost exertions of the Ame-rican army, with field pieces, to dislodge them ;although the former, including 250 tories, amount-ed only to 800 men, while the Americans were5000 in number, ami well appointed in every re-spect.)

CHENE, a river of Canada, which runs n. w,and enters the river St. Lawrence, opposite thesettlement of New Port.

(CHENENGO is a n. branch of Susquehan-nah river. Many of the military townships arewatered by the n. w. branch of this river. Thetowns of Fayette, Jerico, Greene, Clinton, andChenengo, in Tioga county, lie between this riverand the e. waters of Susquehannah.)

(Chenengo, a post town, and one of the chiefin Tioga county, New York. The settled partof the town lies about 40 miles w. e. from Tiogapoint, between Chenengo river and Susquehan-nah ; has the town of Jerico on the n. By thestate census of 1796, 169 of its inhabitants areelectors. It was taken off from Montgomerycounty, and in 1791 it had only 45 inhabitants.It is 375 miles n. n. w. of Philadelphia.)

(CHENESSEE or GENESSEE River rises in Penn-sylvania, near the spot, which is the highest groundin that state, where the eastern most water of Allegha-ny river, and Pine creek, a water of Susquehannah,and Tioga river, rise. Fifty miles from its sourcethere are falls of 40 feet, and five from its mouth of 75feet, and a little above that of 96 feet. These fallsfurnish excellent mill-seats, which arc improved bythe inhabitants. After a course of about 100 miles,mostly n, e. by n. it empties into lakeQntario, four

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raense advantage to the neighbouring states, parti-cularly to Virginia. Of that state it has been ob-served, with some little exaggeration, however,that “ every planter has a river at his door.”)

(CHESHIRE county, in New Hampshire, lies inthe s. w. part of the state, on the e. bank of Con-necticut river. It has the state of Massachusettson the s. Grafton county on the n. and Hillsbo-rough county e. It lias 34 townships, of whichCharlestown and Keene are the chief, and 28,772inhabitants, including 16 slaves.)

(Cheshire, a township in Berkshire county,Massachusetts ; famous for its good cheese ; 140miles fi. w. from Boston.)

(Cheshire, a township in New-Haven county,Connecticut, 15 miles n. of New-Haven city, and26 s.to. of Hartford. It contains an Episcopalchurch and academy, and three Conffreffationalchurches.)

(CHESNUT HILL, a township in Northamptoncounty, Pennsylvania.)

(Chesnut Creek, a branch of the Great Kanha-way, in Virginia, where it crosses the Carolinaline. Here, it is said, are iron mines.)

(Chesnut Ridge. Part of the Alleghanymountains, in Pennsylvania, are thus called, s. e.of Greensborough.)

CHESSOT, a town of the province and colonyof North Carolina ; situate on the shore of theriver Euphasee.

(CHESTER, a township in Lunenburg county,Nova Scotia, on Mali one bay, settled originallyby a few families from New England. Fromhence to Windsor is a road, the distance of 25miles.)

(Chester, a small plantation in Lincoln county,Maine, nine miles from Titcomb. It has eight ornine families.)

(Chester, a township in Hampshire county,Massachusetts, adjoining Westfield on the e. andabout 20 miles n. w. of Springfield. It contains177 houses, and 1119 inhabitants.)

(Chester, a large, pleasant, and elegant town-ship in Rockingham county. New Hampshire.It is 21 miles in length ; and on the w. side is apretty large lake, which sends its waters to Merri-mack river. It was incorporated in 1722, andcontains 1902 inhabitants, who are chiefly farmers.It is situated on the e. side of Merrimack river,14 miles n. w. of Haverhill, as far w. of Exeter,35 tflTby s. of Portsmouth, six n. of Londonderry,and 306 from Philadelphia. From the compactpart of this town there is a gentle descent to thesea, which, in a clear day, may be seen fromthence. It is a post-town, and contains about 60

houses and a Congregational church. Rattlesnakehill, in this township, is a great curiosity; it ishalf a mile in diameter, of a circular form, and400 feet high. On the side, 10 yards from itsbase, is the entrance of a cave, called the Devil’sDen, which is a room 15 or 20 feet square, andfour feet high, floored and circled by a regularrock, from the upper part of which are depend-ent many excrescences, nearly in the form andsize of a pear, which, when approached by a torch,throw out a sparkling lustre of almost every hue;It is a cold, dreary place, of which many fright-ful stories are told by those who delight in themarvellous.)

(Chester, a township in Windsor county, Ver-mont, w. of Springfield, and II miles w. by s. ofCharlestown, in New Hampshire, and contains981 inhabitants.)

(Chester, a borough and post-town in Penn-sylvania, and the capital of Delaware county;pleasantly situated on the w. side of Delaware ri-ver, near Marcus hook, and 13 miles n. e. of Wil-mington. It contains about 60 houses, built on aregular plan, a court-house, and a gaol. FromCliester to Philadelphia is 20 miles by water, and15 n. e. by land ; here the river is narrowed byislands of marsh, which are generally banked,and turned into rich and immensely valuable mea-dows. The first colonial assembly was convenedhere, the 4th of December 1682. The place af-fords genteel inns and good entertainment, and isthe resort of much company from the metropolisduringthe summer season. It was incorporated inDecember 1795, and is governed by two bur-gesses, a constable, a town-clerk, and three assist-ants ; whose power is limited to preserve the peaceand order of the place.)

(Chester County, in Pennsylvania, w. of Dela-ware county, and s. w. of Philadelphia ; about 45miles in length, and 30 in breadth. It contains33 townships, of which West Chester is the shiretown, and 27,937 inhabitants, of whom 145 areslaves. Iron ore is found in the n. parts, whichemploys six forges : these manufacture 'about1000 tons of bar-iron annually.)

(Chester Court-House, in South Carolina, 22miles s. of Pinckney court-house, and 58 n. w. ofColumbia. A post-office is kept here.)

(Chester River, a navigable water of thee. side of Maryland, which rises two miles withinthe line of Delaware state, by two sources, Cyprusand Andover creeks, which unite at Bridgetown ;runs nearly s. w. ; after passing Chester it runs s.nearly three miles, when it receives South-Easterncreek ; and 15 miles farther, in a s. w. direction, it

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mines have as yet been discovered here. Theseislands have some ports, but such as are small, in-secure, and without any defence, with the excep-tion of that of Chacao. The inhabitants shouldamount to 22,000 souls, and these are dividedinto 4 1 settlements or parishes, being formed bythe reducciones of the missionaries of St. Francis,and consisting at the present day, for the mostpart, of Spaniards and Creoles. The capital is thecity of Santiago de Castro, in the large island ofChiloe. [For further account, see index to addi-tional history of Chile, chap. lY. § 35.]

CHILON, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Santa Cruz de la Sierra in Peru ;situate in a valley which is beautiful and fertile,and which abounds in wheat. Twenty-eight leaguesfrom the settlement of Samaypata.

CHILOSTUTA, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldia mayor of Zedales in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CHILPANSINGO, a settlement of the intendancy of Mexico, surroundedwith fertile fields of wheat. Elevation 1080 me-tres, or 3542 feet.

CHILQUES Y MASQUES, a province andcorregimiento of Peru, bounded by the provinceof Quispicanchi; s.e. by that of Churabivilcas ;s. and s. w. by that of Cotabambas ; w. by that ofAbancay; and n. t®. by Cuzco. Its temperatureis various, the proportion of heat and cold beingregulated by its different degrees of elevation ; sothat in the quebradas or deep glens, it is warm,and in the sierras or mountains, cold. It is 13leagues in length, and 25 in width ; is watered bythree rivers, which are the Cusibamba, passingthrough the valley of this name, the Velille, andthe Santo Tomas ; over these rivers are extendedseven bridges, which form a communication withthe other provinces. It has likewise eight smalllakes, and in some of these are found water-fowl.The hot parts abound in all kinds of fruits ; inwheat, maize, pulse, potatoes, and are well stockedwith some sorts of cattle, and great herds of deer.Its natives fabricate the manufactures of the coun-try ; such as cloths, baizes, and coarse frieze, bymeans of chorillos, or running streams, as theyhave no mills for fulling, since a royal licence isnecessary for the making use of the same. Al-though the appearance of mines has in manyplaces been discovered amongst the mountains,yet no mines have as yet been worked, and twoonly have been known to have been opened informer times. This province has suffered muchfrom earthquakes ; and the greatest of these hap-pened in 1707, when many settlements were madedesolate. It is composed of 27 settlements, andthese contain 16,000 inhabitants. The capital isParuro ; and the repariimiento of the corregimientoused to amount to 84,550 dollars, and the alcamlaThe other settlements are.

to 676 dollars per ann.Colcha,

Araipalpa,

San Lorenzo,Parapacucho,

Ceapa,

Cuchirihuay,

Tucuyachi,

Coron,

Pacopata,

Aicha-Urinzaba,

Pilpinto,

Huayaconga,

Accha-Amansaia,

Parco,

Pocoray,

Hanoquite,

Corea,

Paucartarnbo,

Amacha,

Antapalpa,

Quilli,

Acca,

Vilque,

Capi,

Cavabamba,

Huancahuanca,

Yaurisque.

Same name, another settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Lucanas in the same king-dom ; annexed to the curacy of Pucquin.

CHILTAL, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Atacames or Esmeraldas in thekingdom of Quito ; situate in the valley of Chota,on the shore of the river Mira.

CHILTEPEC, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Tepalcatepcec in Nueva Espana. Its tem-perature is the mildest of any part of its jurisdic-tion. It is situate in the middle of a plain, ex-tending over the top of a hill, on two sides ofwhich are large chasms, so immensely deep, thatit is really astonishing to observe how the Indianscontrive to cultivate the impoleras on their edges.It contains 67 families of Indians, and is five leaguesto thes. of its head settlement.

Same name, a river of the province and alcal-diamayor of Tabasco, which runs into the sea.

CHILUA, San Marcos de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Huanta in Peru ;annexed to the Curacy of Huamanguilla.

CHIMA, a mountain of the kingdom of Quito,in the government and corregimiento of Chirnboor Guaranda, to tire zo. of the settlement of Asan-coto. It is entirely covered with woods and withstreams, which flow down from the heights intothe plains of Babahoyo. The river named De laChima runs from e. tow. until it joins the Caracol.A way has been opened through this mountainwhich leads to Guaranda or Guayaquil ; but it ispassable in the summer only. There is also an-other pass equally difficult and dangerous, calledAngas. The cold is great at the top of the moun-tain, and at the skirts the heat is excessive, it i.sin lat. 44' s.

3 L 2

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los Llanos. Its inhabitants amount to about 200,besides 100 Indians.

CHIPATA, a settlement of the corregimiento ofthe jurisdiction of Velez in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada. It is of an hot temperature, and it ishealthy, though by no means abounding in theproductions peculiar to its climate. Its inhabi-tants are very few, and the number of Indians is 50.It was one of the first settlements entered by theSpaniards, and where the first mass ever celebratedin that part of the world was said by the Friar Do-mingo de las Casas, of the order of St. Domingo ;and is situate very close to the city of Velez.

[CHIPAWAS. See Chepawas.]

CHIPAYA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Carangas in Peru, and of thearchbisnoprhe of Charcas ; annexed to the curacyof Huachacalla.

CHIPEOS, a barbarous nation of Indians, ofthe country of Las Amazonas, who inhabit the fo-rests near the river Ucayala. Very little is knownof their customs.

[CHIPPAWYAN Fort, in N. America, fromwhence M‘Kenzie embarked, on the lake of theHills, when he made his way as far as the N. sea,in 1789.1

[CUJPPEWAY River runs s. w. into Missis-sippi river, in that part where the confluent watersform lake Pepin.]

CHIPURANA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Mainas. It rises in the mountainswhich are to the s. of Yurimaguas ; runs in a ser-pentine course from s. to n. and enters the Gual-laga on the e. side, in lat. 7° 8' s.

CHIQUALOQUE, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district and alcaldia mayor ofPopantla in Nueva Espana; inhabited by 12 fami-lies of Indians, and lying 12 leagues to the n. w. ofits capital.

CHIQUIAN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru.

CHIQUIGUANITAS, a barbarous nation of Indians in former times, but now reduced to theCatholic religion. It is in Perú, to the s. of Lima,in the province of Condesuyos de Arequipa.

CHIQUILIGASTA, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucaman, in the districtof its capital ; situate to the s. e. of the same.

CHIQUILIXPAN, a settlement of the headsettlement and alcaldia mayor of Zayula inNueva Espana. It contains 50 families of In-dians, and in the mountains in its vicinity aresome mines of copper, which have been workedat different times ; but not having produced a be-nefit proportionate with the expences incurred, theyhave been abandoned. It is, 15 leagues n. w. ofits head settlement.

CHIQUILLANIANS. Sec Index to new mat-ter concerning Chile, chap. IV.

CHIQUIMULA Y SACAPA, a province andalcaldia mayor of the kingdom of Guatemala.

CHIQUINQUIRA, a settlement of the corregi-miento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada.It is of a cold temperature, but is healthy ; itssituation is delightful, and it abounds in produc-tions. It is watered by a river which runs throughthe centre of it, the waters of which are unwhole-some : at a small distance another river passesthrough a plain ; this is called Balsa, or Raft, since,before the bridge was thrown across it, it was passedby rafts. It rises from the lake Fuguene, andabounds in most exquisite fish. The settlement,which was formerly but small, is now of great note,and its inhabitants are about 500, besides 70 In-dians. It has a good convent of the religious orderof S. Domingo, and is noted for the sanctuary ofthe virgin of its title. Under the large altar, atwhich is placed this image, there is a small foun-tain of water, renowned for the curing of infirmities,as is also the earth which is extracted from thence;it being by no means the least part of the prodigy,that although this earth has been constantly takenout for upwards of 200 years, the excavation formedthereby is comparatively exceedingly small. Thefaith in, and devotion towards this image, arethroughout the kingdom very great, and not lesaso with regard to strangers, who visit it in greatnumbers from far distant provinces. This settle-ment is nine leagues from Tunja, and 15 to then. zeJ. of Santa Fe.

CHIQUITI, a river of the province and go-vernment of Esmeraldas in the kingdom of Quito.It runs from s. w. to n. e. between the rivers Vichiand Cuche, and enters on the s. side into the riverof Las Esrneraldas.

CHIQUITOI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Truxillo in Peru. It is at presentdestroyed, and the few surviving inhabitants after-wards collected together at the settlement of San-tiago de Cao, and it then became merely a smallestate or hamlet, preserving its original name, andbeing inhabited by a few Indians.

CHIQUITOS, a numerous and warlike nation of Indians of Perú, whose country or territory ex-tends from lat. 16° to 20° s. It is bounded w. bythe province and government of Santa Cruz de laSierra ; on the e". it extends itself for upwards of140 leagues as far as the lake of Los Xarayes ; onthe n, as far as the mountains of the Tapacures,the which divide this country from that of Moxos ;

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papas; likewise in cattle, from the fleeces of whichgreat quantities of woven clotlis are made. Its'population amounts to 150 house-keepers and 100Indians. Four leagues to the s. w. of its capital,and near to the settlement of Turmeque.

CHIROBIO, a river of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela. It runs e. and enters thesea opposite the island Tarata.

CHIRTA, a settlement of the province andcorregimienlo of Chachapoyas in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Yambrasbamba.

CHIRU, a settlement of the alcaldia mayorand jurisdiction of Penonome in the kingdom andgovernment of Tierra Firme ; situate on the shoreof the S. sea, upon an extensive plain.

Same name, a river of this jurisdiction, which risesin the mountains of Penonome, and enters the S.sea near the settlement of Anton.

Same name, a very small island of the same juris-diction, close upon the coast, and called El Fa-rallon.

CHISAHALO, a settlement of theprovince and corregimienlo of Tacunga in thekingdom of Quito.

==CHISCAS, a settlement of the province andcorregimienlo of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; situate at the foot of the Snowy sierra^and therefore of a cold and unpleasant temperature.Its productions correspond with those of a similarclimate ; it contains about 80 Indians, with a veryfew whites. Thirty-two leagues n. e. of Tunja.

CHISGAS, Paramo de, a very lofty mountain covered with eternal snow, in the provinceand government of San Juan de los Llanos of theNuevo Reyno de Granada, between the riversApure and Sinaruco.

CHISLOCA, a settlement of the province andcorregimienlo of Chichas and Tarija in Peru ; be-longing to the district of the former. It is annexedto the curacy of Tupisa.

CHISME, a settlement of the head settlementof Puxmecatan, and alcaldia mayor of Villalta.It contains 71 families of Indians, and lies 18leagues from its capital.

CHISPAS, Punta de las, a point on the s.coast and w. head of the island of St. Domingo,in the territory possessed by the French ; lyingbetween the settlement and parish of the English,and the point of Burgados.

CHISQUE, a settlement of the province andcorregimienlo of Canta in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Atabillos Altos.

CHISQUILLA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimienlo of Chachapoyas in Peru.

[CHISSEL, a fort in the state of Tennessee,two miles and a half from English ferry, on Newriver, 43 from Abingdon, and 107 from Longisland, on Holston.]

CHITA, a province and corregimienlo of theNuevo Reyno de Granada, and vice-royalty ofSanta Fe. It was formerly called Chisca. It isbounded w. by the province of Bogota, and n. bythe country bt the Laches Indians, or province ofCochuy, and e. and s. by the llanuras of theOrinoco. It was discovered by George Spira, aGerman, and he was the first who entered it withhis companions in 1535. This territory is fertile,abounds in wheat and maize, the grain of which isextremely large, as also in other seeds, and hasgoats and neat cattle in plenty. It is of an hotand unhealthy temperature, and has palms similarto those of Palestine and Barbary, producing ex-cellent dates. The capital is of the same name.This is situate at the foot of the mountains of Bo-gota ; it is a large settlement, and was formerly en-titled a city. Its inhabitants consist of upwardsof 700 whites and about 200 Indians. Twenty-four leagues to the n. e. of Tunja.

Same name, another settlement, which is the headsettlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofVillalta in Nueva Espana. It is of a mild tempe-rature, contains 90 families of Indians, and is threeleagues and a half to the s. of its capital.

CHITAGA, Punta de, a bridge in the province and government of Merida, to the s. ofthe city of Pamplona, and upon the river of thisname.

CHITANOS, a barbarous nation of Indians;bounded by that of the Chiscas, but distinct fromit, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. They in-habit the woods to the n. e. of the mountains ofBogota and the shores of the rivers Ele, Cuiloto,and Arauca ; are an intractable and. cruel people,and dreaded by all their neighbours. In 1535,having joined company with the Jiraras, theytook and destroyed the city of Las Palmas.

CHITARAQUE, a settlement of the corregi-mienlo and jurisdiction of Velez in the NuevoReyno de Granada, it is of an hot but healtliytemperature, produces yucas, maize, plantains,cotton, and great quantities of sugar, from whichare made fine and much esteemed conserves.

CHITAREROS, a barbarous and brutal nation of Indians of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada,who inhabit the mountains in the vicinity of Pam-plona ; they are mixed with some families of theLaches. This nation is extremely numerous, andpass a wandering life without any fixed abode ;they go entirely naked, and are much given to sen-sual gratifications ; some of them have embraced2

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ment of the province and corre^innenlo of Hiia-machuco in Peru ; one of the lour divisions of thecuracy of Estancias.

CHUQUIYAPU, an ancient province of Peru,which was conquered and united to the empire byMayta Capac, fourth Emperor of the Incas, afterthe famous battle and victory of Huallu againstthe Collas Indians. It is tolerably well j, copied,and of a cold climate. Its territory abounds inexcellent pastures, iti which there are great quan-tities of cattle. In some parts, where the tempera-ture is hot, there is found maize, cacao, and sugar-cane. This country abountls in woods, and inthese are found tigers, leopards, stags, and mon-keys of many dilFerent species.

CHURCAMPA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huanta in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Mayor.

[CHURCH Creek Town, in Dorchestercounty, Maryland, lies at the head of Churchcreek, a branch of Hudson river, seven miles $.w.from Cambridge.]

[Church Hill, a village in Queen Ann’s county,Maryland, at tlie head of S. E. Creek, a branch ofChester river, n. w. of Bridgetown, and n. e. ofCentreville eight miles, and 85 s. w. from Phila-delphia. Lat. 39° 6' n. Long. 76° 10' a?.]

CHURCHILL, a great river of New S. Wales,one of tlie provinces of N. America, at the mouthof which the English Hudson bay company have afort and establishment; situate in lat. 59° w. andlong. 94° 12' w. The commerce of this place isgreat and lucrative, and on account of its greatdistance entirely secure from any disturbance fromthe French. In 1747 the number of castor-skins,which were brought by 100 Indians to this spot intheir canoes, amounted to 20,000. Several otherkinds of skins were also brought from the n, by200 other Indians ; some of whom came hither bythe river Seals, or Marine Wolves, 15 leagues tothe s. of the fort. To the n. of this fort there areno castors, since there arc no woods where theseanimals are found, though there are many otherwoods Avhich abound in wolves, bears, foxes, buf-faloes, and other animals whose skins are valuable.Here are great quantities of shrubs or small trees,planted by the factory, supplying timber ; but theopposite side, of the river is most favourable to theirgrowth ; and at a still greater distance are foundlarge trees of various kinds. The company re-siding in the fort is exposed to many risks, andobliged to inhabit a rock surrounded by frosts andsnows for eight months in the year, being exposedto all the winds and tempests. On account of thedeficiency of pasture, they maintain near the fac-tory no more than four or five horses, and a bullw ith two cows ; for the maintenance of which du-ring the winter, fodder is brought from a fennybottom some miles distant from the river. Thosewho have been hero allirm, that between this riverand the river Nelson there is, at a great distanceup the country, a communication or narrow passof land, by which these rivers are divided; and theIndians who carry on this traffic, have dealingswith the English navigating the river Nelson orAlbany. [See New Britain.]

[CHURCHTOWN, a village so called, in then. e. part of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, about20 miles e.n.e. of Lancaster, and 50w.n.w.oi'Philadelphia. It has 12 houses, and an episcopalchurch ; and m the environs are two forges, which

manufacture about 450 tons of bar iron annually.
reghnienlo of Caxatambo in Peru. Its jurisdictioacomprehends the settlements of

Huacho,

Pal pas,

Curay,

Naba,

Taucir,

Oyon,

Rapas,

Tinta,

Pachangara,

Mallay.

It has some celebrated fountains of mineral waters,

CHURUBAMBA, settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huanuco in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Santa Maria del Valle.

CHURUMACO, a settlement of the head settle-ment and dlealdia mayor of Cinagua in NuevaEspaña ; situate in a dry and warm country ; onwhich account the seeds scarcely ever come to ma-turity, save those of maize ; melons indeed growin abundance, owing to the cultivation they find,and from water being brought to them from a riverwhich runs at least a league’s distance from thethe settlement. In its district are several herds oflarge cattle, which form the principal branch ofthe commerce of the inhabitants : these consist of80 families of Indians. In its limits are also foundsome ranchos, in which reside 22 families of Spa-niards, and 34 of Mustees and Mulattoes. At ashort distance is the mountain called Ynguaran, inwhich copper mines are found, though this metalhas not been observed much to abound. Fourleagues to the e. of its capital.

CHURUMATAS, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Yamparaes in Peru, and ofthe archbishopric of Charcas.

CHUSCOS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe ancient province of Panataguas, to the n. ofthe city of Huanuco ; of which little more than itsname is known.

CHYAIZAQUES, a barbarous nation, and

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or country of Labrador. It runs s. e, and entersthe St. Lawrence.

CODEGO. See Tierra Bomba.

CODEHUE, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Rancagna, in the kingdom ofChile, to the e. of the town of Triana.

CODERA, Cabo de, a cape on the coast ofthe province and government of Venezuela. Lat.10° S5'. Long. 66° 10'.

[CODORUS, a township in York county,Pennsylvania.]

CODOSA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán in Peru; situate on theshore of the river Quarto, and at the head of thesierra of Campanchin.

COELCHO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Chachapoyas in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Chiliquia.

COELLO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Neiva in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra-nada ; situate on the shore of the large river Mag-dalena.

COEMAL, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Luya and Chillaos in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Luya, the capital.

COEURS, Bay of, bay in the island of Martinique, one of the Antilles. It is near the settle-ment of Carbet.

[COEYMANS, a township in Albany county.New York, 12 miles below Albany. By the statecensus of 1796, S89 of its inhabitants are electors.]

COFANES, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe kingdom of Quito, Avhich began to be con-verted to the Catholic religion in 1602, throughthe labour and zeal of the Father Rafael Ferrer,of the extinguished company of the Jesuits, andwho was killed by the same Indians. The princi-pal settlement, founded by this martyr, with thededicatory title of San Pedro, is now almost de-stroyed, though some few inhabitants still remain.The same is situate between the river of its nasneto the n. and that of Azuela to the s. The aboveriver is large and rapid, anti takes its name fromthese Indians. It rises in the sierra Nevada, orSnowy, runs from u. to c. and enters the Azuela,in lat. 13° n.

COFFIN-LAND, a small island of the coastof Georgia, and one of those which are calledGeorgican, at the entrance of the river Ashley.

COFRE, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Aires. It runs s. and entersthe sea between the rivers Favor and Del Rosario,opposite the capital.

COGUA, a settlement of the corregimiento ofZipaguira in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. Itis of a very cold temperature, and abounds in theproductions peculiar to its climate, particularlyin fire-wood, with which it supplies, for the ma-nufacturing of salt, the settlements of Nemoconand Zipaquira. To this last settlement it is verycontiguous ; and it lies nine leagues n, of SantaFe. Its population is reduced to 70 housekeepers,and as many other Indians.

COHANZY, a river of the province andcolony of New Jersey, in the county of Cumberland.It runs s. and enters the sea in the bay of Delaware.

[CoHANZY, or Casaria, a small river,which rises in Salem county. New Jersey, andrunning through Cumberland county, empties intoDelaware river, opposite the upper end of Bombayhook. It is about SO miles in length, and is na-vigable for vessels of 100 tons to Bridgetown, 20miles from its mouth.]

COHASSER, a settlement of the province andcolony of New Hampshire, to the e. of the lakeChamplain.

[COHASSET, a township in Norfolk county,Massachusetts, which was incorporated in 1770,and contains 817 inhabitants. It has a Congrega-tional church, and 126 houses, scattered on dif-ferent farms. Cohasset rocks, which have been sofatal to many vessels, lie oft' this town, about aleague from the shore. It lies 25 miles s. e. ofBoston, but in a straight line not above half thedistance.]

[COHGNAWAGA, a parish in the townshipof Johnstown, Montgomery county. New York,on the ay. side of Mohawk river, 26 miles w. ofSchenectady. This place, which had been settlednear SO years, and which was the seat of Sir Wil-liam Johnson, was mostly destroyed by the Bri-tish and Indians, under the command of Sir Wil-liam in the year 1780; in this action Johnsonevinced a want of feeling which would have dis-graced a savage. The people destroyed in thisex[)cdition were his old neighbours, with whomhe had formerly lived in the habits of friendship ;his estate was among them, and the inhabitantshad always considered him as their friend andneighbour. These unfortunate people, after see-ing their houses and property consumed to ashes,were hurried, such as could walk, into cruel cap-tivity ; those who could not Avalk fell victims tothe toraaliawk and scalping knife. See Caghna-w aga.]

[COllOEZ, or the Falls, in Mohawk river, be-tween two and three miles from its mouth, and 10miles n. of Albany, are a very great natural curio-sity. The river above the falls is about 300 yardswide, and approaches them from the n. w. in a

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rapid current, between high banks on eacli side,and pours the whole body of its water over a per-pendicular rock of about 40 (some say more) feetin height, which extends quite across the riverlike a mill-dam. The banks of the river, imme-diately below the falls, are about 100 feet high.

A bridge 1100 feet long, and 24 feet wide, restingon 13 piers, was erected, at the expence of 12,000dollars, in 1794, a mile below the falls, from whicha spectator may have a grand view of them; butthey appear most romantically from Lansinburghhill, five miles e. of them. 1

(COHONGORONTO is the name of Potow-raack river before it breaks through the Blueridge, in lat, 39° 45' n. Its whole length to theBlue ridge may be about 160 miles ; from thenceit assumes the name of Potowmack, which see.)

(COHUIXCAS, a country in New Spain, inwhich there is a considerable mountain of load-stone, between Tcoiltylan and Chilapan.)

COIABAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chilques and Masques inPeru; annexed to the curacy of Calpi. Anearthquake was experienced in this province in1707, Avhich desolated many settlements ; whenalso happened that extraordinary phenomenonwhich is accredited and related by Don CosineBueno, geographer of Lima, as having takenplace ; which was, that a small estate was by thisearthquake removed from one side of the river tothe other, together with the house, garden, andinhabitants, without their perceiving any thinghad happened ; and as the event took place atmidnight, Avhen they were all asleep, that theywere not a little surprised to find themselves esta-blished in the curacy of Colcha. This extraordi-nary occurrence, however, has its precedent ina similar circumstance which happened in thekingdom of Quito.

COIACHI, a settlement of the missions whichwere held at the expence of the regulars of thecompany of Jesuits, in the province of Taraumara,and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya, 18 leagues andan half between the s. w. and s. e. of the town andreal of the mines of San Felipe de Chiguagua.

COIAIMA, a settlement and head settlementof the corregimiento of this name in the NuevoReyno de Granada. It is of an hot temperature,produces cacao, sugar-cane, maize, ^uca<!, plan-tains, and an infinite quantity of cattle and swine ;but it is much infested with reptiles and insects,vipers, snakes, spiders, and mosquitoes. It alsoabounds in gold, and the Indians to the number of450, who go to Santa Fe to pay their tribute, pro-ceed in companies, and are accustomed to collect

in four or five daj's, on Die shores of the river Sal-dana, as much gold as is necessary for the tributethey are obliged to pay in the city.

COIAME, a river of the province and countryof Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions.It runs n. in a serpentine course, and enters theMaranon between the rivers Tefe and Catoa.

COIBA==, a small island of the S. sea, close to thecoast of the province and government of Veragua,in the kingdom of Tierra Firme, and five leaguesdistant from the point Blanca.

COIN, a river of the island of Guadalupe. Itruns to the n. w. in the isthmus Avhich almost di-vides the island into two parts, and enters the seaat the bottom of the bay of Cul de Sac Petit.

COIOACAN, a district and alcaldia mayor ofNueva España. It is one of the most pleasant,and fertile in wheat, maize, barley, and other seeds.Nearly the whole of its population live in coun-try houses, in gardens and orchards which pro-duce quantities of fruit, such as pears of severalkinds, peaches, apples, prunes, plums, damsons,pomegranates, quinces, oranges, and lemons, withwhich a great commerce is carried on rviththe cityof Mexico. In some parts of this province clothsand baizes are fabricated. It belongs to thejurisdiction of the marquisate Del Valle de Oax-aca ; to which the tributes are paid, the king re-taining the sum of four tomines, (a Spanishcoin weighing the third part of a drachm.) Thesettlements of this district are,

San Angel, Chapultepec,

San Augustin de las Nuestra Senora de los

Culvas, Remedies.

Tacubaya,

The capital, which bears the same name, is alarge, pleasant, fertile, and well peopled town. Ithas shady arbours, country houses, and orchardsand gardens, which serve as a recreation to thepeople of Mexico, from whence it is distant twoleagues to the s. s. e. Its population amounts to1885 Indian families. It has a good convent ofthe religious order of St. Dominic, and manywork-shops, in which are fabricated cloths, baizes,and serges. Long. 99° 4'. Lat. 19° 20'.

COIOMEAPA, Santa Maria de, a settle-ment and head settlement of the alcaldia mayorof Theacan in Nueva Espana. It contains 300families of Indians, and 20 of Mustees and Mu-lattoes. Twelve leagues s. e. of its capital.

COIOTEPEC, San Mateo De, a settlement ofthe alcaldia mayor of Yanguitlan in Nueva Es-pana. It contains 22 families of Indians, whosubsist by the trade in cochineal. Six leagues s. c.of its capital.

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on the banks of the river of its name, near wherethis river joins that of Florido. It is garrisonedby a captain, a lieutenant, a serjeant, and 33 sol-diers, to guard against the irruptions of the infidelIndians. In its vicinity are the estates of La Ci-enega, Sapian, and El Pilar. Fifty-eight leaguesto the n.n.e. of the city of Guadalaxara.

CONCHUCOS, a province and corresimientoof Peru ; bounded n. by the province of Huama-chucos, n. e. by that of Pataz, and separated fromthence by the river Marafion, e. and s. e. by theprovince of Huraalies, and s. by that of Caxa-tambo. It is 52 leagues in length, and in someparts 20 in width. It is of a very irregular figure,and of various temperature, according to the dif-ferent situation of its territories ; cold in all theparts bordering upon the cordil/era, mild in someparts, and in others excessively hot. It is 'V-erypleasant, and it has all kinds of fruits, which itproduces in abundance, and in the same mannerwheat, barley, and pot herbs. On its skirts arefound numerous herds of cattle of every species,and from the wools of some of these are made thecloth manufactures of the country, which meetwith a ready demand in the other provinces. Theprincipal rivers by which it is watered are three ;and these are formed by various streams : the oneof them enters that of Santa to the zo. and theother two the Marafion. The most s. is called DeMiraflores, and the other, which is very large,keeps the name of the province. Here are somemines of silver, which were formerly very rich ;as also some lavaderos, or washing places of gold,of the purest quality, the standard weight of itbeing 23 carats. Also in the curacy of Llamelinare some mines of brimstone, and a fountain orstream, the waters of which, falling down into adeep slough, become condensed and converted intoa stone called Catachi, in the form of columns muchresembling wax-candles, of a very white colour.The same substance is used as a remedy againstthe bloody flux, and it is said, that being madeinto powders, and mixed Avith the white of an egg,it forms a salve which accelerates in a Avonderfulmanner the knitting of fractured bones. It com-prehends 15 curacies, Avithout the annexed settle-ments, all of Avhich, the former and the latter, are

as folloAVS :

Huari del Rey, the ca-pital,

Chavin,

Huantar,

San Marcos,

San Ildefonso,

San Christoval,Yunga,

Uco,

Paucas,

Yanas,

Huachi,

Rapayan,

Llapo,

Llamelin,

Yupan,

Acso,

Ancos,

M irgas,

Tauca,

Taquia

Cavana,

Siccican,

Huendoval,

San Luis de Huari,

Pallasca,

Chacas,

Pampas,

Piscobainba,

Lacabamba,

Sihuas,

Conch UCOS,

Puruay,

Corongo,

Huacachi,

CONCHUCOS, a settlement of the same pro-vince ; annexed to the curacy of Pallasca.

CONCHUCOS, a river of the province and cor-regimiento of the same name in Peru, Avhich risesin the cordillera. It runs s. and enters the Ma-ranon near the settlement of Uchos in the provinceof Andahuailas.

CONCON, a port of the coast of the kingdQmof Chile, in the S. sea, and province and corregi-miento of Quillota,

(CONCORD, a post-toAvn of New Hampshire,very flourishing, and pleasantly situated on thew. bank of Merrimack river, in Rockinghamcounty, eight miles above Hookset falls. Thelegislature, of late, have commonly held their ses-sions here ; and from its central situation, and athriving back country, it will probably become thepermanent seat of government. Much of the tradeof the upper country centres here. A liandsoraetall bridge across the Merrimack connects thistown Avith Pembroke. It has 1747 inhabitants,and Avas incorporated in 1765. The Indian nameAvas Penacook. It was granted by Massachusetts,and called Rumford. Tlie compact part of thetown contains about 170 houses, a Congregationalchurcli, and an academy, which was incorporatedin 1790. It is 54 miles w. n. w. of Portsmouth,58 s. w. of Dartmouth college, and 70 n. fromBoston. Lat. 43” 12' n. Long. 71° 31' a?.)

(Concord, in Essex county, Vermont, lies onConnecticut river, opposite a part of the Fifteen-mile falls.)

(Concord, in Massachusetts, a post-town, oneof the most considerable towns in Middlesexcounty ; situated on Concord river, in a healthyand pleasant spot, nearly in the centre of thecounty, and 18 miles n. w. of Boston, and 17 e.of Lancaster. Its Indian name Avas Musquetequid;and it owes its present name to the peaceable man-ner in which it was obtained from the natives.The first settlers, among whom Avere the Rev.Messrs. Buckley and Jones, having settled- the

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purchase, obtained an act of incorporation, Sep-tember 3, 1655 ; and this was the most distantsettlement from the sea-shore of New England atthat time. The settlers never liad any contest withthe Indians ; and only three persons were ever kill-ed by them within the limits of the town. In1791, there were in this township 225 dwellinglionses, and 1590 inhabitants ; of the latter therewere 80 persons upwards ot 70 years old. For 13years previous to 1791, the average number ofdeaths was 17 ; one in four of whom were 70 yearsold and upwards. The public buildings are, aCongregational church, a spacious stone gaol, thebest in New England, and a very handsome countycourt-house. The town is accommodated withthree convenient bridges over the river ; one ofwhich is 208 feet long, and 18 feet wide, supportedby 12 piers, built after the manner of Charles riverbridge. This town is famous in the history of therevolution, having been the seat of the provincialcongress in 1774, and the spot where the first op-position was made to the British troops, on thememorable 19th of April 1775. The generalcourt have frequently held their sessions here whencontagious diseases have prevailed in the capital.Lat. 42° 20'

(Concord, a small river of Massachusetts,formed of two branches, which unite near thecentre of the town of Concord, whence it takes itscourse in a n. e. and n. direction through Bed-ford and Billerica, and empties itself into Merri-mack river at Tewksbury. Concord river isremarkable for the gentleness of its current, whichis scarcely perceivable by the eye. At low watermark it is from 100 to 200 feet wide, and from threeto 12 feet deep. During floods. Concord riveris near a mile in breadth ; and when viewed fromthe town of Concord, makes a fine appearance.)

(Concord, a township in Delaware county,Pennsylvania.)

(Concord, a settlement in Georgia, on the e.bank of the Mississippi, about a mile from the s.line of Tennessee, 108 miles h. from the mouth ofYazoo river, and 218 bclov/ the Ohio.)

CONDACHE, a river of the province and go-vernment of Quixos in the kingdom of Quito. Itruns n. e. and traversing the royal road whichleads from Baza to Archidono, enters the river Co-quindo on its s. side, in 37' lat.

(CONDE, Fort, or Mobile City, is situate onthe w. side of Mobile bay, in W. Florida, about40 miles above its mouth, in the gulf of Mexico.Lat. 30° 59' n. Long. 88° 11' a'.)

CONDE, a small river of the province andcountry of the Iroquees Indians, in New France or

VOL. I.

Canada. It runs n. and enters the lake On-tario.

CONDE, another of the same name. SecV E H D E .

(CONDECEDO, or Desconocida, a cape orpromontory of N. America, in the province ofYucatán, *100 miles w. of Merida. Lat. 20° 50' n.Long. 90° 45' w.)

CONDEBAMBA, a large and beautiful valleyof the provitice and fo?TCg7'??//f>«/o of Huamachucoin Peru ; celebrated for its fertility.

CONDES, River of the, in the straits of Ma-gellan. It runs into the sea opposite the islandSanta Ana.

CONDESA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cartagena; situate near the coast,at the mouth of the Dique, which forms a com-munication between the sea and the grand riverMagdalena.

CONDESUIOS DE Arequipa, a provinceand corregimiento of Peru : bounded n. by that ofParinocochas, e. by that of Chumbivilcas, s. e.by that of Canes and Canches, and s. by that ofCollahuas. It is generally of a cold temperature,even in the less lofty parts of the cordillera ; ofa rough and broken territory, and with very badroads. Nevertheless, no inconsiderable proportionof wheat is grown in the low grounds, as likewise ofmaize, and other seeds and fruits, such as grapes,pears, peaches, apples, and some flowers. Upontlie heights breed many vicunas, huanacos, andvizcachas, and in other parts is obtained cochineal,here called macno, and which is bartered by theIndians for baizes of the manufacture of the country,and for cacao. It has some gold mines whichwere worked in former times, and which, on ac-count of the baseness of the metal, the depth of themines, and hardness of the strata, have not pro-duced so much as formerly they did, althoughthey are not now without yielding some emolu-ment : such are those of Airahua, Quiquimbo,Araure, and Aznacolea, which may produce alittle more than the expences incurred in Avorkirigthem. The gold of these mines is from 19 to 20carats, and they produce from tliree to four ounceseach cfljjow. They are Avorked by means of steeland powder, and the metals are ground in mills.The greater part of the natives of tliis province oc-cupy themselves in carrying the productions of thevalley of Mages, of the province of Carnana, suchas Avines and brandies, to the other provinces ofthe sierra; also in the cultivation of seeds, andsome in working the mines. It is watered by somesmall rivers or streams, which, incorporate them-selves, and form t-wm large rivers. The capital is3 T

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(is generally 5. s.zc. as likewise through Massachus-setts, and part of Connecticut, until it reaches thecity of Middleton ; after wliich it runs a s, s. e.course to its mouth. The navigation of this beau-tiful river, which, like the Nile, fertilizes tiie landsthrough which it runs, is much obstructed byfalls ; two of these are between New Hampshireand Vermont, the first are called the Fifteen-milefalls ; here the river is rapid for 20 miles : thesecond remarkable fall is at Walpole, formerlycalled the Great falls, but now called Bellows’falls. Above these the breadth of the river is insome places 22, in other places not above 16 rods;the depth of the channel is about 25 feet, and com-monly runs full of water. In September 1792,however, owing to the severe drought, the waterof the river, it is said, “ passed within (he spaceof 12 feet wide, and 2| feet deep.” A large rockdivides the stream into two channels, each about90 feet wide ; when the river is low, the e. channelis dry, being crossed by a solid rock ; and thewhole stream falls into the w. channel, where it iscontracted to the breadth of 16 feet, and flows withastonishing rapidity. There are several pitches,one above another, in the length of half a mile, thelargest of which is that where the rock divides thestream. A bridge of timber was projected over this fallby Colonel Hale, in the year 1784, 365 feet long,and supported in the middle by the island rock,and under it the highest floods pass without doingany injury; this is the only bridge on the river,but it is contemplated to erect another, SO milesabove, at the middle bar of Agar falls, where thepassage for the water, between the rocks, is 100feet wide ; this will connect the towns of Lebanonin New Hampshire, and Hartford in Vermont ; asthe former bridge connects Walpole in NewHampshire with Rockingham in Vermont. Not-withstanding the velocity of the current at Bellows’falls, above described, the salmon pass up theriver, and are taken many miles above, but the shadproceed no farther. On the steep sides of theisland rock, at the fall, hang several arm chairs,secured by a counterpoise ; in these the fishermensit to catch salmon with fishing nets. In the courseof the river, through Massachusetts, are the fallsat South Hadley, around which locks and canalswere completed in 1795, by an enterprising com-pany, incorporated for that purpose in 1792, bythe legislature of Massachusetts. In Connecticutthe river is obstructed by falls at Enfield, to ren-der which navigable in boats, a company has beenincorporated, and a sum of money raised by lot-tery, but nothing effectual is yet done. The

average descent of this river from Weathersfield inVermont, 150 miles from its mouth, is two feet toa mile, according to the barometrical observationsof J. Winthrop, Esq. made in 1786. The riversor streams which fall into Connecticut river arenumerous; such of them as are worthy of noticewill be seen under their respective names. At itsmouth is a bar of sand, which considerably ob-structs the navigation ; it has 10 feet water on itat full tides, and the depth is the same to Middle-ton, from which the bar is 36 miles distant. AboveMiddleton there are some shoals which have onlysix feet water at high tide, and here the tide ebbsand flows about eight inches ; three miles abovethat city the river is contracted to about 40 rodsin breadth, by two high mountains ; on almostevery other part of the river the banks are low,and spread into fine extensive meadows. In thespring floods, which generally happen in May,these meadows are covered with water. At Hart-ford, the water sometimes rises 20 feet above thecommon surface of the river, and the water hav-ing no other outlet but the above mentioned strait,it is sometimes tw o or three weeks before it returnsto its usual bed ; these floods add nothing to-thedepth of water on the bar at the mouth of theriver, as the bar lies too far off in the sound to beaffected by them. This river is navigable toHartford city upwards of 50 miles from its mouth,and the produce of the country for 200 miles aboveit, is brought thither in boats. The boats whichare used in this business are flat-bottomed, long,and narrow, and of so light a make as to be port-able in carts : before the construction of locks andcanals on (his river, they were taken out at threedifferent carrying places, all of which made 15miles : it is expected that in a few years the ob-structions will be all removed. Sturgeon, salmon,and shad, are caught in plenty in their season, fromthe mouth of the river upwards, excepting stur-geon, which do not ascend the upper falls; be-sides a variety of small fish, such as pike, carp,perch, &c. There is yet a strong expectation ofopening a communication between this river andthe Merrimack, through Sugar river, which runsinto the Connecticut at Claremont in New Mamp-shire, and the Contoocook, which falls into tlieMerrimack at Boscawen. From this river wereemployed, in 1789, three brigs of 180 tons each,in the European trade ; and about 60 sail, from60 to 150 tons, in the VV. India trade, besidesa few fishermen, and 40 or 50 coasting vessels.The number has considerably increased since.)

(Connecticut, a stream in Long island, New

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