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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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and government of Tucumán, in the jurisdictionof the city of Santiago del Estero, on the shore ofthe river Choromoros.

(CHAUDIERE River, a s. e. water of the St.Lawrence, rising in Lincoln and Hancock coun-ties, in the district of Maine. The carrying placefrom boatable waters in it, to boatable Avaters in theKetmebeck, is only five miles.)

(CHAUDIERE Falls are situate about nine milesabove Quebec, on the opposite shore, and aboutthree or four miles back from the river St. Law-rence, into which the river Chaudiere disemboguesitself. The river is seen at a distance, emergingfrom a thick wood, and gradually expandingfrom an almost imperceptible stream till it reachesdie cataract, whose breadth is upwards of 360feet. Here the disordered masses of rock, whichiippear to have been rent from their bed by someviolent convulsion of nature, break the course ofthe waters, and precipitate them from a height of120 feet into an immense chasm below. In someparts large sheets of water roll over the precipice,and fall unbroken to the bottom ; while in otherplaces the water dashes from one fragment of therock to another, with wild impetuosity, bellow-ing and foaming with rage in every hollow andcavity that obstructs its progress ; from thence itrushes down with the rapidity of lightning intothe boiling surge beneath, where it rages with in-conceivable fury, till driven from the gulf byfresh columns, it hurries away and loses itself inthe waters of the St. Lawrence. The scenerywhich accompanies the cataract of Chaudiere isbeautiful and romantic beyond description. Inthe centre, a large fragment of rock, which firstdivides the water, at the summit of the precipice,forms a small island ; and a handsome fir-tree,which grows upon it, is thus placed in a mostsingular and picturesque situation. The forest oneither side the river consists of firs, pines, birch,oak, ash, and a variety of other trees and shrubs,intermingled in the most wild and romantic man-ner. Their dark green foliage, joined with thebrown and sombre tint of the rocky fragments overwhich the water precipitates itself, form a strik-ing and pleasing contrast to the snowy white-ness of the foaming surge, and the columns ofsparkling spray which rise in clouds and minglewith the air.)

CHAUGE, a settlement of Indians of S.Carolina ; situate on the shore of the riverTugelo.

CHAUICO, San Pedro de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Tlacotepec, and alcaldía

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mayor of Juxtlahuaca, in Nueva España. It con-tains 57 families of Indians.

CHAUIN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Castro-Vireyna in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Chupamarca in the province ofYauyos.

Chauin, another settlement in the provinceand corregimiento of Caxamarquilla in Peru.

CHAUINA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Lucanas in the same kingdom ;annexed to the curacy of Paraisancos.

CHAUINILLOS, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huamalies in the same king-dom ; annexed to the curacy of Pachas.

CHAUITAS, La Presentacion de, a settle-ment of the province and government of Mainas inthe kingdom of Quito.

CHAULAN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huanuco in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Huacar.

CHAUNAMILLA, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Maule in the kingdomof Chile ; situate upon the shore and at the sourceof the river Jecudahue.

CHAUPICOS, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Canta in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Atabillos Baxos.

CHAUPIMARCA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Tarma in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Tapú.

CHAUTLAN, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldía mayor of Zoques in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CHAUX, PUNTA DE, an extremity of the e.coast of the island of Martinique, one of the An-tilles. It runs into the sea nearly equal with thatof Carabelle.

CHAXAL, a river of the province and alcaldíamayor of Chiapa in the kingdom of Guatemala.It runs e. and enters the sea in the gulf of Hi-gueras.

CHAYANTA, or Charcas, a province andcorregimiento of Peru, bounded n. by that of Co-chabamba, n. w. by the corregimiento of Oruro, e.by the province of Yamparaez, s. e. and s. by thatof Porco, and w. by that of Paria ; is 36 leaguesin length from w. to e. and 44 in width, n. s. Itstemperature is various, since it contains the settle-ments of Puna and Valles ; in the former of theseare found in abundance the productions of thesierra^ and in the latter wheat, maize, and otherseeds and herbs : they have equally a traffic withthe surrounding provinces, especially in the ar-ticles of wheat and flour of maize. Here are bred

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
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it has a large proportion of families of Spaniards,Mustees^ and Mulalloes ; besides which, it con-tains 387 of Indians, and a convent of monks ofSt. Francis. Seven leagues to the n. n. w. ofMexico, although the distance is commonly count-ed at only six. Long. 274° 12'. Lat. 19° 50'.

COAUTLA, a province and alcaldia mayor oiNueva España ; bounded s. by the corregimientoof Mexico. It is also called. Of Amilpas. Itsjurisdiction extends 25 leagues ; it is of a warmand moist temperature, but is fertile, and aboundsin wheat, maize, French beans, lentils, barley,and tares, as also in other productions, which serveas a commerce to its natives. Great quantities ofsugar are also manufactured in various mills andmachines for the purpose. This province is water-ed by two rivers, the one very large, called theAmazinaquc, which runs e. and the other, some-what less, to the e . ; in both of them are caughtmany bagres and trout, which, being much es-teemed in the neighbouring provinces, afford alsoanother considerable branch of commerce. It hassilver mines which produce tolerably well, andfrom one, which is vulgarly called La Peregrina,much riches were formerly extracted. The juris-diction consists of the following settlements ;

The capital of the sarne Xamiltepec,

name, Tlacotepec,

Tetelzingo, Zacoalpan,

Tlamimilulpa, Temoaque,

Cacoyoc, Ancuilco.

Ocuituco,

The capital forms three streets, of regular pro-portion and symmetry in the buildings, with twoelegant edifices, one of the monks of St. Domingo,'and the other of the barefooted monks, or Descal-zos, of St. Francis. It contains 36 families of Spa-niards, 70 of 40 of Mulattoes, and 200

of Indians ; the part of the city inhabited by thelatter is never visited by the Spaniards but as awalk, or place of recreation, and the Indians neverattempt to encroach upon the part not appropriatedto them. Twenty-five leagues 5. of Mexico. Long.274° 10'. Lat. 19° 5'.

Same name, another settlement and real of thesilver mines of this province, in which are twosugar mills, and some engines for grinding metal.It contains 56 families of Spaniards, Mustees, andMulattoes, and lies 12 leagues to the s. w. of itscapital.

COAUTLACO, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district and alcaldia mayor of Tlapain Nueva Espana. It contains 35 families of In-dians, and is two leagues to the n. e. of that place.

COAZA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Larecaja in Peru; annexed to the cu-racy of Combaya.

COBAN, a settlement and capital of the pro-vince and alcaldia mayor of Vera Paz in the king-dom of Guatemala. It contains a good convent ofthe order of St. Domingo, and is 30 leagues fromGuatemala.

[COBBESECONTE, or Copsecook, whichin the Indian language signifies the land where stur-geons are taken, is a small river which rises fromponds in the town of Winthorp, in the district ofMaine, and falls into the Kennebeck within threemiles of Nahunkeag island, and 15 from Mooseisland.]

COBEQUIT, a large settlement of the provinceand colony of Nova Scotia; situate on the side ofthe basin of Minas, on the innermost shore of thebay of Fundy.

[Cobequit or Colchester River, in NovaScotia, rises within 20 miles of Tatamogouche, onthe n. e. coast of Nova Scotia ; from thence it runss. ; then s. w. and w. info the e. end of the basinof Minas. At its mouth there is a short bank, butthere is a good channel on each side, which vesselsof 60 tons burden may pass, and go 40 miles .upthe river. There are some scattered settlements onits banks.]

[COBESEY, in the district of Maine. See

PiTTSTO.V.]

[COBHAM, a small town in Virginia, on thes. bank of James river, opposite James town ; 20miles n. w. of Suffolk, and eight or nine 5. w. ofWilliamsburg.]

[Cobh AM Isle, mentioned by Captain Mid-dleton, in the journal of his voyage for finding a71, e. passage. Its two extremities bear n. by e.and e. by n. in lat. 63° «. long. 3° 50' fromChurchill, which he takes to be the Brook Cob-ham of Fox.]

COBIJA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Atacama in Peru, and archbishopricof Charcas; annexed to the curacy of Chinchin.It is founded on the sea-shore, has a good port,where the inhabitants are busied in the fishing forcongers ; and these being called charqnecillos, orsalted, are carried in abundance for sale to theneighbouring provinces, to the sierra, and otherparts. In lat. 23° 20' s. according to Don CosmeBueno ; and according to the ex-jesuit Coleti,in lat. 22° 25' s.

[COBEZA. See Cobija. This obscure portand village is inhabited by about 50 Indianfamilies, and is the most barren spot on thecoast. This is, however, the nearest port to Lipei^where there are silver mines, and also to Potosi,2

Last edit over 2 years ago by LLILAS Benson
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