LatAm Digital Edition and Gazetteer

OverviewStatisticsSubjects

Search for Monte* monte*

The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

4

hither many barbarous nations of Indians have retired, selecting for their dwelling places the few plains which belong to the province. The Emperor Yupanqui endeavoured to make it subservient to his controul, but without success : the same disappointment awaited Pedro de Andia in his attempt to subjugate it in the year 1538.

ABISMES, Quartel des, that part or division of the island of Guadaloupe which looks to the NE. It takes its name from its having some creeks, or inlets, which serve as places of shelter for vessels, in case of invasion either from enemies or from hurricanes. Here they ride quite safe, for the bottom is very good ; and being made fast to the strong palm-trees which abound here, they stand in no need of being anchored, which would be inconvenient, and attended with risk, on account of the thick roots thrown out by the above trees. Further on is a small island called Des Cochons, where an engineer, of the name of Renau, endeavoured, without success, in 1700, to build a fort, for the sake of securing the harbour, which is a good one.

ABITANIS, a mountain of the province and corregimiento of Lipes in Peru. In the Quechuan tongue it signifies the ore of gold, from a celebrated mine which is at present nearly abandoned, from the want of workmen. It is nearly contiguous to the settlement of Colcha.

ABITIBBI, a small lake in Upper Canada, on the S side of which is a settlement called Frederick, which last lies in N lat. 48° 35'. W long. 82°. Also the name of a river which runs N and joins Moose river near its mouth at James's bay.

ABITIBIS, a lake of the country of Hudson, in the territory of the Indians of this name. This lake is N of Nipissing lake, the NE boundary of Canada, in New South Wales: it has communication with James's bay, near Moose fort. Lat. 48° 39' N Long. 79° 2' W.

ABITIGAS, a nation of barbarous Indians, of the province and corregimiento of Tarma in Peru. It is very numerous and warlike ; and they live a wandering life in the woods. It is 60 leagues to the E of the mountains of the Andes; bounded on the S, by the Ipillos Indians.

ABORROEN, a port of the coast of Brasil, in the province and capitainship of Seara, between the river Escorgogive and the bay of Inobu.

ABRA, an island of the straits of Magellan, at the entrance of the third and last narrow pass, called the Passage.

[ABRAM'S CREEK, falls into Hudson's river, near the city of Hudson.]

ABREOLHOS, on the coast of Brasil, and of the province and capitainship of Espiritu Santo, between the rivers Percipe and Quororupa, in S lat. 18° 19' 30". W long. 39° 5 1° 30". Here are some hidden rocks, or sandbanks, extremely dangerous ; and although there are various navigable channels, it requires the utmost caution to avoid shipwreck, this having been the lot of an infinite number of vessels. These sandbanks are more than 20 leagues distant from the continent, and extend themselves upwards of five leagues to the E of the Island of Tuego. Their situation, taken in the the centre, is in 170° 51' 20" S lat. W long. 39° 18'.

[ABROJOS, a bank, with several small rocks and isles, E of Turk's island, in N lat. 21° 5'. W long. 70° 40'. Between this bank and Turk's Island is a deep channel, for ships of any burden, three leagues wide.]

Abrojos, a shoal of the N. sea. See the article Panuela Quadrado.

ABSECON, Beach, on the coast of New Jersey, 16 miles SW from Little Egg harbour.

ABUCARA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Lucanas in Peru, in a valley of the same name. It was anciently the capital of this province, and had the same denomination. At present it is much reduced, the corregidor having left it to establish himself in Lucanas. Lat. 15° 33' S Long. 73° 28' W

ABUCEES, S. Joseph de los, a settlement of the missions of the Sucumbios Indians, who were founded by, and maintained at the expence of, the abolished order of the Jesuits, in the province and government of Quixos and Macas, of the kingdom of Quito ; situate on the shore of a small river, which enters the Putumayo. Lat. 0° 36' N Long. 75° 22' W.

ABURRA, S. Bartolomé de, a town of the province and government of Antioquia, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, founded in 1542, by the Marshal George Robledo, in a fertile and extensive valley of the same name, which was discovered in 1540 by Captain Geronimo Luis Texelo. It abounds in all kinds of fruits, seeds, and vegetables, and is of a hot temperature. In its district are found many huacas, or sepulchres of the Indians, in which great riches are deposited. It has now so much fallen to decay, that it is no more than a miserable hamlet. In its vicinity are some streams of salt water, from which the Indians procure salt for their use. Lat. 5° 51' 30" N Long. 75° 17' W ACA, a settlement of the alcaldía mayor of Tlaxclala, in Nueva España.

Last edit almost 3 years ago by Romina De León
5

[ACAAY, a parish in Paraguay, situate on a small river which runs into the Río Paraguay. It is about 14 leagues SE of Asuncion. Lat. 25° 54' 7" S Long. 57° 25' W.]

ACACUNA, a mountain of Peru, in the province and corregimiento of Arica in Peru. It is very lofty, and is four leagues distant from the S. sea; is very barren, and situate between the promontory of Ilo and the river Sama. Lat. 70° 29' S [Long. 18° 35' W.]

ACADIA, a province and peninsula of N. America, on the E coast of Canada, between the island or bank of Newfoundland and New England, by which it is bounded on the w. It is more than 100 leagues in length from N W S E and nearly 80 in width, from NE to SW from the gulph of St. Lawrence to the river Santa Cruz. It was discovered in 1497 by Sebastian Cabot, sent thither from England by Henry VII. The French, under the command of Jacob Cartier, of St. Maloes, established themselves here in 1534, in order to carry on a codfishery on the bank of Newfoundland; and in 1604, Peter Guest, a gentleman of the household of Henry IV of France, was sent by that king to establish a colony, which he founded at Port Royal. The English entered it under Gilbert Humphry, in consequence of a grant which had been made to this person by Queen Elizabeth, and gave it the title of Nova Scotia. In 1621 King James I made a donation of it to the Earl of Stirling; and in 1627 the French, commanded by Kirk de la Rochelle, made themselves masters of it, destroying all the establishments of the English, who were obliged to surrender it up, in 1629, by the treaty of St. Germains. The French shortly afterwards lost it; a Governor Philip having taken possession of it; but they, however, regained it in 1691, through the conduct of Mr. De Villebon. In order to settle the pretensions of the rival courts, commissioners were, by mutual consent, appointed in the peace of Riswick, in 1697, to consider which should be the limits of Nova Scotia and New England; and in the peace of Utrecht, it was entirely ceded to the English, who afterwards returned to it. This beautiful country contains many rivers and lakes; the principal of these is the Rosignol, well stocked with fish: there are also many woods, full of excellent timber, and thronged with very singular birds; as, for instance, the Colibri, or hummingbird, and various others. The same woods abound in many kinds of fruits and medicinal herbs. It is very fertile in wheat, maize, pulse of all sorts, and also produces cattle of various kinds, animals of the chase, and abundance of fine fish. Its principal commerce is in skins and salt fish. The winter is longer and colder than in Europe. The capital is Port Royal.— [The name of Acadia was first applied to a tract from the 40th to the 46th degree of N lat. granted to De Mons, Nov. 8, 1603, by Henry IV of France. For the present state of this country, see NOVA SCOTIA.]

ACAGUATO, a settlement of the head settlement of the district and alcaldía mayor of Tancitaro. It is so reduced as to consist of no more than 15 families of Indians, who maintain themselves by sowing some maize, and other vegetable productions. — Eight leagues S of the capital.

ACAHILA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Yamparaes in Peru, dependent on the archibishopric of Charcas, and annexed to the curacy of S. Christobal de Pilcomayo.

ACAIA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Churin.

ACAMBARO, the head settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Zelaya, in the province and bishopric of Mechoacán. It contains 490 families of Indians, 80 of Mustees and Mulattoes, and a convent of the order of St. Francis. In its district there are other small settlements or wards.— Seven leagues S of its capital.

ACAMISTLAHUAC, the head settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Tasco, annexed to the curacy of its capital, from whence it is distant two leagues to the E N E. It contains 30 Indian families.

ACAMUCHITLAN, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Texopilco, and alcaldía mayor of Zultepec. It contains 60 Indian families, whose commerce is in sugar and honey. It produces also maize, and cultivates many vegetable productions. — Five leagues N of its head settlement.

ACAMON, a river of the province and government of Guayana, or Nueva Andalucia. It arises in the serranias of Usupama; runs W N W and enters the Caroni.

ACANTEPEC, the head settlement of the alcaldía mayor of Tlapa. It is of a cold and moist temperature, contains 92 Indian families, among which are included those of another settlement in its vicinity, all of whom maintain themselves by manufacturing cotton stuffs.

ACANTI, a river of the province and government of Darien, in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises in the mountains which lie towards the N and empties itself into the sea between Cape Tiburon and the bay of Calidonia.

ACAPALA, a settlement of the province and alcaldía mayor of Chiapa, in the kingdom of Guatemala. Lat. 16° 53' N Long. 93° 52' W [It is situate on the Tobasco river, near the city of Chiapa, and not far from a bay in the S. sea, called Teguantipac.]

Last edit over 2 years ago by benwbrum
8

Tlacolula, from whence it is distant a league ant a half to the N.

another, settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Xicayan, of the same kingdom. It contains 12 Indian families, and is 10 leagues distant from its head settlement.

ACATEPEQUE, S. Franciso de, a settlement of the head settlement of St. Andres de Cholula, and alcaldía mayor of this name. It contains 140 Indian families, and is half a league to the S of its capital.

another settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Igualapa, situate at a league's distance to the E of the same.

ACATIC, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Tecpatitlan, in the kingdom and bishopric of Nueva Galicia. It is four leagues to the S of its capital.

ACATICO, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Cuquio, in Nueva España.

ACATLAN, a settlement and capital of the alcaldía mayor of this name. It is of a mild temperature, and its situation is at the entrance of the Misteca Baxa. It contains 850 families of Indians, and 20 of Spaniards and Mustees. In its vicinity are some excellent saltgrounds, in which its commerce chiefly consists. The jurisdiction of this alcaldía, which contains four other head settlements of the district, is fertile and pleasant, abounding in flowers, fruits, all kinds of pulse and seeds, and is well watered. They have here large breeds of goats, which they slaughter chiefly for the skin and the fat, salting down the flesh, and sending it to La Puebla and other parts to be sold. In its district are many cultivated lands. It is 55 leagues leagues to the E S E of Mexico. Long. 275° 10' W Lat. 19° 4' N.

another settlement of the same name, with the dedicatory title of S. Andres, in the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Xalapa, in the same kingdom, situate on a clayey spot of ground, of a cold moist temperature, rendered fertile by an abundance of streams, which in a very regular manner water the lands; although,it being void of mountains and exposed to the N winds, the fruits within its neighourhood do not come to maturity. It contains 180 Indian families, including those of the new settlement, which was established at a league's distance to the S of its head settlement, and which is called San Miguel de las Aguastelas. Acatlan is a league and a half distant from its head settlement.

another settlement, having the dedicatory title of San Pedro, belonging to the head settlement of Malacatepec and alcaldía mayor of Nexapa, in the same kingdom. It contains 80 Indian families, who trade in wool and in the fish called bobo, quantities of which are found in a large river which runs close by the settlement, and which are a great source of emolument to them. It is four leagues N of its capital.

another settlement of he bead settlement of Zitlala, of the same alcaldía and kingdom. It contains 198 Indian families, and its situation is a league and an half N of its head settlement.

another settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Sentipac, of the same kingdom. It is of a cold temperature, contains 42 Indian families, and is 15 leagues N E of its capital.

another settlement of the head settlement of Atotonilco, and alcaldía mayor of Tulanzingo in the same kingdom. It contains 115 Indian families, and a convent of the religious order of St. Augustin. — Two leagues N of its head settlement.

ACATLAZINGO, Santa Maria de, a settlement of the head settlement of Xicula, and alcaldía mayor of Nexapa, situate in a plain that is surrounded on all sides by mountains. It contains 67 Indian families, who employ themselves in the culture of the cochineal plant.

ACATULA, a settlement of the province and government of Venezuela, situate on the shore of the river Guasqui, to the E of the city of Coro.

ACAXEE, a nation of Indians of the province of Topia. It is well peopled, and was converted to the Catholic faith by the father Hernando de Santaren, and others of the abolished society of the Jesuits, in 1602. They are docile, of good dispositions and abilities. In the time of their idolatry, they used to bend the heads of their dead with their bodies and knees together, and in this posture inter them in a cave, or under a rock, giving them provisions for the journey which they fancied them about to make ; also laying by them a bow and arrows for their defence. Should an Indian woman happen to have died in childbed, the infant was put to death ; for they used to say, it was the cause of her death. These Indians were once induced by a sorcerer to make an insurrection, but it was quelled by the governor of the province, Don Francisco de Ordinola, in the year 1612.

ACAXETE, Santa María de, the head, settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Tepcaca, situate on the slope of the noted sierra of Tlascala. It is of a cold and dry temperature, contains seven Spanish families, 10 of Mustees and Mulattoes, and 176 of Mexican Indians. In its vicinity is a reservoir, formed of hewn stone, which serves at once to catch the waters as they come down from the sierra, and to conduct them to Tepcaca, three leagues N N W of its capital.

Last edit almost 3 years ago by MJG
9

In its vicinity is a reservoir, formed of hewn stone, which serves at once to catch the waters as they come down from the sierra, and to conduct them to Tepcaca, three leagues N N W of its capital.

ACAXUCHITLAN the head settlement of the alcaldía mayor of Tulazingo, to the N E. It contains 406 Indian families, and is a curacy of the bishopric of La Puebla de los Angeles. Distant four leagues to the E of its capital.

ACAYUCA, the alcaldía mayor of Nueva España, and of the province of Goazacoalco. Its jurisdiction is very extended, and consists, for the most part, of places of a hot and moist temperature, but so fertile is it that it gives annually four crops of maize; and as there is no demand for this production in the other provinces, it follows, of course, that the Indians here are little given to industry. Indeed the ground never requires the plough, and the whole of their labours during the seedtime consist merely in smoothing the surface of the mountains, and in scratching up the ground with a pointed stick. It is at times infested by locusts, which destroy the plants and crops ; and having never been able to find a remedy against this evil, the inhabitants had recourse to the protection of the virgin of La Conception, which is revered in the head settlement of the district of the Chichimecas ; and it is said that, owing to her mediatory influence, the plague has been thought to diminish. This province is watered by the abundant river of the Goazacoalco. The settlements of this alcaldía are, Xocoteapa, Macayapa, Menzapa, Molocan, Theimanquillo, Tinantitlan, Chinameca, Zoconusco, Olutla, Otcapa, Pochutla, Ostitan, Cozolcaque, Ixhuatla, Macatepeque.

another, the capital of the above, situate on the coast of the N. sea. Its inhabitants are composed of 30 families of Spaniards, 296 of Indians, and 70 of Mustees and Mulattoes. It lies a little more than 100 leagues S E of Mexico. Lat. 17° 53' N Long. 94° 46' 30" W.

another, settlement in the alcaldía mayor of Pachuca, in the kingdom of Nueva España, annexed to the curacy of Tezayuca, and containing 100 Indian families.

Acacingo, the head settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Tepcaca, situate in a plain of a mild temperature, and watered by two streams which run close to all the houses of the settlement, to the great comfort of the inhabitants. In the middle of the above plain there is a beautiful fountain, a convent of the religious order of St. Francis, a very ancient building, and some other buildings, which have been erected since the conquest of the country. The parish church is a piece of the most ancient architecture. The inhabitants are composed of 150 families of Spaniards, 104 of Mustees, 31 of Mulattoes, and 700 of Indians; 3 1/4 leagues E to the NE of its capital.

ACAZUTLA, a port of the S sea, on the coast of the province of the alcaldía mayor of Zuchitepec, in the kingdom of Guatemala, between the point of Los Remedios, and the settlement of Guapaca. [Lat. 14° 42' N Long. 90° 3'.]

ACCHA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru, situate on the skirt of a mountain, which has a prominence, seeming as though it were about to fall upon the settlement. This mountain is constantly dwindling away without any assignable cause. Lat. 13° 19 s. Long. 71° 13' W

ACCHA-AMANSAIA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru.

ACCHA-URINZABA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masque in Peru.

Aceites, a river of the province and government of Caraccas, in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises in the mountains, and enters the Orituco.

[ACCOCESAWS. The ancient town and principal place of residence of these Indians is on the W side of Colorado of Rio Rouge, about 200 miles S W of Nacogdoches, but they often change their place of residence for a season : being near the bay, they make great use of fish, oysters &c.; kill a great many deer, which are the largest and fattest in the province ; and their country is universally said to be inferior to no part of the province in soil, growth of timber, goodness of water, and beauty of surface; they have a language peculiar to themselves, but have a mode of communication by dumb signs, which they all understand: number about 80 men. Thirty or forty years ago, the Spaniards had a mission here, but broke it up, or moved it to Nacogdoches. They talk of resettling it, and speak in the highest terms,of the country.]

[ACCOMACK County, in Virginia, is situated on a peninsula, bounded N by Maryland, E by the ocean, and on the W by Chesapeak bay, and contains 13.959 inhabitants, including 4.262 slaves.]

Last edit almost 3 years ago by Romina De León
10

ACHA, Mountains of, in the province and government of Guayana; they run from N to S on the shore of the river Caroni.

ACHACACHE, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Omasuyos, the capital of this province, in Peru. It contains, besides the parish chapel, another, in which is an image of Christ, with the dedicatory title of La Misericordia. [Lat. 16° 33' 30" S. Long. 79° 23' 20" W.]

ACHAGUA, a nation of Indians of the nuevo Reyno de Granada, who dwell among the plains of Gazanare and Meta, and in the woods which skirt the river Ele. They are bold in their engagements with wild beasts, but with human beings they have recourse rather to poison and stratagem; they are dexterous in the use of the dart and spear, and never miss their aim; are particularly fond of horses, of which they take the utmost care, anointing and rubbing them with oil ; and it is a great thing among them to have one of these animals of peculiar size and beauty. They go naked, but, for the sake of decency, wear a small apron made of the thread of aloes, the rest of their bodies being painted of different colours. They are accustomed, at the birth of their children, to smear them with a bituminous ointment, which hinders the hair from growing, even upon the eyebrows. The women's brows are also entirely deprived of hair, and the juice of jagua being immediately rubbed into the little holes formed by the depilatory operation, they remain bald for ever after. They are of a gentle disposisition, but much given to intoxication. The Jesuits reduced many to the catholic faith, forming them into settlements, in 1661 .

ACHALA, Mountains of, in the province and government of Tucuman, bounded by the mountains of Cuyo or Mendoza, of the kingdom of Chile; they run from N N W to S S E at the sources of the river Quarto.

Achamqui. See CHANQUI.

ACHAS, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Guamanga in Peru, situate on the confines which divide the above province from Huanta.

ACHEPE, Bay of, a small port of the N. sea, on the E, coast of the Isla Real, or Cape Breton. It is close to N. cape.

[ACHIACHICA, a town in Mexico. See Angelos.]

ACHIANTLAS, Miguel de, the head settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Tepozcolula. It contains a convent of monks of Santo Domingo, and 260 families of Indians, who occupy themselves in cultivating and improving the land. It is eight leagues to the W with an inclination to the S of its capital.

ACHIBAMBA, a river of the province and government of Mainas in the kingdom of Quito; it rises in the mountains, and enters the Marañon.

ACHINUTLAN, a very lofty mountain of the province and government of Guayana, or Nueva Andalucia. It is on the shore of the river Orinoco, and to the E of the Ciudad Real, (royal city), the river Tacuragua running between them.

ACHIRA. See Cata-Magu.

ACHITE, a small river of the province and government of Guayana. It runs from S to N and enters the Cuyuni.

ACHOCALLA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Pacages in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Viacha.

ACHOGOA, a settlement of the province and government of Cinaloa, founded by the missionaries of the Jesuits, between the rivers Tuerte, Mayo, and Ribas.

ACHOMA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Collahuas in Peru. In its vicinity is a volcano, called Amboto and Sahuarcuca, which vomits smoke and flames; the latter of which are seen clearly at night.

ACHONGA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Angaraes in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Lircay.

ACHOUPEKAHIGAN, a river of Canada. It runs E afterwards turns to the S and enters the lake of St. Thomas.

[ACKLIN'S Island. See Crooked Island.]

ACLA, a small city of the kingdom of Tierra Firme, in the province of Darien, founded by Gabriel de Roxas, in 1514, on the coast of the S. sea, at the mouth of the gulph of Uraba, in front of the island of Pinos, with a good fort, then much frequented and very convenient, from having a good bottom, but somewhat incommoded by currents. Pedro Arias Davila built here a fort for its defence in 1516; but the settlement, nevertheless, did not keep long together, the Spaniards having abandoned it, on account of its unhealthiness, in 1532. [Lat. 8° 56' N. Long. 77° 40' W.]

ACOBAMBA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Angaraes in Peru. It was the capital, but at present the town of Guancavelica bears that title, on account of its being the residence of the governor and other people of consequence. It is of a good temperature, and so abundant in grain, that its crops of wheat amount to 25,000 bushels yearly. In an estate near it, are some pyramidical stones, and in other parts

Last edit almost 3 years ago by Romina De León
11

are the ruins or some well made benches in the shape of couches, which have been much injured by time, and were there before the corning of the Spaniards. Lat. 13° 16' 30" s. Long. 74° 32' 30" w.

another settlement, of the same name in the province and corregimiento of Jauja, annexed to the curaey of Cochangara.

another settlement of the province and corregimiento of Tarma.

ACOBIMBILLA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Angaraes in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Conaica.

ACOCHALA, a very lofty mountain of the province and corregimienento of Lipes, in the arch- bishopric of Charcas, where there are some very fine silver mines, which are, however, little worked for want of hands.

ACOLA , a settlement of the province and cor- regimiento of Lucanas in Peru, annexed to the curacy of its capital.

ACOLMAN, San Agustin de , a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tez- coco, in Nueva Espana, situate in a pleasant valley of a benign temperature. There are some wards united to its district, and the number of its inhabitants, including these wards, amounts to 240 Indian families, besides a convent of monks of the order of St. Augustin.

ACOMA , a settlement of Nuevo Mexico, situ- ate on the shore of a river which enters the Grande of the N. between the settlements of San J uan and La Laguna. [It is on a high mountain, with a strong castle, and is the capital of the province. [Lat, 35° 24' «. Long. 106° 10'

ACOMACK , a county of the province and colony of Virginia, which preserves its Indian name. It is the largest county of the province, containing 200,925 acres of ground ; but not so well peopled as the others, and has only one parish, which is of the same name. Different rivers take their rise here ; among the most noted is the Clif>- sonossea,

ACOMAIO, a settlement of the province, and corregimiento of Huanuco in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Santa Maria del Valle, situate on the confines of the infidel Panataguas Indians.

another settlement of the province and corregimiento of Quispicanchi in Peru.

ACOMARCA, a settlement of the province and corregimityito of Vilcas Huaman in Peru, arinexed to the curacy of Vilcas.

ACOMES, a fall of the river Amariscoggin, in the prov'ince of Continent, one of the four w hich compose the colony of New England.

ACOMULCO, a settlement of the head settle- ment and alcaldia mayor of Zochicoatlan in Nueva Espana. It contains 12 Indian families, and is two leasrues to the w. of its capital.

ACONCAGUA, a province and corregimiento of the kingdom of Chile ; bounded n. by a part of the province of Quillota, e, by the Cordillera, s. by the valley of Colina, of the jurisdiction of Santiago, w. by the province of Quillota. Its territory is level and well watered. It is divided into two parts by a large river of the same name, having a bridge built of stone and mortar, w ith two arches. It produces abundance of wheat and much wild marjoram, which is carried to Peru, and forms the principal branch of its commerce. In this province is the royal road, lying through the Cordillera in the way to Mendoza, which is very rough and dangerous, on account of the many slopes and steep declivities towards the river ; the path is very narrow, and in various places it is necessary to open a pass by means of a pick-axe ; so that, if at any time the mules should crowd together, they would push each other into the river, w hich has not unfrequently been the case. The royal treasures are carried by this road from the month of Novem- ber to April and part of May. A few years since, some small houses of brick and mortar have been built on one or other side of the Cordillera, which they call casuchas (miserable huts) ; in these they put, in the winter time, some coal, biscuit, and hung beef, so that the couriers, providing them- selves with the keys of the doors at Mendoza, or, on the other side, at the Guardia of Aconcagua, may have something to live upon, incase they should be stopt by a fall of snow on their journey ; and with this precaution, a courier goes every month to Santiago, carrying with him the mails brought by the ships from Europe. In the winter it is customary to walk on foot over the snow, from Paramillo, which is three leagues from the top of the Cordillera, and four from its descent to tlie place which is called Los Ojos de Agua, through the valley of Putaendo ; but towards the ??. there is another way, which they call De Los Patos, which is the road generally taken in going to the city of San Juan ; but the Cordillera being more lofty here, it is only passable in the months of February and March. The inhabitants of this province amount, on an average, to 8000 souls. The capital' is San Felipe el Real. [Lat. 32° II' s. Long. 70° 12' 30" w. j

ACONCAGUA, a large river which runs through the above province, rising in the mountains of the Cordillera, and running through it by the side of the road which leads to Buenos Ayres : hrarcliing

Last edit almost 3 years ago by MJG
13

tlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Xochimilco, in the same kingdom. It contains 210 Indian families, including those of its wards.

ACUA, a river of the kingdom of Brazil, in the island of Joanes or Marajo. It runs s. s. e. and enters the large arm of the river of the Amozonas.

ACUIAPAN, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Zultcpec in Nueva Espana, situate between two craggy steeps, and annexed to the curacy of Temascaltepec. It contains 38 Indian families, who carry on a commerce by the dressing of hides of large and small cattle. Six leagues n. of its capital.

ACUILPA, a settlement of the head settlement of Olinala, and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa, in Nueva Espana. It is of a hot and moist temperature, abounding in grain, chia, (a white medicinal earth), seeds, and other productions, with which its inhabitants carry on a trade* These consist of 92 Indian families. It is a little more than three leagues from its head settlement.

ACUIO, a settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Cinaqua in Nueva Espana; of a hot temperature, and inhabited only by nine Indian families, whose commerce consists in collecting salt and wild wax. It belongs to the curacy of Tauricato, and in its district are 11 sugar mills, and seven pastures fit for the larger cattle, and which are so extensive and considerable as to employ in them 50 families of Spaniards, and 235 of Mustees, Mulattoes, and Negroes. 30 leagues towards the s. of its capital.

ACUL, a settlement of the island of St. Domingo, in the part possessed by the French; situate on the n. coast, on the shore of the port of Petit-Goave.

ACUL, another settlement in the same island, belonging also to the French; situate s. of the Llanos of the N.

ACUL another] settlement on the s. coast, upon the bay which forms the point of Abacu.

ACUL a river of the above island. It is small, and runs into the sea behind the point of Abacu.

ACULA, San Pedro de, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Cozamaloapan in Nueva Espana, situate upon a high hill, and bounded by a large lake of salubrious water, called by the Indians Puetla; which lake empties itself into the sea by the sand bank of Alvarado, and the waters of which, in the winter time, overflow to such a degree as nearly to inundate the country. It contains 305 Indian families, and is four leagues to the e. of its capital.

ACULEO, a lake of the kingdom of Chile, which empties itself into the river Maipo, famous for good fish, highly prized in the city of Santiago. It is three leagues in length, and in some parts one in breadth. It is in the district of the settlement of Maipo, of the province and corregimiento of Rancagua.

ACUMA, a river of the captainship of Seara in Brazil]]: it enters the sea between the lake Upieni and the cape of Las Sierras.

ACURAGU, Angoras, or Camosin, a river of the province and captainship of Seara in Brazil, which rises in the province of Pernambuco, runs n. for many leagues, and enters the sea between the points of Tortuga and Palmeras.

ACURAIP1TI, a river of the province and government of Paraguay, which runs s. s. e. and enters the Parana.

ACUTITLAN, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Tepuxilco, and alcaldia mayor of Zultepec, in Nueva Espana. It contains 45 Indian families, who trade in sugar, honey, and maize, and many other of its natural productions. It is five leagues n. e. of its head settlement, and a quarter of a league from Acamuchitlan.

ACUTZIO, a settlement of the head settlement of Tiripitio, and alcaldia mayor of Valladolid, and bishopric of Mechoacan. It contains 136 families of Indians, and 11 of Spaniards and Mustees. There are six large cultivated estates in its district, which produce abundance of wheat, maize, and other seeds; and these estates keep in employ eight families of Spaniards, 60 of Mulattoes, and 102 of Indians, who have also under their care many herds of large and small cattle, which breed here. It is one league and a half s. of its head settlement.

ADAES, Nuestra Senora del Pilar de Los, a town and garrison of the province of Los Texas, or Nuevas Felipinas, and the last of these settlements, being upon the confines of the French colonies. It is of a mild temperature, very fertile,. and abounding in seeds and fruits, which the earth produces without any cultivation ; such as chesnuts, grapes, and walnuts. The garrison consisis of a captain and 57 men, for the defence of the Indian settlements lately converted by the missions belonging to the religious order of St, Francis. It is 215 leagues from its capital, and 576 from Mexico. Long. 93° 35'. Lat, 32° 9'.

ADAES, a lake of the above province, about five leagues broad, and 10 in circumference, forming a gulph, in which large ships can sail with ease. It is more than 180 fathoms deep, as was once proved, when it was found that aline of that length did not reach the bottom. It abounds in a variety offish, which are caught in vast quantities without nets ;

Last edit over 2 years ago by Romina De León
17

A G U

A G U

captainship of the Rio Grande in Brazil. Itrises near the coast, and runs s. s. e. entering thesea close to the cape of San Roque.

Aguada, a sharp point or small island of theS. sea, near the coast, in the province and corre-gimiento of Atacama.

Aguada (point in Cartagena), a point on the coast of Tierra Firme,in the province and government of Cartagena. Itis one of those which form the mouth of the gulphof Uraba or Darien.

AGUADILLA, a river of the province andkingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises in the moun-tains on the s. and enters the large river Chagrevery near its mouth, and the castle of this name.Here ships take in water, on account of the conve-nience of a bay, for the defence of which there is,upon the shore, a battery belonging to the samecastle, which was built under the directions ofDon Dionisio de Alcedo, in 1743.

AGUADORES, River of the, in the islandof Cuba. It runs into the sea on the s. coast ofthis island, having at its mouth a watch-tower andguard to give notice of vessels which may enter theport of Santiago de Cuba, from whence it isseven leagues distant.

AGUAIO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Sierra Gorda, in the bay of Mexico,and kingdom of Nueva España, founded in theyear 1748 by the Colonel of the militia of Quere-taro, Don Joseph de Escandon, Count of SierraGorda.

Aguaio, another settlement, with the dedicatorytitle of San Miguel, in the new kingdom of Leon,inhabited by Spaniards ; 10 leagues distant fromLa Punta.

AGUAIUS, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Quixos and Marcas in the kingdomof Quito.

AGUAGE, a settlement and real of mines of theprovince and government of Sonora in NuevaEspaña. Lat. 29°w. Long. 111° 5'

AGUAJES, a settlement of the province ofTepeguna, and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya, situ-ate on the shore of the river of Las Nasas.

AGUALEI, a small river of the province andgovernment of Guayana, which rises in the sierrasof Usupama, and enters the Caroni on the e. side.

AGUALULCO, a settlement and capital of thejurisdiction of [Izatlan]] in Nueva Galicia. It hasa convent of the religious order of St. Francis, andin 1745 it contained upwards of 100 families ofIndians, including the wards of its district; 17leagues w. of Guadalaxara. Lat. 20° 44' n.Long. 103° 33' w.

VOL. T,

17

AGUAMENA, a settlement of the jurisdictionof Santiago de las Atalayas, and government ofSan Juan de los Llanos, in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, annexed to the curacy of that city. It isof a hot temperature, and produces the same fruitsas the other settlements of this province.

AGUAMIRO, a settlement of the province andcer re gimiento of Huamalies in Peru, celebrated forsome medicinal and very salutary baths.

AGUAN, a river of the province and govern-ment of Honduras, which runs into the sea at thegulph of this name.

AGUANATO, Santa Maria de, a settlementof the head settlement of the district of Puruandiro,^.nAalcaldia mayor of Valladolid, in the provinceand bishopric of Mechoacan. It is of a cold tem-perature, situate at the foot of the sierra of Curupo,and contains 36 families of Indians, who gain theirlivelihood by trading in dressed hides. Sixteenleagues from Pasquaro or Valladolid.

AGUANO, a lake of the province and govern-ment of Mainas in the kingdom of Quito. ' It isformed by an arm or channel of the river Gualla-ga, and is very near the shore of that river.

AGUANOS, San Antonio de, a settlementof the province and government of Mainas in thekingdom of Quito ; one of those which belongedto the missions held there by the Jesuits, andthus called from the nation of Indians of whom it iscomposed. It was founded in 1670 by the fatherLorenzo Lucero.

Aguanos, another settlement, with the dedica-tory title of San Francisco, in this province, andof these missions.

AGUAPAI, a river of the province and go-vernment of Paraguay. It rises between the Pa-rana and the Uruguay, near the settleiment of SanCarlos, runs j. forming a curve, and returning c.enters the last of the above rivers not far from thesettlement of La Cruz.

Aguapai, another river of the same provinceand government, which runs w. and enters theParana close to the Juan Gazu.

AGUAPEI, a river of the same province andgovernment as the two former. It is very small,and rises in the mountains of Nuestra Senora deFe ; runs from n. to s. and enters the Parana.

AGUARAU, a river of the province and go-vernment of Paraguay, which runs w. and entersthe Parana between the Inau and Piray .

AGUARICO, San Pedro de, a settlement ofIndians, converted by the missions of the Jesuits,in the province and government of Mainas; situ-ate on the shore of the river Napo.

n

Last edit over 2 years ago by Romina De León
24

24

A I U

which the inhabitants trade. These are composed of34 Indian families. It is a little more than threeleagues from its head settlement,

AIOZINGO, a settlement of the alcaldía mayorof Chaleo in Nueva España, situate on the shoreof the lake of Mexico, with a good port, at whichare embarked the fruits of many provinces for thesupply of that capital, (Chaleo), which is withineight or ten hours sail from hence. It has a goodconvent of S. Augustin, where a most beauti-ful image of the virgin is reverenced, and sup-posed to be wonder-working. Its inhabitants con-sist of 120 Indian families and some Spanish. Itis distant one league s, s. e. from its capital.

AIQUILE, a settlement of the province of Mizque in Peru.

AIRICOS, a nation of Indians who inhabit theplains of Cazanare and Meta, of the new kingdomof Granada, to the c. of the mountains of Bogota,on the borders of the river Ele. It is numerous,and feared by all its neighbours, on account of itsvalour and dexterity in the use of arms.

Airicos, with the dedicatory title of SanFrancisco Xavier, a settlement which belongedto the Jesuits, and founded in 1662 by father An-tonio de Monteverde, and composed of some ofthose Indians who were thus reduced to the Catho-lic faith.

AIRIHUANCA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Cotabamba in Peru.

AIRS, a small city of the province and colonyof New Jersey, in the county of Burlington.

AIUDA, Nuestra Senora be la, a villageand settlement of the Portuguese, in the provinceand captainship of Pernambuco in Brazil, situateupon the sea-coast, and on the shore of the riverS. Miguel.

Aiuda, another settlement in the province andcaptainship of Puerto Seguro, situate upon thecoast on the shore of the port.

AIUILA, a river of the province and alcaldiamayor of Soconusco, in the kingdom of Guate-mala: It runs into the S. sea between the settle-ment of Suchitepec and the river Coatlan.

AIUINOS, a nation of Indians of the provinceand government of Cinaloa in Nueva Espana,converted to the faith by father Francisco Olinano,of the abolished society of the Jesuits, in 1624.They live towards the n. of the above province,and in the times of their heathenism they dwelt inthe lofty mountains, in order that they might de-fend themselves from the other nations with whomthey were at war. They are docile, well-inclined,and of good habits.

AIUN, or luMERi, a river of the province and

AKA

viceroyalty of Buenos Ayres. It runs s. and entersthe Rio Negro.

AIUNCHA, Pago BE, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucuman, in the districtand jurisdiction of the city of Santiago del Estero,from whence it is 22 leagues distant. It is situateon the shore of the river Dulce.

AIUTLA, the head settlement of the district ofthe alcaldia mayor of Villalta in Nueva Espana.It is of a cold temperature, containing 187 Indianfamilies, and a convent of the religious order of S.Domingo ; distant 13 leagues to the e. of its capi-tal.

Aiutla, another settlement in the head settle-ment of the district and alcaldia mayor of Autlanof the same kingdom, with 23 Indian families, whohave large stores of pulse and fruit, so rich and fer-tile is their country. It is annexed to the curacy ofTenamaztlani, from whence it lies one league s,

AlUA, a small town of the island of St. Domin-go, situate in the line which divides the Spanishterritory from the French. It was the inhabitantsof this town who chiefly contributed to ensure thevictory which was gained against the Spaniards inthe plain of Puerto Real, by the president DonFrancisco de Segura y Sandoval, in 1691.

AIX, Palmar be, a large beach on the coastof Florida, within the channel of Bahama, nearthe point of Canaveral ; memorable for the ship-wreck of 22 vessels, composing the fleet of NuevaEspana, which took place in 1715, being under thecommand of Don Antonio de Ubila ; memorablealso for the loss of two galleons from Tierra Firme,commanded by Don Antonio de Echevers ; theloss of the one and the other amounting to nearly20 million dollars.

Aix, a river of the same province, which runsinto the sea very near the Palmar.

AJOIANI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Carabaya in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Coaza.

[AJOS, a parish situate on the foot of the moun-tains which separate the rivers Paraguay and Pa-rana, about 24 leagues e. of Asuncion. Lat. 23°26' 34" s. Long. 56° 30' w.~\

AJOUES, a settlement of Indians of the pro-vince and government of Louisiana, in which theFrench held a garrison and fort for its defence, onthe shore of a lake near the Missouri.

A joues, another settlement of the same provinceand government, situate on the shore of the riverMissouri.

AKANCEAS, a nation of savage Indians of N.America, who live at the conflux of the riversMississippi, and another abundant stream of its

Last edit over 2 years ago by MJG
27

mules, poultry, cheese, and salt meats. It haslikewise some mines in its district, which are notaltogetlier neglected, though the advantages de-rived from them would be immensely increased, ifthe number of labourers were greater. It is go-verned by a lieutenant nominated by the governorof Santiago de Veragua. [Lat. 8° 12' n. Long.80“ 40' a;.l

ALAQUES, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tacunga in the kingdom ofQuito.

ALAQUINES, a branch of the head settle-ment of the district of Tamazunchale, and alcaldiamayor of Valles, in Nueva España, situate on theshore of a large river which divides this jurisdic-tion from that of Guadalcazar.

ALARA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Antioquia in the new kingdom of Gra-nada. It rises at the foot of the sierra of Gua-moco, and s. of the town of this name; runsand enters the Cauca.

[ALASKE, a long peninsula on the n. w. coastof America, formed by Bristol bay and the oceanon the n. w. and n. and by the ocean and thewaters of Cook’s river on the s. and s. e. At itsextremity are a number of islands, the chief ofwhich, in their order westward, are, Oonemak,Oonala.sha, and Ocumnak, which form part ofthe chain or cluster of islands called the NorthernArchipelago. Captain Cook, on his return in1779, passed through the channel e. of Oonemakisland. See North-avest Coast of America.]

ALATAMALIA, a large river of the provinceand government of Florida. It runs nearly duee. and enters the sea opposite the Georgean isles.[This river, Avliich is navigable, is more properlyof Georgia. It rises in the Cherokee mountains,near the head of a western branch of Savannahriver, called Tugulo. In its descent through themountains it receives several auxiliary streams ;thence it Avinds, with considerable rapidity,through the hilly country 250 miles, from Avhcnceit throAvs itself into the open flat country, by thename of Oakmulgee. Thence, after meanderingfor 150 miles, it is joined by the Oconee, whichlikewise has its source in the mountains. Afterthis junction it assumes the name of Alatamalia,Avhen it becomes a large majestic river ; and flow'-ing Avith a gentle current through forests andplains 100 miles, discharges itself into the Atlan-tic by several mouths. The n. channel glides bythe heights of Darien, about 10 miles above thebar, and after several turnings, enters the oceanbetween Sapelo and Wolf islands. The s. chan-nel, which is esteemed the largest and deepest.

after its separation from the >?. descends gently,,taking its course between MDntosh and Brough-ton islands, and at last by the w. coast of St.Simon’s sound, betAveen the s. end of the islandof that name, and the n. end of Jeky! island.At its confluence with the Atlantic it is 500 yardsAvide.]

ALAUSI, a province and small corregimientoor district of the kingdom of Quito ; bounded «. bythe province of Riobamba, n. w. by Chimbo, s.by Cuenca, w. by the district of Yaguache, ande. by that of Macas. It is Avatered by the riversUzogoche, Gussuntos, Pinancay, Alausi, andothers of less note. It abounds in mountains, themost lofty of Avhich are tOAvard the©.; the countryis pleasant, and yields liberally every kijid offruit and grain that are common either to Americaor Europe. It contains many sugar mills, andthe sugar is the best intlie kingdom. The air hereis mild and healthy, and the climate cannot be saidto be inconveniently hot. It is governed by thecorregidor, who resides in the capital.

Alausi, the capital of the above province. Ithas in its district some mineral fountains of hotwater, established with suitable conveniences bysome families of consideration residing there. Itstrade consists in cloths, baizes, and cotton gar-ments, Avhich are wrought in its manufactories.It has a very good parish church, and a conventof the order of St. Francis. [Lat. 2“ 12' «.Long. 78° 39' ©.]

[ALBANS, St. a township in Franklin county,Vermont, on lake Champlain, opposite N. Heroisland, Avith 256 inhabitants.]

ALBANIA, or Albany, a county of the pro-vince and colony of New York. It contains acertain number of plains fertile in grain, in AA'hich,and in planks of pine, its principal commerce con-sists. The Avinter is extremely cold, and the riverHudson is generally frozen for 100 miles, so a*to bear immense burthens. The gveat cpiautityof snow that falls at this season is useful, not onlybecause it covers the grain, and keeps it from perishing by the frost, but because, when it melts, itso increases the waters of the river, as to facilitatethereby the transportation of the productions ofthe country.

[Albany County Lies Between Ulster AndSaratoga ; Its Extent 46 Miles By 28|ALBANY County lies between Ulster andSaratoga ; its extent 46 miles by 28. By thestate census, .fan. 20, 1796, the number of elec-tors in this county were 6087, and the number oftowns 11.]

Albania, or Albany, the capital of theabove county, founded by the Dutch in 1608,together with tiiat of Orange, on the sliorc of theE 2

Last edit over 2 years ago by Romina De León
31

and tonegimknio of Atacama in Peru, situate onthe coast.

ALGONQUINENSES, or Algonquins, anation of savage Indians, who inhabit a part ofCanada : they are continually at war with theIroqiiees. Their idiom may be looked upon asthe mother tongue of all the other nations of thatcountry, and differs very slightly from the rest,so that any one speaking it would be able totravel in any other nation in these parts. Theyborder o;i the north side of lake Huron; andalthough inhabiting the whole of the coast of lakeSuperior, their number, according to Mackenzie,does not exceed 150 families.

[ALGONQUINS, of Rainy Lake, Indians ofN. America, of the precise limits of whose coun-try we are not informed. They live very muchdetached in small parties. The country theyinhabit is but an indifferent one ; it has been muchhunted, and the game, of course, nearly exhaust-ed. They are well-disposed towards the whites.Their number is said to decrease. They are ex-tremely addicted to spirituous liquors, of whichlarge quantities are annually furnished them bythe n. w. traders, in return for their bark canoes.They live wretchedly poor.]

[Algonquins, of Portage de Prairie, In-dians of N. America, who inhabit a low, flat,marshy country, mostly covered with timber, andwell stocked with game. They are emigrantsfrom the lake of the Woods, and the country e. ofit ; who were introduced some years since by then, tc. traders, in order to hunt the country on thelower parts of Red river, which then aboundedin a variety of animals of the fur kind. They arean orderly, well-disposed people, but, like theirrelations on Rainy lake, addicted to spirituousliquors. Their trade is at its greatest extent.]

ALGUILGUA. See article Santa Monica;

ALllUE, a settlement of the province andcorregim'iento of Rancagua in the kingdom ofChile, annexed to the curacy of San Pedro.

Aliiue, a large lake of the same province andkingdom.

[ALIATANS, Snake Indians, ofN. America,a numerous and well disposed people, inhabitinga woody and mountainous country ; they aredivided into three large tribes, who wander ata considerable distance from each other, and arecalled by themselves So-so-na, So-s6-bubar, andI-a-kar ; these are again subdivided into smaller,though independent bands, the names of Avhich wehave not yet learnt : they raise a number of horsesand mules, with which they trade with the Crow In-dians, or which are stolen by the nations on the e. of

them. They maintain a partial trade with theSpaniards, from whom they obtain many articlesof clothing and ironmongery, but no warlike im-plements.]

[ALiATANs,of La Playes, Indians of N. Ame-rica, who inhabit the rich plains from the headof the Arkansas, embracing the heads of Redriver, and extending, with the mountains and highlands, e. as far as it is known towards the gulph ofMexico. They possess^ no fire arms, but arewarlike and brave. They are, as well as theother Aliatans, a wandering people. Their coun-try abounds in wild horses, beside great numberswhich they raise themselves. These people, andthe West Aliatans, might be induced to trade onthe upper part of the Arkansas river. The Alia-tans do not claim a country within any particularlimits.]

[Aliatans, of the West, Indians of N. Ame-rica, who inhabit a mountainous country, andsometimes venture in the plains e. of the rockymountains, about the head of the Arkansas river.They have more intercourse with the Spaniards ofNew Mexico than the Snake Indians. They aresaid to be very numerous and warlike, but arebadly armed. The Spaniards fear these people,and therefore take the precaution not to furnishthem with any warlike implements. In their pre-sent unarmed state, they frequently commit hos-tilities on the Spaniards. They raise a greatmany horses.]

ALLANTE, a volcano of the kingdom ofChile, in the province and country of Arauco ;in 1640 it burst, the mountain opening in twoplaces, and throwing out large shapeless masses oflava, with so great a noise as to be heard at manyleagues distance: the mischief it did was veryconsiderable.

ALIBAMONS, or Alibamis, a nation ofIndians of Louisiana, dwelling «. of the Apaches.It is very numerous, and is on terms of amity withthe French ; so that they never have communica-tion with the ihiglisli, but from necessity. Theformer, when they first established themselves inthis country, carried on a large trade here, but itafterwards declined, on account of the distance ofthe place. [These Indians are from West Florida,off’ the Allibami river, and came to Red riverabout the same time as the Boluxas and Appala-ches. Part of them have lived on Red river,about sixteen miles above the Bayau Rapide, tilllately, when most of this party, of about 30 men,went up Red river, and have settled themselvesnear the Caddoques, where, we are informed, theyhave lately raised good crops of corn. The Cad-

Last edit over 2 years ago by Gimena
32

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit over 2 years ago by MJG
33

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit over 2 years ago by Romina De León
37

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit over 2 years ago by Romina De León
38

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit over 2 years ago by Romina De León
42

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit over 2 years ago by Romina De León
43

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit over 2 years ago by marisolfila
46

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit over 2 years ago by Bernie
48

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit over 2 years ago by Romina De León
49

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit over 2 years ago by Romina De León
286

nardo. On the shore at its mouth the French,under Robert la Sale, made their first establish-ment in the year 1683.

(CANELON, a town of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Ayres, situate on a branch ofthe river of the same name, about seven leaguesn. of Monte Video. Lat. 34° 35' 23" s. Long.56° 15' w.)

CANELONES, River of the, in the provinceand government of Buenos Ayres. It runs to thes. and enters the sea on the coast of the Rio de laPlata, on the side of Monte Video.

CANELOS, a large province of the kingdomof Quito, discovered by Gonzalo Pizarro in theyear 1540, who gave it this name on account ofthe quantity of cinnamon trees found in it, whichgrow very strong, shedding an odour somethinglike camphor, and very pungent. This cinnamon,which is called raspado, is carried to Quito, andsold at six reals a pound, being made use of in-stead of the fine cinnamon. A small viper is fre-quently met with in it of the same colour as thecinnamon, and extremely venomous. This pro-vince is uncultivated, full of impenetrable forestsand rivers, and contains only one settlement of thesame name, on the n. shore of the river Bobonaza,in which is the port of Canoas, and the residenceof a religious Dominican, who is the curate ofthose few miserable Indians. In lat. 1° 32' 20" s.

CANES AND Canches, a province and cor-regiminto of Peru, bounded on the e. by Cara-baya, towards the town of Mauclani, on the s. e.by Lampa in the cordillera of Villacanota, onthe s. by Cailloma, s. e. by a part of the provinceof Condesuios of Arequipa, w. by Chumbivilca,being divided by the river Apurimac, and n. w.by Quispicanchi. It is in length from n. to s.30 leagues, and 15 in width : Its climate is, forthe greater part, extremely cold, on account ofits being nearly covered with mountains of snow ;nevertheless they cultivate here barley, maize,potatoes, cavi, and quinoa; and in the warm parts,which consist of uneven and broken grounds nearthe rivers, some kinds of fruit, though in no abun-dance. Here also are great quantities of animalswhich breed upon the mountains from the luxu-riance of the pastures ; and of these are the vigog-nes, huanacos, and viscachas, which latter are aspecies of hare or rabbit ; deer also, and par-tridges, abound here. In the rivers are foundbagres a foot in length. The principal riverswhich water this province, are the Vilcamayo,which runs from the province of Quispicanchi,into which runs another flowing down from thesnowy sierras on the e. part called Combapata.

This river has a stone bridge, and descends fromthe heights of Cailloma. This province has manylakes, which are filled with water-fowl, such asducks, widgeons, and others ; these birds arefound more particularly in lake Lanchug, which isthree leagues long and one and a half broad, andin it there is also found the load-stone. Linencloth is fabricated here. In the district of SanPedro de Cacha, in a place called Rache, there isan ancient and grand edifice with nine gates, halfof the walls of which, as high as the first stories,are made of carved stone ; the rest of the edificebeing of earth upon five galleries of stone, formingas it were so many other walls. This building issaid to have served as a temple in Viracocha in thetime of the gentilism of the Indians. At a smalldistance there is an artificial lake with aqueductswhich keep it always at a proper height ; thislake is situate upon a black mountain, which maybe about two leagues in circumference ; also inthe same vicinity are vestiges of a considerablepopulation, and here is found a mineral earthfrom which they fabricate jars, large pitchers, and other vessels, which are carried to be sold in theneighbouring provinces. In this province aremany mines of silver, but they are not worked, onaccount of their being some of them filled withwater, and some of them broken in, with the ex-ception, however, of those of Condoroma, which,although they have experienced the former ca-lamity, do not fail to render yearly many marksof gold, a pretty good testimony of their riches.Great indeed have been the labour and expence inthe attempts to empty them of the water, but inthis they have not as yet succeeded. Here are alsofour good sugar-mills ; and in the jurisdiction ofthe town of Yauri, are two mines of copper, whichare worked : Some gold mines also are not wanting,although they be of little note. In the establish-ment of Condoroma it is not unusual to expe-rience, in the tempests of thunder and lightning,a sort of prickly sensation on the hands and feetand other parts of the body, which they call mos-cas, or flies, without, however, being able todiscover any of these insects ; and it should seemthat the effect is to be attributed to the state of theatmosphere, since the heads' of canes, buckles,and silver or gold galloons, though during suchtimes highly affected by the electric matter, ceaseto be so on the cessation of the tempest. The in-habitants of this province amount to 18,000 souls, dwelling in 24 settlements, which are,

Sicuani, Tunganuca,

San Pablo, Yanacoa,

Chacuyupi, Layo,

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
290

Massachusetts, incorporated in 1797, it beingformerly the n. part of Stoughton.)

CANUARI, a small river of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres. It runs to the n.and enters the Rio Grande of the Portuguese, be-tween the Mbouqui and the Pobatini.

CANUEIRAS, a point of the n. extremity ofthe island of Santa Catalina, on the coast ofBrazil.

CANUERALES, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Cuyo in the kingdom ofChile, situate near the river Diamante.

CANUTO, a river of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela. It rises in the mountain Ta-cazuruma, runs nearly s. and enters the river ofLa Portuguesa.

CANXA, a small settlement of the head settle-ment of Orizavá, and alcaldía mayor of Yxmi-quilpan, in Nueva España.

(CANY Fork, in the state of Tennessee, is ashort navigable river, and runs n. w. into Cum-berland river, w. of the Salt lick, and oppositeSalt Lick creek, 50 miles in a straight line fromNashville.)

CANZE, a river of the colony and govern-ment of Surinam, in the part of Guayana possessedby the Dutch. It rises between the Berbice andthe Corentin, and after a very round-about course,enters the former, close to its mouth, or where itruns into the sea.

CAO, Santa Maria Magdalena de, asettlement of the province and corregimiento ofTruxillo in Peru, situate in the valley of Chicama.It was the capital in the time of the Indians, andthe number of these 200 years ago was 3000 ; butnow it is reduced to a wretched state, and occu-pies a small spot on the other side of the river,being nine leagues distant from its capital.

Cao, with the dedicatory title of Santiago, todistinguish it from another settlement of the sameprovince and corregimiento, although they areboth equally poor and reduced. Its inhabitantsmaintain themselves by the cultivation of maize,wheat, rice, and vegetables, which they carryfor sale to the other provinces, so that they arefor the most part a race of carriers, and indeedpossess no inconsiderable droves of mules. It issix leagues from its capital, just by the sea.

CAOBAS, River of the, in the island of St.Domingo, in that part possessed by the French.It rises in the valley of San Juan, runs to the w.and afterwards changing its course to the n. w. en-ters the Artibonito.

CAORA, a river which runs down from themountains of Guayana to the s. of the lake

Cassipa, into which it enters ; and afterwardsrunning out at the n. side of this lake, it findsits way through a subterraneous passage, until itempties itself into the Orinoco, on its s. shore.The borders of this river are inhabited by anation of barbarous Indians, who wander con-tinually through the forests without any fixedabode. They are cannibals as well as the otherIndian tribes around them, and with whom theykeep up a continual warfare.

CAPACA, a settlement of the province of Culi-acan in Nueva España ; situate near the head set-tlement.

CAPACHICA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Paucarcolla in Peru ; situate onthe w. shore of the lake Titicaca.

Capachica, a narrow strip of land formed bythe great lake Titicaca. Of these strips there arethree, and this appears, for the distance of a league,to be completely divided from any main land.

CAPACHO, a village under the jurisdiction ofthe town of San Christoval, in the new kingdom ofGranada ; of a warm temperature ; abounding insugar-cane, from which much sugar is manufac-tured, and in cacao ; but it is much infested bythe barbarian Indians, called the Motilones (short-haired), who destroy the plantations. It contains200 house- keepers, and is 24; leagues n. e. ofPamplona, in the road which leads to Mérida andLa Grita, and eight leagues from the city of SanChristoval.

CAPACMARCO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chumbivilcas in Peru.

CAPAIA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Aimaraez in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Soraica.

Capaia, another settlement in the province ofBarcelona, and government of Cumana; situate onthe coast, on the banks of a river of the samename.

Capaia, a river of the same province and go-vernment, which rises in the serranía, and aftermaking many turnings runs into the sea, near thecape Codera towards the e.

CAPAIAN, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, in the jurisdiction ofthe city of Rioja.

CAPAIRE, a settlement of the province of Ve-nezuela, and government of Maracaibo ; situatevery near the coast, at the point Colorada, on theshore of the river Guepe.

(CAPALITA, a large town of North America,and in the province of Oaxaca. The countryround abounds with sheep, cattle, and excellentfruit.)

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
293

CAP

It is distant 30 leagues to the n. of Tunja, andeight from the town of Suata.

CAPITUTU, Banado de, a river of the pro-vince and government of Paraguay . It runs tothe w. and enters the same place.

CAPIUARI, a small river of the province andcaptainship of San Vincente in Brazil. It risesin the mountains near the coast, runs almost di-rectly from e. to w. and enters the Harihambu orTiete, between the Piraciacaba and Jundiaya.

Capiuari, another river of the province and go-vernment of the Chiquitos Indians, and in the king-dom of Peru ; it rises to the s. e. of the settlementof San Rafael, runs to the n. and enters the Yteneswith a slight inclination to the n. w.

Capiuari, another, in the province and govern-ment of Paraguay, which enters the Paraná, nearthe settlement of La Mision de Jesus.

Capiuari, another, in the province and captain-ship of Rey in Brazil. It rises from a lake nearthe coast, runs to the w. and enters the large riverof Los Patos.

CAPLIRA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Aricá in Peru ; annexed to the curacyof Tacna.

CAPLITOILGUA, an island of the N. sea, inthe straits De Magellan, one of those which form thes. coast, at the mouth of the canal of St. Isidro.

Caplitoilgua, a bay in the former island.

CAPOCUI, a large lake of the province of Quito,to the n. of the river Napo, emptying itself througha canal into the river Napo. Lat. 57° s.

CAPOLITA, a river of the province and alcaldíamayor of Tecoantepec in Nueva España ; it runsto the e. and enters the S. sea between the Aguatulcoand the Simatlan.

CAPON, a river of the province and govern-ment of Guayana ; one of those which enter theCuium on the n. side.

CAPOT, a small river of the island of Mar-tinique ; it runs to the n. e. and enters the sea be-tween the Falaise and the Grand Ance.

Capot, a bay on the coast of the same island,on its n. w. side, between the town of Carbet andthe bay of Giraumont.

CAPOTERA, River of, in the kingdom of Bra-zil ; it rises in the sierra grande, runs to the n. n. e.and enters the Tocantines, between the Santa Lucíaand the Araguaya.

CAPOTILLO, River of, in the island of St.Domingo ; it rises near the n. coast, runs w. andturning to the n. n. w. enters the sea at port Delfin.

CAPOTIQUI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarquilla in Peru.

CAPUCINS, Morne des, or Morro de los

2

CAP

293

Capuchinos, a mountain of the island of Mar-tinique, at the back of the city of fort Royal.

CAPUCUI, a settlement of the missionaries ofthe regular order of the Jesuits, now abolished.

CAPUE, Alto, a town belonging to the French,in the part which they possess in the island of St.Domingo ; it ivas taken and burnt by the Spaniardsin the year 1691 , after a victory gained by them.

CAPUE, with the addition of Baxo (low), to dis-tinguish it ; another settlement of the same islandand dominion as the former.

CAPUI, a settlement of the province of Guayanaand government of Cumaná ; one of those whichis formed by the missions there established by theCatalanians.

Capui, a small river of the province and govern-ment of Paraguay ; it runs to the w. and enters theParaná between the Caruguampú and the Quendi.

CAPUIO, a small settlement of the head settle-ment of Etuquaro, and alcaldía mayor of Vallado-lid, in the province and bishopric of Mechoacán ;in which district there are some cultivated lands,and in these, as well as in the settlement, residesome Spanish families, and some of the Musteesand Indians, who gain their livelihood in tilling theground, in making lime, and cutting wood. Fourleagues w. of its capital.

CAPULA, a village of a small settlement of thehead settlement and alcaldía mayor of Zultepec inNueva España ; situate in the cleft or hollow partof a mountain covered with trees ; its inhabitants,who consist of 63 Indian families, make charcoaland timber, these being the articles of their com-merce.

CAPULALPA, San Simon de, a small settle-ment of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor ofTezcoco in Nueva España, situate on the top of ahill; it has a very good convent of Franciscans,and contains 75 families of Spaniards, Mulattoes,and Mustees, and 196 of Indians : its territory isvery fertile, and the most luxuriant of any in thesame jurisdiction ; notwithstanding there is a lackof moisture, there being no running streams. Theyare used to gather most abundant crops of wheat,maize, barley, vetches, beans, and French beans ;they have large breeds of hogs, both in the villageand in the farms and neighbouring fattening stalls,which they carry for sale to Mexico, to La Puebla,and other parts. One league n. of its capital.

CAPULUAC, San Bartolome de, a headsettlement of the alcaldia mayor of Metepec inNueva España; it contains 524 Indian families,including those who inhabit the wards of its dis-trict, and it is two leagues to the s. e. of its capital.

CAPURE, an arm of the river Orinoco, one of

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
295

CAR

in America, and they reckon the gold it has pro-duced at 33 millions of dollars, without countingthat which has been concealed ; but at present theyscarce procure from it 200 pound weight a year,on account of the increased charges of labour, andthe want of energy in the inhabitants. Many lumpsof gold have been found here, among which thereis still remembered to have been one of the figure ofa horse, which weighed 100 weight and some oddpounds, and which was carried to the EmperorCharles V. ; and likewise another lump which wassent to Philip II. bearing a resemblance to thehead of a man, which, however, was lost togetherwith much other riches in the channel of Bahama.This latter lump was found in the washing place ofYnahuaya. Nearly the whole of the territory of thisprovince is interspered with gold. The most cele-brated washing places that it had were called SanJuan del Oro, Paulo Coya, Ananea, and that whichwas superior to all, Aporoma. In the year 1713, alump of silver also was discovered in the mountainof Ucuntaya, being of a very solid piece of metal,and of prodigious value ; in its rivers are foundsands of gold, to which at certain times of the year,the Indians have recourse, in order to pay their tri-butes. There are also other mines of silver andcopper in various parts, and springs of hot water.It is very liable to earthquakes, and according tothe tradition of the Indians, there was one whichtook place before the conquest, so large as to over-turn mountains, and that, opening the earth, itswallowed up in an abyss many towns with theirinhabitants. They likewise assert, that in the year1747, another earthquake, throwing out of theground a dirty and muddy water, thereby infectedthe rivers to such a degree as to cause a dreadfuland general mortality. It has some large riversas well as small ; all of which empty themselvesinto the Ynambari, thus rendering this river ex-tremely abundant : towards the n. and n. e. which,as we have observed, is bounded by the infidel In-dians, there are large tracts of ground covered withcoca and rice, with an abundance of mountainfruits. In the aforesaid river they are accustomedto take shad and large dories by shooting themwith muskets, or by piercing them with arrows ordarts. There are also some lakes, which, althoughwithout fish, abound in ducks, snipes, and otheraquatic fowl. The infidel Indians have made va-rious irruptions into this province: its capital isSandia, and its natives, who amount to 28,000, aredivided into 26 settlements, as follows : The repar-timiento received by the corregidor used to amountto 82,800 dollars, and it paid 662 yearly for alcavala.

CAR

295

Sandia, Coaza,

Cuiocuio. Cruzero,

Laqueique, Ajoiani,

Yñacoreque, Usicaios,

Queneque, Esquena,

Patambuco, Cuntuquita,

S. Juan del Oro, Ynambari,

Quiaca, Ayapata,

Sina, Ytuata,

Para, Macusani,

Limbani, Ollachea,

Chejani, Azaroma,

Aporoma, Corani.

CARABAILLO, a river of the province andcorregimiento of Cercado in Peru. It rises in theprovince of Canta from three lakes to the n. of thecapital, and continues its course until it join thesea close to the point of Marques.

CARABAILLO, a settlement of this province andcorregimiento.

CARABANA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana, which runs to the s. andenters the Orinoco between the Corquina and theArrewow. According to Bellin, in his map of thecourse of part of the Orinoco, it is distant fromthe other river called Corobana, which also en-ters the Orinoco on the opposite side.

CARABATANG, a river of the province andcaptainship of Rio Grande in Brazil. It rises inthe sierra of the Tiguares Indians, near the coast,runs s. s. e. and enters the sea between the Congand the Goyana.

CARABELAS, River of the, in the provinceand captainship of Puerto Seguro in Brazil. Itrises in the cold sierra of the Pories Indians, runss. e. and according to Cruz, e. and enters the seaopposite the bank of the Escollos (hidden rocks).

Carabelas, Grandes, a port of the islandof Cuba, on the n. part.

Carabelas, Chicas, a bay in the same island,and on the same coast, between the settlement ofGuanajo and the Puerto del Poniente (w. port.)

CARABERES. See article Guarayos.

CARABUCO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Omasuyos in Peru ; in the vici-nity of which are the ruins of a chapel, which wasdedicated to St. Bartholomew ; and the Indianshave a tradition that the above-mentioned saint ap-peared here and preached the gospel to them :thus, in the principal altar of the church, they re-verence a large cross of very strong wood, andwhich is celebrated for having wrought many mi-racles ; splinters of it being anxiously sought afterby the faithful, wherefrom to form small crosses ;

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
308

[1803 amounted to 5,500,000, and the exports con-sisted of produce to the value of 4,000,000 dollars.He also states the population in 1808 at 900,000souls. The receipts of Caracas, Guatemala, andChile, are consumed within the country. Thepopulation of some of the chief cities is thus stated ;Caracas 40,000, La Guaira 6000, Puerto Cabello7600, Coro 10,000. The harbour, or La Vela deCoro, as it is commonly called, and its environs, aresupposed to contain not less than 2000. In 1797three state prisoners were sent from Spain to Ca-racas, on account of their revolutionary propensi-ties. Being treated with great indulgence by theofficers and soldiers to whose care they were com-mitted, they formed the project of a conspiracyagainst the government. They engaged a numberof persons, some of them of consequence, in theirparty. After gaining their first converts, the spiritdid not spread. The coldness and apathy of thepeople did not admit of the effervescene they de-sired. After the plot had been kept a secret formany months it was disclosed to the government.Some of the ringleaders escaped, and others weretaken. It was found that seventy-two had enteredinto the conspiracy; six were executed. Therest either escaped, or were sent to the galleys orbanished from the country. For an account of therecent revolution in Caracas, see Venezuela.]

Caracas, some islands of the N. sea near thecoast of the kingdom of Tierra Firme, in the pro-vince and government of Cumana. They are sixin number, all small and desert, serving as placesof shelter to the Dutch traders, who carry on anillicit commerce on that coast.

Caracas, a small port of the coast of TierraFirme, in the province and government of Vene-;zuela, between the capital and cape Codera.

CARACHE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Maracaibo, situate n. of the city ofTruxillo, on the shore of a small river which entersthe Matazan.

CARACHIS, San Carlos de a settlement ofthe province and country of the Amazonas ; a re-duccion of the missions which belonged to the abo-lished order of the Jesuits. It is at the mouth ofthe river Huerari, where this enters the Maranon.

CARACOA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Parinacoche in Peru, where thereis a spring of warm medicinal water.

CARACOL, Port, on the coast of the S. sea,and of the province and government of Panamá ;it is near the point of Garachine, behind mount Zapo.

CARACOLI, a port of the coast of the kingdomof Tierra Firme, and of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela, to the w., of cape Codera.

Caracoli, a bay formed by the s. coast, in theprovince and government of Darien, of the kingdomof Tierra Firme ; it lies at the back of point Gara-chine.

Caracoli, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cartagena, situate on the shore ofthe Rio Grande de la Magdalena, and on the n, ofthe town of Maria.

CARACOLLO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Oruro in Peru, eight leagues dis-tant from its capital.

=CARACOTO== a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Lampa in Peru.

Caracoto, another, in the province and corregi-mienlo of Sicasica in the same kingdom.

==CARAGAIAS, a town of the island of Cuba,situate on the n. coast between Cadiz and Nizao,

CARAGUATAI, a river of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres ; it runs s. s. w. andenters the Ayum or Yumeri.

CARAGUET, a small river of Nova Scotia orAcadia ; it runs e. and enters the sea in the gulfof St. Lawrence, opposite the island of its name.

CARAHUACRA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru; annexedto the curacy ofYauli.

CARAIBAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Chalvanca.

CARAIMA Alta, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Quillota in the kingdom ofChile ; situate on the coast between point Caraimiliaand point Pena Blanca.

CARAIMILLA, a settlement on the coast ofthe province and corregimiento aforementioned,between point Caraima Alta, and the isle of Obispo.

CARAMA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Antioquia in the new kingdom ofGranada.

CARAMANTA, a city of the province and go-vernment of Antioquia in the new kingdom ofGratiada ; founded by Sebastian de Benalcazar in1543, near the river Cauca. Its temperature ishot and unhealthy, but it is fertile in maize, vege-tables, grain, and abounds with herds of swine : nearit are many small rivers which enter the Cauca,and some salt pits of the whitest salt. On themountains within its jurisdiction, are some settle-ments of barbarian Indians very little known. Thiscity is indifferently peopled, and is 65 leagues dis-tant to the n. e. of Popayan, and 50 from Antio-quia. Long. 75° 33' w. Lat. 5° 58' «.

CARAMATIBA, a settlement of the provinceand captainship of Rio Grande in Brazil ; situateon the shore of the river Carabatang.

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
310

rection to be drowned in the lake Yaguarcocha,which from thence takes its name, and signifies thelake of blood, with which it was quite polluted ;tlie Indians stating, .according to their traditions,that no less than 20,000 people were thus sacri-ficed. Part of this province is at present compre-hended in that of Ibarra, and part in that ofOtavalo.

CARAP, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana. It rises between the Aca-mon and the Agualey, and taking its course be-tween these two, enters the Caroni on the e. side.

CARAPAICURA, a small river of the provinceand government of Cumana. It rises in the ser-ranla of I mataca, runs and enters the Cuyunion the n. side.

CARAPANATUBA, a river of the province ofGuayana, in the part belonging to the Portuguese.It runs s. s. e. and enters the mouth of the Mara-non before you come to the town and fort of Ma-capa.

CARAPATO, a river of the province and cor-regimiento of Sicasica. It is but small, rises tothere), of the settlement of Caracoto, runs n. andenters the Cliuquiavo.

(CARAPEGUAY, a parish of the province andgovernment of Paraguay, situate near a smallriver, 11 leagues 5. e. of Asuncion. Lat. 25°45' 31" s. Long. 57° 16' 56" w.)

CARAPO, asettlement of the province of Guay-ana, and government of Cumana, one of those be-longing to the missions of the Catalatxian Capuchinfathers.

CARAPO, a river of the province and go-vernment of San Juan de los Llanos in the newkingdom of Granada ; it rises in the country ofthe Chiricoas Indians, runs n. and enters the Meta.

CARAPU, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana ; it rises near the lakeJeupa, runs from s. to n. and enters the Paragua.

CARAPUCHO, Morro de, a mountain onthe coast of Peru, in the province and corregi-miento of Carangas.

CARAQUES, Bay of, on the S. sea-coast, andin the province and government of Guayaquil. Itis close to cape Pasao, and near the equinoctialline. There was a settlement here, bearing the samename, the ruins of which are still visible.

CARAQUET, a small island of the gulf of St.Lawrence, on tlie coast of Nova Scotia or Arca-dia, by the Orphan’s bank.

CARARA, a small river of the province andcaptainship of Para in Brazil; it runs n. and en-ters the sea between the settlement of Senambocaand the island of San Juan.

CARARE, a large river of the new kingdom ofGranada. It rises in the valley of Alferez, to then. of the city of Tunja, runs from s. ton. and join-ing the Zarbe, enters the large river of Magdalena.On the e. side, near the narrow pass which formsits shores, the French have constructed a fort toguard against invasion from the infidel Indians.

CARARI, a strait of the large river Magdalena,formed by great rocks. There was formerly herea fort, which has been moved to a place at somelittle distance. The course of the waters in theabove strait is so rapid as to render it sometimesimpossible for vessels and canoes to pass through it.

==CARAS=, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Caxatambo in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Andajes.

CARASA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cochabamba in Peru.

CARASANI, asettlement of the province andcorregmiento of Larecaja in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Combaya.

CARATE, a small island of the S. sea, near thecoast.

CARATES, a river of the province and go-vernment of Maracaibo. It rises in the mountainsof Lonia, runs s. w. and after many windings,enters the great lake of Maracaibo.

CARAVELAS, Mouth of the, the entrance ofa bay on the n. coast of the island of Cuba.

CARAUELE, Point of the, an extremity ofthe coast looking to the e. in the island of Marti-nique, one of those two which run into the sea inthe above direction.

Carauele, a small island of the N. sea, situatenear the n. e. coast of the island of Martinique,on the n. side of Carauele point.

CARAUELI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cumana in Peru.

CARAUELLES, a river of the province andcaptainship of Puerto Seguro in Brazil. It risesat the foot of the « Fria, and describing a smallcircle, runs s. e. and according to Cruz, e. andenters the sea opposite the island of Pajaros.

CARAZ, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Huailas in Peru.

CARBET, a settlement of the island of Mar-tinique, one of the Antilles ; situate on the n. s».coast, Avith a good port. It Avas a curacy of theregular order of Jesuits, now abolished.

Carbet, two very high mountains of the aboveisland. They are full of sharp points similar tothose on Montserrat in Cateluila. They are nearthe coast, lying towards the n. w. part ; and theFrench call them Pitons de Carbet.

Carbet, a point on the e. coast of the island

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
311

CAR

Of Guadalupe, between the Three Rive*‘s and theAgujero del Ferro.

Carbet Point, on the s. coast of lake Superior,in New France, opposite the island of Philipeaux.

Carbet, a river of the island of Guadalupe,which tuns nearly e. and enters the sea betweenthe Grande and the Orange.

CARBON, Island of, situate in the middle ofa lake on the coast of the province and govern-ment of Buenos Ayres.

Carbon, Monte de, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Puchacay in the king-dom of Chile; situate upon the coast and on theshore of the bay of Culumo, near the mouth ofthe river Biobio.

CARBONIERE, a settlement of the island ofNewfoundland, situate on the e. coast, on theshore of the bay of Concepcion.

CARCAI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Lucanas in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Soras. It has a hot spring of water ofvery medicinal properties, and its heat is so greatthat an egg may be boiled in it in an instant.

CARCARANAL, a river of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres. It rises in the pro-vince of Tucuman, in the mountains of the cityof Cordoba, runs nearly from e. torw. with thename of Tercero, and changing it into Carcara-iial, after it becomes united Avith the Saladillo, joinsthe Plata, and enters the Salado and the Tres Hec-manas.

CARCAZI, a settlement of the government andJurisdiction of Pamplona in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, situate betAveen two mountains, whichcause its temperature to be very moderate. It pro-duces much Avheatand maize ; in its cold parts suchfruits as are peculiar to that climate, and in themilder parts sugar-cane. Its neighbourhoodabounds Avith flocks of goats ; and the number ofinhabitants may amount to about 200 Spaniardsand 30 Indians. It is situate on the confines Avhichdivide the jurisdictions of Tunja and Pamplona.

CARCHIPOR, a river of the province and go-vernment of Cayenne in the kingdom of TierraFirme. It rises in the mountains of the same pro-vince, and runs into the sea on the side of capeOra nge.

(CARDIGAN, about 20 miles e. of Dartmouthcollege, New Hampshire. The township ofOrange once bore this name, which see.)

CARDIN, a settlement of the province of Ve-nezuela and government of Maracaibo, situate onthe shore of the coast, in the interior of the gulfformed by the peninsula of cape San Roman.

CARDINALES, Sombreros de. See articlePitangoas.

CARDOSO, Real de, a settlement and realof gold mines in the province and captainship ofTodos Santos in Brazil; situate on the shore ofthe large river of San Francisco, to the n. of thevillage of Tapuyas.

CAREHANEU, a small river of Pennsylvania,which runs w. and enters the Ohio.

CAREN, a valley or meadow-land of the king-dom of Chile, renowned for its pleasantness, beauty,and extent, being five leagues in length; also fora fountain of very delicate and salutary water,which, penetrating to the soil in these parts, ren-ders them so exceedingly porous, that a person tread-ing somewhat heavily seems to shake the groundunder him. There is an herb found here that keepsgreen all the year round: it is small, resemblingtrefoil, and the natives call it caren: it is of a veryagreeable taste, and gives its name to the valley.

CARENERO, a bay of the coast of the king-dom of Tierra Firme in the province and govern-ment of Venezuela. It is extremely convenientfor careening and repairing ships, and from thiscircumstance it takes its name. It lies behind capeCodera towards the e.

CARET, Anse be, a bay of the island of St.Christopher, one of the Antilles, on the n. e. coast,and in the part possessed by the French beforethey ceded the island to the Englissh. It is be-tween the bays of Fontaine and Morne, or Fuenteand Morro.

=CARETI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Darien, and kingdom of Tierra Firme.It rises in the n. mountains, and enters the sea iathe bay of Mandinga.

CAREU, a settlement of the island of Barba-does, in the district of the parish of Christchurch.

CARGONACHO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Castro Vireyna in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Philpichaca.

CARGUAIRASO, a lofty mountain and vol-cano of the province and corregimiento of Rio-bamba in the kingdom of Quito. It is in the dis-trict of the asiento of Ambato, covered with snowthe whole year round. Its skirts are covered withfine crops of excellent barley. In 1698 this pro-vince was visited by a terrible earthquake, whichopened the mountain and let in a river of mud,formed by the snows which were melted by thefire of the volcano, and by the ashes it threw up.So dreadful were the effects of this revolution thatthe whole of the crops were completely spoiled ;and it was in vain that the cattle endeavoured to-

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
313

C A R I B E.

It was formerly a very rich tract of land, si-tuate on the shore of the river Cazanare, a streamwhich crosses and stops the pass into the coun-try and for this reason there was a consider-able establishment formed here by persons whobelonged to tlie curacy of Santa Rosa de Chire.Its temperature is hot, but it is very fertile, andabounds in productions, which serve to provide forthe other settlements belonging to the same mis-sions : at present it is under the care of the reli-gious order of St. Domingo.

CARIBANA, a large country, at the presentday called Guayana Maritania, or Nueva Anda-iucia Austral. It extends from the mouth of theriver Orinoco to the mouth of the Marahon ; com-prehends the Dutch colonies of Esquibo, Surinam,and Berbice, and the French colony of Cayenne.It takes its name from the Caribes Indians, whoinhabit it, and who are very fierce and cruel,although upon amicable terms with the Dutch.Nearly the whole of this province is uncultivated,full of woods and mountains, but watered bymany rivers, all of which run for the most partfrom s. to e. and empty themselves into the sea ;although some flow from s. ton. and enter the Ori-noco. The climate, though warm and humid, ishealthy ; the productions, and the source of itscommerce, are sugar-cane, some cacao, wild wax,and incense. The coast, inhabited by Europeans,forms the greater part of this tract of country, ofwhich an account will be found under the respec-tive articles.

Caribana, a port on the coast of Tierra Firme,in the province and government of Darien, at theentrance of the gulf of Uraba.

CARIBE, a small port of the coast of TierraFirme, in the province and government of Vene-zuela, to the w. of cape Codera.

Caribe, Caribbee, or Charaibes, someislands close upon the shore of the province andgovernment of Cumana, near the cape of TresPuntas. [The Caribbee islands in the West In-dies extend in a semicircular form from the islandof Porto Rico, the easternmost of the Antilles, tothe coast of S. America. The sea, thus inclosedby the main land and the isles, is called the Ca-ribbean sea; and its great channel leads n. zo. tothe head of the gulf of Mexico through the sea ofHonduras. The chief of these islands are, SantaCruz, Sombuca, Anguilla, St. Martin, St. Bar-tholomew, Barbuda, Saba, St. Eustatia, St. Chris-topher, Nevis, Antigua, Montserrat, Guadalupe,Dcseada, Mariagalante, Dominica, Martinica,St. Vincent, Barbadoes, and Grenada. These areagain classed into Windward and Leeward isles bv

seamen, with regard to the usual courses of shipsfrom Old Spain or the Canaries to Cartagenaor New Spain and Porto Bello. The geographi-caltablesand maps class them into Great and LittleAntilles ; and authors vary much concerning thislast distinction. See Antilles. The Charaibesor Caribbecs were the ancient natives of the Wind-ward islands ; hence many geographers confine theterm to these isles only. Most of these were an-ciently possessed by a nation of cannibals, the ter-ror of the mild anti inotfensive inhabitants of His-paniola, who frequently expressed to Columbustheir dread of these fierce invaders. Thus, whenthese islands were afterwards discovered by thatgreat man, they were denominated Charibbeanisles. The insular Charaibs are supposed to beimmediately descended from the Galibis Indians,or Charaibes of S. America. An ingenious andlearned attempt to trace back the origin of the Ca-ribes to some emigrants from the ancient hemis-phere may be found in Bryan Edwards ; and itis to the valuable work of this author that we areindebted for the following illustrations of the man-ners and customs of this people. — The Caribesare avowedly of a fierce spirit and warlike dispo-sition. Historians have not failed to notice theseamong the most distinguishable of their qualities.Dr. Robertson, in Note X Cl II. to the first vol. ofhisHistory of America, quotes from a MS. Historyof Ferdinand and Isabella, Avrittenby Andrew Ber-naldes, the cotemporary and friend of Columbus,the folloAving instance of the bravery of the Caribes :A canoe with four men, two Avomen, and a boy, un-expectedly fell in with Columbus’s fleet. A Spanish,bark with 25 men was sent to take them; and the fleet,in the mean time, cut off their communication withthe shore. Instead of giving way to despair, theCaribes seized their arms with imdauntcd resolu-tion, and began the attack, wounding several ofthe Spaniards, although they had targets as wellas other defensive armour ; and even after thecanoe was overset, it was with no little difficultyand danger that some of them Avere secured, asthey continued to defend themselves, and to usetheir bows with great dexterity while swimmingin the sea. Herrera has recorded the same anec-dote. Restless, enterprising, and ardent, it wouldseem they considered war as the chief end of theircreation, and the rest of the human race as theirnatural prey ; for they devoured, without re-morse, the bodies of such of their enemies (themen at least) as fell into their hands. Indeed,there is no circumstance in the history of mankindbetter attested than the universal prevalence ofthese practices among them. Columbus was not]

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
318

318 CAR

ment of Paraguay ; situate on a small river aboutl5 leagues e. of Asuncion. Lat. 23° 30' 27"Long. 56° 52' w.)

CARLISLE, a settlement of the island of Ja-maica ; situate on the s.

(Carlisle, the chief town of Cumberlandcounty, Pennsylvania, on the post-road from Phi-ladelphia to Pittsburg ; is 125 miles w. by n. fromthe former, and 178 e. from the latter, and 18 s. w.from Harrisburgh. Its situation is pleasant andhealthy, on a plain near the s. bank of Conedog-winet creek, a water of the Susquehannah. Thetown contains about 400 houses, chiefly of stoneand brick, and about 1500 inhabitants. The streetsintersect each other at right angles, and the publicbuildings are a college, court-house, and gaol, andfour edifices for public worship. Of these thePresbyterians, Germans, Episcopalians, and RomanCatholics, have each one. Dickinson college,named after the celebrated John Dickinson, esq.author of several valuable tracts, has a principal,three professors, a philosophical apparatus, and alibrary containing near SOOO volumes. Its re-venue arises from 4000/. in funded certificates, and10,000 acres of land. In 1787 there were 80 stu-dents, and its reputation is daily increasing.About 50 years ago this spot was inhabited by In-dians and wild beasts.)

(Carlisle, a bay on the w. side of the islandof Barbadoes in the West Indies ; situated be-tween James and Charles forts, on which standsBridge-town, the capital of the island.)

CARLOS, San, a settlement of the provinceand captainship of Rey in Brazil ; situate on theshore of a small river which enters the head of thatof Curituba.

Carlos, San, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province and government of BuenosAyres ; situate on the shore of a small river nearthe river Pargua, about five leagues s. w. of Can-delaria. Lat. 27° 44' 36" s. Long. 55° 57' 12" w.

Carlos, San, another, of the missions of theprovince and government of Tucuman, in the jn-risdiction of the city of Salta; situate on the shoreof the river of Guachipas.

Carlos, San, a city of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela ; situate on the shore of theriver Aguirre, to the n. of the city of Nirua. [Itowes its existence to the first missionaries of Vene-zuela, and its increase and beauty to the activityof its inhabitants. The greatest part of its popu-lation is composed of Spaniards from the Canaryislands ; and as these leave their native country

CAR

but to meliorate their condition, they arrive with awillingness to work, and a courage to undertakeany thing that they think the most proper to an-swer their views. Their example even inspires asort oT emulation among the Creoles, productiveof public prosperity. Cattle forms the great massof the wealth of the inhabitants. Oxen, horses,and mules, are very numerous. Agriculture, al-though not much followed, is yet not neglected.Indigo and coffee are almost the only things theygrow. The quality of the soil gives the fruits anexquisite flavour, but particularly the oranges,which are famed throughout the province. Thecity is large, handsome, and well divided ; theycompute the inhabitants at 9300. The parishchurch, by its construction and neatness, answersto the industry and piety of the people. The heatat San Carlos is extreme ; it would be excessive ifthe n. wind did not moderate the effects of the sun.It lies in 9° 20' lat. 60 leagues s. w. of Caracas,24 s. s.e. of St. Valencia, and 20 from St. Philip’s.

(Carlos, San, a town of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Ayres ; situate on a small riverabout two leagues n. of Maldonado. Lat. 34° 44'45" s. Long. 55° 44' zw.)

(Carlos, San, Real, a parish of the provinceand government of Buenos Ayres ; situate on ariver of the same name, about five leagues n. ofColonia del Sacramento. Lat. 34° 25' 8" s. Long,57° 50' w.')

(San Carlos de Monterey|Carlos, San, de Monterey]]==, the capital ofNew California, founded in 1770, at the foot of thecordillera of Santa Lucia, which is covered withoiiks, pines, (foliis lernis J, and rose bushes. Thevillage is two leagues distant from the presidio ofthe same name. It appears that the bay of Mon-terey had already been discovered by Cabrillo onthe 13th November 1542, and that he gave it thename of Bahia rle los Pinos, on account of thebeautiful pines with which the neighbouring moun-tains are covered. It received its present nameabout 60 years afterwards from Viscaino, in ho-nour of the viceroy of Mexico, Gaspar deZunega,Count de Monterey, an active man, to whom weare indebted for considerable maritime expedi-tions, and who engaged Juan de Onate in the con-quest of New Mexico. The coasts in the vicinityof San Carlos produce the famous aurum merum(ormier) of Monterey, in request by the inhabi-tants of Nootka, and which is employed in thetrade of otter-skins. The population of San Carlosis 700.)

Carlos, San, a fort of the province and go-vernment of Guayana, situate on the shore of the

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
319

CAR

Rio Negro, on a great island formed by this riverand that of Pasimoni.

Carlos, San, a bay of the w. coast of Florida,45 leagues from the soundings of Tortuguilla.Lat. 27° 10'. Long. 284° 30'.

Carlos, San, a small island of the gulf of Cali-fornia, or Mar Roxo de Cortes, in the interior ofthe same, and very close upon the coast.

Carlos, San, a river of the island of Guada-lupe, which runs nearly due n. e. and enters thesea in the bay of the Great Cul de Sac.

Carlos, San, a settlement (with the surnameof Real) of the province and government of BuenosAyres ; situate on the shore of the river La Plata,near the colony of Sacramento, which belonged tothe Portuguese. In its vicinty, on the n. n. e. part,there is a lake of very good sweet water.

Carlos, San, an island of the straits of Magel-lan, between the mountain of the Pan de Azucarand cape Galand of the n. coast.

Carlos, San, a valley in the province and go-vernment of Tucumán, which is very fertile invines, wheat, maize, carob-trees, tar, and in birdsand animals of the chase. Its natives are thosewho most of all infested the Spaniards when theyconquered this province.

Carlos, San, a settlement and fort of the islandof St. Christopher, one of the Antilles.

Carlos, San, another, of the island of Cuba;situate on the n. coast, on the point of land calledthe Pan de Mantanzas.

Carlos, San, another, of the province and go-vernment of Maracaibo ; situate in the island Pax-ara, on the shore of the Gran Laguna, or Greatlake.

Carlos, San, another, of the province andcountry of Las Amazonas ; a reduccion of the mis-sions which were held there by the regulars of thesociety of Jesuits. It lies between the rivers Arau-caso and Shiquita, in the territory of the Cahu-maris Indians.

Carlos, San, another, of the province and go-vernment of Guatemala ; situate on the shore ofthe river of S. Juan, or Del Desaguadero.

Carlos, San, some sierras or mountains, calledDe Don Carlos, in the province and captainship ofRey in Brazil. They run parallel to the sierra ofLos Difuntos, in the extremity of the coast formedby the mouth of the river La Plata.

CARLOSAMA, a large settlement of Indians ofthe province and corregimiento of Pastes in thekingdom of Quito, on the 5. shore of the river ofits name. Its territory is most fertile, but the cli-mate is very cold, and the streets almost always

CAR 319

Impassable. It is to the zo. n. zo. of the settlementof Ipialos, and e. n. e. of that of Cumbal.

CARLTON, a settlement of the island of Bar-badoes, in the district and parish of St. Thomas.

CARLUTAS, a river of the province and cap-tainship of Rio Grande in Brazil. It rises near thecoast, runs s. s. e. and enters the sea between theGenibabu and the Rio Grande.

CARMA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimienlo of Porco in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of Porco.

(CARMEL, a township in Dutchess county,New York. By the state census of 1796, 237 ofits inhabitants were electors.)

(CARMELO, a river on the coast of New Al-bion, s. e. of Francisco bay. A little n. from itis Sir Francis Drake’s harbour, where that navi-gator lay five weeks.)

Carmelo, Sierras del, a cordillera of verylofty mountains of the province of California ; theyrun to the sea-shore from the sierra of the Enfado,as far as the cape of San Lucas.

CARMEN, a river of the province and colony ofSurinam, in the part of Guayana possessed by theDutch. It rises in the sierra of Rinocote, runsfrom w. to e. and gathering the waters of manyothers, enters in a large body into the Mazar-roni.

Carmen, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Cartagena ; situate in the district ofthe mountains of Marca, between those of San Ja-cinto and San Francisco de Asis. It is one ofthose new settlements that were founded by the Go-vemor Don Juan Pimienta in 1776.

Carmen, another settlement, with the additionof Frayeles de el, which is the village of the pro-vince and captainship of Todos Santos in Brazil ;situate between the rivers Rans and Tucumbira.

Carmen, another, in the same kingdom ; situatenear a stream and on the shore of the river Tocan-tines, on the e. side, and not far from the Arrayalof San Feliz.

Carmen, a large island of the gulf of California,or Mar Roxo de Cortes, near the coast, betweenthe islands of San Ildefonso and Agua Verde.

Carmen, a town of the province and captain-ship of Espiritu Santo in Brazil ; situate on theshore and at the head of a river which gives it thisname.

CARMOT, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarca la Grande in Peru ;situate on the shore of the river Chicama.

CARNELAND, Islas de, islands near thecoast of the province and government of Honduras,

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
Records 1 – 30 of 85