LatAm Digital Edition and Gazetteer

OverviewStatisticsSubjects

Search for CARMEN* Carmen*

The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

16

16

A G U

A G U

from s. to e. between 'the rivers Mechicor and St.John, and entering the sea at the mouth of thebay of Fundy.

AGRATUMATI, a river of the province andgovernment of Darien, in the kingdom of TierraFirme. It rises in the mountains of the ». andefiters the sea by the Little Beech, opposite Cali-donia.

AGREDA, or NUEVA MA'LAGA, a city of theprovince and government of Popayan, in the king-dom of Quito, founded by Geronimo Aguado in1541. It is small, and of a hot temperature, butabounds in gold mines. Forty-five leagues s. w.of its capital, 42 from Quito, and 37 to the e. ofthe S, sea.

AGRESINAS, a settlement founded by thePortuguese fathers of the Carmelite. order, in thecountry of the Amazonas, situate on the shores ofthe river Amazonas.

AGRIAS, a nation of Indians of the provinceand government of Santa Marta, to the w. of theCienega Grande. It was formerly very numerous,but at present considerably reduced.

AGUA, Port of, on the n. coast of the islandof St. Domingo, between Point Rabeland the Bayof Marques-

Agua, a small island, situate near the k. coastof the island of Vaca, in the channel formed by theisland of St. Domingo, in front of the bay ofMesle.

Agua, also Ojos de Agua, two springs orfountains of the province and corregimi'ento ofCuyo, in the kingdom of Chile, near the lake ofInca, from whence the river Quillota takes itssource.

Agua Blanca, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela, situate between therivers Sarare and Acarigua, to the e. of the town ofAraure.

Agua Buena y Dulce, or Fresh Water,a bay of the strait of Magellan, near the bayof La Gente.

Agua-Caliente, a settlement of the kingdomof Guatemala.

Agua-Clara, a river of the province andgovernment of Paraguay. It runs e. and entersthe Parana on the w. side.

Agua Colorada, a river of the same provinceand government as the former(Paraguay), which runs e. andenters also the large river of Parana.

==Agua de Culebra, SAN FRANCISCO XA-VIER DE LA==, 'a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela, a reduccionof Indians ofthe Capuchin fathers ; but the place is also inha-bited by some Spanish families. It belongs to the

district and jurisdiction of the city of San Felipe ;and in its vicinity dwell a great number of peoplein the estates belonging to it, and which produceabundance of cacao, plantains, yucas, and othervegetable productions.

Agua-Dulce, Caleta de, or Creek of, onthe s. coast of the strait of Magellan, on the sideof the bay of San Martin.

Agua Escondida, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Sonora in Nueva Espana,situate at the foot of a mountain, and to the n. ofSanta Clara.

Agua-Verde, an island of the gulph ofCalifornia, or Red sea of Cortes, situate near thecoast, between the islands of Carmen and Mon-serrat.

AGUACAGUA, a settlement of the provinceof Guayana, and government of Cumana, one ofthose belonging to the missions of the CatalanianCapuchin fathers. It is on the shore of the riverCaroni, near the mouth, through which this en-ters the Orinoco. Lat. 8° 22' n. Long. 62^42' w.

AGUACATAL, a settlement of the provinceand government of Antioquia, situate in the val-ley of Peneo, on the shore of the river Cauca.Lat. 8° n. Long. 75° 28' w.

AGUACATENANGO, a settlement of the pro-vince and alceddia mayor of Chiapa in the king-dom of Guatemala. [Lat. 16° 18' n. Long.91° 57' a).]

AGUACATLAN, the head settlement of thedistrict of the alcaldia mayor of Xala in N uevaEspana. In 1745 it contained 80 families of In-dians, who employed themselves in the culture ofmaize and French beans. It has a convent of thereligious order of St. Francis, and lies two leaguess. e. of its capital.

AGUACHAPA, a settlement of the provinceand government of Nicaragua in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

AGUADA, a settlement of the island of Porto-rico ; situate in the bay of its name (Aguda), between thecapes Boriquen and St. Francis. It serves as aninlet for ships going to Tierra Firme and NuevaEspana to take in water. [Lat. 18° 23' «. Long.67° 6' a;.]

Aguada (Bay), the aforesaid bay (Aguda) in the above island (Porto rico).

Aguada (point), the point on the coast and at the headof the above island, 27 leagues distant from thecape of San Rafael, of the island of St. Domingo.

Aguada (river), a river near the cape (San Rafael) or former point (Aguada),and in the same island (St. Domingo), being a place where shipsare accustomed to take in water.

Aguada (Small river), a small river of the province and

Last edit over 2 years ago by Romina De León
18

18

A G U

A G U

Aguarico, another settlement of the same pro-yince, and belonging to the same missions, andbearing the dedicatory title of San Estanislao.

Aguarico, a river of the same province andf overnment, being one of those which enter theNapo by the n. side. At its mouth, or entrance,begins the large province of the Encabellados ;and here it was that the Portuguese attempted toestablish themselves in 1732, invading it with acertain number of Piraguas, (small vessels), whichcame from Para. They were, however, throughthe well-timed precautions of the president of Qui-to, forced to retire without attaining their object.This river contains much gold in its sands, andits body is much increased by other streams, suchas those of the Azuela, Cofanes, Sardinas, and Du-ino. It descends from the grand Cordillera of theAndes, near the town of San Miguel de Ibarra,washes the territory of the Sucurabios Indians, andenters the Napo in lat. 1° 23' s.

AGUARINGUA, an ancient and large settle-ment of the nation of the Taironas Indians, in theprovince and government of Santa Marta.

AGUARO, a river of the province and go-vernment of Honduras. It enters the S. sea to thee. of Aguan.

Aguaro, Cano de, a river of the province andgovernment of Venezuela. It enters the Guarico,and is famous for abounding in fish, particularlya kind called pabon, which has a circular spot ofsky-blue and gold upon its tail, resembling an eye,and which is much esteemed for its excellent fla-vour.

AGUAS, a small river of the province andgovernment of Paraguay. It runs n. n. w. andenters the Uruguay close to the J uipa.

Aguas-blancas. See Yaguapiui.

Aguas-bellas, a small river of the pro-vince and government of Paraguay. It runs c.and enters the Parana.

Aguas-calientes, an alcaldia mayor of thethe kingdom of Nueva Galicia, and bishopric ofGuadalaxara, in Nueva España. Its jurisdictionincludes four head settlements of the district, andtwo large estates called the Pavellon, as also theestate Del Fuerte, in which quantities of grain andseed are cultivated. The principal settlement isthe town of the same name, of a moderate tempera-ture, its inhabitants consisting of 500 Spanish fa-milies, as also of some of Mustees and Mulattoes;and although some Mexican Indians arc to befound here, they merely come to traffic with theproductions of the other jurisdictions. It con-tains three convents ; one of the bare- footed Fran-ciscans, a sumptuous and well-built fabric ; one ofthe Mercenarios; and a third of San Juan de Dios,with a well-endowed hospital ; not to mentionseveral other chapels and altars in the vicinity.It is 140 leagues n. n. w. of Mexico, and 35 ofGuadaiaxara. Long. 101° 51' 30" w. Lat. 22° 2' n.

Aguas-calientes, another settlement in theprovince and government of Venezuela, of thekingdom of Tierra Firme, situate upon the coast.

AGUASTELAS, San Miguel de, a settle-ment of the head settlement of the district of SanAndres of Acatlan, and alcaldia mayor of Xalapa,in Nueva España. It is but lately established,and is one league s. of its head settlement.

AGUATEPEC, Santa Maria de, a settle-ment of the head settlement of the district andalcaldia mayor of Tecali in Nueva España. Itcontains 48 families of Indians.

AGUATLAN, the head settlement of the dis-trict of the alcadia mayor of Izucar in Nueva Es-pana. It was formerly a separate jurisdiction;but on account of its smallness, and the ill-fa-voured and craggy state of its soil, it was incorpo-rated with another close to it. It contains 46 Indianfamilies, and is 12 leagues e. of its capital.

AGUATUBI, a settlement of the province ofMoqui in Nuevo Mexico.

AGUATULCO, a river of the province andalcaldia mayor of Tegoantepec in Nueva España.It runs e. and enters the S. sea near the Capolita.

AGUEDA, Mono de Santa, a mountain ofthe w. coast of the straits of Magellan, in the SierraNevada (snowy sierra).

Agueda, a point or cape near the above moun-tain.

[AGUGA Cape, on the coast of Peru, S. Ame-rica, lies s. of Puira, in the 61° of s. lat. and in the81° of w, long.]

AGUIJO, San Miguel de, a settlement ofthe new kingdom of Leon.

AGUILA, Villa Gutierrez de la, a townof the alcaldia mayor of Xerez in Nueva España.It was formerly very considerable, and had a nu-merous population of Spaniards, when it wasmade a fortress against the Tepehuanes and Tarau-maras Indians. It is an alcaldia mayor ^ but itsjurisdiction is consolidated with another, on ac-count of its being a place of little consideration,and its population being very scanty, and livingin some small wards and estates in its district. Itlies at the c. entrance of the province of Nayarith,and is the boundary of the kingdom of NuevaGalicia, being nine leagues e. of Xerez.

Aguila, a very lofty mountain of the province

Last edit over 2 years ago by Romina De León
318

318 CAR

ment of Paraguay ; situate on a small river aboutl5 leagues e. of Asuncion. Lat. 23° 30' 27"Long. 56° 52' w.)

CARLISLE, a settlement of the island of Ja-maica ; situate on the s.

(Carlisle, the chief town of Cumberlandcounty, Pennsylvania, on the post-road from Phi-ladelphia to Pittsburg ; is 125 miles w. by n. fromthe former, and 178 e. from the latter, and 18 s. w.from Harrisburgh. Its situation is pleasant andhealthy, on a plain near the s. bank of Conedog-winet creek, a water of the Susquehannah. Thetown contains about 400 houses, chiefly of stoneand brick, and about 1500 inhabitants. The streetsintersect each other at right angles, and the publicbuildings are a college, court-house, and gaol, andfour edifices for public worship. Of these thePresbyterians, Germans, Episcopalians, and RomanCatholics, have each one. Dickinson college,named after the celebrated John Dickinson, esq.author of several valuable tracts, has a principal,three professors, a philosophical apparatus, and alibrary containing near SOOO volumes. Its re-venue arises from 4000/. in funded certificates, and10,000 acres of land. In 1787 there were 80 stu-dents, and its reputation is daily increasing.About 50 years ago this spot was inhabited by In-dians and wild beasts.)

(Carlisle, a bay on the w. side of the islandof Barbadoes in the West Indies ; situated be-tween James and Charles forts, on which standsBridge-town, the capital of the island.)

CARLOS, San, a settlement of the provinceand captainship of Rey in Brazil ; situate on theshore of a small river which enters the head of thatof Curituba.

Carlos, San, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province and government of BuenosAyres ; situate on the shore of a small river nearthe river Pargua, about five leagues s. w. of Can-delaria. Lat. 27° 44' 36" s. Long. 55° 57' 12" w.

Carlos, San, another, of the missions of theprovince and government of Tucuman, in the jn-risdiction of the city of Salta; situate on the shoreof the river of Guachipas.

Carlos, San, a city of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela ; situate on the shore of theriver Aguirre, to the n. of the city of Nirua. [Itowes its existence to the first missionaries of Vene-zuela, and its increase and beauty to the activityof its inhabitants. The greatest part of its popu-lation is composed of Spaniards from the Canaryislands ; and as these leave their native country

CAR

but to meliorate their condition, they arrive with awillingness to work, and a courage to undertakeany thing that they think the most proper to an-swer their views. Their example even inspires asort oT emulation among the Creoles, productiveof public prosperity. Cattle forms the great massof the wealth of the inhabitants. Oxen, horses,and mules, are very numerous. Agriculture, al-though not much followed, is yet not neglected.Indigo and coffee are almost the only things theygrow. The quality of the soil gives the fruits anexquisite flavour, but particularly the oranges,which are famed throughout the province. Thecity is large, handsome, and well divided ; theycompute the inhabitants at 9300. The parishchurch, by its construction and neatness, answersto the industry and piety of the people. The heatat San Carlos is extreme ; it would be excessive ifthe n. wind did not moderate the effects of the sun.It lies in 9° 20' lat. 60 leagues s. w. of Caracas,24 s. s.e. of St. Valencia, and 20 from St. Philip’s.

(Carlos, San, a town of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Ayres ; situate on a small riverabout two leagues n. of Maldonado. Lat. 34° 44'45" s. Long. 55° 44' zw.)

(Carlos, San, Real, a parish of the provinceand government of Buenos Ayres ; situate on ariver of the same name, about five leagues n. ofColonia del Sacramento. Lat. 34° 25' 8" s. Long,57° 50' w.')

(San Carlos de Monterey|Carlos, San, de Monterey]]==, the capital ofNew California, founded in 1770, at the foot of thecordillera of Santa Lucia, which is covered withoiiks, pines, (foliis lernis J, and rose bushes. Thevillage is two leagues distant from the presidio ofthe same name. It appears that the bay of Mon-terey had already been discovered by Cabrillo onthe 13th November 1542, and that he gave it thename of Bahia rle los Pinos, on account of thebeautiful pines with which the neighbouring moun-tains are covered. It received its present nameabout 60 years afterwards from Viscaino, in ho-nour of the viceroy of Mexico, Gaspar deZunega,Count de Monterey, an active man, to whom weare indebted for considerable maritime expedi-tions, and who engaged Juan de Onate in the con-quest of New Mexico. The coasts in the vicinityof San Carlos produce the famous aurum merum(ormier) of Monterey, in request by the inhabi-tants of Nootka, and which is employed in thetrade of otter-skins. The population of San Carlosis 700.)

Carlos, San, a fort of the province and go-vernment of Guayana, situate on the shore of the

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
323

hind the cape of La Vela, which is at presentdestroyed.

Carrizal, another, of the missions of the pro-vince of Taraumara, and kingdom ofNueva Viz-caya, to the s. of tlie garrison of Paso.

Carrizal, another, with the additional title ofRancho, in the missions of Nuevo Mexico.

Carrizal, another, with the dedicatory titleof San Fernando, in the kingdom of Nueva Vis-caya.

CARTAGENA, a province and governmentof the kingdom of Tierra Firme, in the jurisdictionof the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, bounded n. bythe sea, s. by the province of Antioquia, e. bythe province and government of Santa Marta, fromwhich it is divided by the Rio Grande de la Mag-dalena, and w. by the province of Darien, beingseparated by the river San J uan ; it is 100 leagueslong, running nearly from n. e. to s. w. and 80wide, e. w. It was discovered by Rodrigo Bas-tidas in 1520, and subdued by the addantado orgovernor Pedro de Heredia, at the expence ofmany battles, owing to the valour and warlike dis-position of the natives. This country is of a veryhot and moist temperature, full of mountains andwoods, and towards the n. part swampy, sandy,and full of pools of sea-water, from the lowness ofthe territory ; but it is at the same time fertile, andabounds in maize, pulse, and fruits, as also incattle, of the hides and fat of which this provincemakes a great traffic. Its mountains produce ex-cellent woods, and the famous dyeing wood, equalto that of Campeche, with an abundance of excel-lent gums, medicinal balsams, and herbs. Hereare many kinds of rare birds, animals, and snakesof different species ; amongst the former the mostremarkable are the penco, of the figure of a cat,and so heavy that it takes a full hour to moveitself 20 paces ; the mapurito^ of the size of a smalllap-dog, whose arms and means of defending him-self from other animals and his pursuers consistsimply in discharging some wind with such forceand noise as to stupify his enemies, whilst hequietly makes his retreat to some neighbouringthicket. This province produces also indigo,tortoise-shell, and cotton, and some cacao of anexcellent quality in the Rio de la Magdalena. Itwas well peopled with Indians in the time of itsgentilism, but its inhabitants are now reduced toa very trifling number. It is watered by variousrivers, but those of the most consideration are ElGrande de la Magdalena, and thatof San Juan, orAtracto, both of which are navigable and wellstocked with alligators, tortoises, and a multitudeof fishes. Its district contains 83 setttleraents, of

which there are two cities, seven towns, and 96settlements or villages, inhabited by 59,233 whites,13,993 Indians, and 7770 Negro and Mulattoslaves, according to the numeration of the fiscal ofthe royal audience of Santa Fe, Don FranciscoMoreno y Escandon, in the year 1770. The ca-pital has the same name, and the other settlementsare.

Towns.

Jolojolo,

Tenerife,

San Jacinto,

Mompox,

Nuestra Senora del

Tamalameque,

Carmen,

S. Benito Abad,

San Augustin de

Zirniti,

Playablanca.

Ayapel,

Teton,

Cazeres.

Zambrano,

Settlements.

San Francisco de

Tubara,

Asfs,

Boxon,

Coloso,

Usiacuri,

Tolu Viejo,

J alapa.

Pichelin,

Barranquilla,

Tacaloa,

Soled ad,

Tacamocho,

Malarabo,

Yati,

Pueblo Nuevo,

Pinto,

Sabana Grande,

Santa Ana,

Santo Tomas,

San Fernando,

Palmar de la Can-

San Cenon,

delaria ,

Talaibua,

Santa Catalina,

Morchiquejov

Santa Rosa,

Chilloa,

Sabana Larga,

Guamal,

San Benito,

Penon,

Guamare,

San Pedro,

San Juan de Saha-

Norori,

gun.

Guayal,

Turbaco,

Retiro,

Zirairiguaco,

San Sebastian,

San Estanislao,

Cascajar,

Manatl,

Sto. Tomas Cantu-

Carreto,

ariense,

Cerro de S. Anto-

Tacasaluma,

nio,

Sinse,

Real de la Cruz,

Moron,

Baru,

San Christoval,

Barranca Nueva,

Santiago,

Yucal,

Caimitos,

Pasa Caballos,

Sinsilejo,

Rocha,

Sampues,

Majetas,

Chinu,

San Basilio,

S. Antonio Abad,

San Cayetano,

S. Andres,

San Juan Nepomu-

Pinchorroy,

zano.

San Emigdio,

Hamenco,

Momil,

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
498

498

COM

COM

and government of Neyba in the kingdom of Gra-nada. It rises in the paramo or mountain desertofQuindiu, traverses and waters the valleys ofLas Lanzas, and unites itself witli that of SanJuan, taking the name of Coello, from a Spaniardof this name having been drowned in it. It thenenters the Magdalena.

COMBEJU, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Rey in Brazil ; situate at the sourceof the river Curitaba.

COMBERUI, Bay of, on the coast of the pro-vince o.i\6. captainship of Rey in Brazil. It liesbetween the bay of Tasay and the island of Gallo.

COMBES, a settlement of the island of Bar-badoes, in the district of the parish of St. George.

COMBINCUMA, a spacious, and but littleknown country of the kingdom of Quito. It isfull of woods, in which there are many wild beastsand snakes of various kinds, and it is watered bymany rivers, all of which enter the s. side of theMaranon. Amongst the various nations whichinhabit it is that of the Tontones.

COMBITA, a settlement of the province andcorregirniento oi Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada. It is of a cold temperature, and pro-duces the fruits corresponding with its climate.It contains 100 house-keepers, and as many otherIndians, and is two leagues to the n. zo. of itscapital.

COMBLES, Los Cinco, a settlement andparish of the island of St. Christopher, one of theAntilles ; situate on the shore of the n. w. coast,and in the part formerly possessed by the Eng-lish.

COMBOY, a rocky shoal of the N. sea, to thes. of that of La Vivora.

COMEAPA, a settlement of the province andulcaldia mayor of Los Zoques in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

COMECUERO, a river of the province andgovernment of Honduras in the kingdom of Guate-mala. It runs into the gulf which has tlie nameof the province.

COMETA, PUNTA DE, a point or cape ofthe Caico Grande, or Del N. (of the N.) on the n. e.coast.

Cometa, a shoal of rocks, near upon the n. e.coast of the island of Caico Grande, or Del N.and by the former point, from whence it takes itsname.

(COMFORT Point is the s. easternmost partof Elizabeth City county in Virginia, formed byJames river at its mouth in Chesapeak bay. PointComfort lies 19 miles w. by n. of cape Henry.]Comfort Point, another point, which is also

of the same coast and province as the former, andwithin that bay, being one of the points which formthe entrance of the river York.

Comfort Point, another, on the s. coast ofHudson’s bay, in the province of this name.

COMICHIGELES, Sierra de, in the pro-vince and government of Tucumán, and boundedby the sierra of Cuyo, in the kingdom of Chile. Itruns from 5. s. e. on the shore of the Concara, andin fact follows the course of that river.

COMISARIO, Punta del, a long strip ofland which runs into the sea on the coast of theprovince and government of Cartagena, betweenthis city and the point of S. Bernardo.

COMISTAHUACAN, a settlement of the pro-vince and alcaldia mayor of Los Zoques in thekingdom ol' Guatemala.

COMITLAN, a settlement of the province and'alcaldia mayor of Chiapa in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

COMITLAN, another settlement, in the pro-vince and alcaldia mayor of Capanabastla in thesame kingdom.

(COMMANOES, one of the Small Virginisles, in the W. Indies, situate to the n. n. e. ofTortilla.)

COMOCAUTLA, San Pedro de, a settle-ment of the head settlement of Zapotitlan, andalcaldia mayor of Xacatlan, in Nueva Espana,three leagues distant from its head settlement.

COMO-LEWU, or Rio de los Sauces, call-ed also Gran Desaguadero. See Sauces.

COMONDU, San Joseph de, a settlementof the missions which were held by the regularsof the company of Jesuits in the province of Ca-lifornia ; situate near the sea-coast, between thesettlements of La Concepcion and San FranciscoXavier.

COMONDU, San Joseph de, a bay of this pro-vince, between the bay of Concepcion and theisland of Carmen.

COMOPORO, a settlement of the governmentof Maracaibo in the province of Venezuela;situate on the coast of the lake towards the e. part.

COMORI, Crique de, a creek and establish-ment of the French, in their possessions inGuayana.

COMORIPA, or Comoriopa, as some willhave it, a settlement of the province of Ostimuriin Nueva Espana; situate on the shore of the riverHiaqui, between the settlements of Cocoria andTecoriona.

COMPOSTELA, a province and alcaldiamayor of Nueva Galicia. Its jurisdiction extendsfrom the mouth of the large river San Pedro, as

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
522

522

COR

COROICO, a settlement of the province andeorregimiento of Cicasica in Peru ; situate on theshore of the river of its name, where there is aport for small vessels. This river rises in the cor-dillera of Ancuma, to the s. of the settlement ofPalca, and to the e. of the city of La Paz. It runsin a very rapid course to the e. and forming acurve turns n. and enters the w. side of the Beni,in lat. 16° 50' s.

COROMA, a settlement of the province andeorregimiento of Porco in Peru.

COROMANDIERES, some small islands ofthe N. sea, near the coast of Acadia inN. America,near the coast of Scatari. They are also calledDel Infierno, or Devil’s isles.

COROMOTO, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela ; situate on theshore of the river Guanarito, to the s. of the townof Guanaro.

CORON, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Huanoquite.

CORONA-REAL, a city of the province ofGuayana, and government of Curaana, foundedon the shores of the river Orinoco in 1759, by theRear-Admiral Don Joseph de Iturriaga, for whichpurpose he assembled together some wanderingpeople of the provinces of Caracas and Barcelona.At present, however, it is as it were desert andabandoned, since its inhabitants have returned totheir former savage state of life, having been con-stantly pursued and harassed by the CharibesIndians, against whom they could no longer main-tain their ground, after that the king’s garrisonhad been withdrawn, and since, owing to the dis-tance at which they were situate from the capital,it was in vain for them to look for any succourfrom that quarter.

Corona-Real, a large bay in the lake of Ma-racaibo, on thew. side.

Corona-Real, a rocky isle, or ridge of rocks,close to the n. coast of the island of Guadalupe,between cape St. Juan and the port or bay of Mole.

CORONADOS, a small island of the gulf ofCalifornia, or Mar Roxo de Cortes ; situate verynear the island of Carmen, on its n. e. side, whichlooks to the coast of New Spain.

(CORONDA, a town of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Ayres ; situate on a riverforming the island of Santa Fe, about five leaguess. w. of that town, in Lat. 31° 58' 47". Long. 61°2' a).)

CORONANGO, Santa Maria de, a headsettlement of the alcaldia maj/or of Cholula inNueva Espafia. It contains 94 families of In-

C O R

dians, and to its district belong nine other settle-ments. It lies one league to the n. of its capital.

CORONEL, Puerto del, a port on the coastof the province and corregimiento of Quillota, andkingdom of Chile, between the port of Longotoraaand the river Quilimari.

CORONEL, a river of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela. It rises to the ^ . of the city ofNirua, and afterwards unites itself with the Grape,to enter the Tinaco.

CORONEL, a point of the coast of the kingdomof Chile, in the province and corregimiento of Quil-lota, between the mouth of the river Biobio and theheights of Villagran.

CORONGO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Conchucos in Peru.

COROPA, a spacious country of the provinceand government of Guayana, which extends itselfbetween the river Coropatuba to the s. w. the Ma-ranon to the s. the Avari to the e. the mountainsof Oyacop of the Charibes Indians to the n. andthe mountains of Dorado or Manoa to the n.w.The whole of its territory is, as it were, unknown.The Portuguese possess the shores of the Maranonand the sea-coast as far as the bay of Vicente Pin-zon ; the Dutch of the colony of Surinam, by theriver Esequevo or Esquivo, called also Rupununi,have penetrated as far as the Maranon, by the riverParanapitinga. The mountains, which some haverepresented as being full of gold, silver, and pre-cious stones, sparkling in the rays of the sun, aremerely fables, which, at the beginning of the con-quests, deceived many who had gone in search ofthese rich treasures, and fell a sacrifice to thefatigues and labours which they experienced inthese dry and mountainous countries. The Por-tuguese have constructed here two forts, called Paruand Macapa. Mr. De la Martiniere, with hisusual want of accuracy, says that the Portuguesehave a settlement called Coropa, at the mouth ofthe river Coropatuba, where it enters the Maranon ;the Coropatuba joins the Maranon on the n. side,in the country of Coropa, and at the settlement ofthis name ; this settlement being nothing more thana small fort, and lying in the province of Topayos,on the s. shore of the Maranon, and being knownby the name ofCurupa, in the chart published in1744, and in that of the Father Juan Magnin, in1749.

COROPATUBA. See Curupatuba.

COROPUNA, a desert of the province ofCuzco in Peru, between the provinces of Parina-cocha and Canas or Aruni. It extends more than12 leagues s. to n. and is troublesome and dan-gerous to traverse.

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
524

cos

524 COS

and lies seven leagues to the n. of its head settle-ment.

CORUTES, a small river of the province andgovernment of Paraguay. It runs n. n.'e. and en-ters the Xexuy, opposite the town of Curuguato.

CORWI, a river of the province and govern-ment of French Guinea. It enters the sea close tocape Orange.

COSACURO, a small river of the province andcolony of Surinam, or part of Guayana in theDutch possessions. It runs n. and enters theCuyuni.

COSANGA, a large river of the province ofQuixos in the kingdom of Quito. It runs s. e.then turns its course e. and as it were imperceptiblyto the n. and afterwards, in order to receive on thew. the river Bermejo, enters the s. side of the riverCoca.

COSAPA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Carangas in Peru, of the arch-bishopric of Charcas ; annexed to the curacy ofTurco.

COSCAOCOAS, a nation of Indians reducedto the Catholic faith, dwelling upon the llanura orlevel of Cumboso, of the jurisdiction of Lamas.They are few in number, and are bounded by theAmasifucines.

COSCOMATEPEC, San Juan de, a settle-ment of the head settlement of Yxhuatlan, andalcaldia mayor of Cordoba, in NuevaEspana. Itcontains 10 families of Spaniards, 35 of Mustees,75 of Mulattoes, and 196 of Indians. Seven leaguesto the n. n. w. of its head settlement ; but the roadshere are so rugged and full of steeps and precipicesthat the sight grows dizzy at looking down them.

COSCOMITLAN, a settlement of the lieadsettlement and alcaldia mayor of Caxititlas inNueva Espana, from whence it lies one league anda half to the n. w. In its vicinity is a lake.

COSELA, a settlement and real of the silvermines of the province of Copala, and kingdom ofNueva Vizcaya ; situate to the n. of that of Char-cas.

COSEREMONIANOS, a barbarous nation ofIndians, of the province and government of Moxosin the kingdom of Quito ; discovered by FatherCypriano Baraza, a Jesuit. It is, however, butlittle known.

COSIGUIRACHI, a town of the province ofTaraumara, and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya ; oneof the most wealthy towns in the kingdom, and ofa mild and healthy temperature. Its populationis composed of many families of Spaniards andMustees^ no small number of Mulattoes, and verymany Indians. It is 24 leagues to the s. k?. \ to

the s. of the real of the mines and town of SanFelipe de Chiguagua.

Cosiguirachi, a settlement and real of thesilver mines of the intendancy of Durango inNueva Espana; of a cdld temperature ; situate ina rough and uneven territory, but being fertile, andabounding in fruits and seeds. (By a very recentmemoir of the intendantof Durango, the populationof this real was made to amount to 10,700.)

COSMA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Huamalies in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Banos.

COSMA, another settlement, in the province andcorregimiento of Andahuailas, of the same king-dom ; annexed to the curacy of Moro in the pro-vince of La Santa.

COSME, San, a settlement of the head settle-ment and alcaldia mayor of Fresnillo in NuevaEspana. It contains a very large number ofSpaniards, Indians, Mustees, and Mulattoes, beingvery close to the city of Zacatecas, lying fromthence only seven leagues to the n. and being 10 tothe e. of its capital.

COSME, San, another settlement, of the provinceand government of Sonora in Nueva Espana ;situate in the country of the Sobaipuris Indians, onthe shore of a river between the settlements of SantaCatalina and San Francisco Xavier.

COSME, San, another, with the surname of Viejo,(Old), a reduccion of the missions which were heldby the regulars of the company of Jesuits, in theprovince and government of Paraguay ; situate onthe shore of the river Parana, between the settle-ments of Santa Ana and La Candelaria.

COSME, San, another, with the addition ofNuevo, (New), to distinguish it from the former inthe same province : also a reduccion of the regularsof the company of Jesuits, on the shore of theParana, and to the w. of the settlement ofJesus.

COSME, San, a small island of the gulf of Cali-fornia, or Mar Roxo de Cortes ; situate very nearthe coast, in the middle of the canal which isformed by this coast and the island of Carmen,and close to another island called San Damian.

COSPALA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Juchipila in Nueva Espana.It is five leagues to the s. of the head settlement.

COSSA, or COSAIBO, a river of the provinceand government of Guayana, in the French posses-sions.

COSSART, a town of the province and colonyof N. Carolina ; situate on the shore of the riverJadquin.

COSTA-BAXA, a part of the coast of Brazil, in

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
554

554

CUM

c y L

linas and that of Chirgua, in the space left bythese rivers as they run to enter the Portuguesa.

CULEBRAS, rio de, a settlement of the sameprovince and government (Venezuela) as is the former lake ;situate on the sliore of the river Yaraqui, to the e.of the town of San Felipe.

CULEBRAS, RIO DE, an island of the N. sea,near the coast of the province and government ofCartagena, at the entrance of the large river of LaMagdalena.

CULEBRILLAS, a small island of the S. sea,in the bay of Panama, of the province and go-vernment of Tierra Firme; is one of thosewhich Ibrm with that of Perico the port of thisname. .

CULIACAN, a province and alcald'm mayorof the kingdom of Nueva Galicia ; bounded n.and n. e. by the province of Cinaloa, s. by that ofCopala, s. w. by the kingdom of Niieva Fizcaya,s. by that of Chiamatlan, and w. by the gulf ofCalifornia. It is 60 leagues in length and 50 inAvidth. It is fertile, apd abounds in all sorts ofproductions; is watered by various rivers, par-ticularly the Umaya, Avhich is very large, and inwhich are caught great quantities offish. It emp-ties itself into the S. sea, in the port of Navitoos.It abounds in various earths, salt, and silvermines, and in many settlements of Mexican In-dians, reduced by the missionaries of the religionof St. Francis. The capital is of the same name.Lat.24°58'??.

CULIACAN, with the dedicatory title of San Mi-guel, a town which was founded by Nunez deGuzman in 1531 ; situate on the banks of a smallriver, Avhich afterwards unites itself Avith theUmaya. It is 160 leagues from Guadalaxara,and 260 from Mexico. The other settlements ofthis province are,

Cozela Real de Minas==, ==Binapa,Tacuchameta==, ==Baita.

Buya,

CULIACAN, a settlement of the intendancyof Sonora in Nueva Espana, celebrated in theMexican history under the name of Hueicol-huacan. The population is estimated at 10,800souls.]

CULIACAN, a river of this province (Sonora), which di-vides the jurisdiction of the same from that of Ci-naloa. It runs into the sea at the entrance of thegulf of California, or Mar Roxo de Cortes. At itsmouth or entrance are some very dangerous shoalsof the same name. See St. Michael.

CULLI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Canta in Peru j annexed to the cu-racy of Pari.

CULLOUMAS, a settlement of Indians, of thsprovince and colony of Georgia ; situate on theshore of the river Apalachicola.

CULLOUMAS, a settlement of the province andcorregirnienlo of Canta in Peru ; annexed to the-curacy of San Buenaventura.

CULLUE, a large lake of the province andcorregimiento of Tarma in Peru. From it isformed the canal Avhich empties itself into theriver Paria.

CULLURI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Paria in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Toledo.

CULLURQUI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cotabambas in Peru, in the vici-nity of which, in an estate for breeding cattle, is apoor chapel of Santa Rosa, and near to this twovery large rocks, Avhich, being touched with smallstones, send forth a sound similar to bells of thebest temper and metal.

CULPEPPER, a county in Virginia, betweenthe Blue ridge and the tide waters, which con-tains 22,105 inhabitants, of whom 8226 are slaves.The court-house of this county is 45 miles fromFredericksburg, and 95 from Charlottesville.]

CULTA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Paria in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of Condocondo.

CULTEPEQUE, a settlement of the real ofthe silver mines of the province and alcaldiamayor of Tlaxcala in Nueva Espana.

CULUACAN, San Lucas de, a settlement ofthe head settlement and alcatdia mayor of Yzucárin Nueva Espana. It contains 50 tamilies of In-dians, and Avas formerly the capital of the juris-diction. Here there still remain some baths ofwarm water, celebrated for the cure of many in-firmities. It is two leagues to the s. Avith a slightinclination to the 5. e. of its head settlement.

CUMA, San Antonio de, a town of the pro-vince and captainship of Marañan in Brazil. Itcontains a good parish-church, two convents ofmonks, one of the order of Carmen, and the otherof La Merced ; and at a short distance from thetown is a house Avhich was the residetice of the re-gulars of the company of .Jesuits. This town be-longs to the lordship of the house of Antonio Al-burquerque Coello de Carballo. It is three leaguesfrom its capital.

CUMA, San Antonio de, another settlement inthis province and kingdom (Marañan Brazil); situate near the coastand the cape of its name.

CUMA, San Antonio de. This cape is .alsoin the same captainship^ (Marañan) between a bar and thebay of Cabelo de Yelha. The aforesaid bar is a

Last edit over 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
556

556

C U M A N A.

[a new species of the caprimulgas of Linnaeus, thefat of which makes the oil of Guacharo. Its situa-tion is majestic, and ornamented with the mostbrillant vegetation. A pretty large river issuesfrom the cavern, and in the interior are heard thedismal cries of the birds, which the Indians ascribeto departed souls, which they think are all obligedto enter this cavern, to pass into the other world.The principal colonies belonging to Cumana lie totlie w. ; as Barcelona, Piritu, Clarinas, &c. At12 leagues to s. e. of Cumana is the valley of Cu-manacoa, where are tobacco plantations belongingto the king. The soil there is so adapted to thisspecies of produce, that the tobacco ground hasobtained a decided preference throughout thecountry over that which is cultivated in any otherpart of Tierra Firme. Cigars made of the tobaccoof Cumanacoa fetch easily double the price of thosemade v/ith the tobacco of any other place. In theenvirons of Cumanacoa, are the Indian villages ofSan Fernando, Arenas, Aricagua, which are allsituated on an extremely fertile soil. Farther inthe interior are the valleys of Carepe, Guanaguana,Cocoyar, &c. which are also very fertile, but un-cultivated ; but the part which appears most topromise prosperity is the coast of the gulfof Paria,between the most s. mouth of the Orinoco and themouth of the Guarapiche. The whole territory ofthe government of Cumana is completely hemmedin by ravines, rivulets, and rivers, equally usefulfor the purposes of watering the land, workinghydraulic machines, and for navigation. Therivers that discharge themselves into the sea to then. are the Neveri and Mansanares, both possessinglittle water, and having but short courses. Thosethat fall into the gulf of Paria to the e. flow throughgreater extent of country. Some join the riverGuarapiche, which is navigable as far as 25 leaguesfrom the sea ; and of these are the Colorado,Guatatar, Caripe, Punceres, Tigre, Guayuta^ &c.There are others which run to the s. and afterhaving watered the province, fall into the Orinoco.The produce of the government of Cumana cantherefore be shipped, according to convenience, tothe n. by Barcelona and Cumana; to the e. by thegulf of Paria, and to the s. by the Orinoco. Atan average of four years, from 1799 to 1803, thequantity of cacao exported from this provinceamounted to 18,000 fanegas. Its population is80,000 persons, including the missions of the Ara-gonese Capuchins. The capital is

Cumana, Santa Ines de, a city founded byGonzalo de Ocampo in 1520. It is of a hot andunhealthy temperature, and its territory is dry and

unfruitful. It lies within a cannon’s shot of the sea-shore, in the gulf formed by the sea in the shape ofa semicircle, where all kinds of vessels may bebuilt. On its beech is a saline ground, which,without being regularly worked, supplies sufficientsalt both for the use of the city and of the immediatesettlements. It lies in the middle of the llanura,or plain of the river of its name. The same riverpasses in front of the city, serving as a barrier to it,and so enters the mouth of the gulf. At the backbegins the serrama, which for more than eightleagues is sterile and impassable, on account ofbrambles and thorns. The soil towards the frontof the city is composed of pebble, gypsum, andsand, which, during the prevalence of the windBrha, occasions an excessive heat, (and is veryoffensive to the eyes ; bad sight being here a verycommon malady. Nearly in the centre of thetown, upon an elevated ground, stands the castleof Santa Maria de la Cabeza, which is of a squarefigure, and commands the city. In the lofty partof the sierra are seen three round hills ; upon thehighest of which stands a castle called San Anto-nio, and upon the lowest a fort called La Cande-laria. There is upon the beach another castle,which is denominated the fort of Santa Catalina :The same is at the mouth of the river, just wherea sand bank has of late been formed, so as to blockup the entrance of the river, and to render it dan-gerous for large vessels. The fort is at some dis-tance from the gulf; and as a wood has of latesprung up between this and the shore, it is notpossible to see the water from the fort. It has, be-sides the parish church, which is very poor, twoconvents of monks, one of St. Francis, and the otherof St. Domingo. These form its population,amounting to 600 souls, who maintain themselvesin the poor estates, which are about 50 in number,and produce some sugar-canes, of which are madebrandy, and sugar of the colour of a yellow waxused in the country : some fruits and yucasymaize and cacao, are also grown here, but in suchsmall quantities that a crop never yields upwardsof 100 bushels. These estates are, for the mostpart, at some distance from the city, and the greaternumber of them are inhabited by their masters, thepoorer inhabitants alone dwelling in the city. Ata small distance from it, is an hermitage dedi-cated to Nuestra Sefiora del Carmen. [Reaumur’sthermometer rises here generally in the month ofJuly to 23° daring the day and to 19° during thenight.

The maximum, 27°.

The minimum, 17°.

1

Last edit over 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
Untitled Page 573

CUZCO.

571

tlie small river Guatanay ; the same being nearlydry, save in the months of January, February,and March ; though the little water found in itjust serves to irrigate the neighbouring plains.The grandeur and magnificence of the edifices,of the fortress, and of the temple of the sun, struckthe Spaniards with astonishment, when, at the con-quest, they first beiield them, and upon their en-tering the city.j in 1534, when the same was takenpossession of by Don Francisco Pizarrro, forCharles V^. It was then the capital of the wholeempire of Peru, and the residence of the empe-rors. Its streets were large, wide, and straight ;though at the present day Lima stands in compe-tition with it in regard to grandeur. The housesare almost all builtofstone, and of fine proportions.The cathedral, which has the title of La Asun-cion, is large, beautiful, rich, and of very goodarchitecture, and some even prefer it to the cathe-dral of Lima. Here are three curacies in thechapel of the Sagrario, two for the Spaniards, andanother for the Indians and Negroes ; and the pa-rishes are Nuestra Senora de Belen, San Christo-yal, Santa Ana, San Bias, S:intiago, and the hos-pital ; besides two others, which are without thecity, called San Geronirno and San Sebastian.Here are nine convents of the following religiousorders ; one of St. Dominic, founded on the spotwhere the Indians had their celebrat^sd temple ofthe sun ; two of St. Francis, one of the Observers,and another of the Recoletans, one of St. Au-gustiti, one of La Merced, two colleges whichbelonged to the regulars of the extinguished com-pany of Jesuits, the principal, in the part lyingtowards the c. being destined, at the present time,for an armoury ; and the other at the back of thesame, in which was the house for noviciates andstudents, serving now as barracks for the troops ;add to these the chapel of ease to the cathedral.Here are four hospitals ; the first and most ancientis that of the Espiritu Santo, in which are receivedIndians of both sexes, subject to the patronageof the secular cabildo, and governed by a junta ofS3 persons, the president of whom, the alcalde,has the first vote, and after him the administratoror first brother. It has two chaplains and veryample revenues ; one of the sources being the du-ties paid upon all effects passing over the bridgeof Yipuriraac, the which droits belonged to theroyal exchequer until the year 1763, at whichtime, at the instance of the king’s ensign, DonGabriel de Ugarte, they were conceded by theking to the hospital, together with the right andproperty of the bridge, in redemption of somecrown grants which were left to the hospital by

Rodrigo de Leon, in Seville ; and it was by thismeans that the hospital, having become so wellendowed, has now no less than 250 beds. A jubi-lee has been granted by the apostolical see to itschapel; and this is celebrated at the octave ofPentecost with much solemnity, and by an unusu-ally great concourse of people, and was once the bestobserved jubilee of any in America. The se-cond hospital, being of the religious order of SanJuan de Dios, is for the men, and has 50 beds;the third, called. Of Nuestra Senora de la Almu-dena, is for all descriptions of individuals, andhas also 50 beds ; the tburih, called San rlndres,has 30 beds for Spanish women. Here are threemonasteries of nuns ; the first of Santa Catalina dcSena, founded where the Incas kept the virginsdedicated to the sun ; and the others are of SantaClara and the bare-tboted Carmelites. Here arealso four other religious houses, which are that^ofthe Nazarenes, thatof Nuestra Senora del Carmen,that of Santiago, and that of San Bias ; three col-leges, which are, that of San Bernardo, whereinare taught grammar, philosophy, and theology,and was founded by a Aizcayan for the sons of theconquerors, having been formerly under thecharge of the regulars of the company of Jesuits,and at present under an ecclesiastical rector ; thatof San Borja, for the sons of the Indian caciques,where they are initiated in their letters, and in therudiments of music, at least as many of them asshow any disposition to this science, (this accom-plishment having been formerly taught by thesame regulars of the company) ; and that of SanAntonio Abad, which is a seminary and univer-sity, and is a very sumptuous piece of architec-ture. This city preserves many monuments of itsancient grandeur ; and amongst the rest, thegreat fortress built for its defence, which, althoughinjured by time, bears testimony to the powers ofthe Incas, and excites astonishment in the mindof every beholder, since the stones, so vast andshapeless, and of so irregular a superficies, areknit together, and laid one to fit into the other withsuch nicety as to want no mortar or other materialwhereby to fill up the interstices ; and it is indeeddifficult to imagine how they could work them inthis manner, when it is considered that they knewnot the use of iron, steel, or machinery for thepurpose. The other notable things are the baths ;the one of warm and the other of cold water ; theruins of a large stone-way, which was built by or-der of the Incas, and which reached as far aswhere Lima now stands ; the vestiges of some sub-terraneous passages which led to the fortress fromthe houses or palaces of the Inca, and in which pass-4 n ?

Last edit over 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
All 10 records