LatAm Digital Edition and Gazetteer

OverviewStatisticsSubjects

Search for Panamá* Panama*

The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

26

ALACLATZALA, a branch of the head set-tlement of the district of S. Luis, of the coast andalcaldia mayor of TIapa in Nueva España. Itcontains 125 Indian families, and is one leaguefrom the settlement of Quanzoquitengo.

ALACRANES, some islands, or rather somehidden rocks, of the N. sea, in the bay of Mexico,opposite the coast of Yucatan. Those who navi-gate these parts are accustomed to pass round be-yond them for fear of venturing amongst them, al-though there are some good cliannels among them,and withgood soundings. They are for the most partbarren, producing nothing beyond a herb calledmoron, -And deficient in fresh water ; neither do theyproduce any animal except the mole, which isfound here in prodigious numbers. There are,however, a quantity of birds, of three distinct sorts,each forming a community of itself, and entirelyseparated from the other two ; and it has beenobserved, that if one party may have fixed uponany place for building their nests, the others neverthink of disturbing them, or driving them from it ;but the noise these birds make is so great, that onecannot pass near them without suffering consider-ably from their united clamours.

[ALADAS, a parish situate about 14; leaguess. e, of Corrientes, in Lat. 28° 15' 20" s. Long. 58°SO' e».]

ALAHUIZTLAN, San Juan de, a branchof the head settlement of the district of Escateopan,and alcaldia mayor of Zaqualpa, in Nueva España.It contains 270 Indian families.

ALAIN, a river of the province and govern-ment of Mainas in the kingdom of Quito. It risesin the country of the Locamas Indians, runs fromj. to n. and turning to the n. n. e. enters the Pucaré.

ALAMEDA, a settlement of the missions be-longing to the religious of St. Francis in NuevoMexico.

ALAMILLOS, a settlement of the province ofTaraumara and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya ; oneof the missions which belonged to the religious ofSt Francis. It is close to the town and real ofthe mines of Santa Eulalia.

ALAMO, a settlement of the province andgovernment of the new kingdom of Leon, situ-ate 15 leagues to the s. e. of the Point.

ALAMOS, Real de Los, Real de Los, a settlement andreal of the mines of the province of Sinaloa inNueva España. It is situate s. e. of the SierraMadre, and surrounded by rich silver mines,which would produce abundantly but for want oflabourers. There are in its district five estatesthat are fertile in maize, French beans, and sugar-cane. The spiritual concerns of all these parts

are under the direction of a curate, whose jurisdic-tion extends as far as the river Mayo, which flowsdown from the sierra. It is 20 leagues distantfrom the town of Tuerte, and between these liesthe valley of Maquipo. [Population 7900 souls]

Alamos, with the dedicatory title of S. Jorge,a town of the province and captainship of Para inBrazil, founded by Jorge del Alamo, who gaveit his name, in a place called La Vigia. It has amagnificent parish church, with the title of NuestraSenora de Nazareth, with a large and good fort,and well furnished with artillery. Also, at the dis-tance of a league and an half from the settlement,is a house of charity belonging to the religiousorder of the Capuchins of La Piedad.

Alamos, another town of the province and go-vernment of Sonora, in the line that divides theconfines of this jurisdiction and the province ofOstimuri, between the rivers Hiaqui and LaSonora.

Alamos (Sonora near Coro de Guachi), another settlement of the same pro-vince and government as the former, situate tothe s. of the garrison of Coro de Guachi.

Alamos, another of the missions belonging tothe abolished society of Jesuits, in the provinceof Taraumara and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya.It is 27 leagues s. w. and a quarter of a league s.of the real of the mines and town of S. Felipe deChiguaga.

Alamos, another settlement and real of thesilver mines of the province and government ofCinaloa.

ALANGASI, a settlement of the kingdom ofQuito, in the district of the corregimiento of theCinco Leguas de la Capital. In its territory is afountain of hot medicinal waters.

Alangasi, a river of the above corregimiento,and rising in the desert mountain of Sincholagua ;over it there is a large bridge, composed of a singlearch, but so strong, that when, in 1660, a partof the mountain fell upon it, and precipitated onehalf of it into the stream, the other half still re-mained firm and immoveable. This bridge isbuilt of mud and stone.

ALANIS, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Maracaibo, in the district of the cityof Merida, situate in the way whicE leads fromthis city to the new kingdom of Grenada.

ALANGI, Santiago de, a city and headsettlement of the district of the province of Chi-riqui and government of Santiago de Veragua,in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. It is small, butabounding in fruits and cattle ; in which a regulartrade is carried on for supplying the city of Pa-nama. This trade consists principally in pigs.

Last edit over 2 years ago by MJG
42

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit over 2 years ago by Romina De León
45

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit over 2 years ago by Romina De León
46

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit over 2 years ago by Bernie
47

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit over 2 years ago by Romina De León
308

[1803 amounted to 5,500,000, and the exports con-sisted of produce to the value of 4,000,000 dollars.He also states the population in 1808 at 900,000souls. The receipts of Caracas, Guatemala, andChile, are consumed within the country. Thepopulation of some of the chief cities is thus stated ;Caracas 40,000, La Guaira 6000, Puerto Cabello7600, Coro 10,000. The harbour, or La Vela deCoro, as it is commonly called, and its environs, aresupposed to contain not less than 2000. In 1797three state prisoners were sent from Spain to Ca-racas, on account of their revolutionary propensi-ties. Being treated with great indulgence by theofficers and soldiers to whose care they were com-mitted, they formed the project of a conspiracyagainst the government. They engaged a numberof persons, some of them of consequence, in theirparty. After gaining their first converts, the spiritdid not spread. The coldness and apathy of thepeople did not admit of the effervescene they de-sired. After the plot had been kept a secret formany months it was disclosed to the government.Some of the ringleaders escaped, and others weretaken. It was found that seventy-two had enteredinto the conspiracy; six were executed. Therest either escaped, or were sent to the galleys orbanished from the country. For an account of therecent revolution in Caracas, see Venezuela.]

Caracas, some islands of the N. sea near thecoast of the kingdom of Tierra Firme, in the pro-vince and government of Cumana. They are sixin number, all small and desert, serving as placesof shelter to the Dutch traders, who carry on anillicit commerce on that coast.

Caracas, a small port of the coast of TierraFirme, in the province and government of Vene-;zuela, between the capital and cape Codera.

CARACHE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Maracaibo, situate n. of the city ofTruxillo, on the shore of a small river which entersthe Matazan.

CARACHIS, San Carlos de a settlement ofthe province and country of the Amazonas ; a re-duccion of the missions which belonged to the abo-lished order of the Jesuits. It is at the mouth ofthe river Huerari, where this enters the Maranon.

CARACOA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Parinacoche in Peru, where thereis a spring of warm medicinal water.

CARACOL, Port, on the coast of the S. sea,and of the province and government of Panamá ;it is near the point of Garachine, behind mount Zapo.

CARACOLI, a port of the coast of the kingdomof Tierra Firme, and of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela, to the w., of cape Codera.

Caracoli, a bay formed by the s. coast, in theprovince and government of Darien, of the kingdomof Tierra Firme ; it lies at the back of point Gara-chine.

Caracoli, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cartagena, situate on the shore ofthe Rio Grande de la Magdalena, and on the n, ofthe town of Maria.

CARACOLLO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Oruro in Peru, eight leagues dis-tant from its capital.

=CARACOTO== a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Lampa in Peru.

Caracoto, another, in the province and corregi-mienlo of Sicasica in the same kingdom.

==CARAGAIAS, a town of the island of Cuba,situate on the n. coast between Cadiz and Nizao,

CARAGUATAI, a river of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres ; it runs s. s. w. andenters the Ayum or Yumeri.

CARAGUET, a small river of Nova Scotia orAcadia ; it runs e. and enters the sea in the gulfof St. Lawrence, opposite the island of its name.

CARAHUACRA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru; annexedto the curacy ofYauli.

CARAIBAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Chalvanca.

CARAIMA Alta, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Quillota in the kingdom ofChile ; situate on the coast between point Caraimiliaand point Pena Blanca.

CARAIMILLA, a settlement on the coast ofthe province and corregimiento aforementioned,between point Caraima Alta, and the isle of Obispo.

CARAMA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Antioquia in the new kingdom ofGranada.

CARAMANTA, a city of the province and go-vernment of Antioquia in the new kingdom ofGratiada ; founded by Sebastian de Benalcazar in1543, near the river Cauca. Its temperature ishot and unhealthy, but it is fertile in maize, vege-tables, grain, and abounds with herds of swine : nearit are many small rivers which enter the Cauca,and some salt pits of the whitest salt. On themountains within its jurisdiction, are some settle-ments of barbarian Indians very little known. Thiscity is indifferently peopled, and is 65 leagues dis-tant to the n. e. of Popayan, and 50 from Antio-quia. Long. 75° 33' w. Lat. 5° 58' «.

CARAMATIBA, a settlement of the provinceand captainship of Rio Grande in Brazil ; situateon the shore of the river Carabatang.

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
324

324

CARTAGENA.

San Nicolas de laPaz,

San J uan de lasPalmas,

Pueblo Nuevo,Santero,

Lorica,

San Nicolas deBari,

San Bernardo A-bad,

Morales,

Babilla,

Tablada,

Tiquicio de Aden-tro,

Tiquicio de Afu-era,

Majagua,

Nechi,

San Marcos,

San Pelajo,

Zerete,

Zienega del Oro,San Carlos de Co-losina.

San Geronimo deBuenavista.

The capital is a large city adorned with beauti-ful buildings, founded by Pedro de Heredia in1533, on the shore of a great and very convenientbay more than two leagues in length. It was call-ed Calamari in the time of the Indians, which sig-nifies, in their language, the land of craw-fish, fromthe abundance of these found in it. It is situateon a sandy island, which forming a narrow strait,gives a communication to the part called TierraBomba ; on the left it is entered by a woodenbridge, having a suburb called Xiximani, whichis another island uniting with the continent bymeans of a bridge in the same manner as itself.It is well fortified, and is the residence of a go-vernor, with the title of captain-general, dependenton the viceroy of Santa Fe, having beeu indepen-dent till the year 1739. Besides the precinct andbastions, it has a half-moon, which defends theentrance or gate ; and at a small distance is thecastle of San Felipe de Baraxas, situate on aneminence, and on the side of the bay the castles ofSan Luis, Santa Cruz, San Joseph, San P'elipe,and Pastelillo, which were rebuilt in a modernmanner, in 1654;, by the Lieutenant-general DonIgnacio de Sala, with the names of San Fernando,San Joseph, El Angel, and El Pastelillo. Thecathedral church is magnificent, and included in itis the parish of Sagrario, besides two other pa-rishes called La Trinidad and Santo Toribo. Ithas the convents of monks of St. Francisco, St.Domingo, St. Augustin, St. Diego, La Merced,and San Juan de Dios, which is an hospital, andsituate at the top of a high mountain without thewalls of the city, at a quarter of a league’s dis-tance from the convent of the barefooted Augustins,called Nuestra Senora de la Popa ; to this con-vent vessels are accustomed to offer up a salutationas soon as they discover it at sea. It has also acollege which belonged to the society of Jesuits,a convent of Santa Clara, one of the Observersof San Francisco, and another of barefooted Car-

melites. At a small distance without the city isthe hospital of San Lazaro for lepers, which ma-lady is epidemical in the country. It has also atribunal of the inquisition, established in 1610, ofwhich there is only three in all America, and put-tingthis city, in this pointof view, onafooting withthe metropolitan cities Lima and Mexico. It is thehead of a bishopric erected in 1534 by his holinessClement VII. The bay abounds in fish of variouskinds, but it is infested by marine wolves. Theclimate of this city is very hot ; from May to No-vember, which are the winter months, thunder,rain, and tempests are very frequent, but fromthis inconvenience they derive an advantage offilling with water their cisterns, called aijibes, andwhich afford them the only supply of this inostnecessary article ; accordingly every house is fur-nished with one of these cisterns : from Decemberto April, which is the summer, the heat is exces-sive, occasioning continual perspiration, whichdebilitates the frame, and causes the inhabitants tohave a pale and unhealthy appearance, althoughthey nevertheless enjoy good health, it being notunusual to find amongst them persons exceeding80 years of age. The irregularity of this climateproduces several very afflicting disorders, as theblack vomit, which is most common amongststrangers and sea-faring people, few of whom havethe luck to escape it, but no person ever has ittwice. The inhabitants are likewise much trou-bled with the leprosy, or disease of St. Lazarus ; theculebrilla, which is an insect which breeds under theskin, and causes a swelling which is accustomed toterminate in gangrene and spasms or convulsions :besides these inconveniences, there are multitudesof troublesome insects which infest the houses,such as beetles, niguas, scorpions, centipeds, andmorcielagos. The largest trees are the caob, thecedar, the maria, and balsam ; of the first aremade canoes, out of the solid trunk, for fishing andcommerce ; the red cedar is better than the white,and the two last, not to mention their utility fromthe compactness of their timber, for their delicioussmell and beautiful colour, are the trees fromwhence are procured those admirable distillationscalled the oil of Maria and balsam of Tolu. Hereare also tamarind trees, medlars, sapotas, papai/as,cassias, and Indian apple trees, producing deli-cate and pleasant fruits ; the fruit, however, of thelast mentioned is poisonous, and many who, de-ceived by the beauty of these apples, have therashness to taste them, soon repent of their folly,for they immediately swell to a distressing degree :so if perchance any one should sleep under itsbranches, he will be afflicted in the same way.

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
327

CARTAGENA.

327

16. Don FV. Diego de Tores Atamairano, amonk of the order of St. Francis, native of Trux-illo in Estremadura, commissary-general of theprovinces of Peru ; he received his consecration atEiraa, entered Cartagena in 1620, and died in thefollowing year, 1621.

17. Don Fr. Francisco de Sotomayor, of theorder of St. Francis, native of San Tome, in thebishopric of Tuy, guardian of the convents inMontforte and Salamanca, difimdor general in thechapter which was celebrated at Rome ; elected tothe bishopric of Cartagena in 1622, and promotedto that of Quito before he left Madrid, in 1623.

18. Don Fr. Luis Ronquillo de Cordova, of theorder of the Santissirna Trinidad, native of Gra-nada, where he read arts and theology, was mi-nister in the convent of Malaga, and twice in that ofSeville, provincial and vicar-general of Andalucia ;he was elected bishop in 1630 : he governed eightyears, and returned to Spain without a licence ;he received notice of his promotion to the bishop-ric of Truxillo in Peru, which honour he declined,and retired to his convent in Granada, where hedied in 1642.

19. Don Fr. Christoval Perez de Lazarraga, ofthe order of San Bernardo, native of Madrid,qualificator of the inquisition ; he took to an eccle-siastical life when quite a child, was collegian ofthe college of Meira, afterwards of those of Sala-manca and Alcala, professor of philosophy, moraland theological, abbot of the college of Nuestra Se-hora ' de Salamanca, a most learned theologist ;elected and consecrated bishop of Chiapa, and be-fore he left the court promoted to the bishopric ofCartagena, of which he took possession in 1640 :he thrice visited his bishopric, and after a grievousillness of 90 days duration, died in 1648.

20. Don Francisco Rodriguez de Zepeda Val-carcel, native of Zamora ; he studied grammar inthe town of Garcia, jurisprudence in Salamanca,was professor of laws in Valladolid, abbot of Ci-fuentes, and canonical doctor of the church ofSiguenza ; elected bishop of Cartagena, of whichhe took possession in 1650 ; and having governedonly 11 months, he died in the following.

21. Don Diego del Castillo y Arteaga, native ofTudela ; he studied in the university of Alcala,was collegian of Malaga, professor of arts, hav-ing substituted this title for that of theology, cano-nical master of the church of Avila; presentedto the bishopric of Cartagena in 1632, which hedeclined.

22. Don Garcia Martinez Cabezas, native of thetown of Don Benito in Estremadura ; he was pub-

lic professor of the institutes, primate of canonsin the university of Maese Rodrigo de Sevilla,w hen he was adopted as provisor by the archbishopof Lima, Don Gonzalo de Ocampo, as he passedthrough that city ; he was doctoral canon of thechurch of Charcas, afterwards school-master, trea-surer, and archdeacon, from whence he went toLima as inquisitor, and was elected bishop of Car-tagena, but died before he took possession of hisoffice, in 1653.

23. Don Antonio Sanz Lozano, native of Cava-nillas, chief collegian iti Alcala, public professorof theology, a man of learning and of acute ge-nius ; being rector of his college, he was presentedby the king to the bishopric ot Cartagena, of whichhe took possession in 1661, governed with greatskill for 20 years, and was promoted to the arch-bishopric of Santa Fe in 1681.

24. Don Antonio dc Benavides and Piedrola,native of the city of Andujar, canon of Badajoz ;elected bishop of Cartagena in 1681 : his govern-ment being very troublesome, and disturbed by acessation of religious rites, occasioned by the cir-cumstance of the nuns of Santa Clara, who wereunder the care of the religious order of St. Fran-cis, having been put under the ordinary jurisdic-tion, he was called to the court, and arrived therein 1691 ; and not being willing to accept of anyother bishopric in Spain, he died in Cadiz.

25. Don Fr. Antonio Maria Casiani, monk ofBasilio, of the university of Alcala; elected in1713.

26. Don Francisco Gomez Calleja, doctoral Ca-non of the church of Zamora; elected in 1718.

27. Don Manuel Antoniode Silva, dean of Lima,named through promotion of the former, who nothaving accepted of the same, there became a dis-pute as to which was rightly entitled to the bishop-ric of Cartagena, when it was declared by thecourt in favour of the former, who governed from1725 till 1736.

28. Don Gregorio de Molleda y Clerque, nativeof Lima, consecrated at Rome with the title ofbishop of Isauria, domestic prelate to his holiness,and made bishop of Cartagena in 1736, afterwardspromoted to the see of Truxillo in 1740.

29. Don Diego Martinez Garrido, of the orderof Santiago, opponent to the professors in the uni-versity of Salamanca; elected in 1740: he diedin 1746.

30. Don Bernardo de Arbiza y Ugarte, nativeof Cuzco, in the university of which he studiedand graduated as doctor of both laws ; he waschief auditor of the royal audience of Panama,

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
328

3:18

CARTAGENA.

when he was promoted to the bishopric of Carta-gena in 1746, of which he took possession in thefollowing year, and governed until 1752, whenhe was promoted to the church of Truxillo.

51. Doii Bartolome Narvaez y Berrio, canon ofthis holy church of Cartagena, and native of thiscountry ; presented to this bishopric in^ 1752, andgoverned here until he died in 1754.

52. The Doctor Jacinto Aguado y Chacon, ca-non penitenciario of the holy church of Cadiz ;elected in 1754, and promoted to the bishopric ofArequipa before he embarked for this of Car-tagena.

33. Don Diego Antonio Valenzuela Faxardo,native of the city of Santa Fe of Bogota; electedin 1754 : he died in 1755.

34. The Doctor Don Manuel de Sosa Betancur,archdeacon of the holy church of Caracas ; electedin 1755 : he died in 1765.

35. Don Diego Peredo, native of the town ofLeon of Mechoacan ; elected in 1765, promotedto the bishopric of Yucatan in 1722.

36. Don Augustin de Alvarado y Castillo ; pro-moted to the bishopric of Santa Fe in 1774.

37. The Doctor t)on Bias Sobrino y Minayo ;elected in 1774, and promoted to the archbishopricof Quito in 1776.

38. Don Fr. Joseph Diaz de la Madrid, a monkof the Order of St. Francis, native of the city ofQuito ; elected in 1 777.

Governors of Cartagena.

1. Don Pedro de Heredia, founder of the city ;and its adelantado or governor, a native of Madrid,and a valorous conqueror, in 1532.

2. The Licentiate Badillo, nominated J uez deResidencia,; he exercised the government duringthe commission in 1536.

3. The, Licentiate Santa Cruz, judge of anothersecond residence, who became adelantado in 1537.

4. The Licentiate Miguel Diez de Armendariz;he entered in 1545, had for judge of his resi-dence the Licentiate Juan de Montano, oidor ofSanta F<5, whom he sent to Spain.

5. Don Pedro de Heredia, who for the secondtime was provisional governor until the year 1556,when he died, being drowned in the fleet whichwas wrecked in the Gordas sands.

6. The Doctor J uan de Maldonado, Jiscal of theaudience of Santa Fe in 1556.

7. Jorge de Quintanilla, provisionally nomi-nated by the audience of Santa Fe.

8. The Brigadier Don Go'izalo Ximinez deQuesada ; nominated by the audience as residen-tiary to the three former, in the same year, 1556.

9. Antonio de Castro ; provisionally nominated.

10. Juan de Bustos Villegas, nominated by theking ; he entered in 1 557, and was promoted tothe presidency of Panama in 1563.

11. Anton Davalos de Luna, a field-officer ; heentered in 1563, and governed till 1567, whenhe died.

12. Don Lope de Orozco, as provisional gover-nor in the same year.

13. Francisco Bahamonde y Lugo ; he enteredin 1572, and died in 1573.

14. Hernan Suarez de Villalobos, nominatedprovisonally by the audience of Santa Fe in 1574.

15. Pedro Fernandez del Busto, who entered inthe above year, and was promoted to the govern-ment of Popayan in 1577.

16. Don Pedro de Lodena, in 1593.

17. Don Pedro de Acuna, knight of the orderof San Juan, field-officer, in 1601 ; he had the titleof president of the Philippines, and died the sameyear.

18. Don Geronimo Suazo Casasola, of the habitof Santiago ; he died in 1605.

19. Don Francisco Sarmientode Sotomayor, no-minated in the interim, in 1606.

20. Don Diego Fernandez de Valazco, in 1608.

21. Don Diego de Acuna, in 1614.

22. Don Garcia Giron de Loaysa, who governeduntil 1620.

23. Don Diego de Escobar, knight of the orderof Santiago, who died whilst exercising the govern-ment.

24. Don Francisco de Berrio, nominated in thein the interim, in 1628.

25. Don Francisco de Murga, knight of the or-der of Santiago, a field-officer, and celebratedengineer ; appointed to fortify the Plaza, beingat the time governor of Marmora in Africa : h«died in 1634.

26. Don Nicolas de Larraspuru, nominated inthe interim, in 1636.

27. Don Gonzalo de Herrera, Marquis of Vil-lalta, nominated in the interim, in 1637, on accountof the former not having accepted the office.

28. Don Vincente de los Reyes Villalobos, pro-visional governor in the same year, 1637, being thegovernor of Moxos.

29. Don Melchor de Aguilera, a field-officer;he entered in 1638, was suspended and called toaccount by Don Bernardino de Prado, oidor ofSanta Fe.

30. Don Ortuno de Aldape ; being governor ofMuzo, he was nominated in the interim, in 1641.

31. Don Luis Fernandez de Cordova, of the or-

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
329

der of Santiago, a commander of tlie galleons; hewas deposed and sent to Spain for having marriedwithout a licence; and in his place the audience ofSanta Fe nominated as provisional governor,

32. Don Francisco Rexe Corbalan, until arrivedthe right owner in,

33. Don Clemente Soriano, colonel of militia,in 1616 ; he died in the following year.

34. Don Pedro Zapata, colonel of militia, of theorder of Santiago ; nominated as governor jyrotempore in 1648.

35. Don Fernando de la Riva Agiicro, of theorder of Santiago, a field-officer, being governorof Puertorico ; he entered Cartagena in 1649, andwas promoted to the presidency of Panama in1634.

36. Don Pedro Zapata, twice nominated as pro-prietor in the aforesaid year ; but dying, his placewas filled pro tempore by,

37. Don Francisco Rexe Corbalan.

38. Don Juan Perez de Guzman, of the habitof Santiago, a field-officer, and governor of An-tioquia ; nominated provisionally, and afterwardsappointed to the government of Puertorico.

39. Don Diego de Portugal, colonel of militia,knight of the order of Alcantara; nominated in1659, through the circumstance of Don FernandoAgiiero being appointed governor of Cartagena inCadiz.

40. The Licentiate Don Manuel Martin de Pa-lomeque, nominated by the king ; he afterwardsbecame oidor of St. Domingo.

41 . Don Juan Perez de Guzman, the second timenominated as proprietor; he entered in 1661, andwas removed to the presidency of Panama in 1664.

42. Don Benito de Figueroa Barrantes, of thehabit of Alcantara, a field-officer ; he went as go-vernor of Larache in Africa in 1665, and fromthence to be president of Panama.

43. Don Joseph Sanchez Xiraenez, who wasgovernor of the island of Santa Catalina, nomi-nated to this government, which he did not exer-cise, having been found poniarded and killed inhis bed.

44. Don Antonio de Vergara Azearate, knightof the order of Santiago, nominated previouslyin 1668.

45. Don Pedro de Ulloa Ribadeneyra, of theonler of Santiago ; nominated in 1669.

46. Don Joseph Daza, general of the artillery.

47. Don Rafael Caspir y Sanz, colonel of mi-litia, native of Tortosa, nominated in 1678 ; inwhose time happened those weighty disputes withthe bishop Don Antonio de Benavides; he wassucceeded by,

48. Don Juan de Pando y Estrada, a field-of-ficer ; w ho took possession in 1684.

49. Don Martin de Ceballos y la Cerda, in 1686.

50. Don Diego de los Rios, a field-officer ; inhis time happened the sacking and taking of Car-tagena by the French, in 1695.

51. Don Juan Diaz Pimienta, knight of theorder of Caltrava, a field-officer, gentleman of thecluamberto the Emperor Leopold, of the house ofthe Marquises of Villareal, noted for his valourand military conduct in the siege of Buda, wherehe was wounded ; nominated as governor to con-sole the afflicted natives of Cartagena, taking withhim a certain number of Spansih troops from thekingdom of Galicia ; he entered in 1696, diedin 1706.

52. Don Joseph de Zuniga y la Cerda, of noless credit than the former ; he was governor ofFlorida at the time that he w'as elected to this, in1712, and which he exercised until 1718, whenhe returned to Spain in the unlucky fleet of Anto-nio Ubilla, which was lost in the channel of Baha-ma, the frigate in which he sailed being the onlyvessel saved.

53. Don Alberto de Bertodano, a renowned bri-gadier in Flanders, where he had lost an arm inaction ; he was nominated in 1720, and exercisedthe government until his death, in 1722.

54. Don Luis de Aponte, colonel of the regi-ment of the crown, afterwards brigadier, an officerof the greatest skill and renown of any in thearray ; he was nominated in 1723, and exercisedthe government until his death.

55. Don Juan Joseph de Andia, Marquis ofVillaherraosa, brigadier-general; nominated throughthe death of the general ; he entered Cartagena in1712, and governed till 1730, when he was pro-moted to the presidency of Panama.

56. Don Antonio de Salas, who had becui colo-nel of the regiment of infantry of Saboya ; he e.u-tered in 173i, and died in 1735.

57. Don Pedro Fidalgo, brigadier and captainof the royal Spanish guards ; promoted to this go-vernment in 1736 : he died in 1739.

58. Don Melchor de Navarrete, who was king^slieutenant ; he entered as provisional governorthrough the death of the proprietor : in his timethe town was besieged by the English until the ar-rival of the right owner,

59. Don Basilio de Gante ; who had risen <o therank of brigadier, at that time king’s lieutenantof the fortified town of Ceuta, when he was pro-moted to the government of this, in 1742 : he ex-ercised it till 1739, when he returned to Spain.

60. Don Ignacio de Sala, lieutenant-general, ua-

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
331

CAR

CAR

331

in beautiful singing birds ; and in its rivers aremany sorts of fish of a fine flavour, particularly thepatah. It is not without mines of gold, and laba~deros or washing places, but these are not worked,save by a few day-labourers. In the church of themonks of San Francisco is venerated an image of themost Holy Mary, with the title of La Probezuypainted on a piece of cotton-stuff, adorned with twofine pieces of silver, the natives payitig great de-votion to this superb work, from the wonderfulthings that have been said to have been effectedthrough the prayers offered up to her of whom thisis the semblance. This city has been the nativeplace of,

Don Melchor de Salazar, governor of Choco,and founder of the city Toro.

Of the Doctor Don Francisco Martinez Bueno,presbyter and visitor of the bishopric of Popayan ;a man of great literature.

Of the Doctor Don Manuel de Castro y Rada ; amost exemplary curate.

Of the Father Joseph Vicuna, who, after havingbeen a celebrated Jesuit, became a monk in thecollege of missions for propagating the faith in Po-payan, and died whilst preaching to the AndaquiesIndians.

Of the Father Estevan de Rivas, who, after hav-ing filled the title of jurist with great credit, be-came a Franciscan monk, and died an exemplarypenitent in his convent at Cartagena.

Of the Doctor Don Francisco Felipe del Campo,professor de prima of canons in the university ofSanta Fe ; a celebrated orator.

Of the Doctor Don Geronirao de Rivas, trea-surer and dignitary of the holy church of Popayan,provisor and ecclesiastical governor of that bishop-ric.

Of the Doctor Don Joseph de Renteria, assessorof the viceroyalties of Santa Fe and Lima, honoraryoidor of the audience of Charcas : all of whomhave borne testimony to the clearness and acutenessof their understandings and excellence of their dis-positions. But for all the information on thesesubjects, we have to thank Don Manuel del Cara-po, the son of the last mentioned, who resides inthis court, and to whom the merits thus severallyapplied, unitedly belong.

The arms of this city are three imperial crownswith a sun, and its inhabitants amount to about 5000or 6000 : 25 leagues n. e. of Popayan, in 4° 46'n. lat.

Cartago, another capital city, of the provinceof Costa Rica, in the kingdom of Guatemala,situate 10 leagues from the coast of the N. sea, and17 from that of the S. in each of which it has agood port ; it was formerly rich and flourishing, onaccount of its commerce w ith Panama, Cartagena,Portobclo, and the Havanah ; but it is at the presentday reduced to a miserable village of very few in-habitants, and without any commerce. It has, be-sides the parish church, a convent of monks of St.Francis, and is in 9° 42' s. lat.

Cartago, a river of the same province and go-vernment as is the former city : it runs w. and en-ters the S.sea, in the port of La Herradura.

Cartago, a bay in the province and govern-ment of Honduras, inhabited by the infidel Mos-quitos Indians.

CARTAMA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Antioquia: it rises in the mountains ofChoco, traverses the valley to which it gives itsname, and running e. enters the Cauca.

CARTEL, a port of the coast of the provinceand government of Florida, opposite the castle ofSt. Augustin.

(CARTER, a new county in the state of Tennes-see, formed of a part of the county of Washing-ton.)

(CARTERET, a maritime county of New Beradistrict, N. Carolina, on Core and Pamlico sounds.It contains 3732 inhabitants, including 713 slaves.Beaufort is the chief town.)

Carteret, a district and jurisdiction of S. Caro-lina, on the sea-coast.

Carteret, a cape or extremity of the coast ofthe same province, and one of those which formLong bay. See Roman.

(CARTERSVILLE, a town in Powhatancounty, Virginia, on the s. side of James rivtr, 4fmiles above Richmond.)

CARUALLEDA, Nuestra Senora de, acity of the province and government of Venezuela,in the kingdom of Tierra Firme ; founded byFrancis Faxardo in 1568, and not in 1560, as ac-cording to Coleti : it has a small but insecure port.The town is also a miserable place, having sufferedmuch injury, a short time after its foundation, bythe violent disturbances caused in its neighbour-hood by the Governor Don Luis de Roxas : 80leagues e. of Coro.

CARUALLO, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Paraiba in Brazil, situate near thesea-coast, and on the shore of the river Camara-tuba.

CARUGAMPU, a small river of the provinceand government of Paraguay ; it runs and en-ters the Parana between the rivers Capuy andParanay.

CARUJAL, PUNTA DE, a point on the coast ofthe province and government of Cartagena, called

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
338

338

CAT

CAT

vince and government, on the shore of the riverMasparro, between the cities of New and Old Ba-rinas.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of Venezuela, on theshore of the river Mosquitos, near where this riverenters the Orituco.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of Cartagena, in thekingdom of Tierra Firme.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of La Sonora in NuevaEspana ; situate in the country of the SobaipurisIndians, on the shore of a river which enters theGila, between the settlements of San Cosme andSan Angelo.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of Tucumán, in thejurisdiction of the city of Xuxuy, with four cha-pels of ease.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and alcaldia mayor of Los Zoques in thekingdom of Guatemala.

Catalina, Santa, another, of the provinceand alcaldia mayor of Chiapa in the same king-dom.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theisland of Barbadoes, in the parish and district of S.George.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theisland of Jamaica, which is a parish of the Eng-lish, situate in the s. part.

Catalina, Santa, some sierras or mountainsof the coast of Brazil, in the province and captain-ship of Rey, opposite the island of Santa Catalina,from which they take their name.

Catalina, Santa, a cape or point of land onthe coast of the province and government of Cos-tarica and kingdom of Guatemala, between theport of Las Velas and the town of Nicaragua.

Catalina, Santa, a small island close to thes. coast of the island of St. Domingo, between LaSaona and the bay of Caballo.

Catalina, Santa, another island of the coastof Florida to the n. of Georgia.

Catalina, Santa, another island of the coastof Georgia, between the islands Sapola and As-sabaw.

Catalina, Santa, a bay on the coast of thestraits of Magellan, between point St. Silvestre andpoint St. Antonio de Padua.

Catalina, Santa, a bay of the e. coast of theisland of Newfoundland, between the Saint’s capeand New cape.

Catalina, Santa, a river of the province andcolony of Maryland, in the county of Talbot. Itruns j. and enters the sea in the bay of Chesapeak.

Catalina, Santa, an island of the N. sea,near the coast of Tierra Firme, opposite the Escu-do de Veraguas. It is of a good temperature, fer-tile, and abounding in cattle and fruits. It had init a settlement defended by two castles, called San-tiago and Santa Teresa; which, together with thetown, were destroyed by an English pirate, JohnMorgan, who took the island in 1665 ; and al-though it was recovered in the same year by thepresident of Panama and Colonel Don J uan Perezde Guzman, it remained abandoned and desert.

Catalina, Santa, another small island nearthe coast of Brazil. See St. Catherine.

Catalina, Santa, a small island, situate tothe s. of St. Domingo, and close to it in the frontof the settlement of Higuey.

Catalina, Santa, a valley, in which there isalso a small settlement, in the Nuevo Reyno deLeon ; annexed to the curacy of its capital, fromwhence it lies three leagues to the w. It contains20 families in its neighbourhood, and producesonly some sorts of pulse and some goats.

Catalina, Santa, another valley of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Moquehua in Peru,bounded by a river and by the cordillera.

Catalina, Santa, a bay on the coast ofNova Scotia, between the port Carnero and thatof Ours or Oso.

CATAMAIU, a large and rapid river of theprovince and government of Loxa in the kingdomof Quito, also called Chira, at the part where itenters the sea. It rises in the paramo or desertmountain of Sabanilla ; and collecting the watersof several smaller rivers, runs from s. to n.until it unites itself with tlie Gonzanama, whichenters it on the s. side, in lat. S° 47' s. ; it thenturns its course to the xo. and afterwards to the5 . w. and receives the tributary streams of therivers Quiros, Macara, and Pelingara ; all ofwhich enter it on the s. side. Being swelled withthese, it takes the name of Amotape, from the settle-ment of this name, situate on its shore. Near itsmouth this river is called Colan, and it empties it-self into the sea in the corregimiento and provinceofPiura. The countries which it laves are fertileand beautiful, and its banks are covered with or-chards and plantations of sugar-canes of the terri-tory of Loxa. The climate here is very hot, andin the valleys formed by this river the inhabitantsare much afflicted with the tertian fever ; its wa-ters are generally very cold and unwliolesonic.

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
355

C H A

CHACOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tarma in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Huariaca.

CHACOTA,a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Aricá in Peru ; situate close to theQuebada de Victor.

CHACRALLA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Lucanas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Abucara.

CHACRAPAMPA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Andahuailas in Peru ; annex-ed to the curacy of Huayama.

CHACTAHATCHE, a river of S. Carolina,which runs s. and enters the Chicachas.

CHACTAW, a settlement and capital of theIndian district of this name in Louisiana, in whichthe French had a fort and establishment. (TheChactaws, or Flat-heads, are a powerful, hardy,subtle, and intrepid race of Indians, "vpho inhabita very fine and extensive tract of hilly country,with large and fertile plains intervening, betweenthe Alabama and Mississippi rivers, and in the w.part of the state of Georgia. This natioti had,not many years ago, 43 towns and villages, inthree divisions, containing 12,123 souls, of which4041 were fighting men. They are called by thetraders Flat-heads, all the males having the foreand hind part of their skulls artificially flattenedwhen young. These men, unlike the Muscogul-ges, are slovenly and negligent in every part oftheir dress, but otherwise are said to be ingenious,sensible, and virtuous men, bold and intrepid, yetquiet and peaceable. Some late travellers, how-ever, have observed that they pay little attentionto the most necessary rules of moral conduct, atleast that unnatural crimes were too frequent amongthem. Dift'erent from most of the Indian nationsbordering on the United States, they have largeplantations or country farms, where they employmuch of their time in agricultural improvements,after the manner of the Avhite people. Althoughtheir territories are not one-fburth so large as thoseof the Muscogulge confedraey, the number of in-habitants is greater. The Chactaws and Creeksare inveterate enemies* to each other. There area considerable number of these Indians on the w.side of the Mississippi, who have not been homefor several years. A bout 12 miles above the postat Oachcta on that river, there is a small villageof them of about 30 men, who have lived there forseveral years, and made corn ; and likewise onBayau Chico, in the n. part of the district ofAppalousa, there is another village of them ofabout fifty men, who have been there for aboutnine years, and say they have the governor of

Louisiana’s permission to settle there. Besidesthese, there are rambling hunting parties of themto be met with all over Lower Louisiana. Theyare at war with the Caddoques, and liked by. neither red nor white people.)

(Chactaw Hills, in the n. w. corner of Georgiariver.)

(CHACTOOS, Indians of N. America, wholive on Bayau Boeuf, about 10 miles to the s. ofBayau Rapide, on Red river, towards Appalousa ;a small, honest people ; are aborigines of thecountry where they live; of men about 30 ; di-minishing; have their own peculiar tongue;speak Mobilian. The lands they claim on BayauBceuf are inferior to no part of Louisiana in depthand richness of soil, growth of timber, pleasant-ness of surface, and goodness of water.. TheBayau Bceuf falls into the Chaffeli, and dischargesthrough Appalousa and Attakapa into Vermilionbay.)

CHACURIES, a settlement of the jurisdictionof the city of Pedraga, in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, is of the missions which were held thereof the order of St. Domingo. It is but small, andits climate is hot.

(CHADBOURNE’S River, district of Maine,called by some Great Works river, about 30 milesfrom the mouth of the Bonnebeag pond, fromwhich it flows. It is said to have taken its lattername from a mill with 18 saws, moved by onewheel, erected by one Lodors. But the projectwas soon laid aside. The former name is derivedfrom Mr. Chadbourne, one of the first settlers,,who purchased the land on the mouth of it, of thenatives, and whose posterity possess it at this day.)

CHAGONAMIGON, a point on the s. coastof lake Superior, in New France.

CHAGRE, a large and navigable river of theprovince and government of Panamá in the king-dom of Tierra Firme, has its origin and sourcein the mountains near the valley of Pacora, andtakes its course in various directions, makingmany windings, which are called randa/es, until itenters the N. sea. It is navigated by large vesselscalled chatas, (having no keels), up as far as thesettlement of Cruces, where is the wharf for un-lading, and the royal custom-houses ; the greaterpart of the commerce being conducted by thismeans, to avoid the obstacles occurring from a badand rocky road from Portobeloto Panama. It hasdifferent forts for the defence of its entrance ; thefirst is the castle of its name, at the entrance ormouth ; the second is that of Gatun, situate upona long strip of land formed by a river of this name ;and the third is that of Trinidad, situate in a simb

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
356

C H A

lar way by a river of its name. It abounds inlarge alligators and mosquitoes, which render itsnavigation very troublesome. Its shores are co-vered with beautiful trees, which are inhabited bya variety of birds and apes of several species, whichmake an incredible chattering and noise. It wasby this river that the pirate John Morgan camewhen he took and sacked Panama in 1670. Itwas discovered by Hernando de la Serma in 1527,when he called it the river of Lagartos, but itsmouth was before discovered by Lope de Olanoin 1510. Here are found, at certain seasons, avery small fish of the size of a pin, called titles,and these are so abundant, that putting into thewater a large basket, it is certain to be drawn outfull ; they are fried, and make very savouryfritters.

CHAGRE, with the dedicatory title of San Lo-renzo, a settlement of the same province and king-dom ; situate upon the top of a mountain at theentrance or mouth of the former river. It has forits defence a strong castle, which was built by theorder of Philip 11. by the famous engineer J uanBautista Antoneli. This was taken by the pirateJohn Morgan, after having made a glorious de-fence, in 1668, when the settlement was burnt andsacked ; and in 1740 it was taken by the English,commanded by Admiral Vernon, who entirelydestroyed it ; its loss in that war being supplied bytwo strong batteries, which hindered the Englishfrom making a breach, for the third time, whenthey came with three frigates of war : but theywere driven back by Captain Don Juan de Her-mida, who was formerly captain of the regimentof Granada. In 1752 this castle was rebuilt, in themost perfect manner, by the lieutenant-generaland engineer Don Ignatio de Sala, governor ofCartagena, who came hither for this purpose byorder of the king. In this fortress several per-sonages of distinction' have been held prisoners,ami amongst others the Marquis of La Mina,])resiilent, governor, and captain-general of thekingiUmi in 1694. Is 13 leagues from Porto-belo.

CHAGUANES, an island of the river Orinoco,formed at its entrance into the sea by variouscanals or arms, is large and inhabited by Indiansof the Mariussa nation.

CHAGUARAMA, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela, situate on the con-fines of the province of Cumana, near the riverManapire.

CHAGUARAMA, a bay on the coast of the pro-vince of Cumaná, on the n. e. side ; being formedby the island of Trinidad, and by the mouths of

the channels of the Orinoco as far as the gulfTriste.

CHAGUAREM, a small river of the provinceand government of Venezuela, which runs s. andenters that of Los Aceytes.

CHAHUALTEPEQUE, Santiago de, a set-tlement of the district and alcaldía mayor of Mex-ilcaltzingo in Nueva España. It contains 138families of Indians, and is three leagues from itscapital.

CHAHUANTLA, a small settlement or wardof the alcaldía mayor of Guauchinango in NuevaEspaña ; annexed to the curacy of Naupan.

CHAIALA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Chayanta or Charcas in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Pocoata.

CHAILLON, Cabo de, a cape on the e. coastof lake Superior, in New France.

CHAINAR, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Tucumán ; situate on the shore ofthe river San Miguel.

CHAIPI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Parinacochas in Peru, annexed tothe curacy of the corregimiento of Pullo ; in whichwas venerated, ever since the time of the conquest,a beautiful image of the Virgen del Rosario, which,with the temple, was burnt a few years since, andthe parishioners being much afflicted at their loss,the Marquis of Selva Alegre, president of Quito,sent them another equal to the first : at the cele-bration of the festival people assemble from all theneighbouring districts.

CHAIUIN, a river of the province and govern-ment of Valdivia in the kingdom of Chile, whichruns s. e. and enters Valdivia near its entrance intothe sea.

CHALA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Cumaná in Peru.

Chala, with the distinction of Alta, anothersettlement of the province and corregimiento ofSaña in the same kingdom , situate on the shore ofthe river Chicama.

CHALA, another, with the addition of Baxa,in the same kingdom and province; situate nearthe former.

CHALA, a large and beautiful valley on the seashore, in the province and corregimiento of Cu-maná.

CHALA, a small port, frequented only by fisher-men, in the same province and corregimiento.

CHALACOS, a settlement and asiento of thesilver mines of the province and corregimiento ofPiura in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Huan-cabamba.

==CHALALA, a large river of the Nuevo Reyno

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
359

C H A

C H A

359

(country of the Iroquees Indians. It is handsomeand well built, on the margin of the river of thesame name, about 12 or 15 miles s. w. from Mont-real, and n. of St. John’s fort. It was taken bythe Americans, Oct. 20, 1775, and retaken by theBritish, Jan. 18, 1776. Lat. 45° 26' w.)

CHAMBO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Riobamba in the kingdom ofQuito.

Chambo, a very large river, which rises nearthe former settlement, and runs with such rapiditythat it cannot be forded ; is consequently passedover by means of various bridges made of osiers.

CHAME, a settlement of the alcaldia mayorof Natá in the province and kingdom of TierraFirme ; situate near a river, and two leagues fromthe coast of the S. sea. It produces maize, plan-tains, and other fruits ; swine, fowl, turkeys, andother birds, with which it supplies, by means ofcanoes, the markets of the city of Panama, fromwhence it is nine leagues distant.

CHAMELUCON, or Chamaleton, a river ofthe province and government of Honduras. Itruns n. and enters the sea in the gulf of this name,between La Caldera and the river Ulua.

CHAMETLA, a settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Guajuaha in Nueva España. It con-tains ISO families of Indians.

CHAMETLAN, a province and alcaldia mayorof Nueva España, also called Del Rosario ; bound-ed n. by the province of Culiacan, s. by that of Xa-lisco or Sentipac, e. and n. e. by that of Zacate-cas and Nueva Galicia, and w. by the S. sea ; is30 leagues long from e. to w. and 25 wide n. s. ;is of, a very hot temperature, and the greater partof it is a mountainous and rugged country, abound-ing in. noxious animals and insects, and on thisaccount uninhabitable in the summer and in therainy season. It was conquered by Don Juan deIbarra in 1554, has many mines of silver and gold,which were formerly worked, but which at presentare all abandoned, as well from their having filledwith water, as from the scantiness of the means ofthe inhabitants to work them. The royal mines,however, are productive of some emolument, andare in fafct the support of the place. It producessome maize, and much tobacco , and cotton, towhich article the soil is exactly suited, though notso to wheat, which yields here but sparingly. Onthe banks of the lakes formed by the sea, is left athick incrustation of salt in the month of April ;and although the inhabitants spare no pains to col-lect this valuable commodity, yet abundance of itis lost from the Avant of hands to collect it ere theheats come on, when it very quickly disappears.

Some large cattle are bred here. It is very badlypeopled, or, to speak more truly, it is as it weredesert, having only three settlements and someestates. It is irrigated by a river which flowsdown from the sierra Madre, and passes throughthe capital, the waters of which are made usefulfor the working of the mines. The same river entersthe sea two leagues from the settlement of Chamet-lan, and has abundance of fish, which are caughtwith ease, as well upon its shores as in marsheswhich it forms. Tlie capital, which is the resi-dence of the alcalde mayor, is the real del Ro-sario.

Chametlan, a settlement of the former alcaldíamayor ; from thence taking its name. It containsonly five or six Indians, and some Spaniards, Mus-tees, and Mulattoes, who, the greater part of theyear, live in the estates which they have for thebreeding of large cattle, and on the farms for thecultivation of maize and cotton.

CHAMESA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; annexed to the curacy of Nopsa. Itis of a cold temperature, and produces the fruitscorresponding to such a climate, particularlywheat, which is of the best quality. It contains100 Avhite inhabitants, and as many Indians, andis a little more than eight leagues from its ca-pital.

CHAMI, San Juan de, a settlement of theprovince and government of Chocó ; situate in thedistrict of Thatama, near the ruins of the city ofSan Juan de Rodas, to the w. of the city of San-tiago de Arma.

CHAMIANOS, a settlement of the provinceand government of Mainas in the kingdom ofQuito; situate on the shore of the river Gual-laga.

CHAMICUROS, S. Francisco Xavier de,a settlement of the missions which were held by theregulars of the company of Jesuits, in the provinceand government of Mainas, of the kingdom ofQuito ; founded in 1670 by the Father LorenzoLucero. '

CHAMILPA, San Lorenzo de, a settlementof the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Cuer-navaca in Nueva España.

CHAMPANCHIN, Sierra de, a chain ofmountains in the province and government of Tu-cumán, running s, s.e. on the shore of the riverQuarto.

(CHAMPLAIN,a township, the most n. in Clin-ton county, New York, which takes its name fromthe lake on which it lies. It was granted to someCanadian and Nova Scotia refugees, who were

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
361

C H A

the natives make friezes. The low part, lookingupon the coast, enjoys a temperature equal inmildness to that of Lima. It is very fertile, andin the many estates which are in it maize grows ingreat quantities, and it, besides serving as food forthe labourers, and independent of that which is de-voured by the wild pigeons with which those fieldsare filled, serves to fatten numbers of pigs, which arecarried to supply the markets of Lima ; those ani-mals, one year with another, amounting to 22,000head, and producing an emolument of 300,000dollars to the proprietors of the estates. Here arealso some estates of sugar-cane, and others ofFrench beans and wheat, of which the crops wereformerly very great, and used, together with thevines, to be reckoned amongst the chief produc-tions of this country, though they have now maderoom for a more general cultivation of maize.What conduces much to render the soil fertile, iswhat the Indians call huano^ and which, in theirlanguage, signifies dung, this being brought fromsome small islands at a little distance from thecoast towards the n. It is thought to be the excre-ment of some birds called huanaes^ who have beenaccustomed to deposit it in the above places fromtime immemorial. Some of it has also been foundin various other islands of the coast of Canete,Arica, and others. Of this it is certain, that ahandful being put at the root of a plant of maize,it becomes so invigorated as to produce upwardsof 200 for one, and that not less than 90,000bushels of this valuable manure is used yearly.In the centre of the province, and upon the coast,are some fine salines^ which supply some of theneighbouring districts ; and amongst the rest, thoseof Canta, Tarma, Caxatambo, Huamalies, Hua-nuco, Conchuco, and Huailas, are the most noted.The salt is not only used in the workingof the me-tals, but for preserving the cattle from a venomousinsect called alicuya^ which preys upon their entrailsuntil it destroys them. The population consists of37 settlements ; the capital of which is the town ofArnedo or Chancay. Its repartimiento amountedto 122,000 dollars, and its alcavala to 976 dol-lars per annum.

Arnedo or Chancay,

S. Juan de Huaral,

Huaura,

Mazo,

Vegueta,

Iluacho,

Barraste,

Auccayama,

Sayan,

Tapaya,

Cauchaz or Maráz,

Yurayaco,

Picoy,

Parquin,

Yucul,

Canin,

Mollobamba,

Panun,

Turpay,

Tongos,

Chiuchiu,

Auquimarca,

Paccho,

Yguari,

Ayaranga,

Yancay,

Huacar,

Otequet,

Muca,

Huachinga,

Yacsanga,

Yunqui,

Apache,

Santa Cruz,

Acotama,

Huaycho.

Huanangui,

Chancay, the capital of the above province,founded in a beautiful and very healthy valley, ata league and a half’s distance from the river Pasa-mayo, by order of the viceroy Count of Nieva, in1563 ; who destined it for the honour of being anuniversity, at which however it never attained. Ithas a tolerable port, frequented by trading vessels,a convent of monks of the order of St. Francis, anda good hospital. It is well peopled, and its inha-bitants consist of several noble and rich families.One league from the sea, and 15 from Lima. Lat.11° 30' 5.

(CHANCEFORD, a township in York county,Pennsylvania.)

CHANCHAMAIU, a settlement of the provinceand government of Tarma in Peru, with a fort uponthe river Tapo, in the part washed by this river,called El Balseadero de Chanchamaiu. TheChunchos Indians of this province took possessionof it in 1742, and abandoned it in 1743.

Chanchamaiu, a river of the province of Caxa-marquilla. It rises in the province of Tarraa, tothe n. of the capital, runs n. and enters the largeriver Perene, in the country of the Campas In-dians.

CHANCO, CAPILLA DE, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Itata in tbe king-dom of Chile ; situate near the coast.

CHANDUI, a settlement of the district of SantaElena in the province and government of Guaya-quil ; situate on the sea-shore, with a port whichis frequented by vessels only in stress ; it havingsome extensive shoals which lie just at its entrance.Here it was that the admiral’s ship of the Armadadel Sur foundered and was wrecked in 1654, as itwas dropping down to Panama, for the purpose ofdispatching the galleons under the charge of theMarquis de Villarubia ; although, through the op-portune assistance of the viceroy of Peru, Countde Salvatierra, and of tlm president of Quito, DonPedro Vazquez de Veljixco, the greater part of theproperty on board was saved. Likewise, in 1721.another ship was lost here, carrying the salaries tothe Plaza of Panama, without a single thing onboard being saved ; until, in 1728, a furious windfrom the s. w. blew ashore several fragments of the

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
362

362

C H A

C H A

wreck, and amongst these many valuables of goldand silver, which had grown quite discoloured, tothe amount of 40,000 dollars. Lat. 2°2l' s.

CHANEL, some islands near the coast of thecountry of Labrador, in the gulf of St. Lawrence.They are numerous and very small, one of thembeing very long and narrow ; forming a channelwith the coast, and giving its name to the rest.

CHANESES, a barbarous nation of Indians, ofthe province and government of Paraguay ; dwell-ing to the n. of the Rio de la Plata, and boundedby the Xarayes and Xacoces. They have theirhouses near the lakes, and maintain themselves byfishing.

CHANGAME, some small islands of the S. sea,and of the bay of Panamá, in the province and go-vernment of Tierra Firme. They are two in num-ber, being situate near the coast, and having be-tween them a shallow or quicksand, by which theyare communicated. They abound in a species ofbirds, from which they take their name.

CHANGO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tarma in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Chacayan.

CHANQUI, or Achanqui, a promontory orcape of the province and corregimiento of Valdiviain the kingdom of Chile ; being eight leagues tothe s. of San Marcelo. It forms and covers themouth or entrance of the gulf of Los Coronados,with the other cape, which is to thes. called De laBallena.

CHANTACO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Loxa in the kingdom of Quito,to the w. of Chuquri-bamba, and to the s. of SanPedro, consists entirely of Indians, and lies uponthe bank of a small river, being of an excellentclimate.

CHANTALI, a settlement of the province andgovernment of aen de Bracamoros in the king-dom of Quito ; situate on the shore of the river ofits name.

CHANUSSI, a river of the country of Las Ama-zonas, which runs from c. to w. through the woodslying towards the w. and enters the Guallaga onits ^ sido

CHANXEWATER, an English settlement inthe province and colony of New York ; situatenear the e. arm of the river Delaware.

CHAO, Farallones de, two small islands ofthe S. sea, near the coast of the province and cor-regimiento of Truxillo in Peru.

Chao, Morro de, a mountain of the coast ofthe same corregimiento.

CHAPA, Puerto de, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucumán, in the juris-

diction of the city of Cordoba ; situate near therivers Segundo and Tercero, at the foot of theMontana Nevada, or Snowy mountain.

CHAPACOTO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chimbo in the kingdom ofQuito ; situate at the skirt of the Gran Cuesta, ormountain of San Antonio. Through it passes asmall river, which runs down from this mountain,and empties itself in the river of Chimbo ; is of avery cold temperature, and lies in the middle of awood. Lat. l°40's.

CHAPADA, Sierra, mountains of the king-dom of Brazil, in the province and captainshipof Todos Santos. They run from e. to w. untilthey reach nearly as far as the coast.

CHAPALA, a settlement of the head settlementof the district and alcaldia mayor of Caxititlan inNueva Espana ; situate on the shore of the greatlake or sea of this name ; has a good convent ofthe monks of St. Francis, and in its valley, whichis very fertile, there is an abundance of all kinds ofseed, as wheat, maize, French beans, and many de-licious fruits.

Chapala, another settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Zaiula in the same kingdom ; situate ina plain of a mild temperature. It contains 42 fa-milies of Indians, who trade in seeds and otherfruits, since its district abounds in garden grounds.It has a convent of the religious of St. Francis ;lies 22 leagues between the e. and n. of its capital.

Chapala, a great lake of the kingdom ofNueva Galicia, called Mar de Chapala, on ac-count of its size, is navigated by many vessels,and is extremely well stocked with fish ; fromwhich the inhabitants of the immediate settlementsderive their source of commerce.

CHAPAMARCA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Loxa, in the kingdom ofQuito; situate to the s. of the capital.

CHAPANCHICA. See Madrigal.

CHAPARE, or Parati, a river of the provinceand government of Santa Cruz de la Sierra. Itrises in the serrania of the Altos or Lofts of Inti-nuyo, from two small rivers which unite ; runs inan inclined course to the e. and enters the Mar-more Grande, forming a good port.

CHAPARIPARI, a river of the province andgovernment of Cumaná, runs e. and enters thesea in the gulf of Triste.

CHAPARRA, Valle de, a valley of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Cumaná in Peru ; inthe vicinity of which is a mine abounding in ametal called chumillo.

CHAPARRAL, a small settlement of the cor-regimiento of Coyaima in the Nuevo Reyno de

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
365

C II A R C A S.

365

at that critical moment received fresh succours,that were sent from Cuzco by his brother the Mar-quis Don Francisco Pizarro, he would have fallena sacrifice, with the whole of the Spanish army, tothat undertaking : but being invigorated by thisassistance, he succeeded in routing the Indians,and in obliging them to surrender to the Spanishgovernment. In 1539 the Marquis Don Fran-cisco Pizarro, seeing the importance of making anestablishment here, resolved upon building of atown, giving a commission to Captain Pedro Au-zures to execute the same. This person actuallyput into effect the plan suggested, founding thetown in exactly the same spot in which formerlystood the settlement of Chuquisaca. Here manyof its conquerors settled and became citizens, andthey gave it the name of La Plata, or Silver, fromsome mines of this metal which are found in themountain of Porco, which lies at a small distancefrom this city, and from which the Inca Emperorswere accustomed to extract immense emolument.Notwithstanding this name it has never lost itsoriginal title, Chuquisaca, although indeed it isbadly pronounced by the Spaniards ; since the In-dians, and with great propriety, will have it Cho-quezaca, Choquechaca, or Choquisacha; all ofwhich, however pronounced, signify, the first,moun-tains of gold ; the second, cunchos of gold, orfields of brambles with yellow twigs ; and the third,bridges of gold. Although this province is exten-sive, it is composed of various others, which weshall notice under their proper heads. This keepsits present name, from being the one of all theothers the most abounding in minerals, seeds, andcattle ; as well as being the one best peopled withIndians. It is watered by many large rivers ; andthe whole of it composes an archbishopric, towhich arc suffragan the bishoprics of La Paz,Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Tucuman, Paraguay,and Buenos Ayres. It belongs to the viceroyaltyof this latter place since the time that this waserected, and that the government was entrusted tothe royal audience established in 1559. The afore-said district comprehends in its jurisdiction allthe following provinces and corregimientos :Tomino, Cochabamba,

Porco, Chayanta,

Tarija, Paria,

Lipes, Carangas,

Amparaez, Cicasica,

Oruro, Atacama ;

Pilaya,

In which are contained 188 settlements and cura-cies, in which there were in 1651 about 100,000Indians. The capital of the whole jurisdiction is

the aforesaid city of Chuquisaca or La Plata. —[Charcas joined the new government of BuenosAyres in 1810. See La Plata,]

Those who have been Presidents in the RoyalAudience of Charcas.

1. The Licentiate Pedro Ramirez de Quinones,first president, in 1559.

2. The Licentiate Juan de Matienzo, a cele-brated jurisconsult, in 1580.

3. The Licentiate Zepeda, in 1588.

4. The Licentiate Alonso Maldonado de Torres,in 1606.

5. Don Juan de Lizarazu, knight of the orderof Santiago ; he passed over to the presidency ofQuito in 1612.

6. Don Diego de Portugal, in 1614.

7. Don Alonzo Perez de Salazar, who was pre-sident of Quito, and was promoted to this, wherehe governed until the year 1620.

8. Don Juan de Caravajal y Sande, promotedin 1633.

9. Don Dionisio Perez Manrique, knight ofthe order of Santiago, collegiate in the collegeof Los Manriques de Alcala, rector of the uni-versity there, oidor of Lima, and president ofQuito, from whence he was removed to be pre-sident of this audience of Charcas in 1646 ; whence,having exercised it till 1654, he was removed tothat of Santa Fe.

10. Don Pedro Vazquez de Velasco, who pre-sided until the year 1661.

11. Don Bartolome Gonzalez de Poveda, pro-moted in 1678 ; he was made archbishop of theholy church of Charcas, remaining in the presi-dency until 1688.

12. Don Diego Mesia, native of Lima, oidor ofits royal audience, and formerly of that of Quito ;he was promoted to the presidency of Charcas in1688.

13. Don Jorge Manrique de Lara, who wasoidor of Panama, afterwards of Charcas, as alsopresident.

14. Don Gabriel Antonio Matienzo, president in1723.

15. Don Francisco de Herboso, who was ap-pointed in 1725, and presided until 1732.

16. Don Agustin de Jauregui, knight of theorder of Santiago, and native of Lima.

17. Don Juan Francisco Pestana, adjutant-major of the regiment of Spanish guards ; he wasnominated in 1752, and presided until 1769.

18. Don Ambrosio de Benavides, who enteredin the above year, and presided until 1777.

19. Don Agustin de Pinedo, who succeededthe former, and governed until 1782.

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
375

CHE

CHE

miles and a half e. ofirondequat or Rundagut bay,and SO e. from Niagara falls. The setlleincnts onChenessee river from its month upwards, areHartford, Ontario, Wadsworth, and Williams-burgh. The last mentioned place, it is probable,wili soon be the seat of extensive comineice.There will not be a carrying place between NewYork city and Williamsburgh Avhen tiie w.canals and locks shall be completed. The carry-ing places at present areas follows, viz. Albanyto Schenectady, 16 miles ; from the head of tiieMohawk to Wood creek, one ; Oswego lalls, two ;Chenessee falls, two ; so that there are but 2 1 milesland carriage necessary, in order to convey com-modities from a tract of country capable of main-taining several millions of people. The famousChenessee flats lie on the borders of this river.They arc about 20 miles long, and about fourwide; the soil is remarkably rich, quite clear oftrees, producing grass near 10 feet high. Tlieseflats are estimated to be worth 200,000/. as theynow lie. They arc mostly the property of theIndians.)

CHENGUE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Santa Marta in the kingdom ofTierra Firme ; situate on the sea-coast. It wassacked by William Gauson in 1655, who alsodestroyed and plundered circumjacent estates.

(CHEPAWAS, or Chipeways, an Indiannation inhabiting the coast of lake Superior andthe islands in the lake. They could, according toMr. Hutchins, furnish 1000 warriors 20 yearsago. Otlier tribes of this nation inhabit the coun-try round Saguinam or Sagana bay, and lakeHuron, bay Puan, and a part of lake Michigan.They were lately hostile to the United States, but,by the treaty of Greenville, August 3. 1795, theyyielded to them the island De Bois Blanc. SeeSix Nations.)

(CHEPAWYAN Fort is situated on a penin-sula at the s. w. end of Athapescow lake, lat. 58°40' n. long. 110° 25' Ji>. in the territory of theHudson bay company.)

CHEPEN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Saña in Peru.

CHEPETLAN, a settlement of the head settle-ment, and alcaldía mayor of Tlapa, in Nueva Es-paña. It contains 203 families of Indians, wholive by tiie making and selling of chocolate cups.Two leagues to the n. n. 70. of Tenango.

(CHEPEWAS, of Leach Lake, Indians ofN. America, claiming the country on both sides ofthe Mississippi, from the mouth of the Crow-wingriver to its source, and extending w. of the Missis-

sippi to the lands claimed by the Sioux, withwhom they still cop.tend for dominion. Theyclaim also, c. of the Mississippi, the country ex-tending as far as lake Superior, including thewaters of the St. lamis. Tliis country is thicklycovered with timber generally, lies level, andgenerally fertile, though a considerable propor-tion of it is intersected and broken up by smalllakes, morasses, and small swamps, particularlyabout the heads of the Mississipi and river St.Louis. They do not cultivate, but live princi-pally on the wild rice, which they procure in greatabundance on the borders of Leach lake and thebanks of the Mississipi. Their number has beenconsiderably reduced by W'ars and tlie small-pox.Their trade is at its greatest extent.)

(Chepewas, of Red Lake, Indians of N. Ame-rica, who claim the country about Red Lake andRed Lake river, as far as the Red river of lakeWinnipie, beyond which last river they contendwith the Sioux for territory. This is a low levelcountry, and generally thickly covered with timber,interrupted with many swamps and morasses. This,as well as the other bands of Chepewas, are es-teemed the best hunters in the ti. to. country ; butfrom the long residence of this band in the countrythey now inhabit, game is become scarce ; there-fore their trade is supposed to be at its greatest ex-tent. The Chepewas are a well-disposed people,but excessively fond of spirituous liquors.)

(Chepewas, of River Pembena, Indians of N.America, who formerly resided on the e. side ofthe Mississippi, at Sand lake, but were induced bythe N. W. company to remove, a few years since,to the river Pembena. They do not claim thelands on which they hunt. Tiie country is level,and the soil good. The w. side of the river ispi incipally prumVs, or open plains ; on the e. sidethere is a greater proportion of timber. Theirtrade at present is a very valuable one, and willprobably increase for some years. They do notcultivate, but live by hunting. They are well-disposed towards the whites.)

CHEPICA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Coquimbo in the kingdom ofChile ; situate on the coast, between the port ofHuasco and the point of Pajaros.

CHEPILLO, a small island of the S. sea, inthe gulf of Panamá, and at the mouth or entranceofthe river Bayano, is somewhat more than twoleagues distant Irom the continent; three miles incircumference, and enjoys a pleasant climate, al-though sometim.es subject to intense heat. It wasformerly inhabited by the Indians, of whom there

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
376

376

CHE

CHE

appears to have been a settlement towards the n,of the island, from some vestiges still remaining.It is at present frequented only by some of the in-liabitants of Chepo, who cultivate and gather hereoral^ges, lemons, and plantains of an excellent fla-vour, which are found here in abundance. Inlat. 8^ 57' n.

CHEPO, San Christoval de, a settlementof the province and kingdom of Tierra Firme, andgovernment of Panama ; situate on the shore ofthe river Mamoni ; is of a kind temperature, fer-tile and agreeable, though little cultivated. Theair is however so pure that it is resorted to byinvalids, and seldom fails of affording a speedyrelief. It has a fort, which is an esfacada, or sur-rounded with palisades, having a ditch furnishedwith six small cannon, and being manned by adetachment from the garrison of Panama, for thepurpose of suppressing the encroachments of theinfidel Indians of Darien. This territory was dis-covered by Tello Guzman in 1515, who gave itthe name of Chepo, through its Cazique Chepauri,in 1679. It was invaded by the pirates Bartholo-mew Charps, John Guarlem, and Edward Bol-men, when the settlement Avas robbed and destroy-ed, and unheard-of prosecutions and tormentswere suffered by the inhabitants. Fourteen leaguesnearly due e. of Panama, [and six leaguesfrom the sea ; in lat. 9° 8' «.]

CHEQUELTI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Chilcas and Tarija in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of its capital.

(CHEQUETAN, or Seguataneio, on thecoast of Mexico or New Spain, lies seven leaguesw. of of the rocks of Seguataneio. Between thisand Acapulco, to the e. is a beach of sand, of 18leagues extent, against which the sea breaks soviolently, that it is impossible for boats to land onany part of it ; but there is a good anchorage forshipping at a mile or two from the shore duringthe fair season. The harbour of Chequetan is veryhard to be traced, and of great importance tosuch vessels as cruise in these seas, being the mostsecure harbour to be met with in a vast extent ofcoast, yielding plenty of wood and water; andthe ground near it is able to be defended by a fewmen. When Lord Anson touched here, theplace was uninhabited.)

CHEQUIN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Maúle in the kingdom of Chile,and in the valley or plain of Tango, near the riverColorado. In its vicinity, toAvards the s. is anestate called El Portrero del Key, at the source ofthe river Maipo.

CHERA, a river near Colan, in the province ofQuito in Peru, running to Amotage ; from AvhencePaita has its fresh Avatcr.

CHERAKEE. See Cherokee.

CHERAKIKAU, a river of the province andcolony of South Carolina. It runs e. and entersthe river Cliuvakansty. On its shore is a smallsettlement of Indians of the same name.

CHERAKILICHI, or Apalachicola, a fortof the English , in the province and colony of Georgia,on the shore of the river Apalachicola, and at the con-flux, or where this river is entered by the Caillore.

CHERAN EL Grande, S. Francisco de, asettlement of the head settlement of Siguinan, andalcaldia mayor of Valladolid, in Nueva Espana,contains 100 families of Curtidores Indians, and isa little more than half a league from its head set-tlement.

CHERAPA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiernto of Piura in Peru, on the confines ofthe province of Jaen de Bracamoros, upon the riverTambarapa, is of a hot and moist temperature,and consequently unhealthy ; and is situate in theroyal road which leads from Lpxa through Aya-baca and Guancabamba to Tomependa, a port ofthe river Maranon.

(CHERAWS, a district in the upper country ofSouth Carolina, having North Carolina on then. and n. e. Georgetown district on the s. e. andLynche’s creek on the s. w. which separates itfrom Camden district. Its length is about 83miles, and its breadth 63 ; and is subdivided intothe counties of Darlington, Chesterfield, and Marl-borough. By the census of 1791, there were10,706 inhabitants, of Avhich 7618 were white in-habitants, the rest slaves. It sends to the statelegislature six representatives and two senators ;and in conjunction Avith Georgetown district, onemember to congress. This district is watered byGreat Peter river and a number of smaller streams,on the banks of vdiich the land is thickly settledand Aveli cultivated. The chief towns are Green-ville and Chatham. The court-house in this dis-trict is 52 miles from Camden, as far from Lum-berton, and 90 from Georgetown. The mail stopsat this place.]

CHERIBICHE, a port of the province andgovernment of Venezuela, to the w. of the settle-ment of Guaira.

CHERIGUANES. See Chiriguanos.

CHERILLA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of its capital.

CHERINOS, a river of the province and go-

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
386

CHI

386

(CHICKAMAGES, a part of the Cherokee na-tion of Indians, known by this name, inhabit fivevillages on Tennessee river. See CHICCA-MOGGA.)

CHICKAMINE, a river of the province andcolony of Virginia.

(CHICKASAW Bluff is on the e. bank of theMississippi, witiiin the territories of the UnitedStates, in lat. 35 n. The Spaniards erected herea strong stockaded fort, with cannon, and furnishedit with troops, all in the space of 24 hours, in themonth of June 1795. It has since been given up,.according to the treaty of 1796.)

(Chickasaw, a creek which falls into theWabash from the c. a little below Post St. Vin-cent.)

(Chickasaw, a river which empties into theMississippi, on the e. side, 104 miles from themouth of Margot, and 67 s. w. of Mine au Fer.Tlie lands here are of an excellent quality, andcovered with a variety of useful timber, canes, &c.This river may be ascended during high floods up-wards of SO miles with boats of several tons burden.)

(Chickasaws, a famous nation of Indians, whoinhabit the country on the e. side of the Mississippi,on the head branches of the Tombigbee, Mobile,and Yazoo rivers, in the n. zo. corner of the state ofGeorgia, and n. of the country of the Chactaws.Their country is an extensive plain, tolerably wellwatered from springs, and of a pretty good soil.They have seven towns, the central one of whichis in lat. 34° 23' «• long. 89° 30' w. The num-ber of souls in this nation has been formerlyreckoned at 1725, of which 575 were fighting men.There are some Negroes among the Chickasaws,who either were taken captive in war, or ran awayfrom their masters, and sought safety among theIndians. In 1539, Ferdinand de Soto, with 900men, besides seamen, sailed from Cuba with a de-sign to conquer Florida. He travelled n. to theChickasaw country, about lat. 35° or 36° ; and threeyears after died, and was buried on the bank ofMississipi river.)

CHICLAIO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Saña in Peru, in which there is aconvent of the religious order of St. Francis.

CHICO, Rio, a settlement and garrison of theprovince and government of Sonora ; situate onthe shore of the river Yaqui.

Chico, a river of the province and governmentof Panamá in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. Itrises in the mountains to the s. of the istmo, oristhmus, near the settlement of Chepo ; and runss. ze. and enters the sea in the bay or gulf of Pa-nama.

CHI

Chico, another river of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán in Peru. It runs to the e.of the jurisdiction of the city ofXuxuy,

Chico, a small island, called Morro, near thecoast of the province and government of SantaMarta ; opposite this city, and not far from ano-ther island, distinguished by the name of MorroGrande.

CHICOANTEPEC, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldla mayor of Zoques in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CHICOLAPA, a settlement of the head settle-ment, and alcaldla mayor of Coatepec, in NuevaEspana ; annexed to the curacy of its capital. Itcontains 187 families of Indians, who celebrateevery Friday throughout the year a teanguis orfair, at which are sold cattle and other productionsof the country. At these times it is a place of ge-neral rendezvous for the inhabitants of all the con-tiguous provinces ; and this fair has, from the greatconcourse of people usually assembling here, ob-tained the title of the famous teanguis of S. Vi-cente de Chicolapa. It is extremely fertile and plea-sant, and surrounded by several very small settle-ments or wards.

CHICOMESUCHIL, a settlement and headsettlement of tlie alcaldia mayor of Yxtepexi ofthe province and bishopric of Oaxaca in NuevaEspana, is of a hot temperature, and contains300 families of Indians, who exercise themselves inthe making scarlet cloths and cotton garments.

CHICOMI, a settlement and head settlement ofthe district of the alcaldia mayor of Tampico inNueva Espana. It contains 45 families of Indians,and lies 10 leagues to the s. of its capital.

CHICOMOCELO, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldia mayor of Chiapa. in the kingdom ofGuatemala ; [having a cave very narrow at theentry, but spacious within, with a stagnant lake,which is, however, clear, and is two fathoms deeptowards the banks.]

CHICONAUTA, St. Tomas de, a settlementof the alcaldia mayor of Ecatepec in NuevaEspana; annexed to the curacy of its capital;from whence it is distant one league to the n. n. e.It contains 160 families of Indians.

CHICONCUAC, S. Miguel de, a settlementof the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tez-cuco in Nueva Espana. It contains 123 familiesof Indians, and six of Spaniards. It produces agood proportion of grain, seeds, and cattte, fromthe fleeces of which they derive great emolument,as also from the coarse stuffs manufactured of thesame. It is one league to the n. of its capital.

CHICONCUASO, a settlement of the head

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
444

CHI

44-i

CHIMALAPA, Santa Maria de a settlement of the head settlement of the district andalcaldia mayor of Tehuantepec in Nueva Espana.It is of a cold temperature, and the whole of itsdistrict is covered with very large trees, especiallyfirs fit for ship-building. Twenty-five leaguesn.w. of its capital,

CHIAMLHUACAN, a settlement of the headsettlement and alcaldia mayor of Coatepec inNueva Espana. It contains a good convent of thereligious order of St. Domingo, 300 families ofSpaniards, il/wsfees, and Mulattoes, who employthemselves in labour, and in the commerce of seedsand large and small cattle, which are bred in theestates contiguous ; but the latter in no great de-gree, owing to the scarcity of water and pasturewhich prevails here.

Same name, another settlement and headsettlement of the district in the alcaldia mayor ofChaleo, of the same kingdom. It contains 166families of Indians, and a convent of the religiousorder of St. Domingo. Five leagues n. of itscapital.

CHIMALTENANGO, a province and corregimiento of the kingdom of Guatemala ; situatein the valley of this capital. It is very pleasantand fertile, and peopled with Indians.

CHIMALTEPEC, a settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Tlapa in Nueva Espana. It contains 29families of Indians, and is two leagues from thereal of the mines of Cairo.

Same name, another small settlement of thehead settlement of Malcatepec, and alcaldia mayorof Nexapa, very near its head settlement.

CHIMAN, a settlement of the province and government of Darien, in the kingdom of TierraFirme ; situate near the coast of the S. sea, and onthe shore of the river of its name, having a smallport, which is garrisoned by a detachment fromPanama, for the purpose of restraining the inva-sions which are continually made by the Indians.

Same name, a river of this province, and govern-ment, which rises in the mountains on the s. coast,and runs into the sea opposite the island of Nar-ranjal,

CHIMBA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Coquimbo in the kingdom ofChile. It has the celebrated talc gold-mine whichwas discovered 36 years ago by a fisherman, whopulling up a plant of large and prickly leaves,called cordon, or fuller’s thistle, for the purpose offuel for his fire, observed that particles of golddropped from its roots; and having more narrowlyinspected it, found pieces amidst the mould ofconsiderable size and of very fine quality. Thus

CHI

a mine became established here, and when it wasfirst dug it yielded from 300 to 500 dollars eachcaxon.

Same name, another settlement of the province andcorregimienio of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Andajes.

CHIMBACALLEa settlement of the kingdom of Quito, inthe corregimienio of the district of Las CincoLeguasde la Capital, (ofthe Five Leagues from theCapital), of which this is looked upon as a suburbfrom its proximity.

CHIMBARONGO, a river of the kingdom ofChile. It rises in the mountains of its cordillera^and unites itself with that of Tinguiragua to enterthe Napel. This river waters and fertilizes somevery pleasant and delightful valleys, abounding inpastures, whereon breed and fatten an infinite num-ber of cattle. On its shores are two convents, oneofthe religious order of Nuestra Senora de la Mer-ced, for the instruction of the Indians in the Chris-tian faith ; and another a house for novices, whichbelonged to the regulars of the society of Jesuits ;and also within a league’s distance from the latter,is a convent of the order of St. Domingo.

Same name, a settlement of the provinceand corregimienio of Colchagua in the same king-dom ; situate in the Former valley, between therivers Tinguiririca and Teno. There is alsoanother small settlement annexed, with a chapelof ease. In its district is a convent of the religiousorder of La Merced.

[CHIMBO, a jurisdiction in the province ofZinto in South America, in the torrid zone. Thecapital is also called by the same name.]

CHIMBO Y ALAUSI, a province and corregimientoof the kingdom of Quito ; bounded n. oythe serrania of the asiento of Ambato ; s, by thegovernment and jurisdiction of Guayaquil ; e. bythe district of the point of Santa Elena of this govern-ment; and ro. by the province of Riobamba. Its dis-trict is barren and poor, and the country beingmountainous, the inhabitants have no resource forgetting their livelihood other than by acting ascarriers between the provinces of Riobamba andTacunga on the one hand, and the warehouses ofBabahoyo on the other, where also are the royalmagazines ; and thus they bring back goods fromthe provinces of Peru, having for this traffic anumber of requas, or droves of mules, amountingin the whole to 1500 head. This commerce canonly be carried on in the summer, the roads beingimpassable in the winter through the mountains,when they say that these are shut up : at the sameseason the rivers become swollen to such a degree

Last edit over 2 years ago by LLILAS Benson
451

CHI

CHI

451

a settlement founded seven leag'ues from the placecalled the Puerto, but in 16GS they tied, all ofthem, to the mountains, although in the same yearthey returned back again to the settlement.

CHIRIGUANA, a large settlement of the pro-vince and government of Santa Marta in the NuevoReyno de Granada. It is of an hot temperature,and the territory is level, fertile, and beautiful.It has besides the parish church a convent or houseof entertainment of the religious order of St.Francis.

CHIRIGUANOS, a country and nation of theinfidel Indians of the province and government ofSanta Cruz de la Sierra in Peru, from whence itlies 20 leagues to thes. It is bounded on the e.by the province of Tomina, and s. e. by that ofChuquisaca ; is composed of different settlements,each governed by its captain or cazique, subject,in a certain degree, to the above government.These people, though they refuse to adopt the Ca-tholic religion, are in perfect amity with the Spa-niards, trading with them in wax, cotton, andmaize. This nation, by the incursions which tlieymade, used at first to give frequent alarm to theprovince, and once had the address to capture thecity of Chiquisaca. The Inca Yupanqui en-deavoured in vain to subdue them, and neither henor the Spaniards could avail aught with them■until they were reduced by the missionaries, theregulars of the extinguished company of the Je-suits ; since that time they have been stedfast insupporting the Spaniards against the other infidels,serving them as a barrier, and having for their ownline of defence the river Guapay. They are veryvalorous, but inconstant and faithless ; they aredescended from the nations which are found to thee. of Paraguay ; and fled from thence, to the num-ber of 4000, ^hen avoiding the threatened chastise-ment of the Portuguese, who were about to inflictcondign punishment on them for having treache-rously murdered the Captain Alexo Garcia in thetime of the King Don Juan 111. of Portugal.They were foi'merly cannibals, and used to fattentheir prisoners that these might become better fare ;but their intercourse and trade with the Spaniardshas caused them by degrees to forget this barbarouspractice, and even to give them a disgust at theirsavage neighbours, who still continue in the samepractices. They are at the present day so greatlyincreased in numbers, that they are one of themost numerous nations of America ; are besidesvery neat and clean ; and it is not uncommon forthem to rush out of their dwellings in the middleof the night to plunge and wash themselves in ariver in the most severe seasons ; their wives too.

immediately after parturition, invariably do thesame, and on their return lay themselves on a heapof sand, which they have for this purpose in thehouse; but the husband immediately takes to hisbed, and being covered all over with very largeleaves, refuses to take any other nourishment thana little broth made of maize ; it being an incorri-gible error of belief amongst them that these cere-monies will be the cause of making their childrenbold and warlike. They have shewn great powerand address in their combats with our troops whenthese first endeavoured to enter their territories,and they threw themselves in such an agile and un-daunted manner upon our fire-arms that it wasfound necessary, on our part, to insert in the rantsa lance-man between every two fusileers : the vare, moreover, so extremely nimble that it isimpossible to take them prisoners but by sur-prise.

CHIRIMICHATE, a river of the provinceand government of Venezuela. It rises in thesierra opposite the point of Hicacos, and entersthe sea in this point.

CHIRINOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Jaen de Bracamoros in the king-dom of Quito.

CHIRIQUI, a district of the province and go-vernment of Santiago de Veragua in the kingdomof Tierra Firme, the last district of this province ;dividing the government from that of Guatemala,and touching upon the province of Costarica.It is of limited extent ; the country is mountainous,and its climate hot and unhealthy, surrounded onall sides by infidel Indians. Here are bred num-bers of mules, which are carried to be sold at Pa-nama and Guatemala ; upon the coast of the S.sea are found crabs which distil a purple colourused for dyeing cotton, which, although it mayfade a little, can never be entirely eradicated.They have plenty of swine, and some vegetable pro-ductions ; with which they carry on a trade, nowfallen much to decay, with the city of Panama.The capital is Santiago de Alanje.

Same name, a river of the above province (Santiago de Veragua), whichrises in the mountains on the s. and enters the sea,serving as limits to that province, and dividing itfrom that of Costarica in the kingdom of Gua-temala.

CHIRIS, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Castro Vireyna in Peru; annexedto the curacy of Huachos.

CHIRISU, a settlement of the province andcorregimieto of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada. It is of a rather cold temperature, andabounds in wheat, maize, barley, a/berjas, andS M 2

Last edit over 2 years ago by LLILAS Benson
453

C H I

the Catholic faith, and are reduced to settlements,though the number of these is very small.

CHITEPEC, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district and alcaldia mayor of Tlapain Nueva Espaiia. It is of a cold temperature,and contains 39 families of Indians, who live bysowing maize, the only vegetable production oftheir territory. Five leagues w. n. w. of its capi-tal.

CHITO, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdomof Quito, upon the s. shore of the river Sangalla,and in the royal road of Loxa, which leads to To-mependa. In its vicinity are some gold mines,but which are not worked ; its temperature is hotand moist, and consequently unhealthy.

[CHITTENDEN County, in Vermont, lieson lake Champlain, between Franklin county onthe w. and Addison s. ; La Moille river passesthrough its n. w. corner, and Onion river dividesit nearly in the centre.' Its chief town is Burling-ton. This county contained, by the census of1791, 44 townships and 7301 inhabitants. Sincethat time the n. counties have been taken from it,so that neither its size or number of inhabitants cannow be ascertained.]

[Chittenden, a township in Rutland county,Vermont, contains 159 inhabitants. The roadover the mountain passes through this township.It lies seven miles e. from the fort on Otter creek,in Pittsford, and about 60 n. by e. from Ben-nington.]

[CHITTENENGO, or Canaserage, a con-siderable stream which runs n. into lake Oneida,in the state of New York.]

CHIUAO, a small river of theprovince and colony of Surinam, or the part ofGuayana possessed by the Dutch . It rises in themountain of Sincomay, runs n. and turning w.enters another river which is without a name, andwhere several others unite to enter the Cuyuni onthe s. side.

CHIUATA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Cumana in the kingdom of TierraFirme. It rises from some plains in this territory,runs s. collecting the waters of several otherrivers, particularly that of the Suata, and thenenters the sea, just as it becomes navigable.

Same name, another river of the same provinceand government (Cumana), which rises at the foot of theserramas of Paraguay, to the w. of the town ofSan Fernando, runs s. and enters the Orinoco.

CHIUCHA, S. Juan de, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Lipes, and arch-bishopric of Charcas, in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of San Christoval.

CHIUCHIN, a settlement of the province andcorregimienlo of Chancay in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Canchas. In its district there is amineral hot-water spring, much renowned for thecuring of various kinds of maladies.

CHIUCHIU, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Atacama, and archbishopric ofCharcas, in Peru.

CHIUGOTOS, a barbarous na-tion of Indians of the province and government ofVenezuela, bordering upon the settlement of Mara-capana. They are very few, and live retired in themountains ; they are cruel even to cannibalism.

CHIUICOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Buenos Aires ; situate to the s. ofits capital.

CHIXILA, a settlement and head settlement ofthe district of the alcaldia mayor of Villalta inNueva Espana. It is of an hot temperature, con-tains 134 families of Indians, and lies 12 leaguesto the n. of its capital.

CHOCAIA, Nueva, a settlement of the pro-vince of Chichas and Tarija in Peru ; of the dis-trict of the former, and annexed to the curacy ofTatasi.

CHOCAMAN, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district of Zacan, and alcaldia mayorof Cordoba, in Nueva Espana. It is of a coldand moist temperature, contains 103 families ofIndians, and is five leagues to the n, n. w. of thecapital.

CHOCAN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Piura in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Aabaca.

CHOCAYAS, a mountain of the province andcorregimiento of Chichas and Tarija in Peru, andjurisdiction of Chuquisaca. It is celebrated forits rich gold mines.

CHOCO, a large province and government ofthe jurisdiction of Popayan ; by the territory ofwhich it is bounded e. and s. e . ; on the w. by thePacific or S. sea; n. by the barbarous nations ofIndians, and by the province of Darien ; and s. bythat of Barbacoas. The whole of this provinceabounds in woods and mountains, and is crossedby a chain of the Andes, which run as far as theisthmus of Panama. It is watered by several riversand streams, all of which run w. and enter the S.sea. The districts of Citara and Raposo form apart of this province ; very few of their ancientinhabitants remain at the present day ; the greaterpart of them having perished in the war of the

Last edit over 2 years ago by LLILAS Benson
464

464

C H U

C H U

Tvliich rises in the mountains of the cordillera.On its shores is caught a much esteemed sort ofshell-fish, called iascas. It runs into the sea inlat. 31° 40'.

Same name, a volcano of the same kingdom (Chile), ce-lebrated for the irruptions it has made. It is 23leagues from the coast, and to the n. of the cityof San Juan de la Frontera, in lat. 31° 30' s.

CHUAZINGO, a settlement of the head settle-ment and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in Nueva Es-pana. It contains 124 families of Indians, and istwo leagues to the n. n. w. of that of Tlapa.

CHUBISCA, a settlement of the missionswhich belong to the religious order of St. Francis,in the province of Taraumara, and kingdom ofNueva Vizcaya, lying four leagues to the s. e.one-fourth to the s. of the settlement and real of themines of San Felipe de Chiguaga. Fivfe leaguesto the s. €. of this settlement are two large estates,called Fresnos and Charcas.

CHUCAPA, a settlement of the province andnorregimiento of Angaraes in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Acoria.

Same name another settlement, in the province and corre-ghniento of Xauja in the same kingdom.

CHUCANTI, a river of the province and go-vernment of Darien, in the kingdom of TierraFirrae. it rises in the mountains towards the n.and enters the sea between the islands Las Palmasand Pinos.

CHUCAY, a settlement of the province of Venezuela, and government of Maracaibo ; situate onthe extremity of the peninsula formed by the capeof San Roman.

CHUCHA, a bay in the port of Portobelo, andlying quite in the interior of the same. It is anharbour, or second port, of a circular figure,closed in on all sides, its access being through anarrow channel. Several rivers flow into it.

CHUCHE, a small island of the S. sea, in thebay and gulph of Panama. It lies the farthest ofany from the coast, and to the w. of the largeisland of Rey.

CHUCHULAIA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Combaya, in which there is apious sanctuary of Our Lady, much frequented.

CHUCUNAQUI, a large river of the provinceof Darien, and kingdom of Tierra Firme. Itrises in the mountainous parts, and runs 13leagues as far as the fort Royal of Santa Maria,collecting in its course the waters of 20 rivers lessthan itself ; it then enters the grand river Tuira.

CHUCHUNGA, a settlement of the provinceand government of Jaen do Bracamoros in thekingdom of Quito; situate on the shore of theriver of its name, having a port, which is a lad-ing-place for the river Maranon. The above riverrises in the sierra of the province of Luya andChilians, enters the Ymasa, being united to theCumbassa ; these together run into the Maranon,and at their conflux is the aforesaid port. Itsmouth is in lat. 5° 12' SO* s.

CllUCMI. See Julumito.

CHUCO, Santiago de, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Huamachuco inPeru.

CHUCUITO, a province and government ofPeru ; bounded e. by the great lake of its name,and part of the province of Omasuyos ; n. by thatof Paucarcolla orPuno ; s. e. by that of Pacages ;and s. w. and w. by the cordillera of the coastwhich looks towards Moquehua. It is 23 leagueslong from «. to s. and 36 wide. It was extremelypopulous at the time of the conquest, and was onthat account considered wealthy. Its governorshad the controul of political afiairs, and enjoyedthe title of vice-patron and captain-general of theimmediate provinces, including some which layupon the coast. It is of a cold but healthy tempe-rature, particularly in the rainy months, whichare December, February, and March. It producessweet and bitter papas, of which are made chum,bark, canagua, hagua, and barley. In some ofthe glens, where the soil is moister, they growpulse, flowers, and fruit-trees. This provinceabounds in cattle, such as cows, sheep and pigs,and native sheep, which the natives use for trad-ing instead of asses ; the regular load for eachbeing four or five arrohas. Here are also bredalpacas, huanacos, vicunas, deer, cuyes, and vizca-chas, which are similar in shape and figure to ahare ; also pigeons, partridges, ducks, and os-triches. From (he fleeces of the cattle many kindsof woven articles are made for useful and orna-mental apparel, beautifully dyed ; and from thewool of the alpaca handsome carpets, quilts, andmantles of various designs and colours. This pro-vince has many silver mines, which are workedwith emolument ; also streams of hot medicinalwaters. It is situate on the shores of the greatlake of Chucuito, from which large quantities offish are taken, and sold for a good price to theneighbouring provinces. It is watered by severalrivers, all of which enter the lake : the largest ormost considerable of them is the Hilava. Its na-tives amount to 30,000, separated in 10 differentsettlements. Its repartimiento used to amount to101,730 dollars, and its alcavala to 813 dollars an-nually. The capital is of the same name. This

Last edit over 2 years ago by LLILAS Benson
485

c o c

c o c

485

venerated an image of Oar L idy, the most cele-brated for miracles of any in the whole kingdom.The wonderful things, indeed, that have beenwrought here, have caused it to be the object ofgreat devotion ; accordingly an handsome templehas been erected, and the riches and ornamentswhich adorn the same are exceedingly valuable.People conse here from all the distant provinces tooffer up their prayers, to implore the protection ofthe Holy Virgin, and to thank her for benefits re-ceived. The festival here celebrated is on the 8thof September, when the quantity of people as-sembled is so large as to give the place, for thespace of 12 days, t!ie‘ appearance of a fair.

COCHAS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru.

COCHE, an island of the North sea, near the coastof Nueva Andalucia, and belonging to the islandof Margarita. It is nine miles in circumference,and its territory is low and barren. It was cele-brated for the pearl-fishery formerly carried onhere. It is four leagues to the e. of Cubagiia.

COCHEARI, a river of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas. It runs w. and enters theMadera opposite the Yamari.

[COCHECHO, a n.w. branch of Piscataquariver in New Hampshire. It rises in the Bluehills in Strafford county, and its mouth is fivemiles above Hilton’s point. See Piscat.xqua.J

COCHEIRA, Cumplida, a river of the coun-try of Brazil. It rises to the n. of the gold minesof La Navidad, runs w. and enters the Tocantineson the e. side, between the Salto de Ties Leguasand the settlement of the Portal de San Luis.

COCHIMATLAN, a settlement of the headsettlement of Almololoyan, and alcald'ia mayor ofColima, in Nueva Espana. It contains 100 fami-lies of Indians, whose trade consists in the manu-facturing of salt, and the cultivation of their gar-dens, which produce various kinds of fruits. Twoleagues to the w. of its head settlement.

COCHINOCA, a settlement of the provinceand governmeist of Tucuman, in the jurisdictionof the city of Xnjui. It has an hermitage, withthe dedicatory title of Santa Barbara, which is achapel of ease, and three other chapels in the set-tlement of Casivindo. The Indians of this placemanufacture gunpowder equal to that of Europe,and in its district are some gold mines.

COCHINOS, Ensenada de, a bay on the s.coast of the island of Cuba, between the pointGorda and the bay of Xagua, opposite the falls ofi)iego Perez.

COCHITI, a settlement of the kingdom ofNuevo Mexico ; situate at the source of a riverwhich enters the large river Uel Norte, or of theNorth.

COCHOAPA, a settlement of the alcaldia mayorof Tlapa in Nueva Espana; situate upon a dryand barren plain. It contains 150 families of In-dians, who are busied in the cultivation of cotton,the only production of the place.

COCHON, a small isle of the North sea,near the island of Guadalupe, in the bay ofthe Cul de Sac Petit, or Cala Angosta.

COCHUTA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Sonora in Nueva Espana.

COCHUY, a province of the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, to the n. e. ; bounded by the provinceof Chita. It has now the name of Laches, fromhaving been inhabited by this nation of Indians.It is very thinly peopled, of a hot climate, andabounding in Avoods.

COCKAHISPEN, a small river of Canada,which runs n. e. and enters Hudson’s bay.

[COCKBCRNE, a township in the n. part ofNew Hampshire, Grafton county, on the e. bankof Connecticut river, s, of Colebrooke.]

[COCKERMOUTH, a town in Grafton county,New Hampshire, about 15 miles n. e. of Dart-mouth college. It was incorporated in 1766, andin 1775 contained 118 inhabitants ; and in 1790,373.]

[COCKSAKIE. See Coxakie.]

COCLE, a large river of the province and go-vernment of Panama in the kingdom of TierraFirmc. It is formed by the union of the Penomeand the Nata, which run to the right and left ofthe mountain of Toabre, becoming navigable fromthat part to their entrance into the sea. A contra-band trade was in former times constantly carriedon through this river into the S. sea ; for whichreason Don Dionisio de Alcedo (the father of theauthor of this Dictionary) built a fort which de-fended its entrance, as likewise a rvatch-tower orsignal-house, to give notice of any strange vesselswhich might enter the river for the above pur-poses. The English took this tower, and built an-other fort by it in 1746, having been assisted by acompany of at least 200 smugglers. These w eredislodged in their turn by the aforesaid president,who inflicted condign punishment upon the headsof all the offenders.

COCMONOMAS, a barbarous nation of Indians of Peru, who inhabit the mountains ol' theprovince of Guanuco. They are docile, of a noblespirit, and in continual warfare with the Callisecasand Mazupes.

Last edit over 2 years ago by LLILAS Benson
486

486

c o c

COD

COCO, a river of the province and governmentof Darien in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. Itrises in the mountains of the n. and enters the seaopposite the island of Las Palmas, and gives itsname to the territory of a Cacique, thus called.

Same name, a point of the coast of the South sea,and kingdom of Tierra Firme, in the bay ofPanama.

COCOLI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Honduras. It runs e. and enters the seain the gulf of this name.

COCOLI, a point of the coast, in the same pro-vince and kingdom (Honduras).

COCOLOT, a city, which some liave supposedto be in the province of Chaco in Peru, but of theexistence of which no proofs are at present to befound.

COCOMERACHI, a settlement of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits, in the province of Taraumara, andkingdom of Nueva Vizcaya. It is 40 leagues tothe w. s.zo. of the town 'And real of the mines ofChiguaga.

COCOMICO, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Popayan in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada,

COCONUCO, See Cucunuco.

COCORALE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Venezuela in the kingdom ofTierra Firme; situate at the w. of the town of SanFelipe.

COCORIN, a settlement of the province ofOstimuri in Nueva Espana; situate on the shoreof the river Hiagui, between the settlements ofBacun and Comoriopa.

COCOROTE, some copper mines in the pro-vince and government of Venezuela, much cele-brated.

COCOS, some small islands of the Pacific orS. sea, lying close together, and divided by somenarrow channels. They abound in cocoa-trees,and from thence take their name. They are alsocalled Santa Cruz, from having been discoveredon the day of the invention of the cross. Theclimate here is pleasant, but the isles are unculti-vated and desert. Lat. 5° n.

Same name, a point of the island of Trinidad, on thee. coast.

COCOSPERA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Sonora in Nueva Espana ; situateat the source of a river,

COCOTA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tunja, in the jurisdiction of thecity of Pamplona, of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada.

COCOTZINGO, S. Geronimo de, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor ofCuernavaca in Nueva Espana.

COCUI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Tunja in the NueVo Reyno de Gra-nada ; situate at the foot of the sierra Nevada. Itis of a cold temperature, but abounds in all kindsof productions, and particularly in wheat, maize,barley, &c. It contains 700 white inhabitants,and 150 Indians. Thirty-two leagues from Tunja,and eight from the settlement of Chita.

COCUISAS, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cumana in the kingdom of TierraFirme, It lies to the s. of the city of Cariaco.

Same name, a river of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela, being one of those whichenter the Gamaiotal, before this runs into that ofLa Portuguesa.

COCULA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Tlajomulco in Nueva Es-pana. It contains a convent of the religious orderof St. Francis, and is six leagues to the w. of itscapital.

COCUPAC, a city and headsettlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofValladolid in Nueva Espana, and of the bishopricof Mechoaean. Its situation is in a nook to the n.of the great lake. On the e. and ze. are two loftymountains, which form so many other entrances,the one to the 5. and the other to the n. Its tem-perature is rather cold than w'arm ; and althoughit does not want for fruits, it is but ill supplied withwater, the only stream it has not running morethan the distance of a stone’s throw before it entersa lake. The inhabitants are thus under the ne-cessity of supplying themselves by wells. Thepopulation of this city consists in 45 families ofSpaniards, 52 of Mustees and Mulattoes, and 150of Indians. They occupy themselves in the mak-ing of tiles or flags ; and the inferior order aremuleteers. It has a convent of the religious orderof St. Francis.

COCUS, Punta de, a point on the e. coast ofthe island of Newfoundland, between cape Spearand the bay of Tor.

COD, a cape of the coast of New England andprovince of Massachusetts. It runs for many leaguestowards the sea, forming a large semicircle, andafterwards returning, forms the bay of Barnstable.[See Cape Cod, Barnstable, &c.]

CODDINGTON, a settlement of the island ofBarbadoes, in the district of the parish of SanJuan.

CODEBORE, a small river of New Britain,

Last edit over 2 years ago by LLILAS Benson
489

C O K

COL

m

COIOTZINGO, S. Miguel de, a settlementof the head settlement and alcaldia mayor ofGuejozingo in Nueva Espana. It contains ISfamilies of Indians.

COIQUAR, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cumaná, situate on tlie shore of ariver, between t!ie city of Cariaco, and the inte-rior bay of the gulf Triste.

COIUCA, San Miguel de, a settlement andhead settlement of tlie district of the government ofAcapulco in Nueva Espana. It contains 137 fa-milies of Indians, and is nine leagues to the n. e.of its capital. Close by this, and annexed toit, is another settlement, called Chinas, with 120families.

Coiuca, with the dedicatory title of San Agus-tin, another settlement of the head settlement andalcaldin mayor of Zacatula in the same kingdom ;containing 32 families of Indians and some Mus-tees, and being annexed to the curacy of itscapital.

COIULA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Cuicatlan in Nueva Es-paua. It contains SO families of Indians, whotrade in cochineal. Three leagues e. of its ca-pital.

COIUTLA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Zochicoatlan in Nueva Es-pana ; situate on a plain surrounded bj^ heights.It is annexed to the curacy of its capital, andcontains 37 families of Indians, being; 15 leagrucsdistant from its capital.

COJATA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Paucarcolla in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Vilques.

COJEDO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela in the kingdom of TierraFirme ; situate on the skirt of a mountain near theriver Guarico,

(COKESBURY College, in the town ofAbington, in Harford county, Maryland, is an in-stitution which bids fair to promote the improve-ment of science, and the cultivation of virtue. Itwas founded by the methodists in 1785, and has itsname in honour of Thomas Coke and FrancisAsbury, the American bishops of the methodistepiscopal church. The edifice is of brick, hand-somely built on a healthy spot, enjoying a fine airand a very extensive prospect. The college waserected, and is wholly supported by subscriptionand voluntary donations. The students, who areto consist of the sons of travelling preachers, annualsubscribers, members of the society, and orphans,are instructed in English, Latin, Greek, logic,rhetoric, history, geography, natural philosophy,

VOL. I.

and astronomy ; and when the finances of the col-lege will admit, they are to be taught the Hebrew,French, and German languages. The rules forthe private conduct of the students extend to theiramusements ; and all tend to promote regularity,encourage industry, and to nip the buds of idlenessand vice. Their recreations without doors arewalking, gardening, riding, andbathiiig; withindoors they have tools and accommodations for thecarpenter’s, joiner’s, cabinet-maker’s, or turner’sbusiness. These they are taught to consider aspleasing and healthful recreations, both for thebody and mind.]

COLAISACAPE, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Loxa in the kingdom ofQuito.

COLUMBO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Loxa in the kingdom of Quito.

COLAMI, a settlement of Indians of S. Carolina;situate on the shore of the river Albama.

COLAN, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Piura in Peru, on the coast of thePacific ; annexed to the curacy of Paita. its terri-tory produces in abundance fruits and vegetables,which are carried for the supply of its capital.All its inhabitants are either agriculturists or fisher-men. It is watered by the river Achira, alsocalled Colan, as well as the settlement ; and thoughdistinct from Cachimayu, it is not so from Cata-mayu, as is erroneously stated by Mr. La Marti-niere. [Here they make large rafts of logs, whichwill carry 60 or 70 tons of goods ; with these theymake long voyages, even to Panama, 5 or 600leagues distant, 'fhey have a mast with a sailfastened to it. They always go before the wind,being unable to ply against it ; and therefore onlyfit for these seas, where the wind is always in amanner the same, not varying above a point or twoall the way from Lima, till they come into the bayof Panama ; and there they must sometimes w'aitfor a change. Their cargo is usually wine, oil,sugar, Quito cloth, soap, and dressed goat-skins.The float is usually navigated by three or four men,who sell their float where they dispose of theircargo ; and return as passengers to the port theycame from. The Indians go out at night by thehelp of the land-wind with fishing floats, moremanageable than the others, though these havemasts and sails too, and return again in the davtime with the sea-wind.] Lat. 4° 56' s.

Colan, the aforesaid river. See Cat am a yu.

COLAPISAS, a settlement of Indians of theprovince and government of Louisiana ; situate onthe shore of the Mississippi, upon a long strip ofland formed by the lake Maurepas.

3 R

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
494

49i

COL

COL

much incommoded by mosquitos ; so that its po-pulation is much reduced, and those that remainapply themselves to the cultivation of sugar-canes,maize, yucas^ and plantains.

COLONCHE, a small settlement of Indians,of the district and jurisdiction of Santa Elena,in the government of Guayaquil, and kingdomof Quito ; situate on the s. shore of a river,from whence it takes its name, in lat. 1° 56' s.The said river rises in the mountains of thedistrict, and enters the S. sea, opposite the islandof La Plata.

Colonche, a small island of the S. sea, nearthe coast of the province and government of Gua-yaquil.

COLONIES OF THE English. See thearticles Virginia, Carolina, New England,New York, Jersey, Massachusetts, RhodeIsland, Pennsylvania, Nova Scotia ; of theJ3utch, see Surinam, Berbice, Corentin,CuRAZAo ; of the Portuguese, San Gabriel;of the French, Cayenne, St. Domingo, Mar-tinique; of the Danes, St. Thomas. (See gene-ral Tables of Dominions, &c. in the introductorymatter.)

COLOPO, a large river of the province andgovernment of Esmeraldas in the kingdom ofQuito. It runs from s. e. to n. w. at an almostequal distance between the rivers Esmeraldas andVerde, and runs into the S. sea, in the bay of SanMateo, in lat. 58' n.

COLOR, Cabo de, a cape on the coast of theprovince and captainship of Sergipé in Brazil. Itlies between the rivers Real and Ponica.

COLORADA, Punta, a point on the coast ofthe N. sea, and in the province and governmentof Venezuela, to the e. of the cape San Roman.

COLORADA, a river of tlie jurisdiction andalcaldta mayor of Penonomé, in the governmentof Panama, and kingdom of Tierra Firme. It risesin the mountains to the s. and enters the Pacificnear the settlement of Anton.

COLORADO, a settlement of the provinceand government of Tucumán, in the district andjurisdiction of the city of Salta, and s. s. e. of thesame.

Colorado, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Santa Marta in the kingdom of TierraFirme; situate on the shore of the river of its name.

Colorado, a river of the province and corre-^imiento of Cuyo in the kingdom of Chile. Itrises in its cordillera, to the n. runs e. and spendsitself in various lakes, on account of the level oftlie country. The geographer Cruz errs in makingit enter the river Maipo.

Colorado, another, a large river of the pro-:vince and government of Sonora in NuevaEspana.

Colorado, another, a small river of the pro-vince and government of Santa Marta in thekingdom of Tierra Firme, which enters the greatriver Magdalena before you come to the townof Tamalameque.

Colorado, another, in the province and go-vernment of Louisiana, near the road wliich leadsto Mexico. It runs s. e. in a very large stream,and enters the sea in the bay of San Bernardo.

Colorado, a cape or point of land of the s.coast of St. Domingo, in the part possessed bythe French, between the bays of Tondo and Puer. .

Colorado, a mountain of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, on the shore of the riverSalado, and to the s. of the settlement of Nuestra'Sefiora de Buenas Costumbres. ;

COLORADOS, a barbarous nation of Indians,of the province and corregimiento of Tacunga inthe kingdom of Quito, who inhabit some moun-,tains of the same name, very craggy and rugged,abounding in animals and wild beasts, such asbears, lions, tigers, deer, squirrels, monkeys, andmarmosets. These Indians, although the greaterpart of them are reduced to the Catholic faith bythe extinguished company of the Jesuits, aregiven to superstition ; they are divided into twoparts, the one called the Colorados of Angamarca,since tlieir principal settlement bears this title, andthe other the Colorados of St. Domingo ; they now,belong to the province and government of Esme-raklas, and live retired in the woods, and upon thebanks of the rivers Toachi and Quininay, wherethe missionaries of the religion of St. Domingo ofQuito exercise their apostolical zeal. The princi-pal settlement of this place, being situate on the w.shore, is called St. Domingo. The commerce ofthese Indians, and by which they subsist, is incarrying to Guayaquil, the province by whichthey are bounded , w dod for making canoes and rafts,sugar-canes, achiote, and agi pepper, and bring-ing back in exchange cattle, fish, soap, and othernecessary eft'ects.

COLOSO, a settlement of the province andgovernment ©f Cartagena ; situate on the shore ofthe river Pechelin, to the s. s. w. of the townof Maria, to the jurisdiction^of which it apper-tains.

COLOTLAN, a settlement and head settlementof the alcaldia mayor of Mextitlan in Nueva Es-pana. It contains 240 families of Indians, and isthree leagues to the w. of its capital.

COLOTLIPAN, a settlement of the head set-

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
530

530

C R A

C R A

Oaxaca. It contains only 20 families of Indians,wbo live by the cultivation of the cochineal plantand seeds.

COZCATLAN, a settlement and head settle-ment of the alcaldia mayor of Tasco in NuevaEspana. It contains 200 families of Indians, andis five leagues c. of its capital.

COZEL, a settlement of the jurisdiction andaknld'ia mayor of Culiacan in Nueva Espaila.

COZINAS, a bay of the coast of the provinceand government of Yucatán.

COZINERA, a shoal of rocks on the coast ofthe S. sea, of the province and government ofTierra Firme, very near the point of Paytilla, inthe bay of Panama.

COZOCOZONQUE, a settlement of the headsettlement of Puxmecatan, and alcaldia mayor ofViUalta, in Nueva Espana. It is of a hot tem-perature, contains 85 families of Indians, and is29 leagues to the e. of its capital.

COZTLA, San Miguel de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Coronango, and alcaldiamayor of Cholula, in Nueva Espana. It contains48 families of Indians, and is two leagues to the n.of the capital.

COZUMEL, an island of the N. sea, oppositethe e. coast of Yucatan, to the province and go-vernment of which it belongs. It is 10 leagueslong n. w.f s. w. and from four to five wide. It isfertile, and abounds in fruit and cattle, and iscovered with shady trees. The Indians call it Cu-zamel, which in their language signifies the islandof swallows. Here was the most renowned sanc-tuary of any belonging to the Indians in this pro-vince, and a noted pilgrimage, and the remains ofsome causeways over which the pilgrims used topass. It was discovered by the Captain Juan deGrijalba in 1518, and the Spaniards gave it thename of Santa Cruz, from a cross that was de-posited in it by Hernan Cortes, when he demolishedthe idols, and when at the same time the first massever said in this kingdom of Nueva Espana, wascelebrated by the Fray Bartolome de Olrnedo, ofthe order of La Merced, At present it is inhabitedby Indians only. It is three leagues distant fromthe coast of Tierra Firme.

(CRAB-ORCHARD, a post-town on Dick’sriver, in Kentucky, eight miles from Cumberlandriver, and 25 miles s. e. of Danville. The roadto Virginia passes through this place.)

CRABS, or Boriquen, an island of the N. sea ;situate on the s. side of the island of St. Domingo,first called so by the Bucaniers, from the abundanceof crabs found upon its coast. It is large andbeautiful, and its mountains and plains arc covered

with trees. The English established themselveshere in 1718, but they were attacked and drivenout by the Spaniards of St. Domingo in 17^0, whocould not suffer a colony of strangers to settle sonear them. The women and children were, how-ever, taken prisoners, and carried to the capital andPortobelo. See Boriquen.

CRAMBERRI, a small river of the provinceand colony of N. Carolina. It runs s. and entersthe source of the Conhaway.

CRAMBROOK, a river of the province andcolony of Pennsylvania in N. America.

(CRANBERRY, a thriving town in Middlesexcounty. New Jersey, nine miles e. of Princeton,and 16 s. s. w. of Brunswick. It contains a hand-some Presbyterian church, and a variety of manu-factures are carried on by its industrious in-habitants. The stage from New York to Phila-delphia passes through Amboy, this town, andthence to Bordentown.)

(Cranberry Islands, on the coast of the dis-trict of Maine. See Mount Desert Island.)

(CRANEY, a small island on the s. side ofJames river, in Virginia, at the mouth of Eliza-beth river, and five miles 5. w. of fort George, onpoint Comfort. It commands the entrance of bothrivers.)

(CRANSTON is the s. easternmost townshipof Providence county, Rhode Island, situated onthe w. bank of Providence river, five miles s. ofthe town of Providence. The corajiact part of thetown contains 50 or 60 houses, a Baptist meetinghouse, handsome school-house, a distillery, and anumber of saw and grist mills^and is called Paw-tuxet, from the river, on both sides of whose mouthit stands, and over which is a bridge connectingthe two parts of the town. It makes a pretty ap-pearance as you pass it on the river. The wholetownship contains 1877 inhabitants.)

CRAVEN, a county of the province and colonyof Carolina in N. America, situate on the shore ofthe river Congaree, which divides the provinceinto South and North. It is filled with English andF'rench protestants. The latter of these disem-barked here to establish themselves in 1706, butwere routed, and the greater part put to death bythe hands of the former. The river Sewee watersthis county, and its first establishment was owingto some families wlio had come hither from NewEngland. It has no large city nor any considerabletown, but has two forts upon the river Saute, theone called Sheuinirigh fort, which is 45 miles fromtlie entrance or mouth of the river, and the othercalled Congaree, 65 miles from the other. [It con-tains 10,469 inhabitants, of whom S658are slaves.}

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
Records 1 – 30 of 37