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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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anti government of Darien, near the n. coast, andthus "called from an eagle Avitli two heads, whichwas caught here in 1608, and which Avas sent tothe queen, Doha Maria-Ana of Austria, motherof Philip III. At its skirt is a bay, or swampyground, which is round, and has a very narroAVinlet. Forty-five leagues from Cartagena.

Aguila (point), a point or cape of the larger island ofthe Malvinas or Falkland isles ; thus named fromhaving been discovered by the French frigate, theAguila, or Eagle. It is one of those whith formtlie great bay or port.

AGUILUSCO, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district of Arantzan, and alcaldiamayor of Valladolid, in the province and bishop-ric of Mechoacan. It contains 32 families of In-dians, who employ themselves in sowing seed,cutting Avood, manufacturing vessels of fineearth en-Avare, and saddle-trees for riding.

AGUIRRE, a river of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela. It rises by the side of thecity of Niura, runs s. passes through the town ofSan Carlos, and enters the Sarara.

Aguirre (pastures), some pastures for young horses inthe province and corregimiento of Coquimbo, ofthe kingdom of Chile, between the rivers Ramosand Mamas,

AGUJA, Point of the, on the coast of TierraFirme, and of the province and government ofSanta Marta, between this city and Cape Chichi-bacoa. It is the part of land which projects far-thest into the sea.

Aguja, Point of the, another point on thecoast of the S. sea,, and of the province and corre-gimiento of Piura in Peru.

Aguja, Point of the. See article Eguille.

AGUR, Francisco, a settlement of the pro-vince and captainship of Espiritu Santo in Bra-zil, situate near the coast and the bay of EspirituSanto,

AGUSTIN, San, a capital city of the pro-vince and government of E. Florida, situate on thee. coast, in a peninsula, or narrow strip of land.It has a good port, which was discovered by Ad-miral Pedro Menendes de Aviles, on St. Augus-.tin’s day in the year 1565, which was his reasonfor giving the place this title, which has, however,been tAvice changed. He also built here a goodcastle for its defence. The city has a very goodparish church, and a convent of the Franciscanorder; and, as far as relates to its spiritual con-cerns, it is subject to the bishop of Cuba, who hasat various times proposed the erection of anabbey, but has not obtained his wish, although ithad been approved by the council of the Indies.

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It has two hospitals, one for the garrison troops,and another for the community ; it has also anhermitage, Avith the dedicatory title of Santa Bar-bara. It was burnt by Francis Drake in 1586;by Captain Davis, Avith the Bucaniers, in 1665 ;but it was immediately afterwards rebuilt. In1702 it Avas besieged by the English, under thecommand of Colonel Moore, who, failing in hisattempts to take the castle, which Avas defended bythe governor, Don Joseph de Zuniga, exhibitedhis revenge by burning and destroying the town.In 1744 the English returned to the siege, underthe command of General Oglethorp, who wasequally unsuccessful, in as much as it w^as mostvaliantly defended by the governor, Don Manuelde Montiano, who defied the bombardment of theenemy. This fort has a curtain of 60 toises long ;the parapet is nine feet ; and the terrace, or horizon-tal surface of the rampart, is 20 feet high, withgood bomb-proof casemates, and mounted Avith 50pieces of cannon, having also, on the exterior, anexcellent covered way. The city, although it isencompassed by a wall, is not strong, and its de-fence consists in 10 projecting angles. It was ced-ed, Avith the whole of the province, to the English,by the King ofSpain, in the peace of Versailles, in1762 ; and it remained in their possession till 1783,when it was restored by the treaty of Paris. Thebreakers at the entrance of the harbour haveformed two channels, whose bars have eight feet ofwater each. Long. 81° 40'. Lat. 29° 58'.

Agustin, San, a settlement and real of mines,of the province of Tarauraara, in the kingdotli ofNueva Vizcaya, which was formerly a populationof some consequence, and wealthy withal, fromthe richness of its mines, Avhich -have lately falleainto decay, and thereby entailed poverty upon theinhabitants. It is 26 leagues s. of the town of S,Felipe de Chiguagua.

Agustin, San, another small settlement orw ard of the head settlement of the district of Zum-pahuacan, and alcaldia mayor of Marinalco, inNueva España.

Agustin, San, another settlement of the headsettlement of the district of Nopaluca, and alcaldiamayor of Tepcaca, in Nueva España. It contains20 families of Indians, and is distant a little morethan a league from its head settlement.

Agustin, San, another, in the head settlementof the district of Pinoteca, and alcaldia mayor ofXicayan. It contains 70 families of Indians, whotrade in grain, seeds, and tobacco. Four leaguen. of its head settlement.

Agustin, San, another settlement of the dis-trict of Cuilapa, and the alcaldia mayor of Quatro

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AHUACAZALCA, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district of San Luis de la Costa,and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa, in Nueva Espaiia.It contains 56 families of Indians, -whose com-merce consists in rice and cotton. Three leaguesn. e. of its liead settlement.

AHUACAZINGO, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district of Atengo, and alcaldiamayor of Chilapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains46 families of Indians, and is ten leagues e. of itshead settlement.

AHUALICAN, a settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Tixtlan in Nueva Espana ; of a benignand salutary temperature, as it is fanned by then,breezes. It lies three leagues n. of its head settle-ment, which is Oapan ; and contains 36 familiesof Indians.

AHUATELCO, a settlement of the head set-tlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofIzucai in Nueva Espana, situate on the skirt of thevolcano of the same name. In its district areeight settlements, inhabited by 289 families of In-dians, and 11 of Musiees and Mulattoes, wholive in some temporary habitations for labourers.It is situate on a cold, rough, and barren soil, butis nevertheless fertile in wheat, and abounds inwater and cattle. Eight leagues n. w. of its capital.

AHUATEMPA, a settlement of the head set-tlement of the district of Santa Isabel, and alcaldiamayor of Cholula, in Nueva Espana. It contains 39families of Indians, and is two leagues s.of its capital.

AHUATEPEC, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district and alcaldia mayor of Tlapain Nueva Espana. It contains 32 families of In-dians, and is two leagues n. of its capitaL

AHUATLAN, San Pedko de, a settlementof the head settlement of the district of San Juandel Rio, and alcaldia mayor of Queretaro, in NuevaEspana ; annexed to the curacy of the formerplace, and lying ten leagues n. w, of the latter.

AHUEHUEZINGO, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district of Chietlan, and alcaldiamayor of Izucar, in Nueva Espana.

AHUEZITLA, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district and alcaldia mayor of Tlapain Nueva Espana. It contains 36 families of In-dians, and abounds in chia, (a white medicinalearth), grain, and earthen-ware. It is nine leaguesw, n. w. of its capital.

AHWAHHAWAY, a race of Indians, whodiffer but very little in any particular from theMandans, their neighbours, except in the unjustwar which they, as well as the Minetares, prosecuteagainst the defenceless Snake Indians. They claimto have once been a part of the Crow Indians, whom

they still acknowledge as relations. They haveresided on the Missouri as long as their traditionwill enable them to inform.

AIABACA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Piura in Peru.

AIACASI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chumbivilcas in Peru, annexed tothe curacy of Belille.

AIACOA, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana, or Nueva Andalucia. Itrises to the w. of the Sierra Maiguatida, runs e. andenters the Orinoco near the rapid stream of theMarumarota.

AIACOCHA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huanta in Peru, situate in theisland Tayacaja.

AIAHUALTEMPA, a settlement of the head set-tlement of the district of Zitlala, and alcaldia mayorof Chilapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains 36 fa-milies of Indians, and is three leagues to the s. ofits head settlement.

AIAHUALULCO, a settlement of the head set-tlement of the district of Ixlahuacan, and alcaldiamayor of Xalapa, in Nueva Espana, which, in theMexican language, signifies a small river. Itabounds in the best fruits of its jurisdiction, suchas pears and other sorts of fruit highly esteemed atVera Cruz. It contains only three families of Spa-niards, 22 of Mustees and Mulattoes, and 70 of In-dians. In its district are several temporary habi.tations for labourers, and pastures for breeding cat-tle, which reach as far as the district of Tepcaca,in the lofty eminence of Xamiltepec, 16 leaguesdistant from Xalapa. It includes also within itsadministration the cultivated estates extending asfar as the place called Puertezuelo, where this juris-diction approximates to that of San Juan de losLlanos on the w. s.w. side ; and in the culture ofthe above estates many Spaniards, 3Iustees, andMulattoes, are employed. One league s. w. of itshead settlement.

Aiahualulco, another settlement of the headsettlement of the district of Zitlala, and alcaldiamayor of Chilapa, in the kingdom of Xalapa, andannexed to the curacy of this place, from which itis three leagues distant, being nine to the s. of itshead settlement. It contains 42 families of Indians,including another small settlement incorporatedwith it.

AlAHUASA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru, annexed tothe curacy of Pachaconas.

AIAMARCA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Castro Virreyna in Peru, an-nexed to the curacy of Cordova.

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merit of Venezuela ; situate upon the coast nearcape Blanco.

(CATABAW River. See Wateree.)

(Catabaw Indians, a small tribe who have onetown called Catabaw, situate on the river of thatname, hit. 44° S9' n, on the boundary line betweenN. and S. Carolina, and contains about 450 inha-bitants, of which about 150 are fighting men.They are the only tribe w hich resides in the state ;144,000 acres of land . were granted them by theproprietary government. These are the remains ofa forrnidalile nation, the bravest and most generousenemy thp Six Nations had, butthey have degenera-ted sincp they have been surrounded by the whites.)

CATABUHU, a river of the province andcountry of Las Amazonas: it rises near the equi-noctial line, runs s. e. and enters the Rio Negro.

CATACACHI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiehto of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Santa Cruz, in which there is astream of water Avhich distils from some crevices,and deposits in its bed a sort of white stone orcrystalline substance, which they call catachi^ andwhich being dissolved in water, is accounted a spe-cific in the flux.

CATACAOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Piura in Peru.

CATACOCHA, a settlement of the province andcorreghniento of Loxa in the kingdom of Quito.

CATACUMBO, a river of the province andgovernment of Maracaibo, which rises to the e. ofthe city of Las Palmas, and runs e. increasing itsstream by many others which flow into it, until itunites itself with the Sulia, to enter the lake ofMaracaibo; where, at its mouth, it extends itselfand forms a large pool of water called La Lagu-neta.

CATAGANE, a settlement of Canada, situateon the side of lake Superior, close to the point ofChagovamigon, (or more properly called Camanis-tigovan.)

CATAGUAR, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cumaná ; situate to the e. of thecity of Cariaco.

CATALANA, an island of the gulf of Califor-nia, or Mar Roxo de Cories ; situate near thecoast, between the islands of Monserrat and SantaCruz.

CATALINA, Santa, a settlement of the headsettlement and alcaldia mayor of Tezcoco in Nue-va Espana ; annexed to the settlement of NuestraSenora de la Purificacion. It contains 132 fami-lies of Indians.

CATALINA, Santa, another seUlement in the head settle-mentand district of Tepaxtlan, and alcaldia mar/orof Cuercavaca, in Nueva España.

CATALINA, Santa, another settlement of thehead settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tepeaca inthe same kingdom.

CATALINA, Santa, another, with the distin-gnishing title of Martyr, in the head settlement andah aldia mayor of Zacatlan in the same kingdom.

CATALINA, Santa, anotlier settlement of thehead settlement of Teutalpan, and alcaldia mayorof Zacatlan, in the same kingdom.

CATALINA, Santa, a small settlement of thehead settlement and alcaldia mayor of Juxtlahua-ca in the same kingdom.

CATALINA, Santa, another, of the head set-tlement of Tantoyuca, and alcaldia mayor ofTampico, in the same kingdom : it is of a hot tem-perature, and contains 80 families of Indians, whoapply themselves to the culture of the soil ; is 10leagues to the e. of its head settlement.

CATALINA, Santa, another, of the provinceand corregimiento of Omasuyos in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Huaicho.

CATALINA, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Cauta in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Pari ; it has some hot me-dicinal baths.

CATALINA, Santa, a small settlement of thedistrict and jurisdiction of Valladolid in the pro-vince and bishopric of Mechoacan of NuevaEspana.

CATALINA, Santa, another,' of the head set-tlement of Mistepeque, and alcaldia mayor of Ne-japa, in Nueva España: it is of a cold temperature,situate at the foot of a mountain, with 60 familiesof Indians, and is 4 leagues from its head settle-ment.

CATALINA, Santa, another, of the head set-tlement of Quiatoni, and alcaldia mayor of Teutit-lan, in Nueva España, with 20 families of Indians ;and is one league n. of its head settlement.

CATALINA, Santa, another settlement of themissions which were held by the regulars of thecompany of Jesuits, in the province of Tepeguanaand kingdom of Nueva Viscaya, on the shore ofthe river Las Nasas ; is 30 leagues to the n. w. ofits capital.

CATALINA, Santa, another settlement, withthe addition of Sera, of the province and govern-ment of Maracaibo, in the district of the city ofPedraza ; situate on the shore of the river Pariva ;is one of the missions which are held in Barinas bjthe religion of St. Domingo.

CATALINA, Santa, another, of the same pro-

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vince and government, on the shore of the riverMasparro, between the cities of New and Old Ba-rinas.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of Venezuela, on theshore of the river Mosquitos, near where this riverenters the Orituco.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of Cartagena, in thekingdom of Tierra Firme.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of La Sonora in NuevaEspana ; situate in the country of the SobaipurisIndians, on the shore of a river which enters theGila, between the settlements of San Cosme andSan Angelo.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of Tucumán, in thejurisdiction of the city of Xuxuy, with four cha-pels of ease.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and alcaldia mayor of Los Zoques in thekingdom of Guatemala.

Catalina, Santa, another, of the provinceand alcaldia mayor of Chiapa in the same king-dom.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theisland of Barbadoes, in the parish and district of S.George.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theisland of Jamaica, which is a parish of the Eng-lish, situate in the s. part.

Catalina, Santa, some sierras or mountainsof the coast of Brazil, in the province and captain-ship of Rey, opposite the island of Santa Catalina,from which they take their name.

Catalina, Santa, a cape or point of land onthe coast of the province and government of Cos-tarica and kingdom of Guatemala, between theport of Las Velas and the town of Nicaragua.

Catalina, Santa, a small island close to thes. coast of the island of St. Domingo, between LaSaona and the bay of Caballo.

Catalina, Santa, another island of the coastof Florida to the n. of Georgia.

Catalina, Santa, another island of the coastof Georgia, between the islands Sapola and As-sabaw.

Catalina, Santa, a bay on the coast of thestraits of Magellan, between point St. Silvestre andpoint St. Antonio de Padua.

Catalina, Santa, a bay of the e. coast of theisland of Newfoundland, between the Saint’s capeand New cape.

Catalina, Santa, a river of the province andcolony of Maryland, in the county of Talbot. Itruns j. and enters the sea in the bay of Chesapeak.

Catalina, Santa, an island of the N. sea,near the coast of Tierra Firme, opposite the Escu-do de Veraguas. It is of a good temperature, fer-tile, and abounding in cattle and fruits. It had init a settlement defended by two castles, called San-tiago and Santa Teresa; which, together with thetown, were destroyed by an English pirate, JohnMorgan, who took the island in 1665 ; and al-though it was recovered in the same year by thepresident of Panama and Colonel Don J uan Perezde Guzman, it remained abandoned and desert.

Catalina, Santa, another small island nearthe coast of Brazil. See St. Catherine.

Catalina, Santa, a small island, situate tothe s. of St. Domingo, and close to it in the frontof the settlement of Higuey.

Catalina, Santa, a valley, in which there isalso a small settlement, in the Nuevo Reyno deLeon ; annexed to the curacy of its capital, fromwhence it lies three leagues to the w. It contains20 families in its neighbourhood, and producesonly some sorts of pulse and some goats.

Catalina, Santa, another valley of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Moquehua in Peru,bounded by a river and by the cordillera.

Catalina, Santa, a bay on the coast ofNova Scotia, between the port Carnero and thatof Ours or Oso.

CATAMAIU, a large and rapid river of theprovince and government of Loxa in the kingdomof Quito, also called Chira, at the part where itenters the sea. It rises in the paramo or desertmountain of Sabanilla ; and collecting the watersof several smaller rivers, runs from s. to n.until it unites itself with tlie Gonzanama, whichenters it on the s. side, in lat. S° 47' s. ; it thenturns its course to the xo. and afterwards to the5 . w. and receives the tributary streams of therivers Quiros, Macara, and Pelingara ; all ofwhich enter it on the s. side. Being swelled withthese, it takes the name of Amotape, from the settle-ment of this name, situate on its shore. Near itsmouth this river is called Colan, and it empties it-self into the sea in the corregimiento and provinceofPiura. The countries which it laves are fertileand beautiful, and its banks are covered with or-chards and plantations of sugar-canes of the terri-tory of Loxa. The climate here is very hot, andin the valleys formed by this river the inhabitantsare much afflicted with the tertian fever ; its wa-ters are generally very cold and unwliolesonic.

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from six to 20 feet diameter, worn almost perfectlysmooth, into the solid body of a rock.]

(CAVIANA, an island in S. America, towardsthe n. w. side of Amazon river. Lat. 30' n.)

(CAVOGLIERO, a bay on the side of theisland of St. Domingo, at the mouth of the riverRomaine, 24 leagues e. of St. Domingo.)

CAXABAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Riobamba in the kingdom ofQuito.

Caxabamba, another settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huamachuco in Peru.

CAXACAI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru.

CAXAMARCA, a province and corregimientoof Peru, in the bishopric of Truxillo ; boundeds. e. by the province of Caxamarquilla, e. by thatof Chachapoyas, n.w. by that of Luya and Chil-Igos : all these three being situate at that part oft^e Maranon which serves as a limit to this pro-vince of Caxamarca. It is bounded ». by the pro-vince of Jaen, n. w. by that of Piura, w. by thatof Saha and by a part of Truxillo, and s. by thatof Huamachuco. It is in length 40 leagues froms. e. ion. w. ; and in breadth, or across, 36 leagues.To enter it through the province of Truxillo, whichis the grand road, it is necessary to pass the cordil-lera, which is not here so lofty as in the s. pro-vinces. This province, however, abounds witheminences which are branches of the cordillera;and on account of the height and situation ofthese, a great variety of temperature is experienced,some parts being subject to an intense heat, andothers to , a severe cold. Thus it partakes of thenature of the sierra, and its uneven figure no lesscorresponds with it : but it is for the most part of agood temperature, particularly in the capital. Theprovince abounds greatly in all kinds of fruits andcattle : in it are fabricated cloths, baizes, blankets,canvas for sails of ships, and cotton garments of aVery fine and excellent quality. Formerly its prin-cipal commerce was in swine ; at present it is not,though these animals still abound in some parts.It is watered by many rivers, of which those risingon the w. side of the cordillera, as the Sana, Lam-bay eque, and those passing through the provinceof Truxillo, all enter the S. sea. The others,amongst which that of the Criznejas is the largest,incoporate themselves with the Maranon. On itsshores are lavaderos, or washing-places of gold;and its rivers in general abound in very good andwholesome fish. Besides the fruits and the pro-ductions of every kind found in this province, ithas to boast many gold and silver mines, some ofwhich are worked. There a e also some of copper,

very fine lead, brimstone, and alcaparrosa. To-wards the n. part, where it touches the province ofJaen, are found some bark-trees, the production ofwhich, although not equal to the trees of Loxa, isof the colour of heated copper, and possesses allthe virtues of the common bark. Here are alsomany medicinal herbs, and amongst them the cele-brated calagimla. In the time of the Indians, andbefore the conquest, it was so well peopled that itsnatives formed upwards of 500 settlements. Atpresent they amount to 46,000, being divided into46 settlements. The capital bears the same title,and the repartimiento of the corregidor used toamount to 80,000 dollars, and it paid an alcavalaof 640 dollars per annum.

The settlements are.

Caxamarca, the ca-pital,

Santa Catalina,

San Pedro,

San Joseph,Cherillo,

Jesus,

Asuncion,

Contumaza,

Cascas,

Guzrnanga,

San Benito,

Trinidad de Chetu,S. Francisco doCay an,

Santa Cruz,

Pion,

Santa Catalina deChugod,

San Pablo de Cha-lique,

S. Luis de Tuniba-din,

S. Bernardino de

S. Juan de Llallan,Nepos,

Tinguis,

San Miguel de Pal-laques,

Celedin,

Sorocucho,

San Marcos,Catacachi,Amarcucho,Ichocan,

San Juan de Huam-bos,

Cochabamba,

Llama,

Cachen,

Cutervo,

Queracoto,

Chachopin,

Tocmocha,

Zocota,

Todos Santos deChota,Tacabamba,Yauyucan.

its figure is

Nice,

The capital is large and handsomeirregular, and it is situate upon a level plainT Thehouses are of clay, and the streets are wide andstraight. The parish church, Avhich has threenaves, is of finely worked stone, and the buildingexpences of it Avere defrayed by King Charles II.in the time of the viceroy the Duke of La Palata,in 1682. It has a parish of Spaniards, calledSanta Catalina ; two of Indians, which are SanPedro and San Joseph ; two convents of the orderof St. Francis, one of the Observers, and anotherof the Recoletans ; an hospital and a convent ofBethlemites, a monastery of nuns of La Concepcion,an house of entertainment of Nuestra Senora de

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lar way by a river of its name. It abounds inlarge alligators and mosquitoes, which render itsnavigation very troublesome. Its shores are co-vered with beautiful trees, which are inhabited bya variety of birds and apes of several species, whichmake an incredible chattering and noise. It wasby this river that the pirate John Morgan camewhen he took and sacked Panama in 1670. Itwas discovered by Hernando de la Serma in 1527,when he called it the river of Lagartos, but itsmouth was before discovered by Lope de Olanoin 1510. Here are found, at certain seasons, avery small fish of the size of a pin, called titles,and these are so abundant, that putting into thewater a large basket, it is certain to be drawn outfull ; they are fried, and make very savouryfritters.

CHAGRE, with the dedicatory title of San Lo-renzo, a settlement of the same province and king-dom ; situate upon the top of a mountain at theentrance or mouth of the former river. It has forits defence a strong castle, which was built by theorder of Philip 11. by the famous engineer J uanBautista Antoneli. This was taken by the pirateJohn Morgan, after having made a glorious de-fence, in 1668, when the settlement was burnt andsacked ; and in 1740 it was taken by the English,commanded by Admiral Vernon, who entirelydestroyed it ; its loss in that war being supplied bytwo strong batteries, which hindered the Englishfrom making a breach, for the third time, whenthey came with three frigates of war : but theywere driven back by Captain Don Juan de Her-mida, who was formerly captain of the regimentof Granada. In 1752 this castle was rebuilt, in themost perfect manner, by the lieutenant-generaland engineer Don Ignatio de Sala, governor ofCartagena, who came hither for this purpose byorder of the king. In this fortress several per-sonages of distinction' have been held prisoners,ami amongst others the Marquis of La Mina,])resiilent, governor, and captain-general of thekingiUmi in 1694. Is 13 leagues from Porto-belo.

CHAGUANES, an island of the river Orinoco,formed at its entrance into the sea by variouscanals or arms, is large and inhabited by Indiansof the Mariussa nation.

CHAGUARAMA, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela, situate on the con-fines of the province of Cumana, near the riverManapire.

CHAGUARAMA, a bay on the coast of the pro-vince of Cumaná, on the n. e. side ; being formedby the island of Trinidad, and by the mouths of

the channels of the Orinoco as far as the gulfTriste.

CHAGUAREM, a small river of the provinceand government of Venezuela, which runs s. andenters that of Los Aceytes.

CHAHUALTEPEQUE, Santiago de, a set-tlement of the district and alcaldía mayor of Mex-ilcaltzingo in Nueva España. It contains 138families of Indians, and is three leagues from itscapital.

CHAHUANTLA, a small settlement or wardof the alcaldía mayor of Guauchinango in NuevaEspaña ; annexed to the curacy of Naupan.

CHAIALA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Chayanta or Charcas in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Pocoata.

CHAILLON, Cabo de, a cape on the e. coastof lake Superior, in New France.

CHAINAR, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Tucumán ; situate on the shore ofthe river San Miguel.

CHAIPI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Parinacochas in Peru, annexed tothe curacy of the corregimiento of Pullo ; in whichwas venerated, ever since the time of the conquest,a beautiful image of the Virgen del Rosario, which,with the temple, was burnt a few years since, andthe parishioners being much afflicted at their loss,the Marquis of Selva Alegre, president of Quito,sent them another equal to the first : at the cele-bration of the festival people assemble from all theneighbouring districts.

CHAIUIN, a river of the province and govern-ment of Valdivia in the kingdom of Chile, whichruns s. e. and enters Valdivia near its entrance intothe sea.

CHALA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Cumaná in Peru.

Chala, with the distinction of Alta, anothersettlement of the province and corregimiento ofSaña in the same kingdom , situate on the shore ofthe river Chicama.

CHALA, another, with the addition of Baxa,in the same kingdom and province; situate nearthe former.

CHALA, a large and beautiful valley on the seashore, in the province and corregimiento of Cu-maná.

CHALA, a small port, frequented only by fisher-men, in the same province and corregimiento.

CHALACOS, a settlement and asiento of thesilver mines of the province and corregimiento ofPiura in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Huan-cabamba.

==CHALALA, a large river of the Nuevo Reyno

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appears to have been a settlement towards the n,of the island, from some vestiges still remaining.It is at present frequented only by some of the in-liabitants of Chepo, who cultivate and gather hereoral^ges, lemons, and plantains of an excellent fla-vour, which are found here in abundance. Inlat. 8^ 57' n.

CHEPO, San Christoval de, a settlementof the province and kingdom of Tierra Firme, andgovernment of Panama ; situate on the shore ofthe river Mamoni ; is of a kind temperature, fer-tile and agreeable, though little cultivated. Theair is however so pure that it is resorted to byinvalids, and seldom fails of affording a speedyrelief. It has a fort, which is an esfacada, or sur-rounded with palisades, having a ditch furnishedwith six small cannon, and being manned by adetachment from the garrison of Panama, for thepurpose of suppressing the encroachments of theinfidel Indians of Darien. This territory was dis-covered by Tello Guzman in 1515, who gave itthe name of Chepo, through its Cazique Chepauri,in 1679. It was invaded by the pirates Bartholo-mew Charps, John Guarlem, and Edward Bol-men, when the settlement Avas robbed and destroy-ed, and unheard-of prosecutions and tormentswere suffered by the inhabitants. Fourteen leaguesnearly due e. of Panama, [and six leaguesfrom the sea ; in lat. 9° 8' «.]

CHEQUELTI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Chilcas and Tarija in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of its capital.

(CHEQUETAN, or Seguataneio, on thecoast of Mexico or New Spain, lies seven leaguesw. of of the rocks of Seguataneio. Between thisand Acapulco, to the e. is a beach of sand, of 18leagues extent, against which the sea breaks soviolently, that it is impossible for boats to land onany part of it ; but there is a good anchorage forshipping at a mile or two from the shore duringthe fair season. The harbour of Chequetan is veryhard to be traced, and of great importance tosuch vessels as cruise in these seas, being the mostsecure harbour to be met with in a vast extent ofcoast, yielding plenty of wood and water; andthe ground near it is able to be defended by a fewmen. When Lord Anson touched here, theplace was uninhabited.)

CHEQUIN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Maúle in the kingdom of Chile,and in the valley or plain of Tango, near the riverColorado. In its vicinity, toAvards the s. is anestate called El Portrero del Key, at the source ofthe river Maipo.

CHERA, a river near Colan, in the province ofQuito in Peru, running to Amotage ; from AvhencePaita has its fresh Avatcr.

CHERAKEE. See Cherokee.

CHERAKIKAU, a river of the province andcolony of South Carolina. It runs e. and entersthe river Cliuvakansty. On its shore is a smallsettlement of Indians of the same name.

CHERAKILICHI, or Apalachicola, a fortof the English , in the province and colony of Georgia,on the shore of the river Apalachicola, and at the con-flux, or where this river is entered by the Caillore.

CHERAN EL Grande, S. Francisco de, asettlement of the head settlement of Siguinan, andalcaldia mayor of Valladolid, in Nueva Espana,contains 100 families of Curtidores Indians, and isa little more than half a league from its head set-tlement.

CHERAPA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiernto of Piura in Peru, on the confines ofthe province of Jaen de Bracamoros, upon the riverTambarapa, is of a hot and moist temperature,and consequently unhealthy ; and is situate in theroyal road which leads from Lpxa through Aya-baca and Guancabamba to Tomependa, a port ofthe river Maranon.

(CHERAWS, a district in the upper country ofSouth Carolina, having North Carolina on then. and n. e. Georgetown district on the s. e. andLynche’s creek on the s. w. which separates itfrom Camden district. Its length is about 83miles, and its breadth 63 ; and is subdivided intothe counties of Darlington, Chesterfield, and Marl-borough. By the census of 1791, there were10,706 inhabitants, of Avhich 7618 were white in-habitants, the rest slaves. It sends to the statelegislature six representatives and two senators ;and in conjunction Avith Georgetown district, onemember to congress. This district is watered byGreat Peter river and a number of smaller streams,on the banks of vdiich the land is thickly settledand Aveli cultivated. The chief towns are Green-ville and Chatham. The court-house in this dis-trict is 52 miles from Camden, as far from Lum-berton, and 90 from Georgetown. The mail stopsat this place.]

CHERIBICHE, a port of the province andgovernment of Venezuela, to the w. of the settle-ment of Guaira.

CHERIGUANES. See Chiriguanos.

CHERILLA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of its capital.

CHERINOS, a river of the province and go-

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in Nueva Espana, is of a mild temperature ; si-tuate in a pleasant and fertile plain, and one whichabounds in maize, wheat, and other seeds. It con-tains S68 families of Indians, 13 of Spaniards, anda convent of the religious order of St. Francis;is one league n. of its capital,

Chiautla, with the addition of La Sal, an-other settlement, the capital of its jurisdiction, inthe same kingdom, thus called from the salt minesfound in it formerly, and from which the inhabi-tants used to derive a great commerce. At pre-sent it is in a thorough state of decay, not only asits trade has fallen off in the other provinces ; butas the Indians have applied themselves rather tothe cultivation of the soil and the planting of fruitsand pulse, from the traffic of which they derivetheir maintenance. It is inhabited by 650 familiesof Mexican Indians, and 40 of Spaniards, J\/us~iees, and Mulattoes. It contains a convent of thereligious order of St. Augustin. The jurisdictionis so much reduced that it is not more than fiveleagues in length and three in width, void of com-merce, and has but a small revenue. Its inhabi-tants, although they are somewhat given to thebreeding of small cattle, yet this must hardly beconsidered with them a branch of commerce,since they have scarcely enough of these where-with to support theiiiselves. It contains only twoother settlements, and these are,

Xicotlan, Huehetlan.

Forty-five leagues s. e. to the s. w. of Mexico.
CHIBACOA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Venezuela ; situate on the shore ofa river to the w. of the town of Nirua.

CHIBATA, a settlement of the . province andcorregimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, and the head settlement of the corregi-miento of Indies, is of a very cold and fresh tem-perature, abounding in productions, and particu-larly in cattle, from the fleeces and hides of whichare made quantities of blankets, linen cloths, andother articles for garments. It may contain about200 Indians, and it is eight leagues to the n. e.of Tunja, lying between this latter place and thesettlement of Siachoque.

CHIBAI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Collahuas in Peru.

CHICA, an island of the N. sea, one of theLucayas ; situate between the islands Siguate andSt. Andrew. The English gave it the name ofLittle.

CHICACHAE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Louisiana or S. Carolina, in whichthe English have a fort and establishment to carry

on commerce with the Indians, is situated on theshore of the river Sonlahove.

CHICACHAS, a settlement of Indians of thisnation, in the territory thus called, where the Eng-lish have an establishment or factory for com-merce.

CHICAGOU, a port of Canada, on the w. sideof the lake Michigan.

Chicagou, a river of the same province andgovernment, which runs s. then ?i. e. and entersthe former port.

CHICAHOMINI, a river of the province andcolony of Virginia, runs s.e. and turning itscourse to the s. enters the Thames.

CHICAHUASCO, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Huipuxtla, and alcaldia mayor of Tepe-tango, in Nueva Espana, contains 72 families ofIndians.

CHICAHUASTEPEC, San Miguel de, asettlement of the head settlement of Zoyaltepec, andalcaldia mayor of Yanguitlan. It contains 48 fa-milies of Indians, and is 10 leagues from its headsettlement.

CHICAHUAZTLA, San Andres de, a settle-ment and head settlement of the alcaldia mayor ofTepozcolula, in the province and bishopric ofOaxaca, in the kingdom of Nueva Espana, is ofa cold temperature, inhabited by 332 families ofIndians, including those of the settlements or wardsof its district, and they maintain themselves bybartering cotton garments for salt on the coast ofXicayan ; 12 leagues s. w. of its capital.

Chicahuaztla, another, a small settlement orward of the alcaldia mayor of Guachinango in thesame kingdom ; annexed to the curacy of that ofTlaola.

CHICAMA, a large, fertile, and beautiful valleyof the province and corregimiento of Truxillo inPeru. It was one of the most populous in thetimes of the gentilisra of the Indians, owing to itsagreeable and benign temperature : is watered bya river of its name, which divides it from that ofChimu. In 1540, the friar Domingo de SantoTomas founded here a convent of his order, forthe instruction of the Indians, which immediatelywas turned into a priory and a house for noviciates.It is at present, however, fallen into decay, throughthe ravages of time. This valley is six leaguesfrom the capital, to the n. in the road which leadsto the provinces of Quito, Sana, and Piura.

Chicama, a river of this province and corregi-miento. It rises in the province of Guamachuco,from two very lofty mountains, called Y ulcaguancaand Yanaguanca, to the n. e . ; and waters and fer-

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dried flesh, hung up to preserve them from corrup-tion. Their garments are a shirt without sleeves,reaching down to the middle of their legs. Themarried people wear drawers of baize with colouredpuckers for festival days, and those who enjoyoffices of state wear a baize jacket : they neitheruse hatnorshoes, and no one of them ever goes outwithout slinging round his neck some medals and arosary. The hair is worn short until they marry,and when they become old they suffer it to growlong. The women wear close gowns which reachdown to the ground, and which they call tapoyes:they never swathe or bind themselves round thewaist, but carry on their necks, on gala-days, somethreads strung with glass intermixed with beadsmade of cacao nuts, and coloured beans ; thesethreads usually amount to 20 or SO rows ; on en-tering the church they always loosen their hair.The regulars of the company of the Jesuits taughtthem offices, in which they assisted most dexte-rously ; and it really excites admiration that In-dians, acquainted only with their own barbariandialect, should be able to manage the compass ofthe notes, understand their proportions and num-bers, and apply the rules of music to its execution.At certain times of the year they go a mdear, orto hunt for honey among the woods : from thencethey bring back wax of two sorts, one which iswhite and odoriferous, Jhe other of less substance,as the wax of Europe, manufactured by a speciesof bees without stings, called opernus; also an-other kind of wax, made by a still different sort ofbees, but which are all properly denominated wildwax. This wax is delivered to the curate, whopreserves it in his house to send to the provinces ofPeru ; and from the product of this article, andfrom that of the cotton, which is made into woofs,to the amount of two pounds weight yearly byeach Indian, he procures in 3xchange whatever isnecessary for the settlement, such as baizes, colouredwools, bags, iron and steel articles, choppingknives, wedges, hatchets, scissars, pocket-knives,needles, medals, bugles, and other articles of hard-ware and little necessaries, which, being stored upby him, is distributed amongst the natives accord-ing to their necessities, and in a manner that theymay want for nothing, but live happy and con-tented. The settlements are as follows :

San Xavier, San Joseph,

La Concepcion, Santiago,

San Miguel, San Juan,

San Ignacio, El Santo,

Santa Ana, Corazon.

San Rafael,

CHIQUIZA, a settlement of the corregimientoof Sachica in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. Itis of a cold temperature, and produces wheat,maize, barley, papaSy and the other fruits peculiarto its climate. Its ijihabitants are so few as scarcelyto amount to 30 housekeepers, and about the samenumber of Indians. Four leagues to the n. w. ofTunja, and somewhat less from Velez.

CHIRA, a settlement and seat of the silver minesof the province and corregimiento of Piura in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Paita.

Same name, another settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Nicoya in the kingdomof Guate-mala.

[CHIRAGOW. See Plein River.]

CHIRAMBIRA, an island situate in the largebay of St. Juan, on the coast of the province andgovernment of Choco in the S. sea, which gives itsname to a small creek formed by this island and thecontinent.

CHIRCA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Sicasica in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Chulumani.

CHIRE, Santa Rosa de a city of the govern-ment and province of Los Llanos in the NuevoReyno de Granada ; founded by the GovernorFrancisco Anciso. It is of a very hot and un-healthy temperature, but affords the same vegetableproductions as the rest of the province. It is somean and reduced as to contain hardly 100 house-keepers, and scarcely deserves the name of a city.This settlement lies the furthest to the n. w. extre-mity of any in this kingdom, and is bounded inthat quarter by the province and bishopric of Ca-racas.

Same name a river of the aboveprovince and government. It rises at the foot ofthe lomas del Viento, runs e. and enters the Meta,traversing the country of the Betoyes Indians.

CHIRGUA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela. It rises in the mountain of Ta-cazuruma on the s. runs s. and enters the Gamalo-tal, after having collected the waters of many otherrivers.

CHIRIBIQUI, Santa Fe de a settlement ofthe province and government of Cumana in thekingdom of Tierra Firme ; situate on the coast,between the rivers Mosina and Marecapana.

CHIRICOAS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe Nuevo Reyno de Granada, to the e. of themountains of Bogota, and at the entrance of thellanos or plains of Cazanare and Meta. Theylead a wandering life through the woods in com-pany with the Guaibas ; they are crafty and verydexterous thieves, but of a docile and pacific dis-position. In 16.64; some of them were reduced into

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the Catholic faith, and are reduced to settlements,though the number of these is very small.

CHITEPEC, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district and alcaldia mayor of Tlapain Nueva Espaiia. It is of a cold temperature,and contains 39 families of Indians, who live bysowing maize, the only vegetable production oftheir territory. Five leagues w. n. w. of its capi-tal.

CHITO, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdomof Quito, upon the s. shore of the river Sangalla,and in the royal road of Loxa, which leads to To-mependa. In its vicinity are some gold mines,but which are not worked ; its temperature is hotand moist, and consequently unhealthy.

[CHITTENDEN County, in Vermont, lieson lake Champlain, between Franklin county onthe w. and Addison s. ; La Moille river passesthrough its n. w. corner, and Onion river dividesit nearly in the centre.' Its chief town is Burling-ton. This county contained, by the census of1791, 44 townships and 7301 inhabitants. Sincethat time the n. counties have been taken from it,so that neither its size or number of inhabitants cannow be ascertained.]

[Chittenden, a township in Rutland county,Vermont, contains 159 inhabitants. The roadover the mountain passes through this township.It lies seven miles e. from the fort on Otter creek,in Pittsford, and about 60 n. by e. from Ben-nington.]

[CHITTENENGO, or Canaserage, a con-siderable stream which runs n. into lake Oneida,in the state of New York.]

CHIUAO, a small river of theprovince and colony of Surinam, or the part ofGuayana possessed by the Dutch . It rises in themountain of Sincomay, runs n. and turning w.enters another river which is without a name, andwhere several others unite to enter the Cuyuni onthe s. side.

CHIUATA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Cumana in the kingdom of TierraFirme. It rises from some plains in this territory,runs s. collecting the waters of several otherrivers, particularly that of the Suata, and thenenters the sea, just as it becomes navigable.

Same name, another river of the same provinceand government (Cumana), which rises at the foot of theserramas of Paraguay, to the w. of the town ofSan Fernando, runs s. and enters the Orinoco.

CHIUCHA, S. Juan de, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Lipes, and arch-bishopric of Charcas, in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of San Christoval.

CHIUCHIN, a settlement of the province andcorregimienlo of Chancay in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Canchas. In its district there is amineral hot-water spring, much renowned for thecuring of various kinds of maladies.

CHIUCHIU, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Atacama, and archbishopric ofCharcas, in Peru.

CHIUGOTOS, a barbarous na-tion of Indians of the province and government ofVenezuela, bordering upon the settlement of Mara-capana. They are very few, and live retired in themountains ; they are cruel even to cannibalism.

CHIUICOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Buenos Aires ; situate to the s. ofits capital.

CHIXILA, a settlement and head settlement ofthe district of the alcaldia mayor of Villalta inNueva Espana. It is of an hot temperature, con-tains 134 families of Indians, and lies 12 leaguesto the n. of its capital.

CHOCAIA, Nueva, a settlement of the pro-vince of Chichas and Tarija in Peru ; of the dis-trict of the former, and annexed to the curacy ofTatasi.

CHOCAMAN, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district of Zacan, and alcaldia mayorof Cordoba, in Nueva Espana. It is of a coldand moist temperature, contains 103 families ofIndians, and is five leagues to the n, n. w. of thecapital.

CHOCAN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Piura in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Aabaca.

CHOCAYAS, a mountain of the province andcorregimiento of Chichas and Tarija in Peru, andjurisdiction of Chuquisaca. It is celebrated forits rich gold mines.

CHOCO, a large province and government ofthe jurisdiction of Popayan ; by the territory ofwhich it is bounded e. and s. e . ; on the w. by thePacific or S. sea; n. by the barbarous nations ofIndians, and by the province of Darien ; and s. bythat of Barbacoas. The whole of this provinceabounds in woods and mountains, and is crossedby a chain of the Andes, which run as far as theisthmus of Panama. It is watered by several riversand streams, all of which run w. and enter the S.sea. The districts of Citara and Raposo form apart of this province ; very few of their ancientinhabitants remain at the present day ; the greaterpart of them having perished in the war of the

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of Key in Brazil. It runs s. and turning e. en-ters the lake Mini.

Same name, a settlement of this province (Rey) ; situate onthe sea-coast, and lying between this and the lakeMini.

CHUIGOTES. See Chiugotob.

CHUILLE, a river of the province and go-vernment ot Darien in the kingdom of TierraFirme. It has its source in the mountains towardsthe e. runs n. e. and enters the river Tarena.

CHUIRIEUI, a river of the province and go-vernment of Paraguay. It runs n. and enters theIguy near the mission of San Miguel.

CHULK, a small port or creek of the coast ofthe S. sea, in the province and corregimiento ofArequipa. It is shallow, insecure, and exposedto the ,v. w. winds.

==CHULIHUCANI, a settlement of tlie province and government of Potosiin Peru.

CHULINA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Charazani.

CHULISANA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Andahuailas in Peru; annexed tothe curacy of Cachi.

CHULUMANI, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Cicasica in Peru.

Same name, a river of the above province (Cicasica),which rises at the end of the cordillera of Ancuma,begins its course to the e. and forming a large bendtowards the n. enters the Beni just at its source,and where it keeps the name of the Chuquiavo.

CHUMA, a river of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, which flows down from the mountains ofBogota. It waters the territory of Merida, pass-ing opposite the city, and enters through the s.side into the lake of Maracaybo.

Same name, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

CHUMATLAN, a settlement of the head settle-nidnt of Zozocoles, and alculdia mayor of Papantla,in Nueva Espana. It is situate at the top of anhigli mountain, and from it may be seen all the set-tlements belonging to this jurisdiction. Its popu-lation amounts to 183 families of Indians, and itlies to the n. of its head settlement, three leaguesdistant from this, and 14 from the capital.

CHUMBE, a village of the province and corre-gimiento of Cuenca in the kingdom of Quito. Itis to the xd. of Tarqui, and on the w. shore of oneof the torrents rising in fhe river Paute. Not farfrom it are some excellent hot baths, of which nouse is made. LHere the stately melastoma and theembothriuin are growing at an elevation of 12,000feet, according to Humboldt, who visited this vil-lage in 1802. Lat. 3° 10' s.]

CHUMBES, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Vilcas Huaman in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Vizchongo.

CHUMBI, a settlement of the province and cor-of Parinacochas in Peru, where thereis a pious sanctuary, with an excellent painting ofthe blessed virgin, said to have been given by apontitf to the curate of this settlement when he wasat Rome.

CHUMBICHA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tucuman in Peru; situate to thew. of the valley of San Fernando de Cata-inarca.

CHUMBICOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Piura in Peru ; situate on theshore of a small river of the same name.

CHUMBILLA, a mountain of the province andcorregimiento of Huamanga in Peru ; celebratedfor a rich silver mine. It lies three leagues froma small settlement called Canaria, which is at pre-sent abandoned and deserted.

CHUMBIVILCAS, a province and corregi-miento of Peru. It is bounded n. by the provinceof Quispicanchialgo, and by that of Chilquesand Masques on the n. w. ; by those of Cota-bamba and Aymaraez on the jr. ; by that of Con-dcsuyos de Arequipa on the s . ; and on the e. bythat of Canes and Cauches. Its temperature isfor the most part cold, although in some placestemperate, so that it produces the fruits peculiar toeither climate ; such as wheat, barley, maize, pa-pas, and other seeds, though none in abundance,but plenty of neat cattle. In this province arefound the lofty and vast snowy mountains calledCondesuyos del Cuzco. It lies on the boundariesof the province of Parinacocha, being separatedfrom it by the river which flows down from theprovince of Camana. Here much cloth peculiarto the country is manufactured ; and in its districtare many mouths of gold and silver mines, themounds and pits of which, together with the re-mains of several mills for working metal, indicatethat in former times they were probably worked tono small advantage. They gather here a greatquantity of Cochineal, which is called macno, withwhich cloths are dyed of very fine colours. Ithas likewise fountains and mineral streams of hotwater, and is subject to earthquakes. Its reparti-mento used to amount to 85,800 dollars, and its al-cavala to 685 dollars per annum. Its inhabitants,including the district of Condesuyos, amount to16,000 souls, who live in the 22 following set-tlements :

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corregimiento of Huamanga in Peru; annexed tothe curacy of Anco.

CHUNIANIS, a barbarous nation of Indiansof the lands of Magellan, in the vicinity of thestraits of Magellan. It is a tribe descended fromthe Huyellanes. They are numerous and fero-cious ; the men and women go entirely naked ;their arms are bows and arrows, the latter beingpointed with well-filed flints ; they are robust, ofgreat strength, and fine appearance. Some tra-vellers pretend that these are the fabulous giantsof whom so many have written.

CHUPA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Asangaro in Peru.

Same name, a very lofty mountain of the provinceand government of Veragua in the kingdom ofTierra Firme, to the s. of the capital, midway be-tw'cen the coasts of the two seas.

CHUPACHOS, a river of Peru, which flowsdown from the mountains of the Andes. It risesfrom the lake Patancocho, in lat. 10° 4P s . ;washes the country of the Chupachos Indians, fromwhence it takes its name, and finishes its courseby emptying itself into the Mollobamba, on the®,side, in lat. 7° 21' s.

CHUPAN, a settlement of the province andcorregbniento of Huamalies in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Banos.

CHUPANA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Mainas in the kingdom of Quito. Itrises iu the cordillera of the Andes, to the n. of thecity of Guanuco in Peru, and after collecting thewaters of several other rivers in its protractedcourse, enters the river Maranon in a very broadstream.

CHUPAS, an extensive valley or plain of theprovince and corregimiento of Huamanga in Peru,near to the city. It is celebrated for the battlewhich was fought here by the Licentiate Baca deCastro, of the royal council of Castille, governor ofPeru, on the 16th September 1542, against thearmy of the rebels commanded by Diego de Al-magro the younger, and son of the conqueror of thesame name, when the latter was routed and takenprisoner with the loss of more than 700 men.

Same name, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Canta in the same kingdom ; annex-ed to the curacy of Pari.

CHUPE, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Cicasica in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Y anacache.

CHUQUI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Calca and Lares in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of of Lares.

2

Same name, settlement, in the province and corre-gimiento of Yamparaes, not far from the town ofPotosi.

CHUQUIABO. See PAZ.

CHUQUIBAMBA, a settlement and capital ofthe province and corregimiento of Condesuyos deArequipa in Peru. It is of a cold and unpleasanttemperature, and lies four leagues from Camana.

Same name, another settlement, in the province andcorregimiento of Cochabamba in Peru.

Same name, another settlement, in the province andcorregimiento of Chachapoyas, of the same king-dom.

CHUQUICARA, a river of the province andcorregimiento of Guamachuco. It rises in thesame province, and enters the river Santa, chang-ing its own name to this, immediately that it touche*the boundary of this jurisdiction, which it divide*from those of Truxillo and Guamachuco.

CHUQUICHAMBI, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Charangas, arch-bishopric of Charcas in Peru.

CHUQUICOTA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Carangas, and the arch-bishopric of Charcas, in Peru.

CHUQUILLA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Lipas, and archbishopric ofCharcas, in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of SanChristoval.

CHUQUl-MAGU, a river of Peru. It risesin the mountains of Jaen de Bracamoros, of thekingdom of Quito, and after laving the territoryof the corregimiento ofPiura, enters the S. sea.

CHUQUINGA, a settlement close to that ofNasca, and nearly upon the shore of the riverAmancay, where there is a narrow pass, throughwhich two men cannot without great difficulty goabreast ; for on one side rises the mountain nearlyperpendicular, and on the other is a precipicewhich runs into the river ; this is the spot where asignal victory was obtained by the rebel FranciscoHernandez Giron, in 1554, against the BrigadierAlonzo de Alvarado, both of them leaders of fac-tions, maintaining the separate interests enkindledin the civil wars of Peru.

Same name, another settlement, in the pro-vince and corregimiento of Aymaraez, also inPeru.

CHUQUIRIBAMBA, a large settlement of Indians, of the province and corregimiento of Loxa inthe kingdom of Quito ; on the shore of a smallriver which enters the Catamayu, on which ac-count some maintain that it is the origin of thelatter. It is surrounded by a beautiful and fertile

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COIOTZINGO, S. Miguel de, a settlementof the head settlement and alcaldia mayor ofGuejozingo in Nueva Espana. It contains ISfamilies of Indians.

COIQUAR, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cumaná, situate on tlie shore of ariver, between t!ie city of Cariaco, and the inte-rior bay of the gulf Triste.

COIUCA, San Miguel de, a settlement andhead settlement of tlie district of the government ofAcapulco in Nueva Espana. It contains 137 fa-milies of Indians, and is nine leagues to the n. e.of its capital. Close by this, and annexed toit, is another settlement, called Chinas, with 120families.

Coiuca, with the dedicatory title of San Agus-tin, another settlement of the head settlement andalcaldin mayor of Zacatula in the same kingdom ;containing 32 families of Indians and some Mus-tees, and being annexed to the curacy of itscapital.

COIULA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Cuicatlan in Nueva Es-paua. It contains SO families of Indians, whotrade in cochineal. Three leagues e. of its ca-pital.

COIUTLA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Zochicoatlan in Nueva Es-pana ; situate on a plain surrounded bj^ heights.It is annexed to the curacy of its capital, andcontains 37 families of Indians, being; 15 leagrucsdistant from its capital.

COJATA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Paucarcolla in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Vilques.

COJEDO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela in the kingdom of TierraFirme ; situate on the skirt of a mountain near theriver Guarico,

(COKESBURY College, in the town ofAbington, in Harford county, Maryland, is an in-stitution which bids fair to promote the improve-ment of science, and the cultivation of virtue. Itwas founded by the methodists in 1785, and has itsname in honour of Thomas Coke and FrancisAsbury, the American bishops of the methodistepiscopal church. The edifice is of brick, hand-somely built on a healthy spot, enjoying a fine airand a very extensive prospect. The college waserected, and is wholly supported by subscriptionand voluntary donations. The students, who areto consist of the sons of travelling preachers, annualsubscribers, members of the society, and orphans,are instructed in English, Latin, Greek, logic,rhetoric, history, geography, natural philosophy,

VOL. I.

and astronomy ; and when the finances of the col-lege will admit, they are to be taught the Hebrew,French, and German languages. The rules forthe private conduct of the students extend to theiramusements ; and all tend to promote regularity,encourage industry, and to nip the buds of idlenessand vice. Their recreations without doors arewalking, gardening, riding, andbathiiig; withindoors they have tools and accommodations for thecarpenter’s, joiner’s, cabinet-maker’s, or turner’sbusiness. These they are taught to consider aspleasing and healthful recreations, both for thebody and mind.]

COLAISACAPE, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Loxa in the kingdom ofQuito.

COLUMBO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Loxa in the kingdom of Quito.

COLAMI, a settlement of Indians of S. Carolina;situate on the shore of the river Albama.

COLAN, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Piura in Peru, on the coast of thePacific ; annexed to the curacy of Paita. its terri-tory produces in abundance fruits and vegetables,which are carried for the supply of its capital.All its inhabitants are either agriculturists or fisher-men. It is watered by the river Achira, alsocalled Colan, as well as the settlement ; and thoughdistinct from Cachimayu, it is not so from Cata-mayu, as is erroneously stated by Mr. La Marti-niere. [Here they make large rafts of logs, whichwill carry 60 or 70 tons of goods ; with these theymake long voyages, even to Panama, 5 or 600leagues distant, 'fhey have a mast with a sailfastened to it. They always go before the wind,being unable to ply against it ; and therefore onlyfit for these seas, where the wind is always in amanner the same, not varying above a point or twoall the way from Lima, till they come into the bayof Panama ; and there they must sometimes w'aitfor a change. Their cargo is usually wine, oil,sugar, Quito cloth, soap, and dressed goat-skins.The float is usually navigated by three or four men,who sell their float where they dispose of theircargo ; and return as passengers to the port theycame from. The Indians go out at night by thehelp of the land-wind with fishing floats, moremanageable than the others, though these havemasts and sails too, and return again in the davtime with the sea-wind.] Lat. 4° 56' s.

Colan, the aforesaid river. See Cat am a yu.

COLAPISAS, a settlement of Indians of theprovince and government of Louisiana ; situate onthe shore of the Mississippi, upon a long strip ofland formed by the lake Maurepas.

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CORORAMO, a small river of tbe province andgovernment of Guayana. It rises to the w. of thelake Icupa, runs n. and enters the Paraguay.

COROYA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán in Peru ; of the district andjurisdiction of the city of Cordoba ; situate on theshore of the river Priraero.

COROYO, a lake of the province and countryof Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions.It is in the island of Topinambes, and is formedby the waters of the Maranon. '

COROZAL, or Pileta, a settlement of theprovince and government of Cartagena in the king-dom of Tierra Firme.

CORPAHUASI, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Cotabamba in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Huaillati.

CORPANQUI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Tillos.

CORPUS-CHRISTI, a settlement of the mis-sions which were held by the regulars of the com-pany of Jesuits in the province and government ofParaguay ; situate on the shore of the river Parana,about 11 leagues n. e. of Candelaria. Lat. 27° T23" s. Long. 55° 32' 29" w.

Corpus-Christi, a large, beautiful, and fertilevalley of the province and government of Mariquitain the Nuevo Reyno de Granada.

CORQUEMAR, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Carangas in Peru, and of thearchbishopric of Charcas.

CORQUINA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana. It runs s. and enters theOrinoco.

CORRAL, a settlement of the district of Gua-dalabquen, of the kingdom of Chile ; situate on theshore of the river Valdivia.

Corral, Quemado, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Piura in Peru ; situatein an angle formed by a river of this name.

CORRALES, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Antioquia ; situate on the shore ofthe river Perico, in the sierras of Guarnoco.

CORRALITO, a setdement of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, in the district and juris-diction of the city of Santiago del Estero ; to thee. of the same, and on the shore of the river Gua-rico.

CORRIENTES, S.Juan de , a city of theprovince and government of Buenos Ayres inPeru ; founded in 1588, on the e. coast of the riverLa Plata, near the part where those of the Paranaand Paraguay unite. It has, besides the parish

church, three convents, of St. Domingo, St. Francis,and La Merced, and a college which belonged tothe regulars of the company of Jesuits. This cityhas been harassed by the infidel Abipones In-dians, who have here put to death many Spaniards,and taken others prisoners ; on which account aguard of horse-militia has been established for itsdefence. (It is 100 leagues n. of the city of SantaFe, and contained, in 1801, 4300 inhabitants. Lat.27° 27' 21" s.)

CORRIENTES, S. JUAN DE, a rivcr of the pro-vince and government of Darien in the kingdom ofTierra Firme. It rises in the mountains towardsthe n. and enters the sea in the large plain oppositethe Mulatto isles.

CORRIENTES, S. JUAN DE, another river, of theprovince and government of Buenos Ayres, whichrises from the lake Yberia, and runs s. w. to enterthe river La Plata.

CORRIENTES, S. JUAN DE, another, of the pro-vince and government of Paraguay. It rises in theserrania which lies between the rivers Paraguayand Parana, runs w. and enters the former betweenthe rivers Mboeri and P'areiri.

CORRIENTES, S. JUAN DE, another, of the pro-vince and captainship of Rey in Brazil, which runss.s. e. and enters the large lake of Los Patos.

CORRIENTES, S. JUAN DE, a Cape of the s. coastof the island of Cuba : CO leagues from the islandof Trinidad, and 13 from the cape of San An-tonio.

CORRIENTES, S. JUAN DE, another cape, calledalso De Arenas Gordas, on the coast which lies be-tween the river La Plata and the straits of Ma-gellan, between the capes San Antonio and SaaAndres.

CORRIENTES, S. JUAN DE, another Cape OF pointof the coast, in the province and captainship ofSeara, between the river Molitatuba and the portPalmeras.

(CORTLANDT, a township in the n. part ofthe county of W. Chester, on the e. bank of Hud-son river. New York, containing 1932 inhabitants,of whom 66 are slaves. Of its inhabitants, in 1796,305 were electors.)

CORUPA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Darien in the kingdom of Tierra Firme.It rises near the coast of the N. sea to the e. of theprovince, and enters the Tarina.

CORUPA, another river. See Curupa.

CORUPO, San Francisco de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Uruapa, and alcaldia mayorof Valladolid, in the province and bishopric ofMechoacan. It contains S3 families of Indians,3x2

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bounded ??. and 71 . w. by Mifiiin ; e. and n.e. bySusqiiehaiinah river, which divides it from Dau-phin ; i-. by York, and s.w. by Franklin county.It is 47 miles in length, and 42 in breadth, and has10 townships, of which Carlisle is the chief. Thecounty is generally mountainous; lies between^North and Soutli mountain ; on each side of Cone-dogwinet creek, there is an extensive, rich, andwell cultivated valley. It contains 18,243 inhabi-tants, of whom 223 are slaves.]

[Cumberland, a township in York county,Pennsylvania. Also the name of a township inWashington county, in the same state.]

[Cumberland County, in Fayette district, N.Carolina, contains 8671 inhabitants, of whom 2181are slaves. Chief town Fayetteville.]

rCUMBERLAND, a township of the above county (Cumberland),in N. Carolina,]

[Cumberland, a post-town and the chieftownship of Alleghany county, Maryland, lies onthe «. bank of a great bend of Potowmack river,and on both sides of the mouth of Will’s creek.It is 148 miles w. by n. of Baltimore, 109 mea-sured miles above Georgetown, and about 105». w. of Washington City. Fort Cumberlandstood formerly at the w. side of the mouth of Will’screek.]

[Cumberland County, in Virginia, on the«, side of Appamatox river, which divides it fromPrince Edward. It contains 8153 inhabitants, ofwhom 4434 are slaves. The court-house is 28miles from Pawhatan court-house, and 52 fromRichmond.]

[Cumberland Mountain occupies a part ofthe uninhabited country of the state of Tennessee,between the districts of Washington and Hamiltonand Mero district, and between the two firstnamed districts and the state of Kentucky. Theridge is about SO miles broad, and extends fromCrow creek, on Tennessee river, from s. w. ion. e.The place where the Tennessee breaks through theGreat ridge, called the Whirl or Suck, is 250miles above the Muscle shoals. Limestone isfound on both sides the mountain. The moun-tain consists of the most stupendous piles of craggyrocks of any mountain in the w. country ; inseveral parts of it, it is inaccessible for miles, evento the Indians on foot. In one place particularly,near the summit of the mountain, there is a mostremarkable ledge of rocks, of about SO miles inlength, and 200 feet thick, shewing a perpen-dicular face to the s. e. more noble and grand thanany artificial fortification in the known world, andapparently equal in point of regularity.]

[Cumberland River, called by the Indians“ Shawanee,” and by the French “ Shavanon,”falls into the Ohio 10 miles above the mouth ofTennessee river, and about 24 miles due e. fromfort Massac, and 1113 below Pittsburg. It isnavigable for large vessels to Nashville in Ten-nessee, and from thence to the mouth of Obed’s orObas river. The Caney-fork, Harpeth, Stones,Red, and Obed’s, are its chief branches ; some ofthem are navigable to a great distance. TheCumberland mountains in Virginia separate thehead waters of this river from those of Clinchriver ; it runs s. w. till it comes near the s. line ofKentucky, when its course is w. in general,through Lincoln county, receiving many streamsfrom each side ; thence it flows s. w. into the stateof Tennessee, where it takes a winding course, in-closing Sumner, Davidson, and Tennessee coun-ties ; afterwards it takes a n. w. direction, and re-enters the state of Kentucky ; and from thence itpreserves nearly an uniform distance from Tennes-see river to its mouth, where it is 300 yards wide.It is 200 yards broad at Nashville, and its wholelength is computed to be above 450 miles.]

[Cumberland-River, a place so called, wherea post-office is kept, in Tennessee, 13 miles fromCumberland mountain, and 80 from the Crab-Orchard in Kentucky.]

CUMBICOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Piura in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Trias.

CUMBINAMA. See Loyola.

CUMINACA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Asangaro in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Combaya.

[CUMMASHAWAS, or Cummasuawaa, asound and village on the e. side of Washingtonisland, on the n. w. coast of N. America. Theport is capacious and safe. In this port CaptainIngraham remained some time, and he observes,in his journal, that here, in direct opposition tomost other parts of the world, the women main-tained a precedency to the men in every point ;insomuch that a man dares not trade without theconcurrence of his wife, and that he has often beenwitness to men’s being abused for parting withskins before their approbation was obtained ; andthis precedency often occasioned much disturbance.

[CUMMINGTON, a township in Hampshirecounty, Massachusetts, having 873 inhabitants;lying about 20 miles n. w. of Northampton, and120 n. w. by zjj. of Boston. It was incorporatedin 1779.1

CUMPAYO, a settlement of the province of

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