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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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ACHA, Mountains of, in the province and government of Guayana; they run from N to S on the shore of the river Caroni.

ACHACACHE, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Omasuyos, the capital of this province, in Peru. It contains, besides the parish chapel, another, in which is an image of Christ, with the dedicatory title of La Misericordia. [Lat. 16° 33' 30" S. Long. 79° 23' 20" W.]

ACHAGUA, a nation of Indians of the nuevo Reyno de Granada, who dwell among the plains of Gazanare and Meta, and in the woods which skirt the river Ele. They are bold in their engagements with wild beasts, but with human beings they have recourse rather to poison and stratagem; they are dexterous in the use of the dart and spear, and never miss their aim; are particularly fond of horses, of which they take the utmost care, anointing and rubbing them with oil ; and it is a great thing among them to have one of these animals of peculiar size and beauty. They go naked, but, for the sake of decency, wear a small apron made of the thread of aloes, the rest of their bodies being painted of different colours. They are accustomed, at the birth of their children, to smear them with a bituminous ointment, which hinders the hair from growing, even upon the eyebrows. The women's brows are also entirely deprived of hair, and the juice of jagua being immediately rubbed into the little holes formed by the depilatory operation, they remain bald for ever after. They are of a gentle disposisition, but much given to intoxication. The Jesuits reduced many to the catholic faith, forming them into settlements, in 1661 .

ACHALA, Mountains of, in the province and government of Tucuman, bounded by the mountains of Cuyo or Mendoza, of the kingdom of Chile; they run from N N W to S S E at the sources of the river Quarto.

Achamqui. See CHANQUI.

ACHAS, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Guamanga in Peru, situate on the confines which divide the above province from Huanta.

ACHEPE, Bay of, a small port of the N. sea, on the E, coast of the Isla Real, or Cape Breton. It is close to N. cape.

[ACHIACHICA, a town in Mexico. See Angelos.]

ACHIANTLAS, Miguel de, the head settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Tepozcolula. It contains a convent of monks of Santo Domingo, and 260 families of Indians, who occupy themselves in cultivating and improving the land. It is eight leagues to the W with an inclination to the S of its capital.

ACHIBAMBA, a river of the province and government of Mainas in the kingdom of Quito; it rises in the mountains, and enters the Marañon.

ACHINUTLAN, a very lofty mountain of the province and government of Guayana, or Nueva Andalucia. It is on the shore of the river Orinoco, and to the E of the Ciudad Real, (royal city), the river Tacuragua running between them.

ACHIRA. See Cata-Magu.

ACHITE, a small river of the province and government of Guayana. It runs from S to N and enters the Cuyuni.

ACHOCALLA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Pacages in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Viacha.

ACHOGOA, a settlement of the province and government of Cinaloa, founded by the missionaries of the Jesuits, between the rivers Tuerte, Mayo, and Ribas.

ACHOMA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Collahuas in Peru. In its vicinity is a volcano, called Amboto and Sahuarcuca, which vomits smoke and flames; the latter of which are seen clearly at night.

ACHONGA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Angaraes in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Lircay.

ACHOUPEKAHIGAN, a river of Canada. It runs E afterwards turns to the S and enters the lake of St. Thomas.

[ACKLIN'S Island. See Crooked Island.]

ACLA, a small city of the kingdom of Tierra Firme, in the province of Darien, founded by Gabriel de Roxas, in 1514, on the coast of the S. sea, at the mouth of the gulph of Uraba, in front of the island of Pinos, with a good fort, then much frequented and very convenient, from having a good bottom, but somewhat incommoded by currents. Pedro Arias Davila built here a fort for its defence in 1516; but the settlement, nevertheless, did not keep long together, the Spaniards having abandoned it, on account of its unhealthiness, in 1532. [Lat. 8° 56' N. Long. 77° 40' W.]

ACOBAMBA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Angaraes in Peru. It was the capital, but at present the town of Guancavelica bears that title, on account of its being the residence of the governor and other people of consequence. It is of a good temperature, and so abundant in grain, that its crops of wheat amount to 25,000 bushels yearly. In an estate near it, are some pyramidical stones, and in other parts

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in America, and they reckon the gold it has pro-duced at 33 millions of dollars, without countingthat which has been concealed ; but at present theyscarce procure from it 200 pound weight a year,on account of the increased charges of labour, andthe want of energy in the inhabitants. Many lumpsof gold have been found here, among which thereis still remembered to have been one of the figure ofa horse, which weighed 100 weight and some oddpounds, and which was carried to the EmperorCharles V. ; and likewise another lump which wassent to Philip II. bearing a resemblance to thehead of a man, which, however, was lost togetherwith much other riches in the channel of Bahama.This latter lump was found in the washing place ofYnahuaya. Nearly the whole of the territory of thisprovince is interspered with gold. The most cele-brated washing places that it had were called SanJuan del Oro, Paulo Coya, Ananea, and that whichwas superior to all, Aporoma. In the year 1713, alump of silver also was discovered in the mountainof Ucuntaya, being of a very solid piece of metal,and of prodigious value ; in its rivers are foundsands of gold, to which at certain times of the year,the Indians have recourse, in order to pay their tri-butes. There are also other mines of silver andcopper in various parts, and springs of hot water.It is very liable to earthquakes, and according tothe tradition of the Indians, there was one whichtook place before the conquest, so large as to over-turn mountains, and that, opening the earth, itswallowed up in an abyss many towns with theirinhabitants. They likewise assert, that in the year1747, another earthquake, throwing out of theground a dirty and muddy water, thereby infectedthe rivers to such a degree as to cause a dreadfuland general mortality. It has some large riversas well as small ; all of which empty themselvesinto the Ynambari, thus rendering this river ex-tremely abundant : towards the n. and n. e. which,as we have observed, is bounded by the infidel In-dians, there are large tracts of ground covered withcoca and rice, with an abundance of mountainfruits. In the aforesaid river they are accustomedto take shad and large dories by shooting themwith muskets, or by piercing them with arrows ordarts. There are also some lakes, which, althoughwithout fish, abound in ducks, snipes, and otheraquatic fowl. The infidel Indians have made va-rious irruptions into this province: its capital isSandia, and its natives, who amount to 28,000, aredivided into 26 settlements, as follows : The repar-timiento received by the corregidor used to amountto 82,800 dollars, and it paid 662 yearly for alcavala.

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Sandia, Coaza,

Cuiocuio. Cruzero,

Laqueique, Ajoiani,

Yñacoreque, Usicaios,

Queneque, Esquena,

Patambuco, Cuntuquita,

S. Juan del Oro, Ynambari,

Quiaca, Ayapata,

Sina, Ytuata,

Para, Macusani,

Limbani, Ollachea,

Chejani, Azaroma,

Aporoma, Corani.

CARABAILLO, a river of the province andcorregimiento of Cercado in Peru. It rises in theprovince of Canta from three lakes to the n. of thecapital, and continues its course until it join thesea close to the point of Marques.

CARABAILLO, a settlement of this province andcorregimiento.

CARABANA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana, which runs to the s. andenters the Orinoco between the Corquina and theArrewow. According to Bellin, in his map of thecourse of part of the Orinoco, it is distant fromthe other river called Corobana, which also en-ters the Orinoco on the opposite side.

CARABATANG, a river of the province andcaptainship of Rio Grande in Brazil. It rises inthe sierra of the Tiguares Indians, near the coast,runs s. s. e. and enters the sea between the Congand the Goyana.

CARABELAS, River of the, in the provinceand captainship of Puerto Seguro in Brazil. Itrises in the cold sierra of the Pories Indians, runss. e. and according to Cruz, e. and enters the seaopposite the bank of the Escollos (hidden rocks).

Carabelas, Grandes, a port of the islandof Cuba, on the n. part.

Carabelas, Chicas, a bay in the same island,and on the same coast, between the settlement ofGuanajo and the Puerto del Poniente (w. port.)

CARABERES. See article Guarayos.

CARABUCO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Omasuyos in Peru ; in the vici-nity of which are the ruins of a chapel, which wasdedicated to St. Bartholomew ; and the Indianshave a tradition that the above-mentioned saint ap-peared here and preached the gospel to them :thus, in the principal altar of the church, they re-verence a large cross of very strong wood, andwhich is celebrated for having wrought many mi-racles ; splinters of it being anxiously sought afterby the faithful, wherefrom to form small crosses ;

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merit of Venezuela ; situate upon the coast nearcape Blanco.

(CATABAW River. See Wateree.)

(Catabaw Indians, a small tribe who have onetown called Catabaw, situate on the river of thatname, hit. 44° S9' n, on the boundary line betweenN. and S. Carolina, and contains about 450 inha-bitants, of which about 150 are fighting men.They are the only tribe w hich resides in the state ;144,000 acres of land . were granted them by theproprietary government. These are the remains ofa forrnidalile nation, the bravest and most generousenemy thp Six Nations had, butthey have degenera-ted sincp they have been surrounded by the whites.)

CATABUHU, a river of the province andcountry of Las Amazonas: it rises near the equi-noctial line, runs s. e. and enters the Rio Negro.

CATACACHI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiehto of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Santa Cruz, in which there is astream of water Avhich distils from some crevices,and deposits in its bed a sort of white stone orcrystalline substance, which they call catachi^ andwhich being dissolved in water, is accounted a spe-cific in the flux.

CATACAOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Piura in Peru.

CATACOCHA, a settlement of the province andcorreghniento of Loxa in the kingdom of Quito.

CATACUMBO, a river of the province andgovernment of Maracaibo, which rises to the e. ofthe city of Las Palmas, and runs e. increasing itsstream by many others which flow into it, until itunites itself with the Sulia, to enter the lake ofMaracaibo; where, at its mouth, it extends itselfand forms a large pool of water called La Lagu-neta.

CATAGANE, a settlement of Canada, situateon the side of lake Superior, close to the point ofChagovamigon, (or more properly called Camanis-tigovan.)

CATAGUAR, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cumaná ; situate to the e. of thecity of Cariaco.

CATALANA, an island of the gulf of Califor-nia, or Mar Roxo de Cories ; situate near thecoast, between the islands of Monserrat and SantaCruz.

CATALINA, Santa, a settlement of the headsettlement and alcaldia mayor of Tezcoco in Nue-va Espana ; annexed to the settlement of NuestraSenora de la Purificacion. It contains 132 fami-lies of Indians.

CATALINA, Santa, another seUlement in the head settle-mentand district of Tepaxtlan, and alcaldia mar/orof Cuercavaca, in Nueva España.

CATALINA, Santa, another settlement of thehead settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tepeaca inthe same kingdom.

CATALINA, Santa, another, with the distin-gnishing title of Martyr, in the head settlement andah aldia mayor of Zacatlan in the same kingdom.

CATALINA, Santa, anotlier settlement of thehead settlement of Teutalpan, and alcaldia mayorof Zacatlan, in the same kingdom.

CATALINA, Santa, a small settlement of thehead settlement and alcaldia mayor of Juxtlahua-ca in the same kingdom.

CATALINA, Santa, another, of the head set-tlement of Tantoyuca, and alcaldia mayor ofTampico, in the same kingdom : it is of a hot tem-perature, and contains 80 families of Indians, whoapply themselves to the culture of the soil ; is 10leagues to the e. of its head settlement.

CATALINA, Santa, another, of the provinceand corregimiento of Omasuyos in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Huaicho.

CATALINA, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Cauta in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Pari ; it has some hot me-dicinal baths.

CATALINA, Santa, a small settlement of thedistrict and jurisdiction of Valladolid in the pro-vince and bishopric of Mechoacan of NuevaEspana.

CATALINA, Santa, another,' of the head set-tlement of Mistepeque, and alcaldia mayor of Ne-japa, in Nueva España: it is of a cold temperature,situate at the foot of a mountain, with 60 familiesof Indians, and is 4 leagues from its head settle-ment.

CATALINA, Santa, another, of the head set-tlement of Quiatoni, and alcaldia mayor of Teutit-lan, in Nueva España, with 20 families of Indians ;and is one league n. of its head settlement.

CATALINA, Santa, another settlement of themissions which were held by the regulars of thecompany of Jesuits, in the province of Tepeguanaand kingdom of Nueva Viscaya, on the shore ofthe river Las Nasas ; is 30 leagues to the n. w. ofits capital.

CATALINA, Santa, another settlement, withthe addition of Sera, of the province and govern-ment of Maracaibo, in the district of the city ofPedraza ; situate on the shore of the river Pariva ;is one of the missions which are held in Barinas bjthe religion of St. Domingo.

CATALINA, Santa, another, of the same pro-

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Tvliich rises in the mountains of the cordillera.On its shores is caught a much esteemed sort ofshell-fish, called iascas. It runs into the sea inlat. 31° 40'.

Same name, a volcano of the same kingdom (Chile), ce-lebrated for the irruptions it has made. It is 23leagues from the coast, and to the n. of the cityof San Juan de la Frontera, in lat. 31° 30' s.

CHUAZINGO, a settlement of the head settle-ment and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in Nueva Es-pana. It contains 124 families of Indians, and istwo leagues to the n. n. w. of that of Tlapa.

CHUBISCA, a settlement of the missionswhich belong to the religious order of St. Francis,in the province of Taraumara, and kingdom ofNueva Vizcaya, lying four leagues to the s. e.one-fourth to the s. of the settlement and real of themines of San Felipe de Chiguaga. Fivfe leaguesto the s. €. of this settlement are two large estates,called Fresnos and Charcas.

CHUCAPA, a settlement of the province andnorregimiento of Angaraes in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Acoria.

Same name another settlement, in the province and corre-ghniento of Xauja in the same kingdom.

CHUCANTI, a river of the province and go-vernment of Darien, in the kingdom of TierraFirrae. it rises in the mountains towards the n.and enters the sea between the islands Las Palmasand Pinos.

CHUCAY, a settlement of the province of Venezuela, and government of Maracaibo ; situate onthe extremity of the peninsula formed by the capeof San Roman.

CHUCHA, a bay in the port of Portobelo, andlying quite in the interior of the same. It is anharbour, or second port, of a circular figure,closed in on all sides, its access being through anarrow channel. Several rivers flow into it.

CHUCHE, a small island of the S. sea, in thebay and gulph of Panama. It lies the farthest ofany from the coast, and to the w. of the largeisland of Rey.

CHUCHULAIA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Combaya, in which there is apious sanctuary of Our Lady, much frequented.

CHUCUNAQUI, a large river of the provinceof Darien, and kingdom of Tierra Firme. Itrises in the mountainous parts, and runs 13leagues as far as the fort Royal of Santa Maria,collecting in its course the waters of 20 rivers lessthan itself ; it then enters the grand river Tuira.

CHUCHUNGA, a settlement of the provinceand government of Jaen do Bracamoros in thekingdom of Quito; situate on the shore of theriver of its name, having a port, which is a lad-ing-place for the river Maranon. The above riverrises in the sierra of the province of Luya andChilians, enters the Ymasa, being united to theCumbassa ; these together run into the Maranon,and at their conflux is the aforesaid port. Itsmouth is in lat. 5° 12' SO* s.

CllUCMI. See Julumito.

CHUCO, Santiago de, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Huamachuco inPeru.

CHUCUITO, a province and government ofPeru ; bounded e. by the great lake of its name,and part of the province of Omasuyos ; n. by thatof Paucarcolla orPuno ; s. e. by that of Pacages ;and s. w. and w. by the cordillera of the coastwhich looks towards Moquehua. It is 23 leagueslong from «. to s. and 36 wide. It was extremelypopulous at the time of the conquest, and was onthat account considered wealthy. Its governorshad the controul of political afiairs, and enjoyedthe title of vice-patron and captain-general of theimmediate provinces, including some which layupon the coast. It is of a cold but healthy tempe-rature, particularly in the rainy months, whichare December, February, and March. It producessweet and bitter papas, of which are made chum,bark, canagua, hagua, and barley. In some ofthe glens, where the soil is moister, they growpulse, flowers, and fruit-trees. This provinceabounds in cattle, such as cows, sheep and pigs,and native sheep, which the natives use for trad-ing instead of asses ; the regular load for eachbeing four or five arrohas. Here are also bredalpacas, huanacos, vicunas, deer, cuyes, and vizca-chas, which are similar in shape and figure to ahare ; also pigeons, partridges, ducks, and os-triches. From (he fleeces of the cattle many kindsof woven articles are made for useful and orna-mental apparel, beautifully dyed ; and from thewool of the alpaca handsome carpets, quilts, andmantles of various designs and colours. This pro-vince has many silver mines, which are workedwith emolument ; also streams of hot medicinalwaters. It is situate on the shores of the greatlake of Chucuito, from which large quantities offish are taken, and sold for a good price to theneighbouring provinces. It is watered by severalrivers, all of which enter the lake : the largest ormost considerable of them is the Hilava. Its na-tives amount to 30,000, separated in 10 differentsettlements. Its repartimiento used to amount to101,730 dollars, and its alcavala to 813 dollars an-nually. The capital is of the same name. This

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belongs to the bishopric of La Paz, and is so situateas to have a fine view of the lake. It is a settle-ment at once the most pleasant and convenient,fertile, and abounding in fruits and cattle, butits temperature is excessively cold. It has twoparishes, with the dedicatory title of Santo Do-mingo and La Asuncion, and two hermitages de-dicated to St. Barbara and St. Sebastian. Theother settlements are,

Asiento de Minas de Mi- Asiento del Desagua-

chacani, dero,

Asiento de San Ante- Acora,

nio de Esquilache, Hi lave,

Pomata, *July,

Asiento de Huacullani, Santiago,

Zepita.

Same name, The lake of, which, although it bethus called, is also known by the name of Titicaca,is 51 leagues in length from n. w. to s. e. and 26in width, although in some parts less. On its shoresare six provinces or corregimientos^ which are.The province of this Paucarcolla,name, Lampa,Pacages, Asangaro.Omasuyos,This lake is of sufficient depth for vessels ofany size, since in many bays not far in from itsshores there are from four to six fathoms of water,and within it, some places from 40 to 50. It is, asfar as is ascertained, without any shoals or banks.Near it grow some herbs, called clacchos, eaten bythe cows and pigs ; also a great quantity of theherb called totora, or cat’s tail, which in someparts grows to the length of a yard and an half.Of this the Indians make rafts, not only for fishingbut for carrying to and fro the cattleand productionsof the harvest and crops growing in the variousislands lying in this lake. Some of these islandsare so covered and hemmed in with the herb totorathat it requires much force and labour to cut a pas-sage through it. In one of the largest of theseislands the Incas had a magnificent temple, dedi-cated to the sun, the first that was ever built. Thislake is not without its tempests and squalls ; theyare, on the contrary, frequent, and have at timescaused no inconsiderable mischief. Its watersare thick, but are nevertheless drank by the cattle,and even the Indians ; particularly by those ofthe nation of the Uros, who are a poor ignorantpeople, who formerly lived upon the islands ingreat wretchedness, and who by dint of great solici-tations have been prevailed upon to leave them forthe mainland^ where they now reside in some mi-serable caves, excavated places, or holes in theearth covered over with fiags of totora^ maintain-

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ing themselves by fishing. This lake containslikewise various kinds of fish, such as trout,ormantos, cuches, anchovies, and boquillas inabundance; these are, for the most part, aboutthe length of a man’s hand, and three fingersthick. The Indians of Yunguyo take upwardsof 700 yearly, and sell them at four and six dollarsthe thousand. They also catch some small peje-reyesy and an infinite variety of birds, which aresalted, and afford excellent food. It is confidentlyand repeatedly asserted by the Indians, that thegreater part of the riches of the country was throwninto this lake when the Spaniards entered it at thetime of the conquest ; and amongst other valuablesthe great gold chain made by the order of theInca Huayanacap, which was 2S3 yards in length,and within which 6000 men could dance.

CHUCURPU, an ancient settlement of warlikeIndians of the province and corregimiento ofCuzco in Peru. It lies to the e. of this city, andwas subjected and united to the empire after along resistance by Pachacutec, emperor of theIncas.

CHUCUTI, a river of the province and go-vernment of Darien in the government of TierraFirme. It rises in the mountains towards the e.and following this course, enters the Taranena at asmall distance from its source.

CHUDAUINAS, a barbarous nation of Indians of the kingdom of Quito, to the s, e. ofthis city. They inhabit the part lying s. w. ofthe river Pastaza, and are bounded on the s. e, bythe Ipapuisas, and w. by the Xibaros. They arenot numerous, owing to the continual wars whichthey have maintained with their neighbours ; andthough of a martial spirt, they are of a docile andhumane disposition. Some of them have 'Unitedthemselves with the Andoas, in the settlement ofthis name, which lies upon the w. shore of theriver Pastaza.

CHUECA, San Agustin de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Lipes, and archbi-shopric of Charcas, in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of San Christoval.

CHUETI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Choco. It rises in the sierras of Abide,runs w. and enters the Paganagandi.

CHUFIAS, a barbarous nation of Indians whoinhabit the e. of the river Aguaricu, bounded onthe n. w. by the nation of the Encabellados, withwhom they are in continual warfare.

CHUGOD, Santa Catalina de, a settlementof the province and corregimiento of Caxamarcain Peru, annexed to the curacy of Chetu.

CHUI, a river of the province and captainship3 o

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rises in the hi<>'h lands of the Cfierokecs country,and joining Tallapoose, forms Alabama river. Itscourse is generally s. running through the conntryof the Natchez, and other tribes of the UpperCreeks, the roughest and most broken of the wholenation. It is rapid, and full of rocks and shoals,hardly navigable for canoes.)

(COOSAWATCHIE, or Coosahatchie, apost-town in Beaufort district, S. Carolina; situ-ated on the s. w. side of Coosa river, over which abridge has been lately erected. It is a flourishingplace, having about 40 houses, a court-house, andgaol. The courts formerly held at Beaufort areheld here. It is 33 miles from Beaufort, and 77ze. ». w. of Charleslon.)

(COOTSTOWN, in Berks county, Pennsyl-vania, is situated on a branch of Sauhoca creek, abranch of the Schuylkill river. It contains 40houses, and a German, Lutheran, and Calvinistchurch united. It is 17 miles n. n. e. of Reading,and 73 n. w. by n. of Philadelphia.)

COPA, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of Ambana.

Copa, another settlement, in the province andcorregimiento of Caxatambo in the same kingdom ;annexed to the curacy of Mangas.

Copa, a large and copious river of the kingdomof Quito, which runs n. e. enters the Cipre to then. and the Quinindi to the s. ; then joins theBlanco on the w. side, a little before this unites it-self with the Guaillabamba, and forms the Esme-raldas. Its mouth or entrance is in lat. 2Q' n.

COPACAUANA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Omasuyos in Peru ; situateon a loner strip of land which runs into the greatlake of Titicaca or Chucuito. Here is veneratedan image of Nuestra Senora de la Candelaria,which, in 1583, was put into a temple, very sump-tuous, and of fine architecture, riches, and orna-ments. The same is a sanctuary of the greatestdevotion, and most resorted to of any in Peru.

COPACAUANA, another settlement, in the pro-vince and corregimiento of Paria in the samekingdom.

COPACAUANA, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of theJesuits, in the province of Gayrá, and govern-ment of Paraguay ; situate on the shore of a smallriver which enters the Parana, and on the skirtof a mountain to the s. e. of the city of Gayra,which was destroyed by the Portuguese of SanPablo,

COPACAUANA, a point or long strip of land oflake Titicaca, which serves as a limit to the

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province of Umamarca, in the province of Uma-suyos.

COPAMALA, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Los Zoques in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

COPAIQUE, a setlement of the province andcorregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Ambana.

COPALA, a province of the alcaldia mayor ofNueva España ; bounded n. w. by that of Chia-metla or Chametlan. It is a mountainous coun-try, abounding in wax, honey, and some sugar-cane, from which sugar is made in various mills.Its population of Indians is but small, and thesefot the most part occupy themselves in fishing ;an employment which is readily afforded them bythe copious river Mazatan. It is of a very hottemperature, and has many silver mines, whichare worked to tolerable advantage. Some salinesalso on the sea-shore are not less lucrative ; andhere there is a small port. This province has beenfrequently invaded by enemies. Near the riverPiastla, which also waters this province, the re-gulars of the company of Jesuits held some mis-sions, where there had been formed three settle-ments of Indians, reduced to the Catholic faith.The capital is the town called Del Rosario, andthe other settlements are,

Mazatan, Charcas, the same,

Copala, real of the Cosela, the same,mines, San Xavier de Cavasan.

Copala, with the dedicatory title of San Juan,a settlement and head settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Tepozcolula in Nueva Espana. It isof a hot temperature, pleasant, and abounding , infruits. It contains 104 families of Indians, and is15 leagues w. by s. of its capital.

Copala, another settlement in the head settle-ment of Tuzcacuesco, and alcaldia mayor ofAmola, in the same kingdom. It contains 32 fa-milies of Indians, and is five leagues to the n. ofits head settlement.

Copala, another settlement and real of thesilver mines of the province and alcaldia mayorof its name ; situate to tlie n. of the capital.

COPALLEN, an ancient province of the In-dians, to the s. of the city of Jaen de Bracamorosin the kingdom of Quito. As yet its limits are notknown ; but it is full of woods, uncultivated, anduninhabited.

COPALLIN, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Jaen de Bracamoros in the king-dom of Quito.

COPAN, Santa Maria de, a settlement ofthe alcaldia mayor of Córdova in Nueva Espana;

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