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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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finger, but of so hard a texture, that, when split, they cut exactly like a knife. These Indians speak the Tchicachan language, and with the other nations are in alliance against the Iroquees.

ABERCORN, a town of the province and colony of New Georgia, on the shore of the river Savannah, near where it enters the sea, and at a league's distance from the city of this name. [It is about 30 miles from the sea, 5 miles from Ebenezer, and 13 N W of Savannah.]

ABIDE, mountains, or serrania, of the province and government of Cartagena. They run from W to N E from near the large river of Magdalena to the province of Chocó, and the S. Sea. Their limits and extent are not known, but they are 20 leagues wide, and were discovered by Capt. Francisco Cesar in 1536; he being the first who penetrated into them, after a labour of 10 months, in which time he had to undergo the most extreme privations and excessive perils ; not that these exceeded the hardships which were endured by the licentiate Badillo, who entered upon its conquest with a fine army.

ABIGIRAS, a settlement of Indians, one of the missions, or a reduction, which belonged to the regular order of the Jesuits, in the province and government of Mainas, of the kingdom of Quito ; founded in the year 1665, by the father Lorenzo Lucero, on the shore of the river Curarari, 30 leagues from its mouth, and 240 from Quito.

[Abineau Port, on the N side of lake Erie, is about 13 miles W S W from fort Erie. Lat. 42° 6' N Long. 79° 15' W. ]

[ABINGDON, a town at the head of the tide waters of Bush river, Harford county, Maryland, 12 miles SW from Havre-de-Grace, and 20 NE from Baltimore. Cokesbury college, instituted by the methodists in 1785, is in this town. Lat. 39° 27' 30" N Long. 76° 20' 35" W.]

[another, the chief town of Washington county, Virginia, contained but about 20 houses in 1788, and in 1796 upwards of 150. It is about 145 miles from Campbell's station, near Holston; 260 from Richmond in Virginia, in a direct line, and 310 as the road runs, bearing a little to the S of W Lat. 36° 41' 30" N Long. 81° 59' W.]

[ABINGTON, a township in Plymouth county, Massachusetts; 22 miles SE from Boston, and contains 1453 inhabitants. Lat. 42° 4' 30". ]

[another, a parish in the town of Pomfret in Connecticut. Lat. 42° 4' 30". Long. 70° 51' 30".]

[another, a village in Pennsylvania, 32 miles N of Philadelphia.]

Abipi, a small settlement of the jurisdiction of Muzo, and corregimiento of Tunja, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It is of a hot temperature, producing some wheat, maize, yucas, plantains, and canes ; it has been celebrated for its rich mines of emeralds, which are, however, at present abandoned from want of water; it is nearly three leagues distant from the large mine of Itoco.

ABIPONES, a nation of barbarous Indians, of the province and government of Tucuman, inhabiting the S shores of the river Bermejo. Their number once exceeded 100000; but they are certainly at present much reduced. They go naked, except that the women cover themselves with little skins, prettily ornamented, which they call queyapi. They are very good swimmers, of a lofty and robust stature, and well featured: but they paint their faces and the rest of their body, and are very much given to war, which they carry on chiefly against such as come either to hunt or to fish upon their territory. Their victims they have a custom of sticking upon lofty poles, as a landmark, or by way of intimidation to their enemies. From their infancy they cut and scarify their bodies, to make themselves hardy. When their country is inundated, which happens in the five winter months, they retire to live in the islands, or upon the tops of trees: they have some slight notion of agriculture, but they live by fishing, and the produce of the chase, holding in the highest estimation the flesh of tigers, which they divide among their relations, as a sort of precious relic or dainty ; also asserting that it has the properties of infusing strength and valour. They have no knowledge either of God, of law, or of policy; but they believe in the immortality of the soul, and that there is a land of consummate bliss, where they shall dance and divert themselves after their death. When a man dies, his widow observes a state of celibacy, and fasts a year, which consists in an abstinence from fish: this period being fulfilled, an assembly run out to meet her, and inform her that her husband has given her leave to marry. The women occupy themselves in spinning and sewing hides; the men are idlers, and the boys run about the whole day in exercising their strength. The men are much addicted to drunkenness, and then the women are accustomed to conceal their husband's weapons, for fear of being killed. They do not rear more than two or three children, killing all above this number.

Abisca, an extensive province of the kingdom of Peru, to the E of the Cordillera of the Andes, between the rivers Yetau and Amarumago, and to the S of Cuzco. It is little known, consisting entirely of woods, rivers, and lakes; and hither many barbarous nations of Indians have retired, selecting for their dwelling places the few plains which belong to the province. The Emperor Yupanqui endeavoured to make it subservient to his controul, but without success: the same disappointment awaited Pedro de Andia in his attempt to subjugate it in the year 1538.

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In its vicinity is a reservoir, formed of hewn stone, which serves at once to catch the waters as they come down from the sierra, and to conduct them to Tepcaca, three leagues N N W of its capital.

ACAXUCHITLAN the head settlement of the alcaldía mayor of Tulazingo, to the N E. It contains 406 Indian families, and is a curacy of the bishopric of La Puebla de los Angeles. Distant four leagues to the E of its capital.

ACAYUCA, the alcaldía mayor of Nueva España, and of the province of Goazacoalco. Its jurisdiction is very extended, and consists, for the most part, of places of a hot and moist temperature, but so fertile is it that it gives annually four crops of maize; and as there is no demand for this production in the other provinces, it follows, of course, that the Indians here are little given to industry. Indeed the ground never requires the plough, and the whole of their labours during the seedtime consist merely in smoothing the surface of the mountains, and in scratching up the ground with a pointed stick. It is at times infested by locusts, which destroy the plants and crops ; and having never been able to find a remedy against this evil, the inhabitants had recourse to the protection of the virgin of La Conception, which is revered in the head settlement of the district of the Chichimecas ; and it is said that, owing to her mediatory influence, the plague has been thought to diminish. This province is watered by the abundant river of the Goazacoalco. The settlements of this alcaldía are, Xocoteapa, Macayapa, Menzapa, Molocan, Theimanquillo, Tinantitlan, Chinameca, Zoconusco, Olutla, Otcapa, Pochutla, Ostitan, Cozolcaque, Ixhuatla, Macatepeque.

another, the capital of the above, situate on the coast of the N. sea. Its inhabitants are composed of 30 families of Spaniards, 296 of Indians, and 70 of Mustees and Mulattoes. It lies a little more than 100 leagues S E of Mexico. Lat. 17° 53' N Long. 94° 46' 30" W.

another, settlement in the alcaldía mayor of Pachuca, in the kingdom of Nueva España, annexed to the curacy of Tezayuca, and containing 100 Indian families.

Acacingo, the head settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Tepcaca, situate in a plain of a mild temperature, and watered by two streams which run close to all the houses of the settlement, to the great comfort of the inhabitants. In the middle of the above plain there is a beautiful fountain, a convent of the religious order of St. Francis, a very ancient building, and some other buildings, which have been erected since the conquest of the country. The parish church is a piece of the most ancient architecture. The inhabitants are composed of 150 families of Spaniards, 104 of Mustees, 31 of Mulattoes, and 700 of Indians; 3 1/4 leagues E to the NE of its capital.

ACAZUTLA, a port of the S sea, on the coast of the province of the alcaldía mayor of Zuchitepec, in the kingdom of Guatemala, between the point of Los Remedios, and the settlement of Guapaca. [Lat. 14° 42' N Long. 90° 3'.]

ACCHA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru, situate on the skirt of a mountain, which has a prominence, seeming as though it were about to fall upon the settlement. This mountain is constantly dwindling away without any assignable cause. Lat. 13° 19 s. Long. 71° 13' W

ACCHA-AMANSAIA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru.

ACCHA-URINZABA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masque in Peru.

Aceites, a river of the province and government of Caraccas, in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises in the mountains, and enters the Orituco.

[ACCOCESAWS. The ancient town and principal place of residence of these Indians is on the W side of Colorado of Rio Rouge, about 200 miles S W of Nacogdoches, but they often change their place of residence for a season : being near the bay, they make great use of fish, oysters &c.; kill a great many deer, which are the largest and fattest in the province ; and their country is universally said to be inferior to no part of the province in soil, growth of timber, goodness of water, and beauty of surface; they have a language peculiar to themselves, but have a mode of communication by dumb signs, which they all understand: number about 80 men. Thirty or forty years ago, the Spaniards had a mission here, but broke it up, or moved it to Nacogdoches. They talk of resettling it, and speak in the highest terms,of the country.]

[ACCOMACK County, in Virginia, is situated on a peninsula, bounded N by Maryland, E by the ocean, and on the W by Chesapeak bay, and contains 13.959 inhabitants, including 4.262 slaves.]

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are the ruins or some well made benches in the shape of couches, which have been much injured by time, and were there before the corning of the Spaniards. Lat. 13° 16' 30" s. Long. 74° 32' 30" w.

another settlement, of the same name in the province and corregimiento of Jauja, annexed to the curaey of Cochangara.

another settlement of the province and corregimiento of Tarma.

ACOBIMBILLA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Angaraes in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Conaica.

ACOCHALA, a very lofty mountain of the province and corregimienento of Lipes, in the arch- bishopric of Charcas, where there are some very fine silver mines, which are, however, little worked for want of hands.

ACOLA , a settlement of the province and cor- regimiento of Lucanas in Peru, annexed to the curacy of its capital.

ACOLMAN, San Agustin de , a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tez- coco, in Nueva Espana, situate in a pleasant valley of a benign temperature. There are some wards united to its district, and the number of its inhabitants, including these wards, amounts to 240 Indian families, besides a convent of monks of the order of St. Augustin.

ACOMA , a settlement of Nuevo Mexico, situ- ate on the shore of a river which enters the Grande of the N. between the settlements of San J uan and La Laguna. [It is on a high mountain, with a strong castle, and is the capital of the province. [Lat, 35° 24' «. Long. 106° 10'

ACOMACK , a county of the province and colony of Virginia, which preserves its Indian name. It is the largest county of the province, containing 200,925 acres of ground ; but not so well peopled as the others, and has only one parish, which is of the same name. Different rivers take their rise here ; among the most noted is the Clif>- sonossea,

ACOMAIO, a settlement of the province, and corregimiento of Huanuco in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Santa Maria del Valle, situate on the confines of the infidel Panataguas Indians.

another settlement of the province and corregimiento of Quispicanchi in Peru.

ACOMARCA, a settlement of the province and corregimityito of Vilcas Huaman in Peru, arinexed to the curacy of Vilcas.

ACOMES, a fall of the river Amariscoggin, in the prov'ince of Continent, one of the four w hich compose the colony of New England.

ACOMULCO, a settlement of the head settle- ment and alcaldia mayor of Zochicoatlan in Nueva Espana. It contains 12 Indian families, and is two leasrues to the w. of its capital.

ACONCAGUA, a province and corregimiento of the kingdom of Chile ; bounded n. by a part of the province of Quillota, e, by the Cordillera, s. by the valley of Colina, of the jurisdiction of Santiago, w. by the province of Quillota. Its territory is level and well watered. It is divided into two parts by a large river of the same name, having a bridge built of stone and mortar, w ith two arches. It produces abundance of wheat and much wild marjoram, which is carried to Peru, and forms the principal branch of its commerce. In this province is the royal road, lying through the Cordillera in the way to Mendoza, which is very rough and dangerous, on account of the many slopes and steep declivities towards the river ; the path is very narrow, and in various places it is necessary to open a pass by means of a pick-axe ; so that, if at any time the mules should crowd together, they would push each other into the river, w hich has not unfrequently been the case. The royal treasures are carried by this road from the month of Novem- ber to April and part of May. A few years since, some small houses of brick and mortar have been built on one or other side of the Cordillera, which they call casuchas (miserable huts) ; in these they put, in the winter time, some coal, biscuit, and hung beef, so that the couriers, providing them- selves with the keys of the doors at Mendoza, or, on the other side, at the Guardia of Aconcagua, may have something to live upon, incase they should be stopt by a fall of snow on their journey ; and with this precaution, a courier goes every month to Santiago, carrying with him the mails brought by the ships from Europe. In the winter it is customary to walk on foot over the snow, from Paramillo, which is three leagues from the top of the Cordillera, and four from its descent to tlie place which is called Los Ojos de Agua, through the valley of Putaendo ; but towards the ??. there is another way, which they call De Los Patos, which is the road generally taken in going to the city of San Juan ; but the Cordillera being more lofty here, it is only passable in the months of February and March. The inhabitants of this province amount, on an average, to 8000 souls. The capital' is San Felipe el Real. [Lat. 32° II' s. Long. 70° 12' 30" w. j

ACONCAGUA, a large river which runs through the above province, rising in the mountains of the Cordillera, and running through it by the side of the road which leads to Buenos Ayres : hrarcliing

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vince of Orinoco, and part of the Saliva nation,forming a separate district, and situate in theplains of San Juan, of the new kingdom of Gra-nada, near the river Sinaruco. It was destroyedby the Caribee indians in 1684.

ADORATORIO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru, situatew. of Larin.

ADSON’S Town lies near the n. e. line of NewJersey, and s. e. of the Drowned Lands; 27 milesn. of Morristown, and 24 n. w. of Patterson . ]

ADUANA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Maracaibo, situate on the shore ofthe lake of this name, on the e. side.

ADVANCE. See Forward.

AEIQUAIA, the head settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Tonala in Nueva Espana.

AERIUCTUQUEN, a mountain of the pro-vince and colony of Surinam, or part of Guayana,in the Dutch possessions. It is the beginning ofthe great sierra of Binocote, between the riversCutini and Caroni.

AFFREUX, a lake of the province and colonyof Virginia, near the coast.

AFUERA, one of the islands of Juan Fer-nandes, on the S. sea coast, in the kingdom ofChile. About 400 leagues to the n. of Cape Horn.This coast swarms with sea lions and wolves.Lat. 33° 47' s. Long. 80° 41' w.

[Aga|AGA]], a mountain of the province and captain-ship oi Rio Janeiro in Brazil. It is between therivers Irutiba and Tapoana, on the sea-coast.

AGACES, a nation of Indians, of the provinceof Paraguay, on the shore of the river of thisname, towards the e. The people are numerous,valiant, and of a lofty stature. In ancient timesthey were masters of that river, cruising about init, and being the enemies of the Guaranies ; butafter several conflicts, they were at last subjectedby Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, governor of theprovince, in 1642.

AGALTECA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Honduras, in the kingdom of Guate-mala.

AGAMENTIGUS, a river of the province andcolony of New England, of York county, dis-trict of Maine. It is indebted to the ocean for itswaters, through Pascataqua bay ; having no con-siderable aid from streams of fresh water. Itsmouth is about four miles s. from Cape Neddieriver. Small vessels can enter here.]

AGAMENTIGUS, a mountain of consider-able elevation in the district of Maine, distantabout six miles from Bald Head, and eight fromYork harbour. Lat. 43° 12' n, and Long. 70°

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43' w. from Greenwich. It is a nofed land-markfor seamen, and is a good directory for the entryof Pascataqua harbour, as it lies very nearly inthe same meridian with it and with Pigeon hill,on Cape Ann. The mountain is covered witliwood and shrubs, and affords pasture up to itssummit, where there is an enchanting prospect.The cultivated parts of the country, especially onthe s. and s. w. appear as a beautiful garden, in-tersected by the majestic river Pascataqua, itsbays and branches. The immense ranges ofmountains on the «. and n. w. afford a sublimespectacle ; and on the sea side the various in-dentings of the coast, from Cape Ann to CapeElizabeth, are plainly in view in a clear day ; andthe Atlantic stretches to the e. as far as the powerof vision extends. At this spot the bearing of thefollowing objects were taken, with a good sur-veying instrument, October 11, 1780.

Summit of the White mountains, n. 15° w.

Cape Porpoise, n. 63° e.

Rochester hill, n. 64° w,

Tuckaway South peak, s. 80° w.

Frost’s hill, Kittery, s. 57° w.

Saddle of Bonabeag, w. 14° w.

Isle of Shoals Meeting-house, s. 6° r.

Varney’s hill, in Dover, distant 10| miles bymensuration, «. 89° zo. Variation of theneedle, 6° te).]

AGAMUNTIC, or Amaguntic Pond, inthe district of Maine, sends its waters northward tothe Chaudiere, through the west branch of thatriver.]

AGCHILLA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Pilaya and Paspaya in Peru.It has in its district seven public chapels, withinfour leagues distance.]

AGENAGATENINGA, a river of the pro-vince and country of the Amazonas, in the Portu-guese territory. It rises in the country of theAnamaris Indians, runs n. and enters the abundantstream of the Madera.

AGIQUA, a river of N. Carolina, which runsn. w. and afterwards turning to the w. enters theCherokees.

AGNALOS, a nation of infidel Indians, of theNuevo Reyno de Granada, inhabiting the moun-tains w. of the river Apure.

AGNAPURAS, a chain of mountains, or acordillera of the kingdom of Peru, whicli run forleagues from n. to s. without termination, andseparate the Taucas from the Chizuitos Indians.

AGOMISO, an island of Hudson’s bay, nearits w. coast; n. n. e. from Albany fort.] >

AGONICHE, a river of Nova Scotia, running

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state to maintain itself. Thus the colonists lived for some years, and in time the productions in which their commerce consisted, increased to such a degree as to have caused them to excel all the other English colonies,

ALUEMAur.E, another county or part of Vir- ginia, washed by the river Fluvana on the s. which divides itself into several branches, and adds much to the fertility of the country. It is bounded e. by the county of Goochland, w. divided by a chain of mountains of Augusta, and by that of Louisa on the «. [It contains 12,585 inha- bitants, including 5579 slaves. Its extent, about S5 miles square.]

Albemarle, a strait, which is the mouth or entrance into the sea of the river Roanoke.

ALBERTO, a small settlement or ward of the head settlement of the district of Tlazintla, and alcafdia mayor of Ixmiqailpan, in Nueva Espana.

[ALBION, New, the name given by Sir Francis Drake to California, and part of the n. w. coast of America, when he took possession of it. A large uncertain tract of the n. w, coast is thus called. Its limits, according to Mr. Arrow- smith’s chart, are between 27° 12' and 41° 15' 71. lat. Humboldt asserts, that, agreeably to sure historical data, the denomination of New Albion ought to be limited to that part of the coast which extends from the 43° to the 48°, or from Cape White of Martin de x\guilar, to the entrance of Juan de Fuea. Besides, he adds, from the mis- sions of the Catholic priests to those of the Greek priests, that is to say, from the Spanish village of San Francisco, in New California, to the Russian establishments on Cook river at Prince William’s bay', and to the islands of Kodiac and Unalaska, there are more than a thousand leagues of coast inhabited by' free men, and stocked with otters and Phocre! Consequently, the discussions on the extent of the New Albion of Drake, and the pre- tended rights acquired by certain European na- tions, from planting small crosses, and leaving inscriptions fastened to trunks of trees, or the burying of bottles, may be considered as futile. The part of the coast on which Capt. Cook landed on the 7th of March 1778, and which some desig- nate as Nezo Albion, is in n. lat. 44° 33'. e. long. 235° 10', which he thus describes : “ The land is lull of mountains, the tops of w hich are covered with snow, while the vallies between them, and the grounds on the sea-coast, high as well as low, are covered with trees, which form a beautiful prospect, as of one vast forest. At first the natives seemed to prefer iron to every other article of

commerce; at last they preferred brass. They were more tenacious of their property than any of the savage nations that had hitherto been met with ; so that they would not part with wood, water, grass, nor the most trifling article without a compensation, and were sometimes very unrea- sonable in their demands.” See Calii^ornia, New.]

ALBOR, a small island of the N. or Atlantic sea, one of the Bahamas, between those of Neque and 8. Salvador.

ALBUQUERQUE, Santa Rosa de, a settle- ment and real of the silver mines of the alcaldia mayor of Colotlan in Nueva Espana. It is 19 leagues s. w. of the head settlement of the district of Tlaltcnango.

Albuquehque, a townof New Mexico, situate on the shore of the Rio Grande (large river) of the N. [opposite the village of Atrisco, to the w. of tlie Sierra Obseqra. Population 0000 souls.]

Albuquerque, a small island, or low rocks, of the N. sea, near that of 8. Andres.

ALCA, a settlement of the province and corre- gimienlo of Condensuyos of Arequipa in Peru.

ALCALA, a settlement of the province and alcaldia mayor of Chiapa, and kingdom of Gua- temala, in the division and district of that city.

ALCAMANI, a branch of the head settlement of the district and alcaldia mayor of Igualapa in Neuva Espana, and two leagues to the n. of the same.

ALCANTARA, S. Antonio de, a town of the province and captainship of Maranam' in the kingdom of Brazil. It luis been frequently invaded by the infidel Indians, who destroyed its work- shops, so that its inhabitants have been much reduced.

Alcantara, S. Antonio de, another settle- ment in the province and district of Chanco, in the kingdom of Chile, near the shore of the rivec Mataquino.

ALCARAI, a small river of the province and government of Buenos Ayres. It runs e. and enters the river La Plata between those of Lay- man and Gomez.

ALCATRACES, Ishmd of the, one of those which lie n. of St. Domingo, between the s. point of the Caico Grande, and the Panuelo Quadrado, (square handkerchief).

ALCIIICHlCd, 8 . Martin de, a ward of the head settlement erf the district and alcaldia mayor of Izucar in Nueva Espana, belonging to that of Santa Maria de la Asuncion.

ALCHIDOMAS, a settlement of the province of the Apaches in Nuevo Mexico, situate on the

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shore of the Rio Grande Colorado, (large colouredriver), or of the North.

ALCO, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Chumbivilcas in Peru, annexed tothe curacy of Libitaca.

ALCOHOLADES, a nation of Indians of theprovince of Venezuela. They are of a docile andaffable disposition, and live upon the borders ofthe lake Maracaibo. Their numbers are muchdiminished, from the treatment they received fromthe German Weltzers, who, through a covetous-ness to possess the gold of these people, killed thegreater part of them.

ALCOZAUCA, a settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Tlapa in Nueva Espana. It contains104 families of Spaniards, Mulattoes, and Mustees;not a single Indian dwells in it. It is of a mildtemperature, and in its district were the once cele-brated mines of Cayro, which were crushed in anddestroyed, having been almost unparalleled for thequantity of silver that they produced. Eight lea-gues from its capital.

ALDAS, a small settlement or ward of the headsettlement of the district of Santa Ana, and alcaldiamayor of Zultepec, in Nueva Espana.

ALDEA, DEL Espiritu Santo, a settlementof the province and captainship of Tondos Santosin Brazil, situate on the coast, at the mouth of theriver Joana.

Aldea, del Espiritu Santo, another settle-ment of the province and captainship of Seregipe,in the same kingdom (Brazil), situate on the shore, andat the entrance of the river Real.

[ALDEN, Fort, in Cherry Valley, in thestate of New York.]

ALU WORT, a settlement of the island ofBarbadoes, in the district and parish of Santiago,on the coast.

ALEBASTER, or Eleuthera, an island ofthe channel of Bahama. See Alabaster.

ALEGRE, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of S. Vincente in Brasil, situate s.of the settlement of Alto.

[ALEMPIGON, a small lake northward oflake Superior.]

ALEXANDRIA, a city of Virginia, [formerlycalled Belhaven, and situated on the southernbank of the Patowmac river, in Fairfax county,about five miles s. w. from the Federal city, 60L from Baltimore, 60 n, from Fredericks-burgh, 168 n. of Williamsburgh, and 290 fromthe. sea; 38° 54' n. lat. and 77° 10' w. long.Its situation is elevated and pleasant. The soilis clayey. The original settlers, anticipating itsfuture growth and importance, laid out the streets

on the plan of Philadelphia. It contains about400 houses, many of which are handsomely built,and 2748 inhabitants. This city, upon openingthe navigation of Patowmac river, and in conse-quence of its vicinity to the future seat of thefederal government, bids fair to be one of the mostthriving commercial places on the continent. Ninemiles from hence is Mount Vernon, the celebratedseat of the late General Washington.]

[Alexandria, a township in Grafton county.New Hampshire, containing 298 inhabitants, in-corporoted in 1782.]

[Alexandria, a township in Hunterdon coun-ty. New Jersey, containing 1503 inhabitants, inclu-sive of 40 slaves.]

[Alexandria, a small town in Huntingdoncounty, Pennsylvania, on the Frankstown branchof Janiatta river, 192 miles n. w. of Philadel-phia.]

ALEXO, S. an island of the N. sea, near thecoast of Brazil, in the province and captainshipof Pernambuco, between the river Formoso andCape S. Agustin.

ALFARO, S. Miguel de, a settlement of theprovince and government of the Chiquitos Indians;situate on the shore of the river Ubay. It has agood port, from whence it is also known by thename of Port of the Chiquitos. It is, however,at present destroyed, and the ruins alone remain.

ALFAXAIUCA, a settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Kilotepec in Nueva Espana. It con-tains 171 Indian families, and is seven leaguese. n. e. of its capital.

ALFEREZ, Valley of the, in the provinceand correscimienlo of Bogota in the new kingdomof Granada.

Alfeuez, a river of the province and captain-ship Rey in Brazil; it runs w. and enters thelake of Mini.

[ALFORD, a township in Berkshire county,Massachusetts, containing 577 inhabitants ; 145miles w. from Boston.]

[ALFORDSTOWN, a small town in Moorcounty, North Carolina.]

ALfjrARROBO, a settlement of the provinceand government of Antioquia in the new kingdomof Granada ; situate on the bank of an arm of theriver Perico, in an island which it forms in th«serranias of Guamoca.

ALGODON, Island of the, one of thosewhich are in the N. sea, between the s. point ofthe Cayco Grande and the Panuelo Quadrado.

Algodon, a settlement of the same name. SeeBiezmet.

ALGODONALES, a .settlement of the province

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CAPANA, a river of the province and countryof the Amazonas, in the part belonging to the Por-tuguese. It rises in the territory of the YaveisIndians, between the rivers Cuchivara and theMadera ; runs to the s. and turning to the s. s. e.enters into one of the lakes which forms the latterriver.

CAPANATOIAQUE, a small settlement of thehead settlement of Acantepec, and alcaldía mayorof Tlapa, in Nueva España. Its temperature iswarm, and it contains 90 families of Mexican In-dians, who employ themselves in the cultivatingand dressing of cotton.

CAPANEMA, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Todos Santos in Brazil ; situateon the shore of the river of its name, near the bay.

Capanema, a river of the same province,which rises near the coast, runs e. and enters thesea in the bay.

CAPANEREALTE, a river of the provinceand alcaldía mayor of Soconusco, in the king-dom of Guatemala. It runs into the S. sea be-tween the rivers Colate and Gueguetlan.

CAPARE, an island of the river Orinoco, in theprovince and government of Guayana; situate atthe entrance, and one of those forming the mouths,of that river.

CAPARRAPI, a small settlement of the ju-risdiction of the city of Palma, and corregimientoof Tunja, in the new kingdom of Granada. Itstemperature is warm ; the number of its inhabi-tants is much reduced ; they may, however, stillamount to 40 housekeepers : its only productionsare some maize, cotton, yucas, and plantains.

CAPATARIDA, a settlement of the provinceand government of Maracaibo ; situate on the coast,at the mouth of the river so called.

Capatarida, the river which rises near thecoast, runs n. and enters the sea.

(CAPATI. Within a very few years has beendiscovered in the gold mine of this place, on themountains of Copiapo, a new immalleable sort ofmetal, of a kind unknown to the miners ; but Mo-lina imagined it to be no other than platina.)

CAPAUILQUE, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento ofYamparaes, and archbishopricof Charcas, in Peru.

(CAPE St. Andrew’s, on the coast of Para-guay, or La Plata, S, America. Lat. 38° 18' s.Long. 58° 2' w.)

(Cape St. Antonio, or Anthonio, is thepoint of land on the s. side of La Plata river inS. America, which, with cape St. Mary on the n.forms the mouth of that river. Lat. 36° 32' s.Long, 56° 45' w.)

(Cape St. Augustine, on the coast of Brazil,S. America, lies s. of Pernambuco. Lat. 8° 39' s.Long. 35° 8' w.)

(Cape Blow-me-down, which is the s. side ofthe entrance from the bay of Fundy into the basinof Minas, is the easternmost termination of a rangeof mountains, extending about 80 or 90 miles tothe gut of Annapolis; bounded n. by the shores ofthe bay of Fundy, and s. by the shores of Anna-polis river.)

(Cape Cod, anciently called Mallebarre bythe French, is the s. e. point of the bay of Mas-sachusetts, opposite cape Ann. Lat. 42° 4' n.Long. 70° 14' w. from Greenwich. See Barn-staple County and Province Town.)

(Cape Elizabeth, a head-land and townshipin Cumberland county, district of Maine. Thecape lies in n. lat. 43° 33' e. by s. from the centreof the town nine miles, about 20 s. w. of Cape Smallpoint, and 12 n e. from the mouth of Saco river.The town has Portland on the n. e. and Scarboroughs. w. and contains 1355 inhabitants. It was incor-porated in 1765, and lies 126 miles n. e. ofBoston.)

(Cape Fear is the s. point of Smith’s island,which forms the mouth of Cape Fear river into twochannels, on the coast of N. Carolina, s. w. of capeLook-out, and remarkable for a dangerous shoalcalled the Frying-pan, from its form. Near thiscape is Johnson’s fort, in Brunswick county, anddistrict of Wilmington. Lat. 33° 57' n. Long.77° 56' w.)

(Cape Fear River, more properly Clarendon,affords the best navigation in N. Carolina. Itopens to the Atlantic ocean by two channels.'I'he s. w. and largest channel, between the s. w.end of Smith’s island, at Bald head, where thelight-house stands, and the e. end of Oakes islands. w. from fort Johnston. The new inlet is be-tween the sea-coast and the n. e. end of Smith’sisland. It will admit vessels drawing 10 or 11feet, and is about three miles wide at its entrance,having 18 feet water at full tides over the bar.It continues its breadth to the flats, and is navi-gable for large vessels 21 miles from its mouth, and14 from Wilmington ; to which town vessels drawl-ing 10 or 12 feet can reach without any risk. Asyou ascend this river you leave Brunswick on theleft and Wilmilgton on the right. A little aboveWilmington the river divides into n. e. and n. w.branches. The former is broader than the latter,but is neither so deep nor so long. The n. w.branch rises within a few miles of the Virginialine, and is formed by the junction of Haw andDeep rivers. Its general course is s. e. Sea ves-

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sels can go 25 miles above Wilmington, and largeboats 90 miles, to Fayetteville. The n. e. branchjoins the n. w. branch a little above Wilmington,and is navigable by sea vessels 20 miles above thattown, and by large boats to S. Washington, 40miles further, and by rafts to Sarecto, which isnearly 70 miles. The whole length of Cape Fearriver is about 200 miles.)

Cape Gross or Great, the point or extremityof the e. coast of lake Superior in Canada, wherethis begins to run out, in order to empty itself intolake Huron.

Cape Gross or Great, another point of theisland of St. Christopher, one of the Antilles, in thes. e. extremity, facing the s. w. and is one of thetwo which form the Grand Ance, or Great bay.

(Cape May is the s. westernmost point of thestate of New Jersey, and of the county to which itgives name. Lat. 38° 59' n. Long. 74° 55' w.It lies 20 miles n. e. from cape Henlopen, whichforms the s. w. point of the mouth of Delaware bay,as cape May does the n. e.)

(Cape May County spreads n. around the capeof its name, is a healthy sandy tract of country, ofsufficient fertility to give support to 2571 industri-ous and peaceable inhabitants. The county isdivided into Upper, Middle, and Lower pre-cincts.)

(CAPERIVACA, a large river in Guayana, S.America.)

CAPERU, a river of the province and govern-ment of Guayana, which enters the Apure, accord-ing to Mr. Bellin.

CAPETI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Darien, in the kingdom of Tierra Firme.It rises in the mountains in the interior of this pro-vince, runs from e. to w. and enters the large riverof Tuira.

CAPI, a settlement of the province and corre-gimienio of Chilques and Masques in Peru.

Capi, a small river of the country of the Ama-zonas, in the territory of the Portuguese. It runsfrom e. to w. and enters the Marañon opposite thecity of Pará. Don Juan de la Cruz, in his map ofS. America, calls it Cupiu.

CAPIATA, a small settlement of the provinceand government of Paraguay ; situate on the shoreof the river of its name, three leagues e. of the cityof Asuncion. [Lat. 25° 21' 45". Long. 57° 31'48" w.]

CAPIGUI, a river of the province and caplain-ship of St. Vincent in Brazil. It runs to the s. s. w.and enters the Mboapiari.

CAPILLA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, in the jurisdiction of

Santiago del Estero, on the bank of the river Cho-romoros.

Capilla Nueva, a parish of the provinceand government of Buenos Ayres, mentioned onlyby D. Cosme Bueno. [It is situate on theriver Negro. Lat. 33° 12' 30" s. Long. 67° 57'40" w.]

CAPILLAS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Castro-Vireyna in Peru, an-nexed to the curacy of Huasitara.

CAPILLUCAS, a settlement of the regularorder of the Jesuits, now abolished, in the provinceand government of Mainas of the kingdom ofQuito ; situate on the shores of the river of theAmazonas.

Capillucas, a lake of the same province andgovernment; formed from an overflow or channelof the river Napo, and at no great distance fromthe banks of this river.

Capillucas, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Yauyos in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Tauripampa.

CAPINANS, a settlement of Louisiana ; situateon the banks of the river Panzacola.

CAPINATA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Sicasica in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Cabari.

CAPINOTA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cochambaba in Peru, and of thearchbishopric of Charcas ; in which there is, inde-pendent of the parish-church, a convent of theorder of San Agustin.

CAPIRA, a settlement of the jurisdiction andalcaldía mayor of Nata, in the kingdom of TierraFirme ; situate on the skirts of a mountain, at alittle distance from the coast of the S. sea.

CAPIRATO, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cinaloa in Nueva España; situateon the sea-coast.

==CAPITAINE, Oric du, or Barranco delCapitan==, a small river of Virginia. It runsto the s. e. and enters the Ohio.

CAPITANA, Point of the, on the coast of theisland Guaricura ; one of those islands which lie inthe river of the Amazonas : it looks to the n.

CAPITANEJO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Tunja in the new kingdom ofGranada; situate on the bank of the river Soga-moso, in the territory called Cabuya de Chica-mocha, which is the direct road from Tunja toSanta Fe. It is of a very hot temperature, abound-ing in sugar-cane, and other productions of a warmclimate. The natives are very subject to an epi-demic disorder of lumps or swellings under thechin. Its population consists of 100 housekeepers.

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close to those of Perlas and Mosquitos ; they arethree in number, small and desert.

CARNERO, Punta del, a point on the coastof the S. sea, and of the province and governmentof Guayaquil ; one of the two which form thegreat bay of Tumbez. It is close to the point ofSanta Elena.

Carnero, Punta del, another, on the coastof the kingdom of Chile ; it is very low, extend-ing itself with a gentle slope towards the sea. Thee. winds are prevalent here, rendering it dangerousto be passed.

Carnero, Punta del, another point of landon the coast of the same kingdom.

Carnero, Punta del, a port of the coast ofthe kingdom of Chile, between tlie mouth of theriver Lebo and the point of Rumena.

(CARNESVILLE, the chief town of Franklincounty, Georgia, 100 miles n. w. of Augusta. Itcontains a court-house, and about 20 dwelling-houses.)

CAROLINA, a province of N. America, andpart of that extensive country anciently calledFlorida, bounded n. by Virginia, s. by the trueFlorida, w. by Louisiana, and e. by the Atlantic.It is divided into N. and S. Carolina. Its ex-tent is 135 leagues in length, nearly from s. w. ton. e. and 75 in width from e. to w. from 30®to 36° 30' of lat. It was discovered by JuanPonce de Leon in 1512, though it was not settledby the Spaniards then, but abandoned until thereign of Charles IX. king of France, when theFrench established themselves in it, under thecommand of admiral Chatilon, protector of theProtestants. He founded a colony and a fort call-ed Charles fort, and gave the name of Carolina tothe country, in lionour to his monarch. This es-tablishment, however, lasted but a short time, forit was destroyed by the Spaniards, who put tothe sword the new colonists, and went away underthe impression that they had now left the countryin a perfectly abandoned state. But the English,at this time, were maintaining a footing here, un-der the command of Sir Walter Raleigh, thoughthey were not under any formal establishmentuntil the reign of Charles II. in 1663, when thecountry was granted as a property to the followingnobility, viz. the Count of Clarendon, Duke ofAlbemarle, Count of Craven, John Berkley, JohnAshley, afterwards Count of Shaftsbury, GeorgeCarteret, John Colleton, and William Berkley;by these it was divided into as many counties,and by them names were given to the rivers, settle-ments, &c. Their privilege of proprietorship and

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jurisdiction extended from lat. 31° to 36° «. andthey had an absolute authority to form establish-ments and governments, according to the laws andstatutes laid down by that famous and renownedphilosopher John Locke ; accordingly the govern-ment partook largely of the despotic, and therulers had the power of acknowledging or renounc-ing laws, of conferring titles, employments, pro-motions, and dignities, according to their owncaprice. They divided the population into threeclasses: The first was composed of those entitledthe Barons, and to these were given 120,000 acresof land; the second were two lordships, with thetitle of Counts, to whom were given 240,000 acres ;and the third, who were called Landgraves, a titlecorresponding to Dukes, had a portion of 480,000acres. This last body formed the high council-chamber, and the lower was composed of the re-presentatives of the counties and cities, both ofthese together forming the parliament, this beingthe real title, and not assembly, as in the othercolonies. The first establishment was the city ofCharlestown, between two navigable rivers calledAshley and Cowper ; the same offered an asylumto the Europeans, who on account of religiousdisturbances fled from Europe, and who havingsuffered great distresses there, had afterwards toencounter a very unfriendly reception from theIndians. Such was the state of affairs until 1728,when this city was taken under the protection ofthe English crown ; a corresponding recompencehaving been paid to the lords, the proprietors, whoyielding it up, thus made a virtue of necessity ;the Count Grenville, however, persisted in keep-ing his eighth share. From that time it was divid-ed into two parts, called North and South. The cli-mate differs but little from that of Virginia, al-though the heat in the summer is rather morepowerful here ; the winter, however, is shorterand milder ; the temperature is serene and theair healthy ; tempests and thunder storms are fre-quent, and this is the only part of this continentwherein have been experienced hurricanes; althoughthey are but rare here, and never so violent as in theislands. The half of March, the whole of April,May, and the greater part of June, the season ismild and agreable ; in July, August, and nearlyall September, the heat is intense ; but the winteris so mild, especially when the w.tw. wind prevails,that the water is seldom frozen. It is extremely fer-tile, and abounds in wheat, barley, rice, and allkinds of pulse, flowers, and fruits of an exquisiteflavour; and the soil, which is uncultivated, iscovered with all kinds of trees. The principal

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emolument which used to be derived to the Eng-lish froPA the skins of the castor, is at presentgreatly abridged from the circumstance of the In-dians invariably destroying this animal; but theloss is in a great measure made up from the greatgain acquired in the sale of turpentine, fish, andpitch. Here they cultivate quantities of indigoof three sorts, much maize, and in the low landsexcellent rice. All this province is a plain 80miles in length, carrying on a great commerce inthe above productions, and formerly that of ricewas very considerable; it being computed to haveyielded that article to the value of 150,000/. ster-ling per annum. In its woods are many exquisitekinds of timber, and the country abounds withrabbits, hares, dantas, deer, pheasants, partridges,cranes, pigeons, and other birds, and with num-bers of ravenous and fierce wolves, against theattacks of which it is difficult to preserve thecattle. The European animals have also multi-plied here astonishingly, so that it is not unusualfor persons, who at first had not more than three orfour cows, now to possess as many thousands.These two provinces forming Carolina have 10navigable rivers, with an infinite number of smallernote, all abounding in fish ; but they hare fewgood ports, and the best of these is Cape Fear.N. Carolina is not so rich as is S. Carolina, andDenton was formerly the capital of the former,but it is at present reduced to a miserable village ;the capital of both is Charlestown, which since thelast w^r is independent of the jEnglish, togetherwith all the country, which now forms one of the 13provinces composing the United States of America.[See North Carolina and South Carolina.]

(CAROLINE County, in Virginia, is on the s.side of Rappahannock river, which separates itfrom King George’s county. It is about 40 milessquare, and contains 17,489 inhabitants, including10,292 slaves.)

(Caroline County, on the e. shore in Mary-land, borders on Delaware state to the e. and con-tains 9506 inhabitants, including 2057 slaves. Itschief town Danton.)

CARONI, a settlement of the province ofGuayana, and government of Cumana ; one ofthose of the missions held in that province by theCatalanian Capuchin fathers.

Caroni, another, in the government of Mara-caibo, and jurisdiction of Varinas. It is very poorand of a hot temperature, but abounding in fruitsof maize, yucas, plaintains, and sugar-canes.

Caroni, another, in the government of the NuevoReyno de Granada ; situate on a lofty spot, andone of the most pleasant and delightful of any in the

whole province. It abounds in gold mines, andis fertile in all the fruits peculiar to the climate,but it is much reduced.

Caroni, a large and abundant river of the pro-vince of Guayana. It rises in the mountains in-habited by the Mediterranean Caribes Indians,runs many leagues, laving the territory of the Ca-puchin missionaries of Guayana. Its shores arevery delightful, from the variety of trees and birdsfound upon them. It enters the Orinoco on the s.side, eight leagues from the garrison of Guayana,and 72 leagues before this river enters the sea, be-ing divided into two arms, which form a smallisland. It is very abundant and wide, but it isnot navigable, on account of the rapidity of its cur-rent, and from its being filled with little islands andshoals, as likewise on account of a great waterfallor cataract, which causes a prodigious noise, and isclose to the mission and settlement of Aguacagua.Its waters are very clear, although at first sightthey appear dark and muddy, which effect is pro-duced from the bed of the river being of a sand ofthis colour. Its source, though not accuratelyknown, is affirmed by the Caribes Indians to bein the snowy sierra to the n. of the lake of Parime,that also being the source by which this lake issupplied. At its entrance into the Orinoco, itgushes with &uch impetuosity as to repel the watersof this river the distance of a gun’s shot, [or, as'Depons observes, half a league. Its course is di-rectly from s. to n. and its source is more than100 leagues from its mouth.]

CAROPI, a river of the island and governmentof Trinidad. It runs from e. to w. and enters thesea in the gulf Triste.

==CARORA, S. Juan Bautista del Por-tillo DE==, a city of the province and governmentof Venezuela, founded by Captain John Salamancain 1572, and not in 1566, as is asserted by FatherColeti, in the Siege of Baraquiga. It is situate inthe savanas or Uanuras ; is of a hot temperature,but very healthy, although deficient in water,since the river Morere, which passes in its vicinity,affords but a trifling stream in tlie summer, and isat times entirely dry. In its district are bred allkinds of cattle, but particularly thegoat, as the quan-tities of thorns and thistles found in this countryrender it peculiarly adapted for the nourishmentof this animal. It abounds in very fine grains,also in aromatic balsams and gums, noted for thecure of w'ounds. At present it is reduced to amiserable population, unworthy of the name of acity, consisting of Mustees, Mulattoes, and some In-dians.; but it still preserves a very good parishchurch, a convent of monks of St. hhancisco, and

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in beautiful singing birds ; and in its rivers aremany sorts of fish of a fine flavour, particularly thepatah. It is not without mines of gold, and laba~deros or washing places, but these are not worked,save by a few day-labourers. In the church of themonks of San Francisco is venerated an image of themost Holy Mary, with the title of La Probezuypainted on a piece of cotton-stuff, adorned with twofine pieces of silver, the natives payitig great de-votion to this superb work, from the wonderfulthings that have been said to have been effectedthrough the prayers offered up to her of whom thisis the semblance. This city has been the nativeplace of,

Don Melchor de Salazar, governor of Choco,and founder of the city Toro.

Of the Doctor Don Francisco Martinez Bueno,presbyter and visitor of the bishopric of Popayan ;a man of great literature.

Of the Doctor Don Manuel de Castro y Rada ; amost exemplary curate.

Of the Father Joseph Vicuna, who, after havingbeen a celebrated Jesuit, became a monk in thecollege of missions for propagating the faith in Po-payan, and died whilst preaching to the AndaquiesIndians.

Of the Father Estevan de Rivas, who, after hav-ing filled the title of jurist with great credit, be-came a Franciscan monk, and died an exemplarypenitent in his convent at Cartagena.

Of the Doctor Don Francisco Felipe del Campo,professor de prima of canons in the university ofSanta Fe ; a celebrated orator.

Of the Doctor Don Geronirao de Rivas, trea-surer and dignitary of the holy church of Popayan,provisor and ecclesiastical governor of that bishop-ric.

Of the Doctor Don Joseph de Renteria, assessorof the viceroyalties of Santa Fe and Lima, honoraryoidor of the audience of Charcas : all of whomhave borne testimony to the clearness and acutenessof their understandings and excellence of their dis-positions. But for all the information on thesesubjects, we have to thank Don Manuel del Cara-po, the son of the last mentioned, who resides inthis court, and to whom the merits thus severallyapplied, unitedly belong.

The arms of this city are three imperial crownswith a sun, and its inhabitants amount to about 5000or 6000 : 25 leagues n. e. of Popayan, in 4° 46'n. lat.

Cartago, another capital city, of the provinceof Costa Rica, in the kingdom of Guatemala,situate 10 leagues from the coast of the N. sea, and17 from that of the S. in each of which it has agood port ; it was formerly rich and flourishing, onaccount of its commerce w ith Panama, Cartagena,Portobclo, and the Havanah ; but it is at the presentday reduced to a miserable village of very few in-habitants, and without any commerce. It has, be-sides the parish church, a convent of monks of St.Francis, and is in 9° 42' s. lat.

Cartago, a river of the same province and go-vernment as is the former city : it runs w. and en-ters the S.sea, in the port of La Herradura.

Cartago, a bay in the province and govern-ment of Honduras, inhabited by the infidel Mos-quitos Indians.

CARTAMA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Antioquia: it rises in the mountains ofChoco, traverses the valley to which it gives itsname, and running e. enters the Cauca.

CARTEL, a port of the coast of the provinceand government of Florida, opposite the castle ofSt. Augustin.

(CARTER, a new county in the state of Tennes-see, formed of a part of the county of Washing-ton.)

(CARTERET, a maritime county of New Beradistrict, N. Carolina, on Core and Pamlico sounds.It contains 3732 inhabitants, including 713 slaves.Beaufort is the chief town.)

Carteret, a district and jurisdiction of S. Caro-lina, on the sea-coast.

Carteret, a cape or extremity of the coast ofthe same province, and one of those which formLong bay. See Roman.

(CARTERSVILLE, a town in Powhatancounty, Virginia, on the s. side of James rivtr, 4fmiles above Richmond.)

CARUALLEDA, Nuestra Senora de, acity of the province and government of Venezuela,in the kingdom of Tierra Firme ; founded byFrancis Faxardo in 1568, and not in 1560, as ac-cording to Coleti : it has a small but insecure port.The town is also a miserable place, having sufferedmuch injury, a short time after its foundation, bythe violent disturbances caused in its neighbour-hood by the Governor Don Luis de Roxas : 80leagues e. of Coro.

CARUALLO, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Paraiba in Brazil, situate near thesea-coast, and on the shore of the river Camara-tuba.

CARUGAMPU, a small river of the provinceand government of Paraguay ; it runs and en-ters the Parana between the rivers Capuy andParanay.

CARUJAL, PUNTA DE, a point on the coast ofthe province and government of Cartagena, called

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CAS

CASONA, a river of the province of Guayana :it runs e. and enters the Esquivo,

CASPANA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Atacama, and of the archbishopricof Charcas, in Peru ; annexed to the curacy ofChiuchiu.

(CASPEAN, or Beautiful, a small lake inGreensborough, Vermont. It has Hazen block-house on its w. side. It is a head water of LaMoille river.)

CASPIYACU, a small river of the provinceand government of Mainas in the kingdom of Qui-to ; it runs from s. s. e, to n. n, w. and enters theYana at its sources.

(CASQUIPIBIAC, a river on the n. side of Cha-leur bay, about a league from Black cape, n. w.by n. in the bottom of Casquipibiac cove, at thedistance of about one league from which is thegreat river of Casquipibiac. It lies about w, fromthe former, and affords a small cod and salmonfishery.)

(CASSITAH, an Indian town in the w. part ofGeorgia; which, as well as the Coweta town, is60 miles below the Horse ford, on Chattahouseeriver.)

CASTA, San Pedro de, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Coquimbo in thekingdom of Chile : it runs n. n. e. and enters theMames near the sea-coast.

(CASTAHANA, Indians of N. America, whoresemble the Dotames, except that they tradeprincipally Avith the Crow Indians, and that theywould most probably prefer visiting an establish-ment on the Yellow Stone river, or at its mouth onthe Missouri.)

CASTEENS, a small river of the province ofSagadohook : it runs s. and enters the sea in thebay of Penobscot. On its shore and at its mouth isa settlement of Indians, where the English have afort and an establishment.

CASTELA, a large and navigable river of theprovince and government of Moxos in the king-dom of Quito, being formed from those of the Beniand Paravari ; it afterwards unites itself with thatoftheYtenes, and changes its name to Madera,which joins the Maranon on the s. side, in lat. 3°13' 18" s.

CASTELLANOS, Puerto, a port in the largeisland of San Sebastian, and near the coast of Bra-zil, and province and captainship of San Vin-cente.

CASTILLA, Santo Tomas de, a settlementof the province and government of Honduras in thekingdom of Guatemala. Its port is good, and wellfrequented with vessels.

CASTILLA DEL ORO. See Tierra Firme*

CASTILLO, a river of the province and districtof Quillota in the kingdom of Chile : it runs w-and joins the Pcrquilabquien to enter the Lon-gamilla.

Castillo, a port of the coast, in the same pro-vince and kingdom, between the former river andthe port Valparaiso.

Castillo, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, in the jurisdiction of thecity of Cordova ; situate on the shores of the riverTercero, near the mouth Avhere this enters the Sa-ladillo.

CASTILLOS Grandes, an island of the pro-vince and captainship of Rey in Brazil. It is verynear the coast, between the cape Santa Maria ofthe river La Plata and the cape of Las Yncas;the Portuguese have a fort in it.

Castillos Grandes, another island, withthe addition of Chicos, to distinguish it from theother in the same province and kingdom, and ata little distance from the above island.

Castillos Grandes, a point of land or ex-tremity of the island of Guadalupe, opposite thoseof Deseada and of Marigalante.- It is thus calledfrom two castles which it has in it.

(CASTINE, the shire town of Hancock county,district of Maine, is situate on Penobscot bay. Itwas taken from the town of Penobscot, and incor-porated in Feb. 1796. It is named after a Frenchgentleman who resided here ISO years ago, asalso)

(Castine River, which is about 14 mileslong, is navigable lor six miles, and has severalmills at the head of it. It empties into Penobscotbay.)

(CASTLE Island. See Crooked Island.)

(CASTLETOWN, a township in Richmondcounty, Stateti island, New York, which contains805 inhabitants, including 114 slaves; 114 of itsinhabitants are electors.)

(CASTLETON, a township and river in Rut-land county, Vermont, 20 miles s. e. of mount In-dependence at Ticonderoga. Lake Bombazon ischiefly in this town, and sends its waters into Cas-tleton river, which, rising in Pittsford, passesthrough this town in a s. westerley course, and failsinto Pultney river in the town of Fairhaven, a littlebelow Colonel Lyon’s iron Avorks. Fort War-ner stands in thistoAvn. Inhabitants 805.)

(CASTOR’S River, in Newfoundland island,empties in the harbour of St. John’s. Its size isconsiderable for 15 miles from the sea.)

(Castor, Estanque del, a lake of the pro-vince and colony of Virginia, on the shore of the

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Olifo, and between the rivers of Great and LittleMance.]

Castors, a port on the s. coast of Nova Scotia,between the White isles and the port of Tangier.

CASTRO, a capital city of the province andgovernment of Chiloé in the kingdom of Chile;peopled by the order of Don Lope Garcia de Cas-tro, governor of Peru, who gave it his name in1560 : it lies, between two small livers, and has agood port; is inhabited by some good and opu-lent families, and enjoys a pleasant ,and healthytemperature. It is also called Chjloe, and is of aregular and beautiful form ; has, besides the pa-rish church, a convent of monks of St. Francis,and a bishop auxiliary to that of Santiago. It was.sacked by the Dutch in 1643 ; is 42 leagues s. ofthe city of Osorno, in lat. 42° 40' s.

Castro, another capital city of the province andgovernment of Esmeraldas or Atacames in the king-dom of Quito ; founded. in the valley of Fili byFrancisco Quintero, in 1586.

Castro, another settlement of the province andcvrregimknto of Chillan in the kingdom of Chile ;situate in the island of Maule, on the shore of theriver Longomilla.

Castro-Vireyna, a province and corregimientoof Peru, bounded n. w. by the province ofCanete,«. by that of Yauyos, n. e. by that of Angaraes,and partly by the jurisdiction of Huamanga andHuanta, m. by that of Vilcas Huaman, s. w. bythat of Lucanas, and s. s. w. and w. by that of\^ca. It is uneven and barren, and its inhabi-tants, on this account, amount scarcely to 6900,although it is 22 leagues in length from e. to as,and 25 in width n. to s. No mines have been dis-covered here, nor are there any other roads to itthan merely such as are opened through passes inthe snow, or where no obstruction is ofered bythe copious streams which every where precipi-tate themselves down from the mountains, andwhich are particularly large in the rainy season,which is from October to Slarch. Its productionsare wheat, maize, and potatoes; and in someglens, where the cold is not so great, fruits andcattle are extremely plentiful. Here are also lla~mas, vicunas, and huanacos, the wool of whichthey turn to some profit. This province is wa-tered by rivers, some of which descend from theprovinces of the coast of the S. sea, and othersfrom the further side of the cordillera, runningtowards the e. and entering the Maranon ; it isalso watered by the Canete, which rises from theChicha, and collects other streams in this province ;by the Pisco, which rises from a lake called.firacocha ; by the Yea, from the lake Choclo-

cocha ; and by the Calcamayo, which enters theprovince of Vilcas Huaman. In all the waters ofthis province, notwithstanding they are very abun-dant, there is a great scarcity of fish, and withoutdoubt this arises from the cold which prevailshere. This province is but thinly peopled, and itsinhabitants are poor : they do not, we have heard,amount to more than 7000 souls. It consists of sixcuracies, to which there are 29 other settlementsannexed. Its yearly reparlimiento amounted to86,400 dollars, and it paid an alcavala equal to691 dollars. The capital is of the same name ; thisis a small and poor town, situate on a lofty spot,where the cold is most intense : close to it runs ariver, which is made use of for working the millsof the silver mines ; which, although they pro-duce this metal of a good quality, they are by nomeans well stocked with it. The town has a con-vent of monks of St. Francis, and two large estatescalled Huallanto and Huallanga, in which theraare churches annexed to this curacy ; is 14 leaguesfrom Huancablica, 26 from Pisco, and 60 from

la. Long. 74° 44'. Lat. 13° 49' s. The

ements of the province

are.

Saesaquero,

Tambillo,

•Cinto,

Azavi,

Huacahuaca,

Tambo,

Pilpichaca,

Capillas,

Cargonacho,

Sangaiaico,

Santa Ana,

Andaimarca,

Acostambo,

Santiago,

Cordova,

Huachos,

Ocobamba,

Claris,

Ayamarca,

Cotas,

Ocozo,

Cocas,

Larnari,

Arma,

Pacomarca,

Huanactarabo,

Querco,

lluanac.

Laramanca,

Cadrillo,

Quisahuara,

Y anac.

Huaifara,

Tancara.

CASUHATI, a mountam of the province andgovernmemt of Buenos Ayres, on the shore of theriver Hueque Lenori.

CASURO, a river of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese pos-sessions: it runs s. s. e. and enters the Trom-betas.

(CASWELL County, in Hillsborough district,N. Carolina, borders on Virginia, n : it contains10,096 inhabitants, of whom 2736 are slaves.Leesburg is the chief town.)

(CAT Island, or Guanahani, one of the Ba-hama islands. See St. Salvador.)

CATA, a settlement of the province and govern-

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CATAMARCA, S. Fernando de, a city ofthe province and government of Tucumán, found-ed by Juan Gomez Zurita, in 1538, in the fertileand extensive valley of Conando. It has a fort torepress the encroachments of the Indians. Thename of Canete was given it in honour to the vice-roy who then commanded in Peru ; this was after-wards changed to London, in honour to the queenof England, wife of Philip II. king of Spain. Theinquietudes caused amongst the inhabitants by theinfidel Indians induced Don Geronimo Luis deCabrera, son of a governor of that province, in1663, to remove it to another not less fertile val-ley, and to give it the name of San J uan de la Ri-vero ; and lastly, by the permission of the king,in 1683, it was transferred to a spot in the valleyof Catamarca ; where it still remains, under thesame title, at 80 leagues distance from its first sta-tion. It has, besides the parish church, a conventof the Recoletos monks of St. Francis, with thededicatory title of San Pedro de Alcantara ; anhospital of Merced ; aud a house of residence,which formerly belonged to the regulars of thecompany of Jesuits. On the w. side of the val-ley is a mountain in which there are gold mines ;and on the w. also from n. to s. runs a serrama^ theskirts of which are for many leagues covered withestates and cultivated grounds, and filled, fromthe abundance of fine pastures, with lage and smallcattle and with mules. A tolerably large riverruns through the valley in the rainy season, andterminates in some lakes M’hich are formed by itabout 30 leagues s. of the city. The commerce ofthis city is very small, so that there is no coin cur-rent ; and even the payments of the royal dutiesare paid in effects, and in the productions of thecountry, such as cotton, linens, pepper, brandy,and wheat. Lat. 27° s.

Catamarca, a settlement of the same provinceand government ; situate in the district of thiscity.

CATAMBUCU, a settlement of the provinceand government of Popayán in the kingdom ofQuito.

CATAN, San Francisco de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Caxamarca inPeru ; annexed to the curacy of Chetu.

CATANERA, an ancient province of Peru, inthat of Condesuyos, in which dwelt the nation ofthe Quechuas. It was subjected to the empire bythe Inca Capac Y upanqui, fifth Emperor.

CATANIAPU, a river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia. Itrises to the s. of the settlement of San Joseph de

Mapoyes, runs w. and enters the Orinoco close tothe torrent of Los Atures.

CATAPUIN, San Juan de, a settlement ofthe province and government of Quixos y Macasin the kingdom of Quito.

CATARAQUA, or Catarakui, a copiousriver of the province and country of the IroqueesIndians. It rises from the lake Ontario, runs n. e.and continues its course as far as Quebec, fromwhence it takes the name of St. Lawrence, andthen enters the sea.

Cataraqua, a bay on the n. coast of lakeOntario, in New France or Canada.

CATARUBEN, a settlement of the missions ofSan Juan de los Llanos in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; one of the seven which were held bythe regulars of the company of Jesuits, and be-longing to the nation of the Salivas Indians. TheCaribes burnt and destroyed it in 1684.

CATAROSI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Aymaraez in Peru; annexed tothe curacy of Pampamarca.

CATAS-ALTAS, a settlement or village of thePortuguese, in the province and captainship ofEspiritu Santo, and kingdom of Brazil ; situate onthe shore of the river Doce or Dulce.

CATAUBA, a river of Virginia, which runsn. e. and enters the Thames.

Catauba, another river in S. Carolina, whichruns s. e. and enters the Watery.

(CATAWESSY, a township in Northumberlandcounty, Pennsylvania ; situate on the s. e. bankof the e. branch of Susquehannah river, oppositethe mouth of Fishing creek, and about 20 milesn. e. of Sunbury.)

CATCA, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Paucartambo in Peru.

CATCH, or Boutin, a port of the coast ofNova Scotia, between the bay of Cheboucto andtbe island of Samborough.

CATEMU, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Quillota in the kingdom of Chile,on the shore of the river Quillota.

(CATHANCE, or Cathants, a small river inLincoln county, Maine, which rises in Topsham,and empties into Merry Meeting bay, and has se-veral mills upon it.)

(CATHERINE’S Isle, St, a small island inthe captainship of St. Vincent’s in Brazil, be-longing to the Portuguese, 47 leagues s. of Cana-nea island. It is about 23 miles from n. to s. in-habited by Indians, wiio assist the Portugueseagainst their enemies, the natives of Brazil. Lak27° 10' s. Long. 47° 15' w.)

X X 2

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20. Don Ignacio de Flores, native of Quito,who had served as captain of cavalry in the regi-ment of the volunteers of Aragon, and who was go-vernor of the province of Moxos, being of the rankof colonel ; he was nominated as president by wayof reward for his services, in having been instru-mental to the pacification of the Indians of Peru,and to the succouring of the city of La Paz, whichwas besieged by rebels : he governed until 1786,when he was removed from the presidency.

Charcas, a ferocious and barbarous nation ofIndians of Peru, to the s.w. of the lakes of Aul-laga and of Paria ; conquered by Mayta Capac,fourth monarch of the Incas. At present theyare reduced to the Christian faith in the govern-ment of Chuquisaca or La Plata.

Santa Maria Charcas, a settlement, with the dedicatory titleof Santa Maria, being the real of the mines of thekingdom of Nueva Galicia, in which are markedthe boundaries of its jurisdiction, and those ofNueva Espana, the last district of the bishopric ofMechoacan. It contains a convent of the religi-ous order of St. Francis, and 50 families of Spa-niards, ilfwstees, and Mulattoes, as also many of In-dians dispersed in the rancherias and the estatesof its district: is 130 leagues to the n. J to then. w. of Mexico, 75 from Guadalaxera, and 18 tothe n. e. of the sierra of Pinos. Lat. 22° 55'.Long. 100° 40'.

Charcas, another settlement and real of themines of the province of Copala, and kingdom ofNueva Vizcaya ; situate two leagues from thecapital. In its vicinity are the estates of Panuco,in which they work with quicksilver the metals ofthe mines. To its curacy, which is adminsteredby one of the Catholic clergy, are annexed twosmall settlements of Serranos Indians, amongst whomare found some few of the Tepeguana nation.

CHARIMIZA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Mainas in the kingdom of Quito.It rises in the cordillera towards the s. and entersthe Maranon.

(CHARLEMONT, a township in Hampshirecounty, Massachusets, 16 miles w. of Deerfield,having 665 inhabitants.)

(Charles, a cape on the s.w. part of the straitentering into Hudson’s bay. Lat. 62° 40' n.Long. 75° 15' w.)

Charles, a small lake of New France, to then. of the city of Quebec, which empties itself intothe river St. Lawrence.

Charles, another cape or point of the coast ofthe country of Labrador ; one of those which formthe w. entrance or mouth of the strait of Belle-isle.

(Charles River, in Massachusetts, called an-ciently Quinobequin, is a considerable stream,the principal branch of which rises from a pondbordering on Hopkinton. It passes through Hollis-ton and Bellingham, and divides Medway fromMed field, Wrentham, and Franklin, and thenceinto Dedham, where, by a curious bend, it forms apeninsula of 900 acres of land. A stream calledlother brook runs out of this river in this town,and falls into Neponsit river, forming a naturalcanal, uniting the two rivers, and affording a num-ber of excellent mill-seats. From Dedham thecourse of the river is n. dividing Newton fromNeedham, Weston, and Waltham, passing overromantic falls ; it then bends to the n. e. and e.through Watertown and Cambridge, and passinginto Boston harbour, mingles with the waters ofMystic river, at the point of the peninsula ofCharlestown. It is navigable for boats to Water-town, seven miles. The most remarkable bridgeson this river are those which connect Boston withCharlestown and Cambridge. SeeBosxoN. Thereareseven paper mills on this river, besides other mills.][Charles County, on the w. shore of Maryland,lies between Potowmack and Patuxent rivers. Itschief town is port Tobacco, on the river of thatname. Its extreme length is 28 miles, its breadth24, and it contains 20,613 inhabitants, including10,085 slaves. The country has few hills, is gene-rally low and sandy, and produces tobacco, Indiancorn, sweet potatoes, &c.)

(Charles City County, in Virginia, lies betweenChickahominy and James rivers. It containedformerly part of what now forms Prince George’scounty. It has 5588 inhabitants, including 3141slaves.)

(Charles, a cape of Virginia, in about lat. 37°15' n. It is on the n. side of the mouth of Chesa-peak bay, having cape Henry opposite to it.]

Charles, a promontory in N. America, men-tioned by the English captain Thomas James, inhis voyage published 1663, which was made forthe sake of discovering a pass to S. America.

CHARLES. See Carlos, San.

CHARLESTON, a capital city of S. Carolina,is one of the best of N. America, excelling inbeauty, grandeur, and commerce. It is situateupon a long strip of land between two navigablerivers, which are Ashley and Cowper, and thegreater part of it upon the latter. This forms inthe city two small bays, the one to the n. and theother to the s. The town is of a regular construc-tion, and well fortified both by nature and art,having six bastions and a line of entrenchment ; onthe side of the river Cowper it has the bastions of

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and pleasantly situated. Before the deslrnction oftil is town by the British in 1775, several brandiesof mannfadures were carried on to great advan-tage, some of which have been since revived : par-ticularly tlic manufacture of pot and pearl ashes,ship-building, rum, leather in all its branches,silver, tin, brass, and pewter. Three rope-walkshave lately been erected in this town, and tlie in-crease of its houses, population, trade, and naviga-tion, have been very great within a few' years past.This town is a port of entry in conjunction withBoston. At the head of the neck there is a bridgeover Mystic river, which connects Charlestown withMalden.)

CHARLESTOWN, another city of the island ofNevis, one of the Caribes, in the Antilles ; in w Inchthere are beautiful houses and shops well providedwith every thing ; is defended by a fort calledCharles. It has a market every Saturday, begin-ning at sun-rise and finishing at mid-day, whitherthe Negroes bring 'maize, names, garden-herbs,fruits, &c. In the parish of San Juan is a pieceof sulphureous land, in the upper extremity of anopening of the land, called Solfatara, or Sulphurgut, which is so hot as to be telt through the solesof the shoes when being trodden upon. At thefoot of the declivity of this same part of the city,is a small hot stream, called the Bath, which beingsupposed to rise from the aforesaid spot, loses itselfshortly in the sand. Towards the side lying nextthe sea are two fountains, one of hot water, theother of cold, and of these two are formed the lakeof Blackrock, the waters of which are of a moderatewarmth, and which lies to the n. of the city, beingnearly a quarter of a mile’s distance from the placewhere are caught eels and silver-fish, resemblingthe cod and slimgut in flavour, the latter of whichlias a head disproportioned to its body. [A prodi-gious piece ol Nevis mountain falling down in anearthquake several years ago, left a large vacuity,which is still to be seen. The altitude of thismountain, taken by a quadrant from Charlestownbay, is said to be a mile and a half perpendicular ;and from the said bay to the top, four miles. Thedeclivity from this mountain to the town is verysteep half-way, but afterwards easy of ascent.] InLat. 17° 8' u. and long. 62° 40' w.

Charlestown, another city of the island ofBarbadoes ; the situation of which is two leaguesfrom that of San Miguel. It has a good port de-fended by two castles ; the one beyoml the other,and both commanding the city and the road: inthe middle of them is a platform. Tlse inhabitantscarry on a great trade with the other islands.

(CHARLESTOWN, a township in Montgomery

county. New York, on the s. side of Mohawk river,about 32 miles w. of Schenectady. By the statecensus of 1796, 456 of the inhabitants are elec-tors.)

(Charlestown, a township in Mason county,Kentucky ; situate on the Ohio, at the mouth ofLauren’s creek. It contains but few houses, andis six miles n. of Washington, and 60 n. e. of Lex-ington. Lat. 38° 28' n.)

(Charlestown, a township in Chester county,Pennsylvania.)

(Charlestown, a post town in Cheshire county,New Hampshire, on the e. side of Connecticutriver, 30 miles s. of Dartmouth college, upwards of70 n. of Northampton, 116 n. of w. of Boston, 120w. by 71. of Portsmouth, and 431 n. n. e. of Phila-delphia. It was incorporated in 1753, and con-tains 90 or 100 houses, a Congregational church,a court-house, and an academy. The road fromBoston to Quebec passes through this town. Lat.43° 16' n. Long. 72° 23' w. A small internaltrade is carried on here.)

(Charlestown, a post town in Cecil county,Maryland, near the head of Chesapeak bay ; sixmites e. n. e. from the mouth of Susquehannahriver, 10 zo. s. w. from Elktown, and 50 s. w. by zb.from Philadelphia. Here are about 20 houses,chiefly inhabited by fishermen employed in theherring fishery. Lat. 39° 36' w.)

(Charlestown, a district in the lower countryof S. Carolina, subdivided into 14 parishes. Thislarge district, of which the city of Charleston is thechief town, lies between Santee and Combaheerivers. It pays 21,473/. 14s. 6d. sterling, taxes. Itsends to the state legislature 48 representatives and13 senators, and one member to congress. It con-tains 66,986 inhabitants, of whom only 16,352 arefree.)

(Charlestown, a village in Berkley county,Virginia ; situate on the great road leading fromPhiladelphia to Winchester ; eight miles fromShepherdstown, and 20 from Winchester.)

(Charlestown, a township in Washingtoncounty, Rhode Island state, having the Atlanticocean on the s. and separated from Richmond on the71. by Charles river, a water of Fawcatiick. Some ofits ponds empty into Fawcatiick river, otliers intothe sea. It is 19 miles /L ti:;. of Newport, andcontains 2022 inhabitants, including 12 slaves. Afew years ago there w'ere about 500 Indians in thestate ; the greater part of them resided in tin's town-ship. They are peaceable and well disposed togovernment, and s|5cak the English language.)

CHARLETON, an island situate near the e.coast of the country of Labrador, in the part of N.

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America called New South Wales. Its territoryconsists of a white dry sand, and it is covered withsmall trees and shrubs. This island has a beauti-ful appearance in the spring to those Avho discoverit after a voyage of three or four months, and afterhaving seen nothing but a multitude of mountainscovered with frost, which lie in the bay, and in thestrait of Hudson, and which are rocks petrifiedwith eternal ice. This island appears at that sea-son as though it were one heap of verdure. Theair at the bottom of the bay, although in 51“ of hit.and nearer to the sun than London, is excessivelycold for nine months, and extremely hot the remain-ing three, save when the n. w. wind prevails. Thesoil on the e. <^s well as on the w. side produces allkinds of grain and fruits of fine qualities, whichare cultivated on the shore of the river Rupert.Lat. 52“ 12' n. Long. 80“ w.

CHARNACOCHA, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Pilaya and Paspaya inPeru,

CHARO, Matlazingo, the alcaldía mayorof the province and bishopric of Mechoacán inNueva España, of a mild and dry temperature,being the extremity of the sierra of Otzumatlan ;the heights of which are intersected with manyveins of metals, which manifest themselves veryplainly, although they have never yet been dugout ; and in the wet seasons the clay or mud pitsrender the roads impassable. It is watered by theriver which rises in the pool or lake of Valladolid,and by which the crops of wheat, maize, lentils, andthe fruits peculiar to the place, are rendered fertileand productive. This reduced jurisdiction belongsto the Marquises of Valle, and is subject to theDukes of Terranova. Its population is reduced tosome ranchos, or meetings for the purpose of labour,and to the capital, which has the same name, andwhich contains a convent of the religious order ofSt. Augustin, this being one of the first templesbuilt by the Spaniards in this kingdom, the presentdilapidated state of it bearing ample testimony toits great antiquity. It contains 430 families ofPirindas Indians, employed in labour and in thecultivation of the land, and in making bread, whichis carried for the supply' of Valladolid, the neigh-bouring ranchos and estates. It should also have45 or 50 families of Spaniards, Mustees^ and Mulat-toes. Is .50 leagues to the w. of Mexico, and twoto the e. of Valladolid. Long. 100° 44'. Lat.19“34'.

CHARON, a small river of Canada, which runse. and enters the lake Superior in the bay of Beau-harnois.

CHARPENTIER, Fond du, a bay of the n. e.

coast of the island of Martinique, between the townand parish of Marigot and the Pan de Azucar.

CHARPENTIER, a small river of the same islandwhich runs n. e. and enters the sea in the formerbay.

CHARQUEDA, a lake of the province andcaptainship of Rey in Brazil, near the coast whichlies between this lake and that of Los Patos.

CHARRUAS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofParaguay, who inhabit the parts lying between therivers Parana and Uruguay. These Indians arethe most idle of any in America, and it has beenattempted in vain to reduce them to any thing likea civilized state.

Charruas, a settlement of this province andgovernment.

Charruas, a river of the same province, whichruns s. s. w. and enters the Paraná.

CHARTIER, Bahia de, a bay on the s. coastof the straits of Magellan, between the bay of SanSimon and the point of Tunquichisgua.

Chartier, a settlement of Indians of the pro-vince and colony of Virginia ; situate on the shoreof a river of the same name. It runs s. and entersthe sea in the county of Hampshire.

(Chartier, a township in Washington county,Pennsylvania.)

(Chartier’s Creek. See Canonsburg andMorganza.)

(CHARTRES, a fort which was built bythe French, on the e. side of the Mississippi,three miles n. of La Prairie du Rocher, or theRock meadows, and 12 miles n. of St. Genevieve,on the w. side of that river. It was abandoned in1772, being untenable by the constant washings ofthe Mississippi in high floods. The village s. ofthe fort was very inconsiderable in 1778. A mileabove this is a village settled by 170 warriors of thePiorias and Mitchigamias tribes of Illinois Indians,who are idle and debauched.)

CHASPAIA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Aricá in Peru; annexed to thecuracy of Tarata.

CHASSES, a small river of N. Carolina, whichruns n. n. e. and enters that of Cutawba.

CHAT, Trou de, a settlement of the parish andisland of Martinique ; situate near the bay of theCul de Sac Royal, and to the n. e. of the capital.

Chat, a river of the island of Guadalupe, whichrises in the mountains of the e. coast, and runninge. enters the sea between the rivers Grand Bananierand Trou au Chien, or Hole of the Dog.

Chat, a cape or point of land on the coast ofthe river St. Lawrence, on the shore opposite tothe port of San Pacracio.

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cattle of all sorts; aiul there arc some gold mines,though they produce at present very sp:n ingly;some of the silver mines, Avhlch were very fruitful,have lately filled with water, and attempts havebeen made in vain to empty them. Indeed theonly mines which have produced any great wealthare those found in the mountains of Aullagas, andfrom them, for some years past, metals of therarest qualities have been extracted. In the woodsof the valleys, which produce very fine and excel-lent timber, are found wolves, tigers, and otherwild beasts inhabiting the mountains ; also aspecies of bees, which form their combs in the hol-lows of trees, and the honey of which they callde charas. There is a river in this province com-posed of several streams, and which unites itselfwith the Cochabamba. The number of its inha-bitants amounts to 36,000, who are divided into27 settlements. Its reparlimienfo used to amountto 92,665 dollars, and its n/cflxvife to 7-11 dollarsper annum. It is one of the richest provinces ofPeru.

The capital is of the same name, and the othersettlements are,

Chayantacas,

Amayapampa,

Laimes,

Calacala,

Amaya,

Amayavilque,

Pocoata,

Chayala,

Casimbiico,

San Pedro

Moromoro,

Maragua,

PancacUij

Sarari,

de Macha,

Charca,

Pitantora,

Ocuri,

Uruyearasi,

San Francisco dc Micani,San Marcos de Mirailo-res,

Surumi,

Santiago de l\Ioscari,

San Pedro de Buenavista,Acasio,

Toracari,

Iluaicoma,

Aullagas.

CHEANE, a river of the province and govern-ment of Paraguay.

CHEARA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Andahuailas in Peru; annexed tothe curacy of Huaiama.

(CHEAT River rises in Randolph county,Virginia, and after pursuing a n. n. w. course, joinsMonongahela river, three or four miles within thePennsylvania line. It is 200 yards wide at itsmoutli, and 100 yards at the Dunkards settlement,50 miles higher, and is navigable for boats, exceptin dry seasons. There is a portage of 37 milesfrom this river to the Potowmack, at the mouth ofSavage river.)

CHEBA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra-

nada, of a cold temperature. It lies between somemountains, and abounds in the produclioris of a,cold climate, such as wheat, maize, trullles, andbarley ; it consists of 100 house-keepers, and of40 Indians, all of Avliom are subject to the disorderof the cotos, or swelling of the throat; is 21leagues to the n. e. of Tunja.

CHEBANONKOGUE, a town of the French,in Canada ; situate in the country of the MistasuisIndians, on the n. shore of a lake which gives it itsname.

CHEBEN, a river of Nova Scotia. It risesfrom a small lake near the settlement and fort ofSackville, runs n. and enters the Basin des Mines,or of the Mines, of the bay of Fundy.

(CHEBUCTO, a bay and harbour on the s. s. e.coast of Nova Scotia, distinguished by the loss ofa French fleet in a former war between Franceand Great Britain. Near the head of this bay,on the w. side, stands the city of Halifax, the ca-pital of the province.)

CHECA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Tinta in Peru.

CHECACUPI, a settlement of the same pro-vince and kingdom as the former.

CHECACUPI, another, in the province of Quispi-canchi or Urcos in the same kingdom.

CHECASA, La Nueva, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Pilaya and Paspayain Peru.

CHECHIRGANTI, a river of the provinceand government of Darien in the kingdom ofTierra Firme. It rises in the mountains on the n.side, runs n. and enters the sea in the small beechor playon, opposite the port of Calidonia.

CHECODIN, a small lake of the province andcountry of the Iroquees Indians in Canada, liesbetween the lake Oswego and the river Ohio.

CHECHAS. See Chancay.

(CHEDABUCTO, or Milford Haven, alarge and deep bay on the easternmost part ofNova Scotia, at the mouth of the gut of Canso.Opposite to its mouth stands isle Madame. Sal-mon river falls into this bay from the w. and isremarkable for one of the greatest fisheries in theworld.)

CHEDIAC, a small river of Nova Scotia,which runs e. and enters the sea in the strait formedby the coast and the island of San Juan.

(CHEESADAWD Lake, about 210 miles n. e.by e. of the Canadian house, on the c. end ofSlave lake, in the Hudson bay company’s terri-tory, is about 35 miles in length, and the same inbreadth. Its w. shore is mountainous and rocky.)

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vernment of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdomof Quito. It runs from 7i. to s, and enters tlieChinchipe on the n. side, somewhat lower thanwhere this latter is entered by the Naraballe, andnear a small settlement of Indians.

CHERNAL, a port of the coast of the kingdomof Chile, in the district of the province and ccr-regimiet7tn of Copiapó. Lat. 27° 27'.

CHEROKEE, a settlement of North Carolina,where there is a fort built by the English on theshore of the river of its name, and at the mouth ofthe Agiqua.

Cherokee, a large river of the above colonyand province, called also Hogohegee and Calla-maco. It rises in the county of Augusta, and takesits name from a numerous nation of Indians ; runsV). for many leagues, forming a curve, and entersthe Ohio near the fourches of the Mississippi. Nearto this river are some very large and fertile plains ;and according to the account rendered by the In-dians, there are, at the distance of 40 leagues fromthe Chicazas nation, four islands, called Tahogale,Kakick, Cochali, and Tali, inhabited by as manyother different nations of Indians. (Cherokee wasthe ancient name of Tennessee river. The name ofTennessee was formerly confined to the fourteenthbranch, which empties 15 mites above the mouth ofClinch river, and 18 below Knoxville.)

Cherokee, the country of the Indians of thenation of this name in North Carolina. It standsw. as far as the Mississippi, and w. as far as theconfines of the Six Nations. It was ceded to theEnglish by the treaty of Westminster, in 1729.(This celebrated Indian nation is now on the de-cline. They reside in the n. parts of Georgia,and the s. parts of the state of Tennessee ; havingthe Apalachian or Cherokee mountains on the e.which separate them from North and South Caro-lina, and Tennessee river on the n. and w. and theCreek Indians on the s. The present line betweenthem and the state of Tennessee is not yet settled.A line of experiment was drawn, in 1792, fromClinch river across Holston to Chilhove mountain ;but the Cherokee commissioners not appearing, itis called a line of experiment. The complexion ofthe Cherokees is brighter than that of the neigh-bouring Indians. They are robust and well made,and taller than many of their neighbours ; beinggenerally six feet high, a few are more, and someless. Their women are tall, slender, and delicate.The talents and morals of the Cherokees are heldin great esteem. They were formerly a powerfulnation ; but by continual wars, in which it has beentheir destiny lo be engaged with the n. In-dian tribes, and with the whites, they are now re-duced to about 1500 warriors ; and they are be-coming weak and pusillanimous. Some writersestimate their numbers at 2500 warriors. Theyhave 43 towns now inhabited.)

Cherokee, a settlement of Indians of this na-tion, in the same country as that in which the Eng-lish had a fort and establishment, at the source ofthe river Caillon ; which spot is at present aban-doned.

CHERREPE, a port of the coast of Peru, and ofthe S. sea, in the province and corregimienlo ofSaña, is open, unprotected, and shallow ; andconsequently frequented only by vessels driven toit through stress, and for the sake of convenience.It is in lat. 7° 70' s.

CHERRITON, a port of the coast of the pro-vince and colony of Maryland, within the bay ofChesapeak, behind cape Charles.

(CHERRY Valley, a post-town in Otsegocounty, New York, at the head of the creek of thesame name, about 12 miles >/. e. of Coopersfown,and 18 s. of Canajohary, 61 w. of Albany,and 336 from Philadelphia. It contains about 30houses, and a Presbyterian church. There is anacademy here, which contained, in 1796, 50 or 60scholars. It is a spacious buildit)g, 60 feet by 40.The township is very large, and lies along the e.side of Otsego lake, and its outlet to Adiqnatangiecreek. By the state census of 1796, it appearsthat 629 of its inhabitants are electors. This set-tlement sutlered severely from the Indians in thelate war.)

(CHESAPEAK is one of the largest and safestbays in the United States. Its entrance is nearlye. n. e. and s. s. between cape Charles, lat. 37°13' and cape Henry, lat. 37°, in Virginia, 12 mileswide, and it extends 70 miles to the ??. dividingVirginia and Maryland. It is from 7 to IS milesbroad, and generally as much as 9 fathoms deep ;affording many commodious harbours, and a saleand easy navigation. It has many fertile islands,and these are generally along the c. side of the bay,except a few solitary ones near the xo. shore. Anumber of navigable rivers and other streamsempty into if, the chief of which are Susque-hannab, Fatapsco, Patuxent, Pofowmack, Rap-pahannock, and A^ork, which are all large and na-vigable. Chesapeak bay'- afibrds many excellentfisheries of herring and shad. There are also ex-cellent crabs and oysters. It is the resort ofswans, but is more particularly remarkable for aspecies of wild duck, called camashac/c, whoseflesh is entirely free from any fishy taste, and isadmired by epicures for its richness and delicacy.In a coinnierciul point of view, this bay is of im--

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raense advantage to the neighbouring states, parti-cularly to Virginia. Of that state it has been ob-served, with some little exaggeration, however,that “ every planter has a river at his door.”)

(CHESHIRE county, in New Hampshire, lies inthe s. w. part of the state, on the e. bank of Con-necticut river. It has the state of Massachusettson the s. Grafton county on the n. and Hillsbo-rough county e. It lias 34 townships, of whichCharlestown and Keene are the chief, and 28,772inhabitants, including 16 slaves.)

(Cheshire, a township in Berkshire county,Massachusetts ; famous for its good cheese ; 140miles fi. w. from Boston.)

(Cheshire, a township in New-Haven county,Connecticut, 15 miles n. of New-Haven city, and26 s.to. of Hartford. It contains an Episcopalchurch and academy, and three Conffreffationalchurches.)

(CHESNUT HILL, a township in Northamptoncounty, Pennsylvania.)

(Chesnut Creek, a branch of the Great Kanha-way, in Virginia, where it crosses the Carolinaline. Here, it is said, are iron mines.)

(Chesnut Ridge. Part of the Alleghanymountains, in Pennsylvania, are thus called, s. e.of Greensborough.)

CHESSOT, a town of the province and colonyof North Carolina ; situate on the shore of theriver Euphasee.

(CHESTER, a township in Lunenburg county,Nova Scotia, on Mali one bay, settled originallyby a few families from New England. Fromhence to Windsor is a road, the distance of 25miles.)

(Chester, a small plantation in Lincoln county,Maine, nine miles from Titcomb. It has eight ornine families.)

(Chester, a township in Hampshire county,Massachusetts, adjoining Westfield on the e. andabout 20 miles n. w. of Springfield. It contains177 houses, and 1119 inhabitants.)

(Chester, a large, pleasant, and elegant town-ship in Rockingham county. New Hampshire.It is 21 miles in length ; and on the w. side is apretty large lake, which sends its waters to Merri-mack river. It was incorporated in 1722, andcontains 1902 inhabitants, who are chiefly farmers.It is situated on the e. side of Merrimack river,14 miles n. w. of Haverhill, as far w. of Exeter,35 tflTby s. of Portsmouth, six n. of Londonderry,and 306 from Philadelphia. From the compactpart of this town there is a gentle descent to thesea, which, in a clear day, may be seen fromthence. It is a post-town, and contains about 60

houses and a Congregational church. Rattlesnakehill, in this township, is a great curiosity; it ishalf a mile in diameter, of a circular form, and400 feet high. On the side, 10 yards from itsbase, is the entrance of a cave, called the Devil’sDen, which is a room 15 or 20 feet square, andfour feet high, floored and circled by a regularrock, from the upper part of which are depend-ent many excrescences, nearly in the form andsize of a pear, which, when approached by a torch,throw out a sparkling lustre of almost every hue;It is a cold, dreary place, of which many fright-ful stories are told by those who delight in themarvellous.)

(Chester, a township in Windsor county, Ver-mont, w. of Springfield, and II miles w. by s. ofCharlestown, in New Hampshire, and contains981 inhabitants.)

(Chester, a borough and post-town in Penn-sylvania, and the capital of Delaware county;pleasantly situated on the w. side of Delaware ri-ver, near Marcus hook, and 13 miles n. e. of Wil-mington. It contains about 60 houses, built on aregular plan, a court-house, and a gaol. FromCliester to Philadelphia is 20 miles by water, and15 n. e. by land ; here the river is narrowed byislands of marsh, which are generally banked,and turned into rich and immensely valuable mea-dows. The first colonial assembly was convenedhere, the 4th of December 1682. The place af-fords genteel inns and good entertainment, and isthe resort of much company from the metropolisduringthe summer season. It was incorporated inDecember 1795, and is governed by two bur-gesses, a constable, a town-clerk, and three assist-ants ; whose power is limited to preserve the peaceand order of the place.)

(Chester County, in Pennsylvania, w. of Dela-ware county, and s. w. of Philadelphia ; about 45miles in length, and 30 in breadth. It contains33 townships, of which West Chester is the shiretown, and 27,937 inhabitants, of whom 145 areslaves. Iron ore is found in the n. parts, whichemploys six forges : these manufacture 'about1000 tons of bar-iron annually.)

(Chester Court-House, in South Carolina, 22miles s. of Pinckney court-house, and 58 n. w. ofColumbia. A post-office is kept here.)

(Chester River, a navigable water of thee. side of Maryland, which rises two miles withinthe line of Delaware state, by two sources, Cyprusand Andover creeks, which unite at Bridgetown ;runs nearly s. w. ; after passing Chester it runs s.nearly three miles, when it receives South-Easterncreek ; and 15 miles farther, in a s. w. direction, it

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empties into Chesapeak bay, at Love point. It formsan island at its mouth, and by acbannel on the e. sideof Kent island, communicates with. Eastern bay.It is proposed to cut a canal, about 1 1 miles long,from Andover creek, a mile and a half fromBridgetown to Salisbury, on Upper Duck creek,which falls into Delaware at Hook island.)

(Chester, a small town in Shannandoah county,Virginia, situate on the point of land formed bythe junction of Allen’s or North river and Southriver, which form the Shannandoah ; 16 miles s.by w. of Winchester. Lat. 39° 4' n. Long.78° 25' w.)

(Chester County, in Pinckney district, SouthCarolina, lies in the s.e. corner of the district, onW ateree river, and contains 6866 inhabitants ; ofwhom 5866 are whites, and 938 slaves. It sendstwo representatives, but no senator, to the statelegislature.)

(Chester, a town in Cumberland county, Vir-ginia ; situate on the s. w. bank of James river,15 miles n. of Blandford, and six s. of Rich-mond.)

(CHESTERFIELD, a township in Hampshirecounty, Massachusetts, 14 mites w. of Northamp-ton. It contains 180 houses, and 1183 inha-bitants.)

(Chesterfield, a township in Cheshire county.New Hampshire, on the e. bank of Connecticutriver, having Westmoreland n. and Hinsdale s.It was incorporated in 1752, and contains 1905 in-habitants. It lies about 25 miles s. by w. ofCharlestown, and about 90 or 100 w. of Ports-mouth. About the year 1730, the garrison offort Dummer was alarmed with frequent explosions,and with columns of fire and smoke, emitted fromW est River mountain in th is township , and four milesdistant from that fort. The like appearances havebeen observed at various times since ; particularly,one in 1752 was the most severe of any. Thereare two places where the rocks bear marks of hav-ing been heated and calcined.)

(Chesterfield County, in South Carolina, isin Cheraws district, on the North Carolina line. Itis about 30 mites long, and 29 broad.)

Chesterfield County, in Virginia, is betweenJames and Appamatox rivers. It is about 30miles long, and 25 broad ; and contains 14,214inhabitants, including 7487 slaves.)

(Chesterfield Inlet, on the w. side of Hud-son’s bay, in New South Wales, upwards of 200miles in length, and from 10 to 30 in breadth ; fullof islands.)

(CHESTERTOWN, a post-town and the capi-tal of Kent county, Maryland, on the w. side of

Chester river, 16 miles s.w. of Georgetown, 38e. by s. from Baltimore, and 81 s.w. of Philadel*phia. It contains about 140 houses, a church,college, court-house, and gaol. The college wasincorporated in 1782, by the name of Washing-ton. It is under the direction of 24 trustees, whoare empowered to supply vacancies and hold,estates, whose yearly value shall not exceed 6000/.currency. In 1787 it had a permanent fund of1250/. a year settled upon it by law. Lat. 39° 12'n. Long. 76° 10' cc;.)

CHETIMACHAS, a river of the province andgovernment of Louisiana. It is an arm of theMississippi, which runs s. e. and enters the sea onthe side of the bay of Asuncion or Ascension. [Onthe Chetiraachas, six leagues from the Mississippi,there is a settlement of Indians of the same name ;and thus far it is uniformly 100 yards broad, andfrom two to four fathoms cleep, vfhen the water islowest. Some drifted logs have formed a shoal atits mouth on the Mississippi ; but as the water isdeep under them they could be easily removed;and the Indians say there is nothing to impede na-vigation from their village to the gulf. The banksare more elevated than those of the Mississippi, andin some places are so high as never to be over-flowed. The natural productions are the same ason the Mississippi, but the soil, from the extraordi-nary size and compactness of the canes, is supe-rior. If measures were adopted and pursued witha view to improve this communication, there wouldsoon be on its banks the most prosperous and im-portant settlements in that colony.)

(Chetimachas, Grand Lake of, in Loui-.siana, near the mouth of the Mississippi, is 24miles long, and nine broad. Lake de Portage,which is 13 miles long, and If broad, commu-nicates with this lake at the n. end, by a straita quarter of a mile wide. The country bor-dering on these lakes is low and flat, timbered withcypress, live and other kinds of oak ; and on the€. side, the land between it and the Chafalaya riveris divided by innumerable streams, which occa-sion as many islands. Some of these streams are*navigable. A little distance from the s. e. short?of the lake Chetimachas, is an island where per-sons passing that way generally halt as a restingplace. Nearly opposite this island there is anopening which leads to the sea. It is about 150yards wide, and has 16 or 17 fathoms water.)

CHETO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Luya and Chillaos in Peru ; tothe curacy of which is annexed the extensive val-ley of Huaillabamba, in the province of Chncha-poyas.

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in Nueva Espana, is of a mild temperature ; si-tuate in a pleasant and fertile plain, and one whichabounds in maize, wheat, and other seeds. It con-tains S68 families of Indians, 13 of Spaniards, anda convent of the religious order of St. Francis;is one league n. of its capital,

Chiautla, with the addition of La Sal, an-other settlement, the capital of its jurisdiction, inthe same kingdom, thus called from the salt minesfound in it formerly, and from which the inhabi-tants used to derive a great commerce. At pre-sent it is in a thorough state of decay, not only asits trade has fallen off in the other provinces ; butas the Indians have applied themselves rather tothe cultivation of the soil and the planting of fruitsand pulse, from the traffic of which they derivetheir maintenance. It is inhabited by 650 familiesof Mexican Indians, and 40 of Spaniards, J\/us~iees, and Mulattoes. It contains a convent of thereligious order of St. Augustin. The jurisdictionis so much reduced that it is not more than fiveleagues in length and three in width, void of com-merce, and has but a small revenue. Its inhabi-tants, although they are somewhat given to thebreeding of small cattle, yet this must hardly beconsidered with them a branch of commerce,since they have scarcely enough of these where-with to support theiiiselves. It contains only twoother settlements, and these are,

Xicotlan, Huehetlan.

Forty-five leagues s. e. to the s. w. of Mexico.
CHIBACOA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Venezuela ; situate on the shore ofa river to the w. of the town of Nirua.

CHIBATA, a settlement of the . province andcorregimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, and the head settlement of the corregi-miento of Indies, is of a very cold and fresh tem-perature, abounding in productions, and particu-larly in cattle, from the fleeces and hides of whichare made quantities of blankets, linen cloths, andother articles for garments. It may contain about200 Indians, and it is eight leagues to the n. e.of Tunja, lying between this latter place and thesettlement of Siachoque.

CHIBAI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Collahuas in Peru.

CHICA, an island of the N. sea, one of theLucayas ; situate between the islands Siguate andSt. Andrew. The English gave it the name ofLittle.

CHICACHAE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Louisiana or S. Carolina, in whichthe English have a fort and establishment to carry

on commerce with the Indians, is situated on theshore of the river Sonlahove.

CHICACHAS, a settlement of Indians of thisnation, in the territory thus called, where the Eng-lish have an establishment or factory for com-merce.

CHICAGOU, a port of Canada, on the w. sideof the lake Michigan.

Chicagou, a river of the same province andgovernment, which runs s. then ?i. e. and entersthe former port.

CHICAHOMINI, a river of the province andcolony of Virginia, runs s.e. and turning itscourse to the s. enters the Thames.

CHICAHUASCO, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Huipuxtla, and alcaldia mayor of Tepe-tango, in Nueva Espana, contains 72 families ofIndians.

CHICAHUASTEPEC, San Miguel de, asettlement of the head settlement of Zoyaltepec, andalcaldia mayor of Yanguitlan. It contains 48 fa-milies of Indians, and is 10 leagues from its headsettlement.

CHICAHUAZTLA, San Andres de, a settle-ment and head settlement of the alcaldia mayor ofTepozcolula, in the province and bishopric ofOaxaca, in the kingdom of Nueva Espana, is ofa cold temperature, inhabited by 332 families ofIndians, including those of the settlements or wardsof its district, and they maintain themselves bybartering cotton garments for salt on the coast ofXicayan ; 12 leagues s. w. of its capital.

Chicahuaztla, another, a small settlement orward of the alcaldia mayor of Guachinango in thesame kingdom ; annexed to the curacy of that ofTlaola.

CHICAMA, a large, fertile, and beautiful valleyof the province and corregimiento of Truxillo inPeru. It was one of the most populous in thetimes of the gentilisra of the Indians, owing to itsagreeable and benign temperature : is watered bya river of its name, which divides it from that ofChimu. In 1540, the friar Domingo de SantoTomas founded here a convent of his order, forthe instruction of the Indians, which immediatelywas turned into a priory and a house for noviciates.It is at present, however, fallen into decay, throughthe ravages of time. This valley is six leaguesfrom the capital, to the n. in the road which leadsto the provinces of Quito, Sana, and Piura.

Chicama, a river of this province and corregi-miento. It rises in the province of Guamachuco,from two very lofty mountains, called Y ulcaguancaand Yanaguanca, to the n. e . ; and waters and fer-

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Cotagaitilla,Escara,Chacnacocha,Chequelti,Colnaca,Calccha,Tomola,Tumula,Estarca,

Tupisa,

Oploca,

Tatasi,

Ingenio del Oro

Nueva Cbocaya,Talina,

Verque,

Chacapa,

Clioroma,

Libilibi,

Moraya,

Moxo,

Tojo,

Sococha,

Remedios,

Chisloca,

Suipacha.

And in the district of Tarija,

Tarija de Vieja, La Concepcion,

San Bernardo de Tarija, Berraeo.

The district of Tarija is a territory full of que-hradas and craggy mountains, as far as the punasand lofty plains of Escayache and Tacsora, wherethere are two salt lakes. It is composed of fourfertile valleys lying on the skirts of hills, and inthese are found human bones of a prodigious size,petrified, shin-bones of a yard and a quarter long,and teeth larger than a fist. In the midst of one ofthese valleys is the town of San Bernardo de Tarija,which is the capital of the province. Its reparti-miento used to amount to 82,350 dollars, and itsalcavala to 558 dollars per annum. For the settle-ments of this district, see above.

Chichas, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Condesuyos de Arequipa in thesame kingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Sala-manca.

Chichas, a river of the province and govern-ment of Tucumán, in the district and jurisdictionof the city of Xuxuy, which divides this city fromthat of the capital of San Miguel.

(CHICHESTER, Upper and Lower, twotownships in Delaware county, Pennsylva-nia.)

(Chichester, a small township in Rocking-ham county, New Hampshire, about 35 miles n. w.of Exeter, and 45 from Portsmouth. It lies onSuncook river, was incorporated in 1727, andcontains 491 inhabitants.)

CHICHIBACOA, Cabo de, a cape on thecoast of the province and government of SantaMarta, and kingdom of Tierra Firrae ; 80 leaguesto the w. of that city.

CHICHICAPA, a settlement and capital of thealcaldia mayor of the province and bishopric ofOaxaca in Nueva Espana. It is of a mild tem-perature, and was anciently the real of the mostesteemed silver mines; but is at present muchfallen of, the working of the mines having been for

the most part abandoned from the want of hands,in as much as the natives have given themselvesup to the trade of cochineal, in which its territoryabounds : it produces also much seed and maize.Its jurisdiction includes some of the finest andrichest provinces. It consists of five head settle-ments of districts, to which are subject as manyother. Its capital contains 430 families of Indians,and some of Spaniards, Muslees, and Mulattoes.Ninety leagues s. e. of Mexico. The other settle-ments are.

Zimitlan,Tepezimatlan,La Magdalena,Atzozola.

Rio Hondo or Thequila,

San Agustin de Losi-

cha,

Tetipai,

Cozan tepee,

CHICHICATEPEC, a settlement and head set-tlement of the alcaldia mayor of Villalta in NuevaEspana, is of a cold temperature, contains 26 fa-milies of Indians, and is seven leagues to the s. e.of its capital.

CHICHICOAUTLA, St. Francisco de, asettlement and head settlement of the alcaldia mayorof Metepeque in Nueva Espana. It contains 91families of Indians.

CHICHIMEQUILLA, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district of Zitaquaro, and alcaldiamayor Maravatio, in the bishopric of Mechoacanand kingdom of Nueva Espana. It contains 84families of Indians, and is a quarter of a league tothe s. of its head settlement.

CHICHIQUILA, a settlement of the head set-tlement of Quinuxtlan, and alcaldia mayor of SanJuan de los Llanos, in Nueva Espana. It contains180 families of Indians.

CHICHOI, a settlement of the province andkingdom of Guatemala.

CHICHOPON, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Xuambos.

CHICIBICHE, a point of the coast of the pro-vince and government of Venezuela, opposite theisland of Aves.

(CHICKAHOMINY, a small navigable riverin Virginia. At its mouth in James river, 37miles from point Comfort, in Chesapeak bay, is abar, on which is only 12 feet water at commonflood tide. Vessels passing that may go eightmiles up the river; those of 10 feet draught 12miles ; and vessels of six tons burden may go 32miles up the river.)

(CHICKAMACOMICO Creek, in Dorchestercounty, Maryland, runs s. between the towns ofMiddletown and Vienna, and empties into Fishingbay.)

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(CHICKAMAGES, a part of the Cherokee na-tion of Indians, known by this name, inhabit fivevillages on Tennessee river. See CHICCA-MOGGA.)

CHICKAMINE, a river of the province andcolony of Virginia.

(CHICKASAW Bluff is on the e. bank of theMississippi, witiiin the territories of the UnitedStates, in lat. 35 n. The Spaniards erected herea strong stockaded fort, with cannon, and furnishedit with troops, all in the space of 24 hours, in themonth of June 1795. It has since been given up,.according to the treaty of 1796.)

(Chickasaw, a creek which falls into theWabash from the c. a little below Post St. Vin-cent.)

(Chickasaw, a river which empties into theMississippi, on the e. side, 104 miles from themouth of Margot, and 67 s. w. of Mine au Fer.Tlie lands here are of an excellent quality, andcovered with a variety of useful timber, canes, &c.This river may be ascended during high floods up-wards of SO miles with boats of several tons burden.)

(Chickasaws, a famous nation of Indians, whoinhabit the country on the e. side of the Mississippi,on the head branches of the Tombigbee, Mobile,and Yazoo rivers, in the n. zo. corner of the state ofGeorgia, and n. of the country of the Chactaws.Their country is an extensive plain, tolerably wellwatered from springs, and of a pretty good soil.They have seven towns, the central one of whichis in lat. 34° 23' «• long. 89° 30' w. The num-ber of souls in this nation has been formerlyreckoned at 1725, of which 575 were fighting men.There are some Negroes among the Chickasaws,who either were taken captive in war, or ran awayfrom their masters, and sought safety among theIndians. In 1539, Ferdinand de Soto, with 900men, besides seamen, sailed from Cuba with a de-sign to conquer Florida. He travelled n. to theChickasaw country, about lat. 35° or 36° ; and threeyears after died, and was buried on the bank ofMississipi river.)

CHICLAIO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Saña in Peru, in which there is aconvent of the religious order of St. Francis.

CHICO, Rio, a settlement and garrison of theprovince and government of Sonora ; situate onthe shore of the river Yaqui.

Chico, a river of the province and governmentof Panamá in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. Itrises in the mountains to the s. of the istmo, oristhmus, near the settlement of Chepo ; and runss. ze. and enters the sea in the bay or gulf of Pa-nama.

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Chico, another river of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán in Peru. It runs to the e.of the jurisdiction of the city ofXuxuy,

Chico, a small island, called Morro, near thecoast of the province and government of SantaMarta ; opposite this city, and not far from ano-ther island, distinguished by the name of MorroGrande.

CHICOANTEPEC, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldla mayor of Zoques in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CHICOLAPA, a settlement of the head settle-ment, and alcaldla mayor of Coatepec, in NuevaEspana ; annexed to the curacy of its capital. Itcontains 187 families of Indians, who celebrateevery Friday throughout the year a teanguis orfair, at which are sold cattle and other productionsof the country. At these times it is a place of ge-neral rendezvous for the inhabitants of all the con-tiguous provinces ; and this fair has, from the greatconcourse of people usually assembling here, ob-tained the title of the famous teanguis of S. Vi-cente de Chicolapa. It is extremely fertile and plea-sant, and surrounded by several very small settle-ments or wards.

CHICOMESUCHIL, a settlement and headsettlement of tlie alcaldia mayor of Yxtepexi ofthe province and bishopric of Oaxaca in NuevaEspana, is of a hot temperature, and contains300 families of Indians, who exercise themselves inthe making scarlet cloths and cotton garments.

CHICOMI, a settlement and head settlement ofthe district of the alcaldia mayor of Tampico inNueva Espana. It contains 45 families of Indians,and lies 10 leagues to the s. of its capital.

CHICOMOCELO, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldia mayor of Chiapa. in the kingdom ofGuatemala ; [having a cave very narrow at theentry, but spacious within, with a stagnant lake,which is, however, clear, and is two fathoms deeptowards the banks.]

CHICONAUTA, St. Tomas de, a settlementof the alcaldia mayor of Ecatepec in NuevaEspana; annexed to the curacy of its capital;from whence it is distant one league to the n. n. e.It contains 160 families of Indians.

CHICONCUAC, S. Miguel de, a settlementof the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tez-cuco in Nueva Espana. It contains 123 familiesof Indians, and six of Spaniards. It produces agood proportion of grain, seeds, and cattte, fromthe fleeces of which they derive great emolument,as also from the coarse stuffs manufactured of thesame. It is one league to the n. of its capital.

CHICONCUASO, a settlement of the head

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down from the mountains to the jy. of the RachcsIndians, and runs 52 leagues from s. to «. e. untilit enters the Marmore together with the Guapaix,opposite the settlement and reduccion of Loreto,which lies to the s.

CHOPO, a settlement of the government andjurisdiction of Pamplona in the JNuevo Reyno deGranada. It is of a very mild climate, andabounds in sugar-canes, plantains, maize, and manysorts of vegetables ; these being the principal branchof its trafiic with the Indians, Avho carry them forsale to the capital, which lies at a small distancefrom hence, in the road leading to M6rida andGibraltar. It contains 50 Indians, and almost asmany indigent settlers.

[CHOPS, The, in Kennebeck river, are threemiles from Swan Island; Avhich see.]

CHOPTANK, a large navigable river of theprovince and colony of Maryland, [emptying it-self into Chesapeak bay.]

CHOPTANK, Little, another (river) of the same pro-vince Maryland. It runs w. and enters the sea in the bay ofChesapeak.

CHOQUE, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatarabo in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Acros.

CHOQUECAMATA, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregtmiento of Cochabamba in Peru.

CHOQUELIMPE, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Arica in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Copia.

CHOQUES, a barbarous nation of Caribes Indians,of the Nuevo Reino de Granada, dwellingimmediately upon the mountains and forests ofFosca. They are ferocious and cruel, and pitchtheir huts near the river Bermejo. But little isknown of their customs and of their country.

CHORAS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huamalies in Peru; annexed tothe curacy of Jesus.

CHOROMA, a settlement of the province andcorrregimiento of Chichas and Tarija, in the dis-trict of the former, and annexed to the curacy ofTupisa.

CHOROMOROS, a barbarous nation of Indians of Peru, who formerly occupied the plainsor llanuras of Calchaqui towards the ??. ; touchingtoAvards the e. upon the source of the river Mogo-les, and extending n. as far as the mountains ofthe Lules, and w. as far as the Andes. They areat present reduced to the Catholic religion, and aremixed with those of other nations ; but some fewof them still persist in their idolatry, and livedispersed upon the mountains.

CHORONI, a port of the coast of the kingdomof Tierra Firme, in the province and governmentof Venezuela, between the mountain of Ocumaraand the port of Chuapo.

CHOROS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Coquimbo in the kingdom ofChile. It has the hard lot of being scantily sup-plied Avith Avater, even as much as is necessary lordrinking.

Same name, a point of the coast of this provinceand kingdom (Chile).

Same name, an island near the coast and point ofits name (Choros),

CHORRERA, a settlement of the jurisdictionand akaldia mayor of Nata in the kingdom ofTierra Firme; situate near the coast of the S.sea.

Same name, a creek of the island of Cuba, onthe 71. coast, having a fort for its protection, witha detacliment of troops from the Havana.

CHORILLO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru.

Same name, another (settlement), in the province and corregimento of Cercado in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Surco.

CHORRILLOS, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Cañete in Peru; situate onthe coast, close to the point of China.

CHORROS, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdom of Quito.

CHORROU, Chike du, a rivulet and establishmentof the French, in their possessions inGuayana.

CHORUNGA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Condesuyos de Arequipa in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Andaray ; situate in thevalley of its name.

CHOSAPACK, a large andbeautiful bay on the coast of the province and colony of Virginia]]. [See Chesapeak.]

CHOSCHAMA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Lucanas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Huacaiia.

[CHOSCUMUS, a fort of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres, near a small lakeabout 20 leagues s. e. of Buenos Ayres, in Lat. 35°33' 40^. Long. 38° 2' 15" 20 .]

CHOTA, Todos Santos de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Caxamarca inPeru.

[Chota, a valley of the Andes, which, thoughonly two miles Avide, is nearly a mile in depth.It Avas passed by Humboldt and his companions,in 1801, on tlreir way to Quito, Avhen they foundits temperature to be intensely sultry.]

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CHOTE, a settlement of Indians of N. Carolina ; situate on the shore of the river Tennessee.

CHOTECHEL, a settlement of Indians of the kingdom of Chile ; situate in theinterior of it, and on the shore of the river Como-Leuvre.

CHOUEE, Montañas de, mountains in theprovince and colony of N. Carolina, which followthe course of the river Tennessee,

CHOUMANS, a settlement or village of theprovince and colony of Louisiana ; situate on thebank, and at the source of the river Maligna orSabloniere.

CHOUSSIPI, a small river of the country ofLabrador. It runs s. w. and enters that of St.Lawrence.

CHOWAN, a district and jurisdiction of theprovince and colony of Virginia, between that ofPequima and the river Pansemond. The principalsettlement bears the same name.

[Chowan County, in Edenton district, N.Carolina, on the n. side of Albemarle sound. Itcontains 5011 inhabitants, of whom 2588 are slaves.Chief town, Edenton.]

[Chowan River, in N. Carolina, falls intothe n. w. corner of Albemarle sound. It is threemiles wide at the mouth, but narrows fast as youascend it. It is formed, five miles from the Vir-ginia line, by the confluence of Meherrin, Notta-way, and Black rivers, which all rise in Vir-ginia.]

CHOXLLA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cicasica in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Yanacache.

[CHRIST CnuacH, a parish in Charleston dis-trict, S. Carolina, containing 2954 inhabitants, ofwhom 566 are whites, 2377 slaves.]

[CHRISTENOES, a wandering nation of N.America, who do not cultivate, nor claim any par-ticular tract of country. They are well disposedtowards the whites, and treat their traders Avith re-spect. The country in which these Indians roveis generally open plains, but in some parts, parti-cularly about the head of the Assinniboin river, itis marshy and tolerably Avell furnished with timber,as are also the Fort Dauphin mountains, to whichthey sometimes resort. From the quantity ofbeaver in their country, they ought to furnish mofeof that article than they do at present. They arenot esteemed good beaver-hunters. They mightprobably be induced to visit an establishment onthe Missouri, at the Yellow Stone river. Theirnumber has been reduced by the small-pox sincethey Avere first known to the Canadians.]

[CHRISTIANA, a post-town in Newcastlecounty, Delaware, is situated on a navigable creekof its name, 12 miles from Elkton, nine s. w. ofWilmington, and 37 s. w. of Philadelphia. Thetown, consisting of about 50 houses, and a Presby-terian church, stands on a declivity which commandsa pleasant prospect of the country towards the De-laware. It carries on a brisk trade with Philadel-phia in flour. It is the greatest carrying place be-tween the navigable Avaters of the Delaware andChesapeak, which are 13 miles asunder at thisplace. It was built by the Swedes in 1640, andthus called after their queen.]

[Christiana Creek, on which the above townis situated, falls into Delaware river from the w.a little below Wilmington. It is proposed to cut acanal of about nine miles in length, in a s. to. direc-tion from this creek, at the toAvn of Christiana (sixmiles w. s. w. of Newcastle) to Elk river in Mary-land, about a mile below Elkton. See Delawareand Wilmington.]

[Christiana, St. one of the Marquesa isles,called by the natives Waitahu, lies under the sameparallel with St. Pedro, three or four leagues moreto the w. Resolution bay, near the middle of thew. side of the island, is in lat. 9° 58' s. long. 139'^840' w. from Greenwich ; and the w. end of Do-minica 15 71. Captain f^ook gave this bay thename of his ship. It Avas called Port Madre deDios by the Spaniards. This island produces cot-ton of a superior kind. A specimen of it is depo-sited in the museum of the Massachusetts HistoricalSociety.]

CHRISTIANO, San, a settlement of the province and captainship of Serigipé in Brazil ; situateon the coast, and at the mouth of the river Cirii.

[CHRISTIANSBURG, the chief town of Mont-gomery county, Virginia. It contains A’ery fewhouses ; has a court-house and goal, situated neara branch of Little river, a water of the Kanhaway.Lat. 37° 5' ».]

[CHRISTIANSTED, the principal town in theisland of Santa Cruz, situated on the n. side of theisland, on a fine harbour. It is the residence of theDanish governor, and is defended by a stone for-tress.]

[CHRISTMAS Island, in the Pacific ocean,lies entirely solitary, nearly equally distant fromthe Sandwich islands on the n. and the Marquesason the s. It Avas so named by Captain Cook, onaccount of his first landing there, on Christmasday. Not a drop of fresh Avater was found by dig-ging. A ship touching at this desolate isle mustexpect nothing but turtle, fish, and a few birds. Itis about 15 or 20 leagues in circumference, andbounded by a reef of coral rocks, on the xc. side of

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wliich there is a bank of fine sand, extending amile into the sea, and affording good anchorage.Lat. 1° 59' n. Long. 157° 35' w.]

[Christmas Sound, in Tien a del Fuego, S.America. Lat. 55° 21' n. Long. 69° 48' tw.]

CHRISTOVAL, San, atown of the government and jurisdiction of Maracaibo in the Nuevo Rey no de Granada; foundedby Captain Juan de Maldonado in 1560. It is of•a hot but healthy temperature, produces abundanceof sugar-canes, of which are made honey, sugar,and conserves, in immense quantities ; also a greatproportion of smoking tobacco, which is carried toMaracaibo. It has a good church and a conventt)f St. Augustin, which latter has fallen much todecay with regard to its establishment. The po-pulation of the town consists of 400 housekeepers.It lies 20 leagues n. e. of Pamplona, from the juris-diction of which it is divided by the river Pam-plonilla. It is the native place of Don Gregoriode Jaimes, archdeacon of Santa Fe, and bishop ofSanta Marta.

Same name, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Lipes, archbishopric of Char-cas in Peru ; in which took place the following ex-traordinary occurrence: The curate of this placegoing to confess a sick person in the settlement ofTahisa of the province of Paria, which was annexedto this, sunk into a spring of water in the pampasor llanos dela Sal, when he was drowned, and withthe two Indians who accompanied him on horse-back, never more appeared, nor were any vestigesever found of them : this was the reason why thelatter settlement has since been disunited from thecuracy of San Christoval.

Same name, a capital city of the provinceand captainship of Sergipé in the kingdom of Bra-zil ; being also known by that name. It is foundedon the sea-shore, and has a fine and well defendedport. It has a magnificent parish church with thetitle of Nuestra Senora de la Victoria ; two fineconvents, the one of the order of the Franciscans,and the other of the Carmelites ; also a chapel ofdevotion of the Virgin of the Rosary. The council-house is a very fine edifice, and in the suburbs isa hermitage of San Gonzalo, which is frequentedas a pilgrimage by this and other settlements of thejurisdiction. In this city resides the chief captain,who governs this province, and who is attended bya company of troops as a body-guard. In earlytimes it was filled with nobility, descended from thefirst families in Portugal; but it is now reduced to600 housekeepers. in its district, towards thepart called Coninquiva, is a parish with fourchapels, and towards the river Vaza-Barris fiveothers. It has also 25 engines, by which abundanceof sugar of an excellent quality is manufactured ;this article affords a great commerce w ith t!ic bayof Todos Santos. Lat. ll°40's. Long. ST'* SO' tw.

Same name, an island of the N. sea ; oneof the Antilles, discoverctl by Admiral Christoj)herColumbus, who gave it his name, in 149S. It isfive leagues in circumference, and is very fertile,and abounding in productions, particularly in cot-ton, tobacco, indigo, sugar, and brandy ; by allof which it carries on a great commerce. Here arcsome good salines, and in the mountains are somewoods of fine timber, well adapted for the buildingof ships. The English and the French both esta-blished themselves here in 1625, holding a dividedpossession, when they were driven out by the Spa-niards. After this the former again returned andre-established themselves in the greatest part of theisland, leaving, however, a small share to theFrench, until the year 1713, when the latter, inconjunction with the Spaniards themselves, cededit entirely to the English, who from that time haveheld it and kept it well fortified. [St. Christopher,situate in lat. 17° 21', long. 62° 48' ze. was calledby its ancient possessors, the Charibes, Liamuiga,or the Fertile Island. It was discovered in Novem-ber 1493 by Columbus himself, who was so pleasedwith its appearance, that he honoured it with hisown Christian name. But it was neither plantednor possessed by the Spaniards. It was, however,(notwithstanding that the general opinion ascribesthe honour of seniority to Barbadoes), the eldest ofall the British territories in the \V. Indies, andin truth, the common mother both of the Englishand French settlements in the Charibean islands.A Mr. Thomas Warner, an Englishman, asso-ciated himself Avith 14 other persons in the year1622, and with them took his passage on board aship bound to Virginia. From thence he and hiscompanions sailed from St. Christopher’s, wherethey arrived in January 1623, and by the monthof September following had raised a good crop oftobacco, which they proposed to make their staplecommodity. By the generality of historians whohave treated of the affairs of the W. Indies, it isasserted that a party oflhe French, under the com-mand of a person of the name of D’Esnambuc,took possession of one part of this island, on thesame day that Mr. Warner landed on the other;but the truth is, that the first landing of Warnerand his associates happened two years before thearrival of D’Esnambuc; who, it is admitted byDu Tertre, did not leave France until IG25. Un-fortunately the English settlers, in the latter end of

1623, had their plantations demolished by a dread- j

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CINCOS, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Xauxa in Peru.

CINCO-SEÑORES, a settlement of the pro-vince of Tepeguana, and kingdom of Nueva Viz-caya ; one of the missions of the BabosariganesIndians, held there by the regulars of the com-pany of Jesuits. Within eight leagues to the s.of its district is a great unpeopled tract, called Delas Manos, (Of the Hands), from the infidel Indianshaving nailed up against some temples in thoseparts many hands of some unfortunate Spaniards•whom they had killed, when the latter had en-tered the country under the idea of making pro-selytes.

CINGACUCHUSCAS, a barbarous nation ofIndians, who inhabit the woods to the s. of theriver Marañon. In 1652 they were united to thePandabeques, and established themselves in thesettlement of Xibaros of the missions of Maynas,with the exception of some few, who still remainin their idolatry, and lead a wandering life throughthe woods.

CINIO, a settlement of the province and co-lony of Maryland, in the county of Kent ; situateon the shore, and at the extremity of the bay ofChesapeak.

CIÑOQUIPA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of La Sonora in Nueva Espana.

CINTENELA, Isla de, one of the islandswhich lie between the s. point of the Caico Grandeand the Paiiuelo Quadrado.

CINTO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Castro Vireyna in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of its capital.

CINTORI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarquilla in Peru.

CINTU, a spacious llanura or plain, of theancient province of Chimu, now Truxillo, on thecoast of the S. sea. It was taken possession of byHuaina Capac, thirteenth Emperor of the Incas.It is very fertile, and of a good and healthy cli-mate ; but it is but little inhabited.

CINTY, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Pilaya or Paspaya in Peru.

Same name, a river of the province and governmentof Tucuman. It runs s. and enters the river SanJuan.

CIPOYAY, a country and territory of the pro-vince and government of Paraguay, called also theprovince of Vera, towards the e. and where thenation of the Guaranis Indians dwell. It is of ahot climate, but very fertile, abounding in woods,and well watered by many rivers ; some of whichrun from e. to w. and enter the Uruguay, andothers from s. to n. and enter the Plata.

CIPRE, a river of the province and govern-ment of Esmeraldas in the kingdom of Quito.It takes its course from e. to w. and opposite tlieriver Sola, empties itself into that of Esmeraldas,on the w. side, in lat. 28' n.

CIRANDIRO, a settlement and the capital ofthe alcaldia mayor of Guimeo in the province andbishopric of Mechoacan. It is of a hot tempera-ture, and inliabited by 90 families of Tarascos In-dians. In its vicinity is the estate of Quichandio,in which eight families of Spaniards, and 15 ofMustees and Mulattoes, are employed in makingsugar. Also in the estate of Santa Maria are fivefamilies of the former. It is 75 leagues to the w.and one-fourth to the s. w. of Mexico.

[CIRENCESTER. See Marcus Hook.]

CIRICHE, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Antioquia in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; situate on the shore of a small riverwhich enters that of Cauca.

CIRIGH. Sergipe.

CIRII, a small river of the province and cap-tainship of Sergipe in Brazil. It rises near thecoast, runs s. s. e. and enters the river Sirugipa,a little before this river enters the sea.

CIRIONES, a barbarous nation of Indians,of the province and government of Moxos in Peru.It is a wandering nation, savage, and but littleknown.

CISNE, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Loxa in the kingdom otQuito.

CITRONIERS, mountains in the island of Guadalupe.They are in the large tract of land, and on the s.coast, lying between the settlements of Santa Anaand San Francisco.

CITY Point, in Virginia. See BermudaHundred.

CIUAPA, a river of the province and corregi-miento of Coquimbo in the kingdom of Chile,towards the «. It is notorious from a species offish caught in it, called tache, of an extrem.ely deli-cate flavour. It runs into the S. or Pacific sea,terming a small port of little depth.

CIUDAD REAL, a city of the province andgovernment of Paraguay ; founded in 1557. byRui Diaz Melgarejo, on the shore of the river Pi-quiri, three leagues from Parana. It Was des-troyed by the Mamalukos Indians of San Pablo ofBrazil, in 1630, and in its place was substituted therich town of Espiritu Santo, the territory of whichabounds in fruits, vines, and mines of copper.In the vicinity of the present town is a great wa-terfall, formed by the above river, upwards »f3p 2

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