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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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name. Tlie religion of these idolaters is very sin-gular, for they acknoAvledge a supreme being, who,they imagine, manifests himself to them in thefigure of some animal which feeds in their fields ;and when this dies, tlvey substitute another, afterhaving signified very great demonstrations of re-gret for the fate of the one whicli is lost.

AKANKIA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Louisiana. It is an arm of the Mis-sissippi, which runs s. s. e. and enters the lake ofMaurepas.

AKANSA, a settlement of Indians of the pro-vince and government of Louisiana. It has a fortbuilt by the French, and it is near the mouth ofthe river of its name, where it enters the Missis-sippi.

Akansa, another settlement in the same pro-vince, situate also on the shore of the aforesaidriver, and distinguished by the name of PetitAkansa.

Akansa (river), a river of the above province andgovernment. It rises in the country of the Oza-ques Indians, runs many leagues s. e. as far as thetown of Satovis, Avhen, turning to the s. it entersby two mouths into the Mississippi, being through-out subject to large cataracts.

AKOUKA, a settlement of the province of LaGuayana, in the Dutch possessions, or colony ofSurinam ; situate on the shore of the river Little,just before it enters tlie Marawin.

[ALABAHA, a considerable river in E. Flo-rida. Also said to be the name of a branch of St.Mary’s river.]

[ALABAHA, a considerable river of Georgia,which pursues a s. course to thegulph of Mexico,100 miles w. of the head of St. Mary’s river. Itsbanks are low, and a trifling rain sAvells it to morethan a mile in Avidth. In a freshet the current israpid, and those Avho pass are in danger of being^entangled in vines and briars, and droAvned ; theyare also in r<'ul danger from great numbers of hun-gry alligators. The country for nearly iOO mileson each side of this river, that is to say, from thel)ead of St. Mary’s to Flint river, Avhicli is 90miles w. of the Alabaha, is a continued soft, miryAvaste, affording neither water nor food for men orbeasts ; and is so poor indeed, as that the commongame of the Avoods are not found here. Thei ountry on the of Alabaha is rather preferableto that on the e.l

[ALABAMOUS, an old French fort, in thew. part of Georgia ; situate between Coosa andTallapoose rivers, and not far from their conflu-ence.]

ALABAMA, an Indian village, delightfullysituated on the banks of the Mississippi, on severalswelling green hills, gradually ascending from theverge of the river. These Indians are the remainsof the ancient Alabama nation, who inhabited thee. arm of the Great Mobile river,. Avhich still bearstheir name, now possessed by the Creeks, or Mns-cogulges, who conquered the former.]

[Alabama River is formed by the junctionof the Coosa or Coosee, or High Town river, andTallapoosee river, at Little Tallasee, and runs ina s. w. direction, until it meets Tombigbee riverfrom the n. w. at the great island which it thereforms, 90 miles from the mouth of Mobile bay, inthegulph of Mexico. This beautiful river has agentle current, pure waters, and excellent fish.It runs about two miles an hour, is 70 or 80 rodswide at its head, and from 15 to 18 feet deep inthe driest season. The banks are about 50 feethigh, and seldom, if ever, overfloAved. Travellershave gone down in large boats, in the month ofMay, in nine days, from Little Tallasee fo Mobilebay, Avhich is about 350 miles by water. Its banksabound Avith valuable productions in the vegetableand mineral kingdoms.

[ALABASTER, or Eleutheua, one of theBahama or Lucayo islands, on which is a small fortand garrison. It is on the Great Bahama bank.The soil of this island and Harbour island, whichlies at the n. end of it, is better tlian Providenceisland, and produces the greatest part of the pine-apples that are exported ; the climate is veryhealthy. Lat. 24° 40' to 26° 30' n. Long. 76° 22'to 76° 56' W.1

[ALACHUA Savannah is a level green plain,in the country of the Indians of that name inE. Florida, situate about 75 miles w. from St.Augustine. It is about 15 miles over, and 50 incircumference ; and scarcely a tree or bush of anykind to be seen on it. It is encircled Avith highsloping hills, covered with Avaving forests, andfragrant orange groves, rising from an exube-ranfly fertile soil. The ancient Alachua townstood on the borders of this savannah ; but theIndians mnoved to Cuscowilla, two miles distant,on account of the unhealthiness of the former site,occasioned by the stench of the putrid fisli andreptile.s, in the summer and autumn, driven onshore by the alligafors, and <he noxious exhulu-tions from the marshes of ti)e savannah. Thoughthe horned cattle and horses bred in these meadowsare large, sleek, sprightly, and faf, yet they aresubject to mortal diseases; such as the water rot,or scald, occasioned by the warm Avater of the sa-vannah ; Avhile those which, range in the highforests are clear of this (lisonler.1 °

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mules, poultry, cheese, and salt meats. It haslikewise some mines in its district, which are notaltogetlier neglected, though the advantages de-rived from them would be immensely increased, ifthe number of labourers were greater. It is go-verned by a lieutenant nominated by the governorof Santiago de Veragua. [Lat. 8° 12' n. Long.80“ 40' a;.l

ALAQUES, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tacunga in the kingdom ofQuito.

ALAQUINES, a branch of the head settle-ment of the district of Tamazunchale, and alcaldiamayor of Valles, in Nueva España, situate on theshore of a large river which divides this jurisdic-tion from that of Guadalcazar.

ALARA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Antioquia in the new kingdom of Gra-nada. It rises at the foot of the sierra of Gua-moco, and s. of the town of this name; runsand enters the Cauca.

[ALASKE, a long peninsula on the n. w. coastof America, formed by Bristol bay and the oceanon the n. w. and n. and by the ocean and thewaters of Cook’s river on the s. and s. e. At itsextremity are a number of islands, the chief ofwhich, in their order westward, are, Oonemak,Oonala.sha, and Ocumnak, which form part ofthe chain or cluster of islands called the NorthernArchipelago. Captain Cook, on his return in1779, passed through the channel e. of Oonemakisland. See North-avest Coast of America.]

ALATAMALIA, a large river of the provinceand government of Florida. It runs nearly duee. and enters the sea opposite the Georgean isles.[This river, Avliich is navigable, is more properlyof Georgia. It rises in the Cherokee mountains,near the head of a western branch of Savannahriver, called Tugulo. In its descent through themountains it receives several auxiliary streams ;thence it Avinds, with considerable rapidity,through the hilly country 250 miles, from Avhcnceit throAvs itself into the open flat country, by thename of Oakmulgee. Thence, after meanderingfor 150 miles, it is joined by the Oconee, whichlikewise has its source in the mountains. Afterthis junction it assumes the name of Alatamalia,Avhen it becomes a large majestic river ; and flow'-ing Avith a gentle current through forests andplains 100 miles, discharges itself into the Atlan-tic by several mouths. The n. channel glides bythe heights of Darien, about 10 miles above thebar, and after several turnings, enters the oceanbetween Sapelo and Wolf islands. The s. chan-nel, which is esteemed the largest and deepest.

after its separation from the >?. descends gently,,taking its course between MDntosh and Brough-ton islands, and at last by the w. coast of St.Simon’s sound, betAveen the s. end of the islandof that name, and the n. end of Jeky! island.At its confluence with the Atlantic it is 500 yardsAvide.]

ALAUSI, a province and small corregimientoor district of the kingdom of Quito ; bounded «. bythe province of Riobamba, n. w. by Chimbo, s.by Cuenca, w. by the district of Yaguache, ande. by that of Macas. It is Avatered by the riversUzogoche, Gussuntos, Pinancay, Alausi, andothers of less note. It abounds in mountains, themost lofty of Avhich are tOAvard the©.; the countryis pleasant, and yields liberally every kijid offruit and grain that are common either to Americaor Europe. It contains many sugar mills, andthe sugar is the best intlie kingdom. The air hereis mild and healthy, and the climate cannot be saidto be inconveniently hot. It is governed by thecorregidor, who resides in the capital.

Alausi, the capital of the above province. Ithas in its district some mineral fountains of hotwater, established with suitable conveniences bysome families of consideration residing there. Itstrade consists in cloths, baizes, and cotton gar-ments, Avhich are wrought in its manufactories.It has a very good parish church, and a conventof the order of St. Francis. [Lat. 2“ 12' «.Long. 78° 39' ©.]

[ALBANS, St. a township in Franklin county,Vermont, on lake Champlain, opposite N. Heroisland, Avith 256 inhabitants.]

ALBANIA, or Albany, a county of the pro-vince and colony of New York. It contains acertain number of plains fertile in grain, in AA'hich,and in planks of pine, its principal commerce con-sists. The Avinter is extremely cold, and the riverHudson is generally frozen for 100 miles, so a*to bear immense burthens. The gveat cpiautityof snow that falls at this season is useful, not onlybecause it covers the grain, and keeps it from perishing by the frost, but because, when it melts, itso increases the waters of the river, as to facilitatethereby the transportation of the productions ofthe country.

[Albany County Lies Between Ulster AndSaratoga ; Its Extent 46 Miles By 28|ALBANY County lies between Ulster andSaratoga ; its extent 46 miles by 28. By thestate census, .fan. 20, 1796, the number of elec-tors in this county were 6087, and the number oftowns 11.]

Albania, or Albany, the capital of theabove county, founded by the Dutch in 1608,together with tiiat of Orange, on the sliorc of theE 2

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CHATACANCHA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Olleros.

(CHATA-HATCHI, or Hatchi, is the largestriver which falls into St. Rose’s bay in W. Florida.It is also called Pea river, and runs from n. e. en-tering the bottom of the bay through severalmouths, but so shoal that only a small boat orcanoe can pass them. Mr. Hutchins ascended thisriver about 25 leagues, where there was a smallsettlement of Coussac Indians. The soil and tim-ber on the banks of the river resemble very muchthose of Escambia.)

CHATAHOUCHI, a settlement of Indians ofGeorgia, in which the English have an establish-ment. It is situate on the shore of the river Apala-chicola.

CHATAS, some islands of the N. sea, whichare very small and desert, and lie to the n. of theisland of Ynagua.

(CHATAUCHE, or Chatahuthe, a river inGeorgia. The n. part of Apalachiola river bearsthis name. It is about SO rods wide, very rapid,and full of shoals. The lands on its banks are lightand sandy, and the clay of a bright red. Thelower creeks are settled in scattering clans and vil-lages from the head to the mouth of this river.Their huts and cabins, from the high colour of theclay, resemble clusters of new-burned brick kilns.The distance from this river to the Talapose river,is about 70 miles, by the war-path, which crossesat the falls, just above the town of the Tucka-batches.)

(CHATAUGHQUE Lake, in Ontario county.New York, is about 18 miles long, and three broad.Conewango river, which runs a s. s. e. course,connects it with Alleghany river. Tliis lake isconveniently situated fora communication betweenlake Erie and the Ohio ; there being water enoughfor boats from fort Franklin on the Alleghany tothe n. w. corner of this lake ; from thence there isa portage of nine miles to Cliatanghque harbour onlake Erie, over ground capable of being made agood waggon road. This communication was onceused by the French.)

CHATEAU, a settlement of New France, inwhich the French have a castle and establishment,on the shore of the river St. Lawrence.

CHATEAUX, a small river of the country andland of Labrador. It runs s. and enters the sea inthe strait of Belleisle.

(CHATHAM, a maritime township in Barn-staple county, Massachusetts ; situate on the ex-terior extremity of the elbow of cape Cod, conve-

niently for the fishery ; in which they have usuallyabout 40 vessels employed. It has 1140 inhabi-tants, and lies 95 miles s. e. of Boston. See CapeCod.)

(Chatham, a township in Grafton county,New Hampshire, it Avas incorporated in 1767,and in 1790 contained 58 inhabitants.)

(Chatham, a flourishing township in Middlesexcounty, Connecticut, on the e. bank of Connecticutriver, and opposite Middleton city, it was a partof the township of Middleton till 1767.)

(Chatham, a township in Essex county, N. Jer-sey, is situated on Passaic river, 13 miles zd. ofElizabethtown, and nearly the same from New-ark.)

(Chatham, a township of Columbia county,New York. By the state census of 1796, 380 ofits inhabitants were electors.)

(Chatham County, in Hillsborough district,N. Carolina, about the centre of the state. It con-tains 9221 inhabitants, of whom 1632 are slaves.Chief town, Pittsburg. The court-house is a fewmiles w. of Raleigh, on a branch of Cape Fearriver.)

(Chatham, a town of S. Carolina, in Cherawsdistrict ; situate in Chesterfield county, on the w.side of Great Pedee river. Its situation, in a highlycultivated and rich country, and at the head of anavigable river, bids fair to render it a place ofgreat importance. At present it has only about 30houses, lately built.)

(Chatham County, in the lower district ofGeorgia, lies in the n. e. corner of the state, havingthe Atlantic ocean e. and Savannah river n. e. Itcontains 10,769 inhabitants., including 8201 slaves.The chief toAvn is Savannah, tlie former capital ofthe state.)

(Chatham or Punjo Bay, a large bay on thew. side of the s. end of the promontory of E. Flo-rida. It receives North and Delaware rivers.)

(Chatham House, in the territory of the Hud-son bay company. Lat. 55° 28' n. Long. 97*32' w. from Greenwich.)

CHAUCA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Guarochiri in Peru; annexed tothe curacy of Casta.

Chauca, another settlement, in the provinceand corregimiento of Canta ; annexed to the curacyof Pari.

CHAUCAIAN, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huailas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Caxacai, in the province of Caxa-tambo.

CHAUCHILLOS, a settlement of the province

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(lereent of Quecliollenan^o, and nkaldia mni/orof Chilapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains 27families of Indians, and is three leagues from itshead settlement.

COLOYA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Popayán in the corregimiento ofPasto.

COLPA, a settlement of the province and cor-reghniento of Aymaraez in Peru'; annexed to thecuracy ot Pituhuanca in the province of Cocha-bamba.

COLPAPIRHUA , a settlement of the provincean^l corregimiento of Cochabamba in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Tiquipaya.

COLPES, a settlem.ent of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, in the district of its ca-pital.

COLPI, a small river of the kingdom of Chile,It runs n. and enters the Quisu.

COLQUEMARCA, a settlement of the jrro-vince and correghniento of Chumbivilcas in Peru.

COLQUEPATA, a settlement of tiie provinceand cori'egimienlo of Paucartambo in Peru; an-nexed to the curacy of its capital.

COLQUI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cicasica in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Mohosa in the province of Cocha-bamba.

COLQUIOC, a settlement of the province andcorregimienlo of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed tothe curncy ofCaxacay.

(COLRAINE, a township in Hampshire coun-ty, Massachusetts, which contains 229 houses,and 1417 inhabitants,)

COLTA, a large lake of the province andforregimiento of Riobamba in the kingdom ofQuito, near that city to the s. It is about twoleagues in length from n, to s. and is of an ovalfigure. Its banks are covered with very finerushes and eneax, or flags; but fish will not breedin it, owing to the coldness of the climate ; it hastwo very small streams, the one to the w. and pass-ing very near to Riobamba, and the other to thes. entering the n. side of the river Gamote.

(COLUMBIA, a township in Washingtoncounty, district of Maine, on Pleasant river, ad-joining Macliias on the 7i.e. and was formerlycalled Plantations No. 12 and 13. It was incor-porated in 1796. The town of Machias lies 15miles to the e. ; it is nine miles from Steuben.)

(Columbia County, in New York, is boundedn. by Rensselaer, s. by Dutchess, e. by the stateof Massachusetts, and w. by Hudson river, whichdivides it from Albany county. It is 32 miles inlength and 21 in breadth, and is divided into

eight towns, of which Hudson, Claverack, andKinderhook, are the chief. It contained in 179027,732 inhabitants, and in 1796, 3560 electors.)

(Columbia College. See New York City.)

(Columbia, Territory of. See Washington,or the Federal City.)

(Columbia, a post-town, the capital of Ker-shaw county, and the seat of government of S.Carolina. It is situated in Camden district, onthe e. side of the Congaree, just below the con-fluence of Saluda and Broad rivers ; the streets areregular, and the town contains upwards of 70houses. The public offices have, in some mea-sure, been divided, for the accomodation of theinhabitants of the lower counties, and a branchof each retained in Charlestown. It lies 115 miles«. n. u\ of Charlestown, .35 s. w. of Camden, 85from Augusta in Georgia, and 678 s. u\ of Phila-delphia. Jjat. 33° 58' n. Long. 8° 5' ay.)

(Columbia, a flourishing po.st-town in Gooch-land county, Virginia, on the «. side of Jamesriver, at the mouth of the Rivanna. It containsabout 40 houses, and a warehouse for the inspec-tion of tobacco. It lies 45 miles above Richmond,35 from Charlottesville, and 328 s. w. of Phila-delphia.)

(Columbia, atown newly laid out in Lancas-ter county, Pennsylvania, on the n. e. bank ofSusquehannah river, at Wright’s ferry, 10 milesw. of Lancaster, and 76 to. by n. of Philadel-phia.)

(Columbia County, in the upper district ofGeorgia, is bounded by Savannah e. on the n. e,and e. which separates it from the state of S. Caro-lina, w. of Richmond county. Its shape isvery irregular.)

(Columbia, a town on the «. w. territory, onthe «. bank of Ohio river, and on thezo. side of themouth of Little Miami river; about six miles s. e.by e. of fort W ashington, eight e. by s. of Cincin-nati, and 87 n. by w. of Lexington in Kentucky.Lat. 38° 44' ? 2 .)

COMACARI, a large river of the kingdom ofNuevo Mexico.

COMACHUEN, Santa Maria de, a settle-ment of the head settlement of Siguinan, and akai-dia mayor of Valladolid, in the province andbishopric of Mechoacan, with 25 families of In-dians, whose only occupation is in making saddle-trees. Two leagues from its head settlement.

COMAGRE, a very small, barren, and desertisland of the N. sea, on the coast of the provinceand government of Darien, and nearly to the s. ofthe island of Pinos.

COMALA, a settlement of the head settlement

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the most pleasant situation that could be desired, in an inland country, upon a high swelling ridge of sand hills, within 3 or 400 yards of a large and beautiful lake, abounding with fish and fowl. The lake is terminated on one side by extensive forests, consisting of orange groves, overtopped with grand magnolias, palms, poplar, tilia, liveoaks, &c. ; on the other side by extensive green plains and meadows. The town consists of 30 habitations, each of which consists of two houses, nearly of the same size, large, and convenient, and covered close with the bark of the cypress tree. Each has a little garden spot, containing corn, beans, tobacco, and other vegetables. In the great Alachua savannah, about two miles distant, is an inclosed plantation, which is worked and tended by the whole community, yet every family has its particular part. Each family gathers and deposits in its granary its proper share, setting apart a small contribution for the public granary, which stands in the midst of the plantation.]

CUSE, a river of the kingdom of Peru. It rises in the mountains of the province of Moxos, and runs e. w. from the river and lake of Sara to the river Ubay. It follows its course to the n. and enters the last mentioned river. [CUSHAI, a small river which empties into Albemarle sound, between Chowan and the Roanoke, in N. Carolina.] [CUSHETUNK Mountains, in Hunterdon county, New Jersey.]

[CUSHING, a township in Lincoln county, district of Maine, separated from Warren and Thoraaston by St. George's river. It was incorporated in 1789, contains 942 inhabitants, and lies 216 miles w. by n. of Boston.] CUSHNOE, a waterfal of the river Kenebec, in the province of Sagadahoc, opposite fort Wertern. CUSI, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Yauyos in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Pampas. CUSIANA, a settlement of the jurisdiction of Santiago de las Atalayas, and government of San Juan de los Llanos, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; annexed to the curacy of Santiago. It is much reduced and very poor, of a hot temperature, and producing only maize, yucas, plantains, &c. Cusiana, a river of the same province (San Juan de los Llanos). It rises from a small lake near the settlement of Gameza, in the jurisdiction and corregimiento of Tunja, and there enters the Mcta.

CUSIBAMBA, a river of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru. It rises in the cordillera of the Andes, runs w. and en- e u t iers the Apurimac, opposite the settlement of Curaguasi. Cusibamba, a valley of this province.

CUSICAS, a barbarous nation of Indians, who dwell to the e. of the nation of the Chiquitos, and to the n. of the settlement of San Juan Bautista de los Xamoros. All that is known of them is, that they are numerous and ferocious. CUSITAS, a settlement of Indians of the province and colony of Georgia ; situate on the shore of the river Apalachicola. CUSMO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Santa in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Guarmey. [CUSSENS, a small river in Cumberland county, Maine, which runs a s. e. course to Casco bay, between the towns of Freeport and N. Yarmouth.] [CUSSEWAGA, a settlement in Pennsylvania.] CUSSIA, a settlement of the Salivas Indians, forming the greater part of this nation, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; situate near the river Sinaruco, in the llanuras or plains of the Orinoco. The Caribes destroyed and burnt it in 1684. CUSSIQUINA, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, which laves the territory of the Mayorunas Indians, who live upon its borders to the s. This river, after running many leagues to the n, e. enters the said territory, in lat. 3° 20' *.

[CUSSITAH, an Indian town in the w. part of Georgia, 12 miles above the Broken Arrow, on Chattahoosee river.] CUSTODIO, a river of the kingdom of Brazil. It runs n. n. w. is small, and enters the Tocantines, between that of San Elias and the river Preto or De la Palma. CUSUMPE, a small lake of the province of Hampshire; one of those of New England, between the rivers Pennycook and Pygwaket. CUTACO, a river in a narrow vale of the Andes, the bed of which was ascertained by Humboldt, in 1802, to be at the vast depth of 4200 feet. On its banks are many plantations of sugarcanes. CUTAGOCHI, a settlement of Cherokees Indians, in the province, and colony of S. Carolina ; situate at the source of the river Eu phase, where the English have a commercial establishment. CUTAWA, or Catawba, a river of N. Carolina. It runs n. and enters the Ohio ;. its waters are always full of coal.

CUTERUO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed to' the curacy of Huambos.

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