LatAm Digital Edition and Gazetteer

OverviewStatisticsSubjects

Search for Caracas* "CARACAS, Santiago de Leon de" "CARACAS, Santiago de León de"

The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

9

In its vicinity is a reservoir, formed of hewn stone, which serves at once to catch the waters as they come down from the sierra, and to conduct them to Tepcaca, three leagues N N W of its capital.

ACAXUCHITLAN the head settlement of the alcaldía mayor of Tulazingo, to the N E. It contains 406 Indian families, and is a curacy of the bishopric of La Puebla de los Angeles. Distant four leagues to the E of its capital.

ACAYUCA, the alcaldía mayor of Nueva España, and of the province of Goazacoalco. Its jurisdiction is very extended, and consists, for the most part, of places of a hot and moist temperature, but so fertile is it that it gives annually four crops of maize; and as there is no demand for this production in the other provinces, it follows, of course, that the Indians here are little given to industry. Indeed the ground never requires the plough, and the whole of their labours during the seedtime consist merely in smoothing the surface of the mountains, and in scratching up the ground with a pointed stick. It is at times infested by locusts, which destroy the plants and crops ; and having never been able to find a remedy against this evil, the inhabitants had recourse to the protection of the virgin of La Conception, which is revered in the head settlement of the district of the Chichimecas ; and it is said that, owing to her mediatory influence, the plague has been thought to diminish. This province is watered by the abundant river of the Goazacoalco. The settlements of this alcaldía are, Xocoteapa, Macayapa, Menzapa, Molocan, Theimanquillo, Tinantitlan, Chinameca, Zoconusco, Olutla, Otcapa, Pochutla, Ostitan, Cozolcaque, Ixhuatla, Macatepeque.

another, the capital of the above, situate on the coast of the N. sea. Its inhabitants are composed of 30 families of Spaniards, 296 of Indians, and 70 of Mustees and Mulattoes. It lies a little more than 100 leagues S E of Mexico. Lat. 17° 53' N Long. 94° 46' 30" W.

another, settlement in the alcaldía mayor of Pachuca, in the kingdom of Nueva España, annexed to the curacy of Tezayuca, and containing 100 Indian families.

Acacingo, the head settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Tepcaca, situate in a plain of a mild temperature, and watered by two streams which run close to all the houses of the settlement, to the great comfort of the inhabitants. In the middle of the above plain there is a beautiful fountain, a convent of the religious order of St. Francis, a very ancient building, and some other buildings, which have been erected since the conquest of the country. The parish church is a piece of the most ancient architecture. The inhabitants are composed of 150 families of Spaniards, 104 of Mustees, 31 of Mulattoes, and 700 of Indians; 3 1/4 leagues E to the NE of its capital.

ACAZUTLA, a port of the S sea, on the coast of the province of the alcaldía mayor of Zuchitepec, in the kingdom of Guatemala, between the point of Los Remedios, and the settlement of Guapaca. [Lat. 14° 42' N Long. 90° 3'.]

ACCHA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru, situate on the skirt of a mountain, which has a prominence, seeming as though it were about to fall upon the settlement. This mountain is constantly dwindling away without any assignable cause. Lat. 13° 19 s. Long. 71° 13' W

ACCHA-AMANSAIA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru.

ACCHA-URINZABA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masque in Peru.

Aceites, a river of the province and government of Caraccas, in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises in the mountains, and enters the Orituco.

[ACCOCESAWS. The ancient town and principal place of residence of these Indians is on the W side of Colorado of Rio Rouge, about 200 miles S W of Nacogdoches, but they often change their place of residence for a season : being near the bay, they make great use of fish, oysters &c.; kill a great many deer, which are the largest and fattest in the province ; and their country is universally said to be inferior to no part of the province in soil, growth of timber, goodness of water, and beauty of surface; they have a language peculiar to themselves, but have a mode of communication by dumb signs, which they all understand: number about 80 men. Thirty or forty years ago, the Spaniards had a mission here, but broke it up, or moved it to Nacogdoches. They talk of resettling it, and speak in the highest terms,of the country.]

[ACCOMACK County, in Virginia, is situated on a peninsula, bounded N by Maryland, E by the ocean, and on the W by Chesapeak bay, and contains 13.959 inhabitants, including 4.262 slaves.]

Last edit over 2 years ago by Romina De León
296

296

CARACAS.

and it is, indeed, pretty generally believed thatthis cross was left here by the above apostle.

CARAC, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Canta in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of Lampian.

CARACARA, an ancient and small province ofCharcas in Peru, to the s. of Cuzco, and the lastof those conquered by the sixth Emperor or Inca.

CARACARES, a large lake of the province andgovernment of Paraguay. It is 26 leagues inlength, and has many fertile islands, inhabited bybarbarian Indians, and empties itself through acanal into the river Paraná on the e. side. It isin 30° 41' s. lat.

CARACAS, Santiago de Leon de, a capitalcity of the province of Venezuela, founded byDiego Losada in the year 1566, in a beautiful andextensive valley of more than four leagues inlength. It is of a very mild temperature, beingneither troubled with excessive heat or cold. It iswatered by four rivers, which fertilize its territory,and make it abound as well in delicate waters asin exquisite fruits and flowers: the streets are wideand straight, the buildings elegant and convenient,and it is ornamented by four marts. It is the seatof the bishopric, erected in the city of Coro in1532, and translated to this spot in 1636. It hasa beautiful cathedral church, besides some parishchapels, which are Nuestra Señora de Alta Gra-cia ; San Pablo, which is also an hospital, andNuestra Señora de la Candelaria, out of the wallsof the city. There is also an hospital De la Ca-ridad (of charity) for women ; a convent of the re-ligious order of Santo Domingo, in which is heldin high respect the wonderful image of the Virginof the Rosary, presented by Philip II. There isanother convent of San Francisco, in which ispreserved a piece of the wood of the cross left bythe Governor Don Martin de Robles Villafañate ;another of our Lady of La Merced ; a monasteryof religious women of La Concepcion ; another ofthe Carmelites Descalzas (barefooted) ; a college andseminary for the education of youth, with five ca-thedrals ; four hermitages dedicated to San Mau-ricio, Santa Rosalia de Palermo, La Divina Pas-tora, and La Santisima Trinidad. Charles II.granted to this city the privilege of allowing itsalcaldes to govern the province in the vacancy ofa governor ; and Philip V. permitted a commer-cial company of Biscayans to be established, whoreaped considerable affluence, especially in the ar-tiles of cacoa and sugar, the chief source of its re-venues ; but this company was abolished in thereign of Charles III. in the year 1778 ; which cir-cumstance was considered by the city and the pro-

vince as a most considerable privilege. The num-ber of inhabitants amounts to about 1000, besidesan infinity of people of colour by whom it is in-habited. The natives have shown themselves tobe of an ingenuous disposition, clever, affable, andcourteous. Its arms are a grey lion rampant in afield of silver, having between his arms a scollop-shell of gold, with the cross of Santiago ; and thecrest is a crown with five points of gold. It wassacked in 1566 by Sir Francis Drake, who camethither in an English cruiser ; also by the Frenchin 1679. It is three leagues distant from the portof Guaira. Long. 67° w. Lat. 10° 30' n.

The bishops who have presided in this city.

1. Don Rodrigo Bastidas, dean of the holychurch of St. Domingo, the chief of the visitationof the bishopric of Puertorico; elected on the 27thOctober 1535, and who died in 1542.

2. Don Miguel Gerónimo Ballesteros, dean ofthe church of Cartagena of the Indies ; electedin 1543.

3. Don Fr. Pedro de Agreda, of the order ofSt. Domingo, collegiate of San Gregorio of Val-ladolid ; presented to this bishopric in 1558, andtaking possession of it 1560. In his time the citywas sacked by the English : he died in 1580.

4. Don Fr. Juan de Manzanillo, of the order ofSt. Domingo ; presented in the year 1582 ; he re-built the church, and died in 1593.

5. Don Fr. Diego Salinas, of the order of St.Domingo, native of Medina del Campo, colle-giate of San Gregorio de Valladolid, prior in dif-ferent convents, procurator-general in the court,and elected bishop in the year 1600 : in the fol-lowing year he died.

6. Don Fr. Pedro Martin Palomino, of the orderof St. Domingo ; elected in 1601 : he died the sameyear.

7. Don Fr. Pedro de Oña, native of Burgos, ofthe order of our Lady of La Merced ; he was even-ing lecturer in the university of Santiago, electedbishop in 1601, canonized in the convent of Val-ladolid, and before he came to his church, waspromoted to the bishopric of Gaeta, in the king-dom of Naples, in 1604.

8. Don Fr. Antonio de Alcega, of the order ofSt. Francis ; he Avas formerly married, and heldthe office of accountant to the royal estates in Yu-catán, when he became a widower, and giving allhe possessed as alms to the poor, he took to a re-ligious life, and Philip III. being charmed withhis virtues presented him to this bishopric in1664 ; he celebrated the synod in Caracas theyear following, and died in 1609.

9. Don Fr. Juan de Bohorques, native of Mex-

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
297

CARACAS.

ico, of the religious order of St. Dominic ; electedbishop in 1610, and was from thence translated tothe bishopric of Oaxaca.

10. Don Fr. Gonzalo de Angulo, of the orderof St. Francis, native of Valladolid ; he was su-perior of the convent of Segovia, difinidor of theprovince of Castilla, qualificator of the inquisi-tion ; elected bishop in 1617, visited his bishopric,where he spent more than three years, confirmed3000 persons, and founded many grammar-schools ;he died in 1633.

11. Don Juan Lopez Agurto de la Mata, na-tive of the Mandof Tenerife, canon of the churchof the Puebla de los Angeles, prebendary of thatof Mexico, rector of the college of Los Santos,and lecturer in its university ; he was elected bishopof Puertorico in 1630, and promoted to this in1634 ; in which time the cathedral was removedfor the sake of security: in 1637 he died.

19. Don Fr. Mauro de Tobar, of the order ofSt. Benedict, native of Villacastin, prior and ab-bot of the monastery of Valladolid, and afterwardsof Monforte, preacher to Philip IV. ; elected tothis bishopric in 1639: immediately upon his tak-ing possession of it a great earthquake happened,and destroyed the cathedral, which he was rebuild-ing, when he was translated to the bishopric ofChiapa in 1655.

13. Don Fr. Alonso Briceño, of the order of LaMerced, of the province and kingdom of Chile;he entered Caracas in the year 1659, and diedin 1667.

14. Don Fr. Antonio Gonzales de Acuña, of theorder of St. Dominic, postulador in the court ofRome ; he was elected bishop in 1676, and diedin 1682.

15. The Doctor Don Diego de Baños and Soto-mayor, native of Santa Fe of Bogotá, head colle-giate of the college of the Rosario in this city,honorary chaplain to Charles II. and canon ofCuenca ; he was promoted to the mitre of SantaMarta in 1684 ; he founded the Tridentine col-lege, having endowed the same with professorshipsand revenues ; and being removed to the arch-bishopric of Santa Fe, he died in the year 1706.

16. Don Fr. Francisco del Rincon, of the reli-gious order of the Minims of St. Francis de Paula,native of Valladolid ; he was promoted to thearchbishopric of Domingo in 1711, and fromthence to that of Santa Fe in 1717.

17. Don Juan Joseph de Escalona y Calatayud,was born at Rioja, became doctor of theology atSalamanca, canon of Calahorra, and first chap-lain in the court of Madrid ; he was elected bishop

vol. I.

297

of Caracas, for his charity to the poor, in the year1719, and thence translated to the bishopric of Me-choacau in 1728.

18. Don Joseph Feliz Valverde, native of Gra-nada ; he passed his youth at Mexico, where hewas collegiate of the college of San lldefonso, doc-tor of theology, and of both laws, magistrate anddean of the church of Oaxaca ; elected bishop in1731, and promoted to the church of Mechoácan ;which last appointment he declined : he diedin 1741.

19. Don Juan Garcia Padiano ; who took pos-session in 1742, and died in 1746.

20. Don Manuel Breton, doctoral canon of thechurch of Badajos ; he died in going over to beconsecrated at Cordova in 1749.

21. Don Manuel Machado y Luna, honorarychaplain to his Majesty, and administrator of thecollege of Santa Isabel, native of Estremadura :he studied at Salamanca, obtained the title of pri-mate of canons ; reputed for one of the wisest inecclesiastical discipline ; was made bishop of Ca-racas in 1750, and died in 1752.

22. Don Francisco Julian Antolino, native ofZamora, an eminent theologist, penitentiary ca-non of Badajoz, and bishop of Caracas in 1753 :he died in 1755.

23. Don Miguel Argüelles, principal theologist,and curate in the archbishopric of Toledo ; electedbishop in 1756, and immediately after auxiliarybishop of Madrid.

24. Don Diego Antonio Diaz Madroñero, nativeof Talarrubias in Estremadura, vicar of the cityof Alcalá ; he entered upon his functions in 1757,and died in 1769.

25. Don Mariano Marti, of the principality ofCataluña, ecclesiastical judge and vicar-generalof the archbishopric of Tarragona, doctor in theuniversity of Cervera ; he was promoted to thebishopric of Puertorico in 1770.

Governors and Captains-General of the provinceof Caracas, or Venezuela.

1. Ambrosio de Alfinge ; nominated first gover-nor, and elected by the Weltzers: he drew up thearticles of stipulation with the Emperor in the con-quest of Venezuela ; was founder of the city ofCoro ; took possession of the government in 1528,and retained it till 1531, when he was killed by theIndians in satisfaction of the cruelties he had com-mitted.

2. Juan Aleman, related to the Welzers ; he, byway of precaution, assumed the title of governorwhile the place was vacant, and held it until thearrival of the proper person.

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
298

298

CARACAS.

3. George of Spira, a German knight, nomi-nated by the Weltzers in 1533 : he died in 1540,leaving the title of provisional governor to,

4. Captain Juan de Villegas, a title which wasenjoyed but a few days, inasmuch as the audienceof St. Domingo, immediately upon their hearing oftlie death of Spira, appointed,

5. Don Rodrigo do Bastidas, bishop of that -holy church ; he governed till the year 1541, andbeing promoted to the bishopric of Puertorico,the government in the mean time devolved upon,

6. Diego Boica, a Portuguese gentleman, aknight of the order of Christ ; he was confirmedin the government by the audience of St. Domingo ;but in a very few days after he was superseded by,

7. Enrique Rembolt, a German ; who also go-verned a very short time, inasmuch as the excessesthat he committed, and the clamours of the inha-bitants of Toro, obliged the above tribunal tosend out,

8. The Licentiate Frias, fiscal of that royalaudience ; he entered upon his functions in 1642,until the royal nomination of,

9. The Licentiate Juan Perez de Tolosa, nativeof Segovia ; a very learned and prudent man : hewas chosen by the Emperor to settle the distur-bances which had arisen from the administration ofthe Weltzers; for which reason he deprived themof it ; he entered Coro in 1546 ; and although hehad not fulfilled the three years of his appointment,he was, on account of his tried abilities, confirmedin his office for another three years, and diedin 1548.

10. Juan de Villegas, nominated as intermediategovernor by his antecedent, until the arrival of theproprietor,

11. The Licentiate Villacinda, nominated bythe Princess Doña Juana, who, in the absence ofher father, the Emperor, held the reins of govern-ment in Castilla ; this governor took the reins in1554, and died in 1557, leaving the governmentin charge of the alcaldes.

12. Gutierrez de la Peña, nominated provision-ally bythe audience of St. Domingo ; he enteredupon his functions in 1557, until the year 1559,when arrived,

13. The Licentiate Pablo Collado, who governeduntil the year 1562, when, on account of the ap-peals made against him to the audience of St. Do-mingo, this court sent out an inquisitorial judge,who might call him to account, and order himback to Spain : this was the Licentiate Bernaldes,whom they called “ Ojo de Plata,” (Eye of Silver),he having the defect of one of his eyes supplied by

this artificial means. He having, therefore, dis-placed the former governor, took the managementof affairs upon himself, until the arrival of theproper person, who was nominated by the king in1563.

14. Don Alonzo de Manzanedo, who governed avery short time since ; being of a very advancedage, he soon fell sick, and died in 1564.

15. The Licentiate Bernaldes; who havinggained a certain reputation for the strictness, affa-bility, and justice, with which he conducted him-self in his provisional government, was nominaleda second time by the audience of St. Domingo,with the general acclamation of the province ;he governed until the year following, 1565, whenarrived,

16. Don Pedro Ponce de Leon, a branch of theillustrious house of the Dukes of Arcos ; he hadbeen alcalde of Conil, came to the government inthe aforesaid year, and died in 1569.

17. Don Juan de Chaves, a native of Truxilloin Estremadura ; who was living as a citizen atSt. Domingo at tiie time that he was appointedas provisional governor by the audience, as soon asthe death of the former was known to them : heentered upon the government the same year, andheld it until the year 1572.

18. Diego Mazariego ; who entered Coro in theabove year, and governed until 1576, when hissuccessor arrived, who was,

19. Don Juan Pimentel, a branch of the houseof the Counts of Benavente, knight of the order ofSantiago ; also the first governor who establishedhis residence in the city of Santiago. He wascalled from thence to take the charge of the go-vernment, which he exercised until the year 1582,when his successor arrived.

20. Don Luis de Roxas, native of Madrid ; heentered Caracas in 1583, reigned until 1587, whenhe was succeeded by,

21. Don Domingo de Osorio, commander of thegalleys, and chief officer of the customs of the islandof St. Domingo ; at which place he was residingwhen he received advices relative to his succeed-ing the former governor : he filled his office withmuch diligence, and obtained considerable renown,and in the year 1597 was promoted to the presi-dency of St. Domingo.

22. Gonzalo de Piña Lidueña, who governeduntil 1600, when he died of an apoplectic fit ; andin the interval the audience of St. Domingo ap-pointed,

23. Alonzo Arias Baca, citizen of Coro, and sonof the renowned Dr. Bernaldes, who liad governed

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
299

CARACAS.

twice with so much credit ; he entered upon thegovernment in the same year.

24. Sancho de Alquiza, a captain of infantry ;who began to govern in the year 1601, and con-tinued until the year 1610, when he was succeededby,

25. Don Martin de Robles Villafañate, who go- ,verned the province with great credit and prudenceuntil his death.

26. Don Francisco de la Hoz Berrio, native ofSanta Fe. He entered upon the government in1616, and governed until the year 1622. He wasdrowned returning to Spain in the fleet which waslost in the falls of Metacumbe, close to the Ha-vannah.

27. Don Francisco Nuñez Melian, who suc-ceeded the former, and governed until the year 1632.

28. Don Rui Fernandez de Fuenmayor, fromthe last-mentioned year to 1638,

29. Don Marcos Gelder de Calatayud, a knightof the order of Calatrava ; he was promoted herefrom the government of Santa Marta in 1639, andgoverned until the year 1644, when he died.

30. Don

31. Don

32. Don Pedro de Porras y Toledo, who beganto govern in 1660, and remained in office untilthe year 1665.

33. Don

34. Don

35. Don

36. Don

37. Don Joseph Francisco de Cañas, colonel ofinfantry, and knight of the order of St. Jago ; hecame over to Caracas under a particular commis-sion in 1716, and became provisional successor onaccount of the death of the proper governor.

38. Don Francisco de Portales.

39. Don Lope Carrillo.

40. Don Sebastian Garcia de la Torre, colonelof infantry ; from the year 1730 to 1733

41. Don Martin de Lardizábal, alcalde del cri-men of the royal audience of Aragon; who wassent out with a commission to consider the griev-ances of the province preferred against the com-pany of Guipuzcoana.

42. The Brigadier-general Don Gabriel de Zu-loaga. Count of Torre-alta, captain of the grena-diers of the regiment of the royal Spanish guards ;he governed from 1737 to 1742.

43. The Brigadier-general Don Luis de Castel-lanos, also captain of the regiment of guards ; to1749.

44. Don Fray Julian de Arriaga y Rigera Bai

299

lio, of the order of St. Juan ; vice-admiral of theroyal armada : he governed to 1752, when he waspromoted to the office of president of trade.

45. Don Felipe Ricardos, lieutenant-general ofthe royal armies.

46. Don Felipe Ramirez de Esteñoz, a briga-dier-general.

47. Don Joseph Solano y Bote, captain in theroyal armada ; to the year 1771, when he was pro-moted to the presidency of St. Domingo.

48. The Brigadier-general the Marquis of LaTorre, knight of the order of Santiago ; he enteredCaracas in the aforesaid year, and governed untilthe year 1772, when he was promoted to be go-vernor of the Havannah.

49. Don Joseph Carlos de Aquiero, knight ofthe order of St. Jago ; who had served in the warof Italy as captain of the provincial grenadiers,and afterwards in the regiment of Spanish guards :he then held the government of Nueva Vizcaya,and afterwards, on account of his singular disinte-restedness, nominated to this in 1777 ; but he re-turned to Spain.

50. Don Luis de Unzaga y Amezaga, colonelof infantry : in the aforesaid year he left the go-vernment of Louisiana for this, and exercised ittill the year 1784, when lie was promoted to theHavannah, being succeeded by,

51. Don Manuel Gonzales, knight of the orderof St. Jago, brigadier of the royal armies ; he wasnominated as provisional successor.

52. The Colonel Don Juan Guillelmi, who hadserved in the corps of artillery ; he was promotedto the government in 1785.

[INDEX TO ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CON-CERNING THE City of Caracas.

1. Foundation. --- 2. Privileges. --- 3. Temperalure.--- 4. Meteorology. --- 5. Cyanometrical observa-tion. --- 6. Oxigen and nitrogen gas. --- 7. Va-riation of the needle. --- 8. Inclination of the dip-ping needle. --- 9. Situation. --- 10. Its waters. ---11. Streets. --- 12. Public squares. --- 13. Houses.--- 14. Public buildings. --- 15. Archbishopric. ---16. Cathedral. --- 17. Religious customs. --- 18.Religious costumes of the women. --- 19. Festi-vals. --- 20. The stage, & c. --- 21. Inhabitants. ---22. Freed persons or tradesmen. --- 23. The uni-versity. --- 24. Police. --- 25. Communications withthe interior. --- 26. With Spain. --- 27. Geogra-phical and statistical notices of the captainship-general of Caracas, and present history.

1. Foundation. --- This city, situate in 10° 31'n. lat. and 69° 3' w. long, from the meridian ofParis, was founded by Diego Losada in 1567, 47]

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
300

300

CARACAS.

years after Cumana, 39 after Coro, 33 afterBarcelona, and 15 after Barquisimeto.

2. Ils privileges.— It is the capital, not only ofthe province of Venezuela, but likewise of thatimmense extent of country occupied by the go-vernments of Maracaibo, Barinas, Guayana, Cu-mana, and the island of Margareta ; since it is theseat as well of the captain-generalship, the political 'and military authority of which extends over allthese provinces, as of the royal audience, of theintendancy, and of the consulate, the jurisdictionof which extends as far as the captain-general-ship.

3. Temperature.— Its temperature does not atall correspond with its latitude ; for, instead ofinsupportable heat, which, it would appear,ought to reign so near the equator, it, on thecontrary, enjoys an almost perpetual spring. Itowes this advantage to its elevation, which is 460fathoms above the level of the sea. Thus, al-though the sun has the power usual in such a lati-tude, the elevated situation of Caracas counter-balances its influence. The transitions from heatto cold are great and sudden, from whence nume-rous diseases arise; the most common of which arecolds, called by the Spaniards catarros.

4. Meteorology.— Height of Fahrenheit’s ther-

mometer at Caracas.

In the winter.

Generally at 6 A. M 58°

2 P. M. ' ... 73

10 P. M 68

The maximum .... 76The minimum . . . .52

In the summer.

Generally at 6 A. M 72°

2 P. M 79

10 P. M 75

Maximum . . . . .85

Minimum ..... 69Humidity, according to the hydrometer of Duluc.

Generally 47

Maximum 58

Minimum 37

The mercury, which rises in the most s. partsof Europe, and in the variations of the atmo-sphere to 1 l-12ths of the Paris inch, ascends only2-12ths in the e. parts of Tierra Firme. They ob-serve at Caracas, in all the seasons, four small at-mospherical variations every 24 hours, two in theday, and two in the night.

5. Blue of the skies by the cyanometer of Seaus-sure.

Generally .... 18

6. Oxigen and nitrogen gas. — Of 100 parts, 28of oxj'^gen and 72 of nitrogen.

The maximum of the first is 29The minimum . . . 27f

7. Variation of the needle.

Sept. 27th, 1799 . . 4° 38' 45"

8. Inclination of the dipping needle. Generally^^4-so- Oscillation of the pendulum : in 15 minutes,1270 oscillations.

9. Situation. — The city of Caracas is built in avalley of four leagues in length, in a direction frome. to w. and between that great chain of mountainsAvhich runs in a line with the sea from Coro to Cu-mana. It is, as it were, in a basin or hollow form-ed by this chain ; for it has mountains of equalheight to the n. and to the s. The city occupies aspace of 2000 square paces ; the ground on whichit stands remains as nature formed it, art havingdone nothing towards levelling it, or diminishingits irregularities. The declivity is every wheredecidedly from the s. : the whole of it is 75 fa-thoms perpendicular from the gate De la Pastorato the n. unto the river Guaire, which bounds thecity to the s.

10. Its waters. — It derives its waters from foursmall rivers. The first, which is called Guaire,bounds it entirely on the s. part without pene-trating into the city. Although this be scarcelyconsiderable enough to deserve the name of a river,it is too large to pass by the name of a rivulet. Thesecond, which bears the name of Anauco, watersthe e. side of the town ; and the part where it ap-proaches nearest is called Candelaria, where thereis built a handsome bridge, facilitating the com-munication with the valley of Chacao. The thirdis the Caroata : its course is from n. to s. throughall the w. part of the city, and separates it fromthe quarter called St. John, which parts are unitedby a stone bridge of a sufficiently solid construc-tion, but the regularity of which does not equalthat of the Candelaria. The fourth is named Ca-tucho, to which the city owes the waters of an in-finite number of public and private fountains ; yetthe inhabitants of Caracas, insensible to its bene-fits, suffer it to run in the same channel that timehas made for it, and amidst all the deformitieswhich the rains have occasioned ; for the fourbridges of communication which are thrown acrossit are rather to be considered the offsprings of ne-cessity than as objects of ornament. These fourrivers, after having served all the domestic uses ofthe city, run in one single channel across the valleyof Chacao, which is covered Avith fruits, provi-sions, and merchandize ; and, mixing their wa-]

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
301

301

[ters with those of the Tuy, fall under this nameinto the ocean, at 12 leagues to the e. of cape Co-dera.

11. Its streets. — The streets of Caracas, likethose of many modern cities, arc in parallel lines,about 20 feet broad, paved, and running n. s. e.and w. The houses are well built, about SOO feetfrom each other.

12. Public squares. — There are but three public

squares deserving of the name, and these are notfree from deformities. The great square, calledPlaza Mayor., which ought to be the most regular,is deformed by booths built to the e. and w. whichare let to shopkeepers for the profit of the city;and for the trifling emolument thus derived, issacrificed a most delightful prospect. This squareoccupies the same space as one of the gardens ofthe city, called Quadras, the size of which is aboutSOO square feet. The square is well paved, and init is held a market, in which you might procure inabundance vegetables, fruits, fresh and salted meat,fish, poultry, game, bread, paroquets, and monkeys.The cathedral, which is situate on the e. side of thesquare, has no symmetrical connection with it. Thissquare has on each side two entrances. The secondsquare is that of the Candelaria, surrounded veryregularly by an open palisade of iron upon stonework of an unequal height. This square, althouglinot paved, has a soil of clay mixed with sand, whichis as good as the best pavement, and altogetherit does not fail to afford an agreeable coup d’oeil.It owes nothing to the buildings that compose it,Bor is there, indeed, one fit to engage the attention,save tlie church of Candelaria, which, althoughnot of perfect geometrical proportion, has a frontwhich diverts the eye, and is by no means a dis-advantage to the square. Tlie third square is thatof St. Paul ; its only ornament is a fountain in itscentre. The church of St. Paul is, indeed, at thes. c. angle, but has no other symmetrical relationwith the square than that it forms a part of it.This square is neither paved nor even. The othersquares are, 1st, That of Trinidad, Avhich hasnot even the form of a square, and the ground ofwhich is extremely uneven and neglected : 2rf,That of St. Hyacinth, containing the conventof the Dominicans, and bordered on the e.by the pavement of a street, and crossed by an-other, so as to induce a supposition that it was ne-ver intended for a square : 3d, That of St. La-

zarus, which is a sort of inclosure before the churchof that name, situate to tlie s. e. of the city ; it hasthe merit of neatness, but so detached from the town,that it does not appear to form a part of it : 4//i,The square of Pastora, which is surrounded by

ruins : 5th, The square of St. John, which isspacious, but irregular, unpaved, and borderedonly on the w. side by a row of houses of meanconstruction. It is in this square that (he mountedmilitia are exercised.

13. Houses . — The houses of individuals arehandsome and well built. There are a great num-ber in the interior of the city, which consist of se-parate stories, and are of a very handsome ap-pearance. Some are of brick, but the greaterpart are of masonry, made nearly after the mannerof the Homans, and on the plan now adopted whenbuilding in marshes or in the sea, &c. accordingto the method published by Mr. Tarditf in 1757.They make a sort of frame without a bottom,with planks of five feet long and three high, whichbecomes the model of the front of the Avail aboutto be erected. The ground on which they buildserves as a foundation to this frame or support, andthe frame is removed as each tier or part is addedto complete the walls. They cover the Avails withmortar, called in the country tapia. There aretAvo sorts of this mortar : the first, to Avhich theygive the pompous name of royal tapia, is made ofthe sand of the river mixed with chalk, to Avhichare frequently added flints, stones, and pebbles %the second is composed of common sand Avith avery small quantity of chalk. A person easilydistinguishes, by the mixture of these materials,that Avhich is the most durable ; yet both acquire,by means of the pestle, a consistency which bravesfor a long time the inclemencies of the seasons andthe effects of time. The outside of the houses,Avhen made rough and whitened, appears equal tofree stone.. 'I'he timber of the roof is formed, as itAvere, into a double slope. The wood Avork is Avelljoined, very elegant, and of an excellent descrip-tion of wood, which the country furnishes in abun-dance. The houses of the principal people of thecity, in general, are neatly and even richly fur-nished : they have handsome glasses, elegant cur-tains of crimson damask at the windows and at theinner doors ; chairs and sofas of Avood, Avith thesdats covered with leather or damask stuffed withhair, Avorked in a Gothic style, but overloadedAvith gilding ; beds, Avith the head-boards raisedvery high, exposing to the sight nothing but gold,covered Avitli handsome damask counterpanes, andseveral pillows of feathers covered with muslincases ornamented with lace ; but there is seldommore than one bed of this magnificence in eachhouse, and this is generally the nuptial bed, thoughbeing, in fact, merely kept for show. The feet ofthe fables and the commodes are richly gilt : ele-gant lustres are suspended in the principal apart-

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
302

302

CARACAS.

[ments ; the very cornices appear to have beendipped in gold, whilst superb carpets are spreadover the part of llie floor whereon the seats of ho-nour are placed ; the furniture is arranged in thehall in such a manner that the sofa, which formsan essential part of it, stands at one end withchairs on the right and left, and opposite the prin-cipal bed in the house, which stands at the otherextremitj, in a chamber, the door of which is keptopen, or is equally exposed to view in an alcove.These apartments, always very elegant and high-ly ornamented, are in a manner prohibited to thosewho inhabit the house : they are only opened, witha few exceptions, in honour of guests of superiorrank.

14. Public buildings. — The city of Caracaspossesses no other public buildings than such asare dedicated to religion. The captain-general,the members of the royal audience, the intendant,and all the officers of the tribunal, occupy hiredhouses ; even the hospital for the troops is a pri-vate house. The contaduria, or treasury, is theonly building belonging to the king, and its con-struction is far from bespeaking the majesty of itsowner. It is not so with the barracks ; they arenew, elegantly built, and situate in a spot where thesight breaks upon the city, and are two storieshigh, in which they can conveniently lodge 2000men. They are occupied only by the troops ofthe line ; the militia having barracks of their own,consisting of a house, at the opposite part of thecity.

15. Archbishopric. — Caracas is the seat of thearchbishopric of Venezuela, the diocese of whichis very extensive, it being bounded on the n. bythe sea, from the river Unare to the jurisdiction ofCoro ; on the e. by the province of Cumana, onthe s. by the Orinoco, and on the w. by thebishopric of Merida. Caracas was erected intoan archbishopric in 1803. The annual revenueof the archbishopric depends on the abundance ofthe harvests and the price of commodities, onAvhich they take the titlies : these tithes are equallydivided between the archbishopric, tlie chapter,the king, and the ministers of religion. Thefourth part, belonging to the prelate, amounted onan average, before the war terminated by the treatyof Amiens, to 60,000 dollars per annum. Thedecrease of cultivation will for a long time pre-vent the episcopal revenues amounting to theabove sum. Indeed the archbishop does noteven enjoy the whole of this fourth part of thetithes, the king having reserved to himself theapplication of the third of this quarter, and charg-ing upon it certain pensions. The seat of this

archbishopric was established at Coro in 1532,and translated to Caracas in 1636.

16. Cathedral. — The cathedral church does notmerit a description but from the rank it holds inthe hierarchy ; not but that the interior is deco-rated with hangings and gilding, and that thesacerdotal robes and sacred vases are sufficientlysplendid, but that its construction, its architec-ture, its dimensions, and its arrangements, arevoid of majesty and regularity. It is about 250feet long and 75 broad ; it is low and supported inthe interior by 24 pillars in four rows, which runthe whole length of the cathedral. The two centrerows form the nave of the church, which is 25feet broad ; the other two rows divide the aisles atequal distances of 12| feet, so that the nave aloneis of the width of the two aisles, which are on itsright and left. The chief altar, instead of being,like the Roman altars, in the centre, is placedagainst the wall. The choir occupies one halfof tlie nave, and the arrangement of the churchis such, that not more than 400 persons can seethe officiating priest at whatever altar he may beperforming tlie service. The exterior does notevince any taste or skill in the architect ; thesteeple alone, without having received any em-bellishment from art, has at least the merit of aboldness to which the cathedral has no pretensions.The only clock in Caracas is in this steeple ; itstrikes the quarters, and keeps time pretty well.The humble architecture of the first church inCaracas springs from a source highly honourableto the inhabitants, and which we are thereforebound to relate : The episcopal chair having beentranslated from Coro to Caracas, (as we have be-fore observed), in 1636, there was no necessityuntil this period for a cathedral in this city ; andwhen they had begun to carry into execution aproject of erecting a magnificent church, therehappened, on 11th June 1641, a violent earth-quake, which did great damage in the city. Thiswas regarded as an admonition of heaven to makethe fabric more capable of resisting this sort ofcatastrophe, than of attracting the admiration ofthe curious. From this time, therefore, they nolonger thought of, or rather they renounced, all ideasof magnificence, to give the building nothing butsolidity. But as they have never since expe-rienced any shock of an earthquake, they haveresumed the project of building a handsome ca-thedral.

17. Religious customs, — The people of Caracas,like all the Spaniards, are proud of being Chris-tians, and are very attentive to the duties of re-ligion, that is to the mass, days of obligation, to]

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
303

CARACAS.

303

[sermons and processions ; but it is worthy of re-mark, that they do not admit vespers in the num-ber of religious exercises, ag'reeably to the cus-tom of Old Spain and other Catholic countries.It is necessary that the men going to churchshould wear a cloak or great coat, or that theybe dressed in a long coat ; one of these habits isindispensable, neither rank nor colour affordingan exemption.

18. Religious costumes of the women . — Thedress of the women, whether rich or poor, espe-cially of the whites, ought to be altogether black.This dress consists of a petticoat and veil bothblack ; the slaves alone are obliged to have a Avhiteveil. The object of this attire was, that by im-posing on the sex a veil, every kind of gallantry andcoquetry might be banished from the place ofworship, and that by establishing uniformity indress and colour, the pious might be reminded ofthe equality of all in the eyes of God. But thisdress, which was intended to be the same for everywoman, and of a very common stuff, has becomemost rare and costly, and the gauze veils whichthe ladies wear, expose all their features and com-plexion as far as the eyes. This dress, worn onlyin sacred duties, is now made of silk or velvet,enriched with handsome lace, which often costsfrom 400 to 800 dollars. Such as have no meansof procuring the customary church dress, areobliged to go to the masses that are said beforeday-break, and which are called missasde madru-gada, and are performed at these hours only forthe convenience of those who are destitute ofclothes sufficiently decent to appear at churchduring the day.

19. Festivals . — The Spaniards have no otherfestivals blit those contained in the Roman calen-dar. They are so multiplied at Caracas that thereare very few days in the year on which they donot celebrate the festival of some saint or virginin one of the churches of the city. What greatlymultiplies the number is, that each festival is pre-ceded bj' nine days of devotion consecrated en-tirely to prayers, and followed by eight days, inwhich the faithful of the neighbourhood, and evenof the whole city, join to prayers, public amuse-ments, such as fire-works, music, balls, &c. ; butthe pleasures of tliese festivals never extend to thetable. Public feasts, so common among all otherpeople, are unknown on such occasions amongthe Spaniards. These people are sober even inthe delirium of pleasure. The most striking partof their festivals is the procession of the saint theycelebrate; they perform this always in the after-noon ; the saint, represented by an effigy of human

stature, is richly dressed ; it is borne on a tablehandsomely decorated, and followed or precededby some other saint of the same church, dressedless sumptuously ; a great number of banners andcrosses open the cavalcade ; the men walk in twolines ; each of the principal persons holds a waxtaper, then follow' the music, the clergj', thecivil officers, and at last the women and a file ofbayonets. The followers are always very numer-ous. All the windows in the streets tliroughAvhich the procession passes, are ornamented withfloating streamers, which give the whole neigh-bourhood an air of festivity and rejoicing. Thewindows of the French, in particular, are filledwith ladies, who repair from all parts of the cityto view the agreeable spectacle. But the princi-pal and almost exclusive devotion of the Spaniardsis to the holy Virgin ; they have Irer in everychurch under different denominations, and inevery case she has established herself in a man-ner more or less miraculous.

20. The Stage . — The sum of the public amuse-ments at Caracas is the play-house, at which theyperform only on festivals, the price of admissionbeing a real, nearly sixpence English, a sumsufficiently indicating the talents of the actors,and the beauty and convenience of the theatre.All the plays, bad enough in themselves, are yetmore miserably performed. The performers ofCaracas may be compared to strolling players wholive by moving pity rather than by affordingamusement; every body must suppose from thisdescription, that an exliibition of this sort is alto-gether deserted, but the reader may be assuredthat the rich and poor, the young and the old, thenobleman and plebeian, the governor and the go-verned, all assiduously frequent the theatre. In-dependently of three tennis-courts, a few billiard-tables in a bad condition, scattered through thecity, and which are but rarely frequented, com-plete the catalogue of amusements at Caracas,indeed ttie Sjuviiiards appear averse to all placesof amusement ; they live in their houses as if theyAvere prisons, they never quit them but to go tochurch, or to lultil the offices imposed on themby their stations in society.

21. Inhabitants . — The city of Caracas contain-ed, according to the clerical census of 1802, 31,234souls, and in 1806 they exceeded 40,000. Thispopulation is classed into whites, slaves, freedpeople, and a very fcAV Indians. The first formalmost a fourth part of the amount, the slaves athird part, the Indians a twentieth part, and thefreed men the remainder. In the Avliite popula-tion there are six Castillian titles, three marquisses,]

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
304

304

CARACAS.

[and three counts. All the wliites pretend to be noble,and nearly one third of them are acknowledged to beko. The whites are all either planters, merchants, sol-diers, priests, monks, financiers, or lawyers. ASpanish white person, especially a Creole, howeverpoor he may be, thinks it the greatest disgrace tolabour as a mechanic. The Europeans in Caracasform at least two very distinct classes ; the first com-prises those who come from Spain with apjjoint-ments : the second those actuated by industry anda spirit of enterprise, and who emigrate to acquirewealth ; the greater part of these come from Cata-lonia and Biscay ; their views are purely mercan-tile. Both Catalonians and Biscayans are dis-tinguished among their fellow-citizens by the good,faith they observe in their business, and by theirpunctuality in their payments. The former class,the European placemen, are most obnoxious to theCreoles, and these are in point of ability and edu-cation almost always the superiors. The Spa-niards from the Canary islands, who are impelledby want, rather than fired by ambition, to quittheir native soil and to establish themselves at Ca-racas, import with them tlie united industry ofthe Catalonians and Biscayans. Their geniusassimilates more to that of the latter than to that ofthe former ; but, in fine, both are useful citizens,like all who strive by honest means to gain theirlivelihood, and who are not ashamed to prove byexample, that man is born to labour. The womenof Caracas are agreeable, sensible, and engaging ;few of them are fair, but they have jet black hair,with complexions as clear as alabaster ; their eyesare large, well set, and lovely, whilst the car-nation of their lips marks a health and vigourof constitution. There are a very few, however,above the middle size, whilst there are a greatmany under ; and their feet too are rarely hand-some. As they pass a great part of their lives attheir windows, it may be said that they are soli-citous to display that in which nature has mostfavoured them. There are no female schools here ;the women therefore learn nothing but what theirparents teach them, which is confined, in manycases, to praying, reading badly, and writingAvorse ; it is diflicult for any but an inspired loverto read their scrawl. They have neither dancing,drawing, nor music masters ; all they learn ofthese accomplishments is to play a fgw airs on theguitar and pianoforte; there are but a very fewwho understand the rudiments of music. But inspite of this want of education, the ladies of Ca-racas know very avcU Jiow to unite social mannerswith politeness, and the art of coquetry with ferni-ainc modesty. 'I'his is, however, a picture only

of those women whose husbands or fathers possesslarge fortunes or lucrative places ; for that part ofthe female sex who are doomed to procure theirown livelihood, seldom know of any other meansof existence than the public prostitution of theirvirtue : about 200 of these poor creatures passtheir days in rags and tatters in the ground-floorsof houses, and stroll out only at night to procurethe pittance for their next day’s fare ; their dressis a white petticoat and cloak, with a pasteboardbonnet covered with lustring, to which they at-tach a bunch of artificial flowers and tinsel. Thesame dress often serves in one evening for two orthree of these unhappy beings. The class of do-mestic slaves is considerable at Caracas, since aperson believes himself rich only in proportion tothe number of slaves he has in his house. In ge-neral, four times more servants are kept than are ne-cessary, for this is thought an etfectual method ofconcealing poverty. Thus a white Avouian goes tomass with two Negro or Mulatto women in hertrain, without having an equal value in any otherspecies of property. Those who are reputedlyrich, are followed by four or five servants, whilstas many attend every white person of the samefamily going to another church. Some houses atCaracas contain 12 or 15 servants, Aritliout count-ing the footmen in attendance on the men.

22. Freed persons , — Probably there is not acity throughout all the West Indies that has sogreat a proportion, Avith respect to other classes,of enfranchised persons and their descendants, asCaracas ; they carry on all the trades which thewhites disdain. Every carpenter, joiner, mason,blacksmith, locksmith, tailor, shoemaker, andgoldsmith, &c. is or has been an enfranchisedslave ; they do not excel in any of these trades,because in learning them mechanically they al-ways err in the principle : moreover, indolence,which is so natural to them, extinguishes thatemulation to Avhich tlie arts owe all their progress.However, their masonry and their carpentry aresutiiciently correct, but the joiner’s art is yet inits infancy. They Avork very little; and Avhatappears rather contradictory is, that they workmuch cheaper than the European artists ; in .ge-neral, burdened with families, they live heaped uptogether in poor houses, and in the midst of priva-'tions : In this state of poverty, to employ them,you must aflbrd an immediate advance of money.The blacksmith never has coals nor fire. Thecarpenter is always Avithout Avood even for a table ;even the wants of their families must be administer-ed to by the employer. In fine, the predominantpassion among this class of people is to consume]

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
305

CARACAS.

305

[their Ures in the exercises of devotion, and they arctondof forming themselves into religious societies;indeed there are few churclies that have not one ortwo of these fraternities, composed entirely of en-franchised slaves. Every one has its uniform,differing from the other only in colour.

23. University. — The education of the youth ofCaracas and ot the whole archbishopric is entirelyin a college and an university united together.The foundation of the college preceded that of theuniversity by more than 60 years. This institu-tion originated in the piety and care of bishop A.Gonzales de Acuna, who died in 16S2. At firstnothing was taught here but Latin, with the ad-dition of scholastic philosophy and theology. Ithas now a reading and a writing school ; three Latinschools, in one of which they profess rhetoric ;two professors of philosophy, one of which is a layor secular priest, and the other a Dominican ; fourprofessors of theology, two for school divinity, onefor ethics, and another for positive divinity, thelast of which ought always to be a Dominican ; aprofessor of civil law ; a professor of canon law ; aprofessor of medicine. The university and col-lege of Caracas have only a capital of 47,748 dol-lars and 6\ reals, put out at interest, and produc-ing annually 2.387 dollars, 3| reals: this sumpays the 12 professors. All the ranks of bachelor,licentiate, and doctor, are granted at the univer-sity. The first is given by the rector, the twoothers by the chancellor, who is also endowed withthe quality of schoolmaster. The oath of eachrank is to maintain the immaculate conception, notto teach nor practise regicide or tyrannicide, andto defend the doctrine of St. Thomas. In this col-lege and university there were, in 1802, 64 boarders,and 402 students not boarders, viz.

In the lower classes, comprising rhetoric, 202

Philosophy - - . 140

Theology - - - 36

Canon and civil law - - 55

Physic - - - 11

la the school of sacred music - 22

466

24. Police . — The Spaniards of Caracas, of allpeople in the world, stand least in need of a policeto preserve public tranquillity. Their natural so-briety, and more especially their phlegmatic dis-position, render quarrels and tumults very rareamong them. Here there is never any noise in thestreets ; every body in them is silent, dull, andgrave ; 300 or 400 people coming out of a

church make no more noise than a tortoise movingalong the sand. But if the magistrate has nothing

to fear from open crimes, he has so much the moreto apprehend from assassinations, thefts, frauds,and treachery. The Spaniard is far from exemptfrom that vindictive spirit, which is the moredangerous as it seeks its revenge only in thedark ; and from that rancour which veils itselfwith the mask of friendship to procure an oppor-tunity of gratifying its vengeance. A person whofrom his station and condition has no chance ofrevenging himself, save by his own hands, exhi-bits very little or no passion when he receives theoffence ; but from that instant he watches the op-portunity, which he seldom suffers to escape him,of plunging a poniard in the heart of his enemy.The Spaniards from the province of Andalucia areparticularly branded with this criminal habit. Weare assured that these unfortunate events were un-known here before the year 1778, at which timethe liberty of trading with the province ofYene-zuela, which was belbre exclusively granted to thecompany of Guipuscoa, was extended to all theports of Spain, and drew a number of Spaniards toCaracas Irom every province, and particularlyfrom that of Andalucia. It is true that almost allassassinations that happen at Caracas are perpe-trate by the Europeans : those that can be laid tothe charge of the Creoles are most rare. But allthe thefts are committed by the whites or pre-tended whites of the country, and the enfranchisedpersons. False measures, false weights, changingof commodities and provisions, are likewise fre-quent practices ; because they are looked uponless as acts of dishonesty than as proofs of an ad-dress of which they are proud. HoAvever greatmay be the occupation of the police, it is certainmany things call loudly upon their attention. Itwill hardly be believed that the city of Caracas,the capital of the province, and able to supplyhorned cattle to all the foreign possessions inAmerica, is many days in the year itself in wantof butcher’s meat. The residence of a captain-general, the seat of an archbishop, of a royal audi-ence, and of the principal tribunals of appeal, witha population of more than 40,000 souls, and, inshort, with a garrison of 1000 men, experiencefamine in the midst of abundance. If filth doesnot accumulate in the streets, it is owing t6 thefrequency of the rains, and not to the care of thepolice ; for they are never washed but in honourof some procession. Such streets as procession*do not pass through are covered with an herblike the weed on ponds, the pnnicum dactylum ofLinnaeus. Mendicity, which is in almost everyother country the province of the police, appearsto be unnoticed by it in Caracas. The streets arc]

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
306

306

[crowded with poor of both sexes, who Iiave noother subsistence than what tliey derive from alms,and who prefer these means of living to that oflabour. It is feared that the indiscriminate cha-rity exhibited liere is productive of the worst ef-fects ; that it affords to vice the means of remain-ing vicious. The police are indeed acquaintedwith these abuses, but cannot repress them withoutthe imputation of impiety. To form a correct ideaof the number of mendicants that wander in the.streets, it is but necessary to know that the arch-bishop distributes generally alms every Saturday ;that each mendicant receives a half-escalin, orl-16th of a dollar ; and that at each of these piousdistributions there is given a sum of from 75 or 76dollars, wliich should make the number of beggarsat least 1200 ; and in this list are not included thosewho are ashamed to beg publicly, and to whomthe worthy prelate D. Francis d’lbarra, a Creoleof Caracas, distributes certain revenues in secret.The cabildo^ composed of 22 members, and se-conded by the alcaldes de barrio, who are magis-trates distributed throughout the wards of the city,would be more than sufficient to manage the af-fairs of the police ; but the presence of the higherauthorities, who wish to share the prerogatives ofcommand, has made a division of all matters ofpolice between the governor, the lieutenant-go-yernor, and a member of the audience, who, underthe title of judge of the province, exercises its func-tions in conjunction with the authorities just men-tioned.

25. Communications with the interior. — Caracas,the centre of all the political, judicial, fiscal, mili-tary, commercial, and religious concerns of its de-pendencies, is also naturally that of all the com-munication in the interior. The roads are almostevery where just traced, and nothing more. Themud and overflowing of the rivers, over whichthere are neither bridges nor passage-boats, renderthem impracticable in the rainy season ; and in nopart of the year are they convenient. They countthe distance by a day’s journey, and not by leagues :but a fair computation of a day’s journey is 10leagues, of 2000 geometrical paces each. Theorders transmitted by the governor to the severaltowns of the interior arrive there by expre.ss, andcommunications of whatever nature are returnedby the same means. There are no regular courierssetting out from the capital, excepting for Mara-caibo, Puerto Cabello, Sante Fe, Cumana, andGuayana. All the towns situate on the roads tothese four chief places enjoy the advantages of apost. The courier for Maracaibo sets out fromCaracas every Thursday evening at six o’clock ;

it carries the letters of Victoria, Tulmeco, Mara-cay, Valencia, St. Philip, Puerto Cabello, andCoro ; it is 10 days going from Caracas to Mara-caibo, and arrives from Maracaibo at Caracas ol’ vevery 15th day, but from Puerto Cabello everyTuesday. On the 6th and 22d of each month,a courier sets out from Caracas for Santa Fe ; itcarries the letters of San Carlos, Guanare, Araux,Tocayo, Barquisimeto, Barinas, Merida, Carta-gena, Santa Marta, and Peru ; and arrives, or oughtto arrive, the 4th and 20th of each month ; it isgenerally 42 days in going from Caracas to SantaFe. The courier of Cumana and Guayana arrivesat Caracas once a month ; it proceeds, or stops,according to the state of the roads and rivers.Five days after its arrival at Caracas it sets outagain. The letters for Guayana go directly fromBarcelona by a courier ; and those for Cumana andMargareta by another. This arrives at its placeof destination in 12 days, and that of Guayanain SO days.

26. With Spain . — The official letters from Spainarrive at Caracas every month. A king’s packetsails on one of the first three days of each monthfrom Coruna, touches at the Canaries to leavetheir letters, then sails for the Havanah, andleaves in its way to Puertorico the letters addresser!as well for that island as for tim government ofCaracas. The latter are immediately forwardedby one of the little vessels kept for this service.During war the mail from Spain, instead of touch-ing at Puertorico, leaves the letters for Caracasand its dependencies at Cumana, and those for thekingdom of Santa Fe at Cartagena, and finally al-ways proceeds to the Havanah, from whence itsdeparture for Spain is regular and periodical.The answers from Caracas, even those that are of-ficial, are sent to Spain by the merchant vesselswhich sail from Guaira to Cadiz.

27. Geographical and statistical notices of thecapt amship'general of Caracas, and present his-torij. — Depons’ Voyage to the e. part of TierraFirme, or the Spanish main, in S. America, com-prises an ample description of this region ; and isthe principal authority for the anterior and subse-quent notices. This territory is situate betweenthe 12th degree of«. latitude and the equinoctial.It comprehends

Venezuela, containing

500,000 inhabitants

Maracaibo,

100,000

Cumami,

80,000

Spanish Guayana,

54,000

Isle of Margareta,

14,000

728,000 ]

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
307

CARACAS.

SOT

[Of the population two tenths are whites, tlireeslaves, four freedmen and their descendants, andthe remainder Indians. There is scarcely any emi-gration from Spain to Tierra Firme. The govern-ment of Caracas, like tliat of other parts of SpanishAmerica, is so constituted as to keep it dependenton the parent country. The governor or captain-general represents the monarch, and commands themilitary force. There are delegated governors,who have each an assessor : the royal audience ofCaracas consists of a president, who is tlie captain-general, a regent, three judges, two fiscals, onefor criminal afi’airs, the other for the finances, witha reporter and other necessary officers. It adminis-ters justice, regulates the finances, and has othergreat prerogatives. The naval force of TierraFirme is trifling, and could not resist a single frigate.Several sea-ports have fortresses. Maracaibo has25,000 inhabitants, is defended by three forts andfour companies of troops of tlie line, and a propor-tion of militia. The haven or port of Coro, calledLa Vela de Coro, sixteen leagues e. of Maracaibo,had at the time of General Miranda’s expedition in1S06, two batteries with 15 or 18 pieces of cannonof various calibres from six to 18 pounders. PuertoCabello, 58 leagues to the e. of Coro, has a strongfort with a large and numerous artillery. In timeof war it is supplied with two companies of regulartroops. In case of attack, says Depons, 3000militia might be collected here in eight days. LaGuaira, the haven of Caracas, 25 leagues to the e.of Puerto Cabello, is very strongly fortified. Cu-mana, 100 leagues e. of La Guaira, is of difficultaccess, has a fort, and might collect a force of 5000men. The island of Margareta, four leagues n. ofCurnana, has trifling batteries, one company of re-gular troops, one of artillery, and several of militia.Thus it appears tlie strong places are distant fromeach other (30 or 100 leagues ; hence it is observed,a debarkation on the coast might easily be efl'ectedin various places, and the troops proceed into thecountry, whilst the ships, by attacking the forts,would distract the military operations. The mili-tary force, as stated by Depons, is a regiment of re-gular troops of 918 fnen, distributed at Caracas,La Guaira, and Puerto Cabello: 400 troops of theline are at Maracaibo, at Curnana 150, at Guiana150, and at Barpias 77. The artillery at the re-spective {jlaces is served by separate companiesbesides militia ; the whole armed force of the cap-tainship-genera^regulartroopsand militia, is statedat 13,059. There is no religion but the HomanCatholic. To be suspected of heresy is dangerous ;to be convicted, fatal. The tribunals of the in-quisition are erected at Mexico, Lima, and Carta-

gena, and are very powefful. They prohibit badbooks to the number of 5420. Spanish Americaabounds in priests, who are held in great respect ;the missionaries are numerous ; the churciies aredecent and often elegant. The tithes are paid, onetenth part to the king, one fourth to the bisliop, onefourth to the chapter, and remainder to the parishpriests and to other pious uses. The income of thebishop of Caracas is 40,000 dollars. The produc-tions of this region are cacao, coffee, sugar, indigo,and tobacco. Besides the present products, thereis a great variety 'of others which the soil offers tothe inhabitants, without requiring any advance, orsubjecting them to any trouble, but that of collect-ing and bestowing on them a light a?id easy pre-paration. Among these Depons mentionswild cochineal, dyeing woods and barks, gums,rosin, and medical oils, herbs, roots and bark formedicine. From this country half Europe mightbe supplied with wood for its furniture and cabinet-work. Commerce might draw much from the ani-mal kingdom. The neat cattle are calculated at1,200,0(X) ; horses and mares 180,000 ; and mulesat 90,000 ; sheep are innumerable, and deer abun-dant : notwithstanding this abundance, agricultureis at a low ebb in this country. La Guaira,Puerto Cabello, Maracaibo, Curnana, Barcelona,and Margareta, havearight to trade with the mothercountry. In 1796 the imports from Spain to Ca-racas were estimated at 3,1 18,8117^^ dollars, andthe exports at 283,316 dollars. There is a limitedtrade to the other colonies, which brings about400,000 dollars into the country. It exports toforeign West India islands articles of its own pro-duce, except cacao, in neutral bottoms ; part of thereturns must be in Negroes or in farming or house-hold utensils, and the remainder in specie. Butthis remainder is principally smuggled in manu-factured goods. The contraband trade, dividedchiefly between Jamaica, Curasao, and Trinidad,was estimated at 750,000 dollars annually beforethe war of 1796. It has increased greatly sincethat period. The whole regular exports of Ca-racas from 1793 to 1796 are stated at 12,252,415dollars ; from 1797 to 1800, 6,442,318 dollars.The finances of Caracas are under the direc-tion of an intendant. The revenue arises prin-cipally from the customs, a duty of five per cent,on sales from stamps, licences, and tithes, andfrom the produce of the cruzada and of the sale oftobacco. T’he two last are destined for the treasuryat home. There is usually a deficit, even in timeof peace ; in 1797 the receipt was 1, 147,788 dol-lars ; expenditure, 1,886,363. According toHumboldt, the dollars imported into Caracas in j

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
308

[1803 amounted to 5,500,000, and the exports con-sisted of produce to the value of 4,000,000 dollars.He also states the population in 1808 at 900,000souls. The receipts of Caracas, Guatemala, andChile, are consumed within the country. Thepopulation of some of the chief cities is thus stated ;Caracas 40,000, La Guaira 6000, Puerto Cabello7600, Coro 10,000. The harbour, or La Vela deCoro, as it is commonly called, and its environs, aresupposed to contain not less than 2000. In 1797three state prisoners were sent from Spain to Ca-racas, on account of their revolutionary propensi-ties. Being treated with great indulgence by theofficers and soldiers to whose care they were com-mitted, they formed the project of a conspiracyagainst the government. They engaged a numberof persons, some of them of consequence, in theirparty. After gaining their first converts, the spiritdid not spread. The coldness and apathy of thepeople did not admit of the effervescene they de-sired. After the plot had been kept a secret formany months it was disclosed to the government.Some of the ringleaders escaped, and others weretaken. It was found that seventy-two had enteredinto the conspiracy; six were executed. Therest either escaped, or were sent to the galleys orbanished from the country. For an account of therecent revolution in Caracas, see Venezuela.]

Caracas, some islands of the N. sea near thecoast of the kingdom of Tierra Firme, in the pro-vince and government of Cumana. They are sixin number, all small and desert, serving as placesof shelter to the Dutch traders, who carry on anillicit commerce on that coast.

Caracas, a small port of the coast of TierraFirme, in the province and government of Vene-;zuela, between the capital and cape Codera.

CARACHE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Maracaibo, situate n. of the city ofTruxillo, on the shore of a small river which entersthe Matazan.

CARACHIS, San Carlos de a settlement ofthe province and country of the Amazonas ; a re-duccion of the missions which belonged to the abo-lished order of the Jesuits. It is at the mouth ofthe river Huerari, where this enters the Maranon.

CARACOA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Parinacoche in Peru, where thereis a spring of warm medicinal water.

CARACOL, Port, on the coast of the S. sea,and of the province and government of Panamá ;it is near the point of Garachine, behind mount Zapo.

CARACOLI, a port of the coast of the kingdomof Tierra Firme, and of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela, to the w., of cape Codera.

Caracoli, a bay formed by the s. coast, in theprovince and government of Darien, of the kingdomof Tierra Firme ; it lies at the back of point Gara-chine.

Caracoli, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cartagena, situate on the shore ofthe Rio Grande de la Magdalena, and on the n, ofthe town of Maria.

CARACOLLO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Oruro in Peru, eight leagues dis-tant from its capital.

=CARACOTO== a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Lampa in Peru.

Caracoto, another, in the province and corregi-mienlo of Sicasica in the same kingdom.

==CARAGAIAS, a town of the island of Cuba,situate on the n. coast between Cadiz and Nizao,

CARAGUATAI, a river of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres ; it runs s. s. w. andenters the Ayum or Yumeri.

CARAGUET, a small river of Nova Scotia orAcadia ; it runs e. and enters the sea in the gulfof St. Lawrence, opposite the island of its name.

CARAHUACRA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru; annexedto the curacy ofYauli.

CARAIBAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Chalvanca.

CARAIMA Alta, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Quillota in the kingdom ofChile ; situate on the coast between point Caraimiliaand point Pena Blanca.

CARAIMILLA, a settlement on the coast ofthe province and corregimiento aforementioned,between point Caraima Alta, and the isle of Obispo.

CARAMA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Antioquia in the new kingdom ofGranada.

CARAMANTA, a city of the province and go-vernment of Antioquia in the new kingdom ofGratiada ; founded by Sebastian de Benalcazar in1543, near the river Cauca. Its temperature ishot and unhealthy, but it is fertile in maize, vege-tables, grain, and abounds with herds of swine : nearit are many small rivers which enter the Cauca,and some salt pits of the whitest salt. On themountains within its jurisdiction, are some settle-ments of barbarian Indians very little known. Thiscity is indifferently peopled, and is 65 leagues dis-tant to the n. e. of Popayan, and 50 from Antio-quia. Long. 75° 33' w. Lat. 5° 58' «.

CARAMATIBA, a settlement of the provinceand captainship of Rio Grande in Brazil ; situateon the shore of the river Carabatang.

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
318

318 CAR

ment of Paraguay ; situate on a small river aboutl5 leagues e. of Asuncion. Lat. 23° 30' 27"Long. 56° 52' w.)

CARLISLE, a settlement of the island of Ja-maica ; situate on the s.

(Carlisle, the chief town of Cumberlandcounty, Pennsylvania, on the post-road from Phi-ladelphia to Pittsburg ; is 125 miles w. by n. fromthe former, and 178 e. from the latter, and 18 s. w.from Harrisburgh. Its situation is pleasant andhealthy, on a plain near the s. bank of Conedog-winet creek, a water of the Susquehannah. Thetown contains about 400 houses, chiefly of stoneand brick, and about 1500 inhabitants. The streetsintersect each other at right angles, and the publicbuildings are a college, court-house, and gaol, andfour edifices for public worship. Of these thePresbyterians, Germans, Episcopalians, and RomanCatholics, have each one. Dickinson college,named after the celebrated John Dickinson, esq.author of several valuable tracts, has a principal,three professors, a philosophical apparatus, and alibrary containing near SOOO volumes. Its re-venue arises from 4000/. in funded certificates, and10,000 acres of land. In 1787 there were 80 stu-dents, and its reputation is daily increasing.About 50 years ago this spot was inhabited by In-dians and wild beasts.)

(Carlisle, a bay on the w. side of the islandof Barbadoes in the West Indies ; situated be-tween James and Charles forts, on which standsBridge-town, the capital of the island.)

CARLOS, San, a settlement of the provinceand captainship of Rey in Brazil ; situate on theshore of a small river which enters the head of thatof Curituba.

Carlos, San, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province and government of BuenosAyres ; situate on the shore of a small river nearthe river Pargua, about five leagues s. w. of Can-delaria. Lat. 27° 44' 36" s. Long. 55° 57' 12" w.

Carlos, San, another, of the missions of theprovince and government of Tucuman, in the jn-risdiction of the city of Salta; situate on the shoreof the river of Guachipas.

Carlos, San, a city of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela ; situate on the shore of theriver Aguirre, to the n. of the city of Nirua. [Itowes its existence to the first missionaries of Vene-zuela, and its increase and beauty to the activityof its inhabitants. The greatest part of its popu-lation is composed of Spaniards from the Canaryislands ; and as these leave their native country

CAR

but to meliorate their condition, they arrive with awillingness to work, and a courage to undertakeany thing that they think the most proper to an-swer their views. Their example even inspires asort oT emulation among the Creoles, productiveof public prosperity. Cattle forms the great massof the wealth of the inhabitants. Oxen, horses,and mules, are very numerous. Agriculture, al-though not much followed, is yet not neglected.Indigo and coffee are almost the only things theygrow. The quality of the soil gives the fruits anexquisite flavour, but particularly the oranges,which are famed throughout the province. Thecity is large, handsome, and well divided ; theycompute the inhabitants at 9300. The parishchurch, by its construction and neatness, answersto the industry and piety of the people. The heatat San Carlos is extreme ; it would be excessive ifthe n. wind did not moderate the effects of the sun.It lies in 9° 20' lat. 60 leagues s. w. of Caracas,24 s. s.e. of St. Valencia, and 20 from St. Philip’s.

(Carlos, San, a town of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Ayres ; situate on a small riverabout two leagues n. of Maldonado. Lat. 34° 44'45" s. Long. 55° 44' zw.)

(Carlos, San, Real, a parish of the provinceand government of Buenos Ayres ; situate on ariver of the same name, about five leagues n. ofColonia del Sacramento. Lat. 34° 25' 8" s. Long,57° 50' w.')

(San Carlos de Monterey|Carlos, San, de Monterey]]==, the capital ofNew California, founded in 1770, at the foot of thecordillera of Santa Lucia, which is covered withoiiks, pines, (foliis lernis J, and rose bushes. Thevillage is two leagues distant from the presidio ofthe same name. It appears that the bay of Mon-terey had already been discovered by Cabrillo onthe 13th November 1542, and that he gave it thename of Bahia rle los Pinos, on account of thebeautiful pines with which the neighbouring moun-tains are covered. It received its present nameabout 60 years afterwards from Viscaino, in ho-nour of the viceroy of Mexico, Gaspar deZunega,Count de Monterey, an active man, to whom weare indebted for considerable maritime expedi-tions, and who engaged Juan de Onate in the con-quest of New Mexico. The coasts in the vicinityof San Carlos produce the famous aurum merum(ormier) of Monterey, in request by the inhabi-tants of Nootka, and which is employed in thetrade of otter-skins. The population of San Carlosis 700.)

Carlos, San, a fort of the province and go-vernment of Guayana, situate on the shore of the

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
328

3:18

CARTAGENA.

when he was promoted to the bishopric of Carta-gena in 1746, of which he took possession in thefollowing year, and governed until 1752, whenhe was promoted to the church of Truxillo.

51. Doii Bartolome Narvaez y Berrio, canon ofthis holy church of Cartagena, and native of thiscountry ; presented to this bishopric in^ 1752, andgoverned here until he died in 1754.

52. The Doctor Jacinto Aguado y Chacon, ca-non penitenciario of the holy church of Cadiz ;elected in 1754, and promoted to the bishopric ofArequipa before he embarked for this of Car-tagena.

33. Don Diego Antonio Valenzuela Faxardo,native of the city of Santa Fe of Bogota; electedin 1754 : he died in 1755.

34. The Doctor Don Manuel de Sosa Betancur,archdeacon of the holy church of Caracas ; electedin 1755 : he died in 1765.

35. Don Diego Peredo, native of the town ofLeon of Mechoacan ; elected in 1765, promotedto the bishopric of Yucatan in 1722.

36. Don Augustin de Alvarado y Castillo ; pro-moted to the bishopric of Santa Fe in 1774.

37. The Doctor t)on Bias Sobrino y Minayo ;elected in 1774, and promoted to the archbishopricof Quito in 1776.

38. Don Fr. Joseph Diaz de la Madrid, a monkof the Order of St. Francis, native of the city ofQuito ; elected in 1 777.

Governors of Cartagena.

1. Don Pedro de Heredia, founder of the city ;and its adelantado or governor, a native of Madrid,and a valorous conqueror, in 1532.

2. The Licentiate Badillo, nominated J uez deResidencia,; he exercised the government duringthe commission in 1536.

3. The, Licentiate Santa Cruz, judge of anothersecond residence, who became adelantado in 1537.

4. The Licentiate Miguel Diez de Armendariz;he entered in 1545, had for judge of his resi-dence the Licentiate Juan de Montano, oidor ofSanta F<5, whom he sent to Spain.

5. Don Pedro de Heredia, who for the secondtime was provisional governor until the year 1556,when he died, being drowned in the fleet whichwas wrecked in the Gordas sands.

6. The Doctor J uan de Maldonado, Jiscal of theaudience of Santa Fe in 1556.

7. Jorge de Quintanilla, provisionally nomi-nated by the audience of Santa Fe.

8. The Brigadier Don Go'izalo Ximinez deQuesada ; nominated by the audience as residen-tiary to the three former, in the same year, 1556.

9. Antonio de Castro ; provisionally nominated.

10. Juan de Bustos Villegas, nominated by theking ; he entered in 1 557, and was promoted tothe presidency of Panama in 1563.

11. Anton Davalos de Luna, a field-officer ; heentered in 1563, and governed till 1567, whenhe died.

12. Don Lope de Orozco, as provisional gover-nor in the same year.

13. Francisco Bahamonde y Lugo ; he enteredin 1572, and died in 1573.

14. Hernan Suarez de Villalobos, nominatedprovisonally by the audience of Santa Fe in 1574.

15. Pedro Fernandez del Busto, who entered inthe above year, and was promoted to the govern-ment of Popayan in 1577.

16. Don Pedro de Lodena, in 1593.

17. Don Pedro de Acuna, knight of the orderof San Juan, field-officer, in 1601 ; he had the titleof president of the Philippines, and died the sameyear.

18. Don Geronimo Suazo Casasola, of the habitof Santiago ; he died in 1605.

19. Don Francisco Sarmientode Sotomayor, no-minated in the interim, in 1606.

20. Don Diego Fernandez de Valazco, in 1608.

21. Don Diego de Acuna, in 1614.

22. Don Garcia Giron de Loaysa, who governeduntil 1620.

23. Don Diego de Escobar, knight of the orderof Santiago, who died whilst exercising the govern-ment.

24. Don Francisco de Berrio, nominated in thein the interim, in 1628.

25. Don Francisco de Murga, knight of the or-der of Santiago, a field-officer, and celebratedengineer ; appointed to fortify the Plaza, beingat the time governor of Marmora in Africa : h«died in 1634.

26. Don Nicolas de Larraspuru, nominated inthe interim, in 1636.

27. Don Gonzalo de Herrera, Marquis of Vil-lalta, nominated in the interim, in 1637, on accountof the former not having accepted the office.

28. Don Vincente de los Reyes Villalobos, pro-visional governor in the same year, 1637, being thegovernor of Moxos.

29. Don Melchor de Aguilera, a field-officer;he entered in 1638, was suspended and called toaccount by Don Bernardino de Prado, oidor ofSanta Fe.

30. Don Ortuno de Aldape ; being governor ofMuzo, he was nominated in the interim, in 1641.

31. Don Luis Fernandez de Cordova, of the or-

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
342

342

C A V

certain seasons of tlie year it is so filled withfish, for seven leagues from its mouth, that theIndians are accustomed to harpoon them from theshores.

Cauten, a point of land, or cape, which is oneof those which form the entrance of the formerriver.

CAUTO, a settlement of the s. coast of the islandof Cuba; situate on the shore of a river whichbears the same name.

CAUX, Montanas de, mountains in the pro-vince and government of French Guinea, whichrun along the shore of a river of the same name, be-tween the rivers Orapu and Aprovaque.

(CAVALLO, as some erroneously spell it, asea-port town in the province of Venezuela, inTierra Firme. Lat. 10'’ 28'. Long. G8° 8'. SeeCabello Pderto and Cavello Puerto.)

(CAVAILLON, a town on the s. side of thes. peninsula of the island of St. Domingo, aboutthree leagues n. e. of Les Cayes, and five w. by s.of St. Louis. Lat. 18° 18' w.)

(CAVELLO, Puerto, Borburata. Oneleague e. of Puerto Cavello, was originally the onlyresort of vessels trading to this part of Venezuela.Puerto Cavello was merely frequented by smugglers,fishermen, and the outcasts of the interior. Theold town is surrounded by tlic sea, excepting aspace of a few fathoms to tlie w. ; through whichthey have now cut a canal communicating to thesea on the n. of the town to that on the s. ; thusforming an island, the egress being by a bridgewith a gate which is shut every evening, and atwhich is placed the principal guard. This islandbeing too small for the increasing population,houses were built on a tongue of land to the w. ofthe town, which was the only part free from inun-dation ; and this has now become the residence ofthe merchants, and the principal place. The totalpopulation of Puerto Cavello is 7600, of which,excepting the military and the officers of govern-ment, none are of the nobility. The whites aregenerally employed in trade and navigation ; thechief correspondence being with the ports of thecontinent or the neighbouring colonies ; for, al-though the port has been open from 1798 to thetrade of the metropolis, there is as yet but. littlecommunication with it. Of about 60 vessels trad-ing to this place, 20 at least are from Jamaica, and20 from Cura 9 oa, whilst only four or five are fromSpain. According to the custom-house books, thecargoes of these veesels are of little value ; but therevenue is defrauded, and the vessels discharge theirlading on the coast before entering the port. Thisplace supplies all the w. part of Venezuela,

C A V

and the jurisdiction of Valencia, San Carlos, Bari-quisimeto, San Felipe, and a part of the valleys ofAragoa. About 20 Europeans engross the w holetrade. All vessels trading to the neighbourhoodresort here for repairs, and nothing but the un-wholsoraeness of the air prevents Puerto Cavellobecoming the most important port in America.This insalubrity arises from the exhalations fromthe rain water that accumulates in a clayey marshto the s. of the city. It is particularly fatal tothose who are not seasoned to the climate. In1793 a Spanish squadron anchored at Puerto Ca-vello ; but in six months of its stay, it lost one-thirdof the crew; and in 1802 a French squadron in20 days lost 16 i officers and men. It has beencomputed that 20,000 piastres fortes would be suf-ficient to drain this tatal marsh. The inhabitantsare supplied by conduits with water from a riverthat runs into the sea one- fourth of a league w. ofthe town. A military commander is also at thehead of the police, and is likewise the administra-tor of justice, his decisions being subject to an ap-peal to the royal audience. The people have de-manded the establishment of a cahildo, but withoutsuccess. They obtained in 1800 a single alcalde ywho is appointed annually ; but great inconveni-ences have been found to arise from this arrange-ment.

There is no convent, and but one church, inPuerto Cavello. The foundation of another churchwas begun, but for want of funds it has not beehcompleted. There is a military hospital, and an-other for the poor. The garrison consists of acompany of the regiment of Caracas in time ofpeace ; but daring war it is reinforced from themilitia and troops of the line. 'I'hcre arc from 300to 400 galley-slaves always employed onthepiiblicworks.

Puerto Cavello is 30 leagues from Caracas,in embarking for La Guaira, and 48 leaguesin the direction of Valencia, Maracay, Tulraero,La Victoria, atid San Pedro. Reaumur’s thermo-meter is generally in August at 26°, and in Janu-ary from 18° to 19°. Lat. 10° 20' «. Long. 70*30' w. of Paris. See Puerto Cabello.)

(CAVENDISH, a township in Windsor county,Vermont, w. of Wcathersfield, on Black river,having 491 inhabitants. Upon this river, andwithin this township, the channel has been worndown 100 feet, and rocks of very large dimensionshave been undermined and thrown down one uponanother. Holes are wrought in the rocks of va-rious dimensions and forms ; some cylindrical,from one to eight feet in diameter, and from one to15 feet in depth ; others are of a spherical form.

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
364

364

C H A

C H A

CHAQUIMINAS, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Asangaro in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Sandia in the province of Ca-rabaya.

CHARABAYE, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela ; situate on the shoreof a river in the district of the city of Caracas, andto the e. of the town of Victoria.

CHARACATO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Arequipa in Peru. In itschurch is a miraculous image of Nuestra Senorade la Purificacion or Candelaria, to which singulardevotion is paid.

CHARAI, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Cinaloa ; situate on the shore ofa river of the fort which lies between the settle-ments of Ziribijoa and Mochicauchi.

(CHARAIBES, See Caribe.)

CHARALA, a settlement of the jurisdiction ofthe town of San Gil, in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra-nada, is, at it were, a suburb to the settlement ofMongui, and it is (being very poor and reduced)annexed to the curacy of the same. Its tempera-ture is mild, and abounds in pure good water, andin the productions of a hot climate.

CHARANDO, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Guimeo, and alcaldia mayor of Cirandaro,in Nueva Espafia ; annexed to the curacy of Turi-cato.

CHARAPA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Periban in Nueva España ;situate in the loftiest part of the sierra, fromwhence its temperature is so cold that it is seldomany crops can be gathered from the seeds that aresown. It contains 209 families of Indians, 80 inthe wards of its district, and a convent of the reli-gious order of St. Francis : lies e. of its head settle-ment.

CHARAPE, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Jaen de Bracamoros in the king-dom of Quito.

CHARAPOTO, a settlement of the district ofPuerto Viejo, and government of Guayaquil, in thekingdom of Quito, at a small distance from thesea-coast and bay of its name ; this title beingalso applied to the point which forms the samebay.

CHARAZANI, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

CHARBON, Rio del, a river of N. Carolina,which runs n. and enters the Conhaway. Thewhole of it abounds in cataracts, and its watersthrow up immense quantities of coal, which wasthe cause of its being thus named.

CHARCA, a settlement of the province and

corregimiento of Chayanta in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Sacaca.

CHARCANA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Parinacochas in Peru.

CHARCAS, an extensive province of the king-dom of Peru, composed of various others. Its ju-risdiction comprehends the district of this royalaudience, which begins at Vilcanota, of the cor-regimiento of Lampa and bishopric of Cuzco, andextends as far as Buenos Ayres to the s. It isbounded on the e. by Brazil, the meridian servingas a limit ; and reaching w. as far as the corregi-miento of Atacama, which is of its district, andforms the most n. part of this province in that di-rection, and being closed in on its other sides bythe kingdom of Chile : is 300 leagues in length, in-cluding the degrees of latitude from 20° to 28° s . :is in many parts very thinly peopled, and coveredwith large desert tracts, and rugged and impene-trable mountains, and again by the elevated cordil-leras of the Andes, and the spacious llanuras orpampas, which serve to mark its size and the relativedistances of its territories. Its temperature through-out is extremely cold, although there are not want-ing parts which enjoy a moderate warmth. At thetime that this province was in the possession of theIndians, and previous to the entrance of the Spa-niards, many well-inhabited provinces went jointlyunder the name of Charcas ; and the conquest ofthese was first undertaken by Capac Yupanqui,fifth Emperor ; but he was not able to pass the ter-ritory of the Tutiras Indians and of Chaqui. Hereit was that his conquests terminated : nor did thesubjection of these parts extend farther than Col-laysuyo until after his death, when he was suc-ceeded by his son the Inca Roca, sixth Emperor,who carried on still farther the victories which hadbeen already gained, conquering all the nations asfar on as that of Chuquisaca, where he afterwardsfounded the city of this name, called also La Plata.After that the Spaniards had reduced that part ofPeru, extending from Tumbez to Cuzco, and thatthe civil wars and dissensions which existed be-tween these were at an end, they endeavoured tofollow up their enterprise by making a conquest ofthe most distant nations. To this end, in 1538,Gonzalo Pizarro sallied forth with a great force,and attacking the Charcas and the Carangues,found in them such a spirited opposition, that afterseveral battles he was brought to think this objectwas nearly impracticable : this idea was strength-ened by the reception he had met with from theChuquisacas, who in many conflicts had given himconvincing proofs of their valour and warlikespirit ; indeed it is thought, that had he not just

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
436

436

CHILE.

[their masters, tliat the greatest punishment inflictedon them would be to sell them to others. Mastersnevertheless exercise the rights of fathers of fami-lies over their slaves, in correcting them for theirfaults.

12. Internal and external commerce, mines,imports, and exports. — The internal commerce ofChile has been hitherto of very little importance,notwithstanding the advantages that the countryoffers for its encouragement. Its principal source,industry, or more properly speaking, necessity, iswanting. An extensive commerce is correlativewith a great population, and in proportion as thelatter increases, the former will also be augmented.Hitherto it may be said, that of the two branchesthat in general give birth to commerce, agricultureand industry, the first is that alone which animatesthe internal: commerce of Chile, and even thatpart of the external which is carried on with Peru.The working of mines also occupies the attentionof many in the provinces of Copiapo, Coquimbo,and Quillota ; but the industry is so trifling thatit does not deserve the name. Notwithstanding theabundance of its fruits and materials of manufacture,as flax, wool, hemp, skins and metals, which mightproduce a flourishing commerce, it is conductedbut languidly. The’inhabitants employ themselvesonly in making ponchos, stockings, socks, carpets,blankets, skin-coats, saddles, hats, and other smallarticles chiefly made use of by the common orpoorer class of people, since those of the middlerank employ those of European manufacture.These, but more particularly the sale of hides andtanned leather, which they have in great plenty,with that of grain and wine, form the whole of theinternal commerce of the kingdom. The external,which is carried on with all the ports of Peru, par-ticularly Callao, arises from the exportation offruits ; this amounts to 700,000 dollars annually,according to the statements given in the periodicalpublications at Lima. The commerce betweenChile and Buenos Ayres is quite otherwise, sincefor the herb of Paraguaj/ dXone, it is obliged to ad-vance 300,000 dollars annually in cash ; theother articles received from thence are probablypaid for by those sent thither. In the trade withSpain, the fruits received from Chile go but a littleway in payment of more than a million of dollars,which are received from thence annually in Euro-pean goods, either directly, or by the way ofBuenos Ayres, and sometimes from Lima. Gold,silver, and copper, are the articles which formnearly the whole of this commerce, since the hidesand vicuna wool are in such small quantities as torender them of little importance.

Notwithstanding theworkingofthe mines in Chilehas in a great measure been relinquished from theex-pence,and from the impediments offered by the war-like spirit of the Araucanians, there are more than athousand now in work between the cities of Co-quimbo and Copiapo, besides those of the provinceof Aconcagua ; and it is a matter of fact that theproduce of its mines has been increasing eversince that the passage into the S. sea by cape Hornwas frequented by the Spanish merchants. Thegold coined in the capital was lately regulated at5200 marks annually ; but the present yearly pro-duce of the mines, as calculated from the amountsof the royal duties, and therefore considerablyunder the truth, amounts to 10,000 Spanish marksof pure gold, and 29,700 do. of pure silver. Thevalue in dollars of both is 1,737,380; the goldbeing estimated at 145i*#^ dollars, and the silverat 9 t'V dollars the Spanish mark. Besides^ this, wemust add for contraband 322,620 dollars ; andthe total produce will then be 2,060,000. Accord-ing to liumboldt, the dollars imported into Chileand Peru in 1803 amounted to 11,500,000, andthe exports consisted of produce to the value of4,000,000 dollars, besides 8,000,000 dollars inspecie. The receipts of Chile, Guatemala, and Ca-racas, are consumed within the country. The re-mittances of gold and silver to Spain are usuallymade from Buenos Ayres ; the first being lessbulky, is carried by the monthly packets insums of 2 or 3000 ounces ; as to the second,it has, till within a very late period, been sent intwo convoy ships in the summer, by which con-veyances gold is also remitted. The copper whichis extracted from the mines is estimated from 8to 10,000 quintals. From these data it will notbe difficult to form a general estimate of all thatChile produces annually. A communication bywater, which greatly facilitates the progress ofcommerce, has been already commenced. In se-veral of the ports, barks are employed in the trans-portation of merchandize, which was before carriedby land upon mules. Several large ships havealso been built in the harbour of Concepcion andthe mouth of the river Maule. The external com-merce is carried on with Peru and Spain. In thefirst, 23 or 24 ships, of 5 or 600 tons each, are em-ployed, which are partly Chilian and partly Peru-vian. These usually make three voyages in ayear; they carry from Chile wheat, wine, pulse,almonds, nuts, cocoa-nuts, conserves, dried meat,tallow, lard, cheese, sole-leather, timber for build-ing, copper, and a variety of other articles, andbring back in return silver, sugar, rice and cotton.The Spanish ships receive in exchange for Euro-1

Last edit over 2 years ago by Josie Brumfield
450

450

CHI

dried flesh, hung up to preserve them from corrup-tion. Their garments are a shirt without sleeves,reaching down to the middle of their legs. Themarried people wear drawers of baize with colouredpuckers for festival days, and those who enjoyoffices of state wear a baize jacket : they neitheruse hatnorshoes, and no one of them ever goes outwithout slinging round his neck some medals and arosary. The hair is worn short until they marry,and when they become old they suffer it to growlong. The women wear close gowns which reachdown to the ground, and which they call tapoyes:they never swathe or bind themselves round thewaist, but carry on their necks, on gala-days, somethreads strung with glass intermixed with beadsmade of cacao nuts, and coloured beans ; thesethreads usually amount to 20 or SO rows ; on en-tering the church they always loosen their hair.The regulars of the company of the Jesuits taughtthem offices, in which they assisted most dexte-rously ; and it really excites admiration that In-dians, acquainted only with their own barbariandialect, should be able to manage the compass ofthe notes, understand their proportions and num-bers, and apply the rules of music to its execution.At certain times of the year they go a mdear, orto hunt for honey among the woods : from thencethey bring back wax of two sorts, one which iswhite and odoriferous, Jhe other of less substance,as the wax of Europe, manufactured by a speciesof bees without stings, called opernus; also an-other kind of wax, made by a still different sort ofbees, but which are all properly denominated wildwax. This wax is delivered to the curate, whopreserves it in his house to send to the provinces ofPeru ; and from the product of this article, andfrom that of the cotton, which is made into woofs,to the amount of two pounds weight yearly byeach Indian, he procures in 3xchange whatever isnecessary for the settlement, such as baizes, colouredwools, bags, iron and steel articles, choppingknives, wedges, hatchets, scissars, pocket-knives,needles, medals, bugles, and other articles of hard-ware and little necessaries, which, being stored upby him, is distributed amongst the natives accord-ing to their necessities, and in a manner that theymay want for nothing, but live happy and con-tented. The settlements are as follows :

San Xavier, San Joseph,

La Concepcion, Santiago,

San Miguel, San Juan,

San Ignacio, El Santo,

Santa Ana, Corazon.

San Rafael,

CHIQUIZA, a settlement of the corregimientoof Sachica in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. Itis of a cold temperature, and produces wheat,maize, barley, papaSy and the other fruits peculiarto its climate. Its ijihabitants are so few as scarcelyto amount to 30 housekeepers, and about the samenumber of Indians. Four leagues to the n. w. ofTunja, and somewhat less from Velez.

CHIRA, a settlement and seat of the silver minesof the province and corregimiento of Piura in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Paita.

Same name, another settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Nicoya in the kingdomof Guate-mala.

[CHIRAGOW. See Plein River.]

CHIRAMBIRA, an island situate in the largebay of St. Juan, on the coast of the province andgovernment of Choco in the S. sea, which gives itsname to a small creek formed by this island and thecontinent.

CHIRCA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Sicasica in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Chulumani.

CHIRE, Santa Rosa de a city of the govern-ment and province of Los Llanos in the NuevoReyno de Granada ; founded by the GovernorFrancisco Anciso. It is of a very hot and un-healthy temperature, but affords the same vegetableproductions as the rest of the province. It is somean and reduced as to contain hardly 100 house-keepers, and scarcely deserves the name of a city.This settlement lies the furthest to the n. w. extre-mity of any in this kingdom, and is bounded inthat quarter by the province and bishopric of Ca-racas.

Same name a river of the aboveprovince and government. It rises at the foot ofthe lomas del Viento, runs e. and enters the Meta,traversing the country of the Betoyes Indians.

CHIRGUA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela. It rises in the mountain of Ta-cazuruma on the s. runs s. and enters the Gamalo-tal, after having collected the waters of many otherrivers.

CHIRIBIQUI, Santa Fe de a settlement ofthe province and government of Cumana in thekingdom of Tierra Firme ; situate on the coast,between the rivers Mosina and Marecapana.

CHIRICOAS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe Nuevo Reyno de Granada, to the e. of themountains of Bogota, and at the entrance of thellanos or plains of Cazanare and Meta. Theylead a wandering life through the woods in com-pany with the Guaibas ; they are crafty and verydexterous thieves, but of a docile and pacific dis-position. In 16.64; some of them were reduced into

Last edit over 2 years ago by LLILAS Benson
501

CON

CON

501

21. Don Fray Pedro de Espineira ; elected in1762 ; he governed until his death, in 1778.

22. Don Francisco Joseph de Maran ; electedin 1779.

Concepcion de la Vega, another city, inthe island of St. Domingo, founded by the AdmiralChristopher Columbus, on a beautiful and spaciousplain, or Uanura^ celebrated for a conquest gainedon it by a numerous army of Indians. It has a goodparish church, erected into a bishopric, and wliichwas afterwards done away with in 1605, it beingthen embodied with the archbishopric of S. Do-mingo. it has also a convent of the religiousorder of St. Francis, in which is deposited andvenerated the first cross that the discoverer and con-queror of this country planted here ; which, al-though the Indians have endeavoured with all theirmight to break and destroy, has resisted all theireftbrts. Twenty-five leagues from the capital ofS. Domingo.

(Concepcion, a town of the province and go-vernment of Paraguay ; situate on the e. side ofthe river Paraguay, about SO leagues n. of Asun-cion. Lat. 23'^ 23' 8" s. Long. 57° 16" <®.)

(Concepcion del Pao, a city of the provinceand government of Caracas ; composed of the in-habitants of Trinity, of Margareta, and of Caracas,who owned the folds in the plains near the Ori-noco, to the s. of Barcelona ; they here succes-sively fixed their dwellings, for the purpose ofbeing in the centre of their property, and of super-intending it themselves. In 1744 the number ofthese houses were found considerable enough to ac-quire the name of village. There are only 2300people of all classes here, subsisting will] facilityby Ihe fertility of the soil. The air and water aregood, and the only inconveniences the inhabitantsexperience are an excessive lieat, and inundationsarising from the long and heavy rains. The produceof the land is merely the provisions common to theCQuntry. The wealth of the inhabitants consistsentirely in cattle, which they export to Trinity,liia Guarapiche or Orinoco, This village, nowa city, is distinguished from St.John the Baptistdel Pao, situate in the province of Venezuela, bythe title of Concepcion del Pao. Lat. 8° 42' n.Long. 65° 10' ra.)

Concepcion, a settlement, the capital of theprovince and corregiwicnlo of Xauja in Peru.

Concepcion, another, of tlie same province andcorregimiento, in which there is a convent of thereligious order of St. Francis.

Concepcion, another, of the province and cor-regimknto of Lucanas in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Otoca.

Concepcion, another, of the same province andkingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Paraisancos.

Concepcion, another, of the province and cor-regimiento of Chichas and Tarija in the same king-dom, and of the district of the former.

Concepcion, another, of the province and cor-regimienlo of Vilcas Huaiman in the same king-dom ; annexed to the curacy of Vizchongo.

Concepcion, another, of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Leon in Nueva Espana, andof the bishopric of Mechoacan ; annexed to thecuracy of Rincon. It contains 208 families of In-dians, 100 of Spaniards, and ^0 oi Mustees. Itproduces wheat, maize, and other seeds, and is aquarter of a league from its curacy, and fourleagues from the capital.

Concepcion, another small settlement or ward,united to that of Tequiszillan, of ihealcaldia mayorof Theotihuacan in the same kingdom.

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichare held by the religious order of St. Francis, inthe province of Texas and kingdom of Nueva Es-pana. It is 112 leagues to the e. n. e. of the pre-sidency of San Antonio de Bejar.

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province and government of Mainas,of the kingdom of Quito ; situate on the shore ofthe great river Maranon, on a point of land formedby the same, and where this river is entered by theApena and the Guallaga,

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province of Tepeguana, and kingdomof Nueva Vizcaya; situate on the bank of theriver Florido, near the settlement and real of themines of Parral.

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichbelong to the religion of St. Francis, in the pro-vince of Taraumara, and kingdom of Nueva Viz-caya, lying 17 leagues distant between the s. ands. w. of the real of the mines of San Felipe de Chi-guagua.

Concepcion, another, with the surname ofAchaguas, being composed of Indians of this na-tion, in the kingdom of Granada ; of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits in Orinoco; situate on the shore of theriver Meta.

Concepcion, another settlement, the capital ofthe province and captainship of Itamaraca in Bra-zil ; situate on the top of a mountain by the sea-side. It has a magnificeut parish church, and isgarrisoned by two companies of troops, it con-tains 300 housekeepers, and has three large sugar.

\

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
520

520

COR

COR

CORIXAS, a river of the kingdom of Brazil,It rises in the sierra Bermeja, runs n. forming acurve, and eaters the Tocantines near that of LosMonges, according to tl>e account given by thePortuguese.

CORIXAS, some sierras of the same kingdom,which run s. s. e. and are a continuation of thesierra Bermeja ; they then run e. forming acurve, as far as the river Tocantines, and ex-tend their course on as far as the shore of theAraguaya.

CORK, a large bay in the e. coast of the islandof Newfoundland, between the cape Gull and theisland Tuliquet.

CORKAM, a fort of the English, in the pro-vince and colony of Connecticut, one of the fourwhich composQ New England ; situate near thecoast.

CORMA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Quispicanchi in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Papres.

CORMO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Canta in Peru ; annexed to the curacyof Atabillos Altos.

CORNE, an island of the N. sea, near thecoast of Florida, between the islands Vaisseauxand Massacre.

CORNEJO, an island of the S. sea, near thecoast of the province and corregimiento of Are-quipa, opposite the port of Arantae.

(CORNISH, a township in Cheshire county,New Hampshire, on the e. bank of Connecticutriver, between Claremont and Plainfield, about 15miles n. of Charlestown, and 16 s. of Dartmouthcollege. It was incorporated in 1763. In1775 it contained 309, and in 1790, 982 in-habitants.

(CORNWALL, a township in Addison county,Vermont, e. of Bridport, on lake Champlain, con-taining 826 inhabitants.)

(Cornwall, NEW, atownship in Orange coun-ty, New York, of whose inhabitants 350 aredectors.)

(Cornwall, a township in Litchfield county,Connecticut, about nine miles n. of Litchfield, 11s. of Salisbury, and about 40 w. by n. of Hartfordcity.)

(Cornwall, a small town in Upper Canada, onthe bank of Iroquois river, near lake St. Francis,between Kingston and Quebec, containing a smallchurch, and about 30 or 40 houses.)

(Cornwallis, a town in King’s county, in theprovince of New Brunswick, situated on the s. w.side of the basin of Minas ; 18 miles n. w. of Fal-mouth, and 55 n. w. of Annapolis.)

(Cornwallis, also a river in the »arae pro-vince, navigable for vessels of 100 tons five miles ;for vessels of 50 tons, 10 miles.

CORO, Santa Ana de, a city of the provinceand government of Venezuela, thus named in thetime of the Indians, after the district called Coriana.It was founded by Juan de Ampues in 1529.The Weltzers, under the orders of Nicholas Fe-derman, were the first Avho peopled it, giving it thename of Cordoba, to distinguish it from the othercity of the same name which had been founded byGonzalo de Ocampo in the province of Cumana,This name it afterwards lost, and took that ofCoro, which it preserves to this day, from a smallsettlement of Indians thus named. It is of a dryand hot temperature, but so healthy that physiciansare said here to be of no use. The territory, al-though sandy and lack of water, produces everykind of vegetable production ; so that it may besaid to abound in every thing that luxury or con^venience may require. Here are large breeds ofcow-cattle and goats, and a considerable numberof good mules. Its articles of merchandize, suchas cheese, tanned hides, and cacao, meet with aready sale in Cartagena, Caracas, and the island ofSt. Domingo. It has a reduced convent of the re-ligious order of St. Francis, and an hermitagededicated to St. Nicholas. The town is very rich.It was plundered, by the English in 1567. Itschurch was a cathedral, and the head of thebishopric, from the time that it was erected in1532 until 1636, when this title was transferred toSantiago of Caracas. It is two leagues distantfrom the sea, where there is a port insecure, butmuch frequented by trading vessels.

(From the time that the governor began to re-side at Caracas, in 1576, there remained no con-spicuous authority at Coro but the bishop andchapter, and they did all they could to follow th«governor; and indeed, not being able to leaveCoro by legal measures, they put tlieir wishesinto effect by flight, in 1636. At three leaguesfrom the city are lands where they cultivate withsuccess, if not with abundance, all the usual pro-duce of the country. The inhabitants, who aremuch addicted to indolence, glory that they aredescended from the first conquerors of the country ;and there is here, generally speaking, more rankthan wealth, and more idleness than industry. Thelittle trade that is carried on here consists in mules,goats, hides, sheep-skins, cheeses, &c. which comein a great measure from the interior, and thelarger part fromCarora; shipments of these ar-ticles are made for the islands. The most commonintercourse is with Cura 9 oa, from whence they2

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
522

522

COR

COROICO, a settlement of the province andeorregimiento of Cicasica in Peru ; situate on theshore of the river of its name, where there is aport for small vessels. This river rises in the cor-dillera of Ancuma, to the s. of the settlement ofPalca, and to the e. of the city of La Paz. It runsin a very rapid course to the e. and forming acurve turns n. and enters the w. side of the Beni,in lat. 16° 50' s.

COROMA, a settlement of the province andeorregimiento of Porco in Peru.

COROMANDIERES, some small islands ofthe N. sea, near the coast of Acadia inN. America,near the coast of Scatari. They are also calledDel Infierno, or Devil’s isles.

COROMOTO, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela ; situate on theshore of the river Guanarito, to the s. of the townof Guanaro.

CORON, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Huanoquite.

CORONA-REAL, a city of the province ofGuayana, and government of Curaana, foundedon the shores of the river Orinoco in 1759, by theRear-Admiral Don Joseph de Iturriaga, for whichpurpose he assembled together some wanderingpeople of the provinces of Caracas and Barcelona.At present, however, it is as it were desert andabandoned, since its inhabitants have returned totheir former savage state of life, having been con-stantly pursued and harassed by the CharibesIndians, against whom they could no longer main-tain their ground, after that the king’s garrisonhad been withdrawn, and since, owing to the dis-tance at which they were situate from the capital,it was in vain for them to look for any succourfrom that quarter.

Corona-Real, a large bay in the lake of Ma-racaibo, on thew. side.

Corona-Real, a rocky isle, or ridge of rocks,close to the n. coast of the island of Guadalupe,between cape St. Juan and the port or bay of Mole.

CORONADOS, a small island of the gulf ofCalifornia, or Mar Roxo de Cortes ; situate verynear the island of Carmen, on its n. e. side, whichlooks to the coast of New Spain.

(CORONDA, a town of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Ayres ; situate on a riverforming the island of Santa Fe, about five leaguess. w. of that town, in Lat. 31° 58' 47". Long. 61°2' a).)

CORONANGO, Santa Maria de, a headsettlement of the alcaldia maj/or of Cholula inNueva Espafia. It contains 94 families of In-

C O R

dians, and to its district belong nine other settle-ments. It lies one league to the n. of its capital.

CORONEL, Puerto del, a port on the coastof the province and corregimiento of Quillota, andkingdom of Chile, between the port of Longotoraaand the river Quilimari.

CORONEL, a river of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela. It rises to the ^ . of the city ofNirua, and afterwards unites itself with the Grape,to enter the Tinaco.

CORONEL, a point of the coast of the kingdomof Chile, in the province and corregimiento of Quil-lota, between the mouth of the river Biobio and theheights of Villagran.

CORONGO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Conchucos in Peru.

COROPA, a spacious country of the provinceand government of Guayana, which extends itselfbetween the river Coropatuba to the s. w. the Ma-ranon to the s. the Avari to the e. the mountainsof Oyacop of the Charibes Indians to the n. andthe mountains of Dorado or Manoa to the n.w.The whole of its territory is, as it were, unknown.The Portuguese possess the shores of the Maranonand the sea-coast as far as the bay of Vicente Pin-zon ; the Dutch of the colony of Surinam, by theriver Esequevo or Esquivo, called also Rupununi,have penetrated as far as the Maranon, by the riverParanapitinga. The mountains, which some haverepresented as being full of gold, silver, and pre-cious stones, sparkling in the rays of the sun, aremerely fables, which, at the beginning of the con-quests, deceived many who had gone in search ofthese rich treasures, and fell a sacrifice to thefatigues and labours which they experienced inthese dry and mountainous countries. The Por-tuguese have constructed here two forts, called Paruand Macapa. Mr. De la Martiniere, with hisusual want of accuracy, says that the Portuguesehave a settlement called Coropa, at the mouth ofthe river Coropatuba, where it enters the Maranon ;the Coropatuba joins the Maranon on the n. side,in the country of Coropa, and at the settlement ofthis name ; this settlement being nothing more thana small fort, and lying in the province of Topayos,on the s. shore of the Maranon, and being knownby the name ofCurupa, in the chart published in1744, and in that of the Father Juan Magnin, in1749.

COROPATUBA. See Curupatuba.

COROPUNA, a desert of the province ofCuzco in Peru, between the provinces of Parina-cocha and Canas or Aruni. It extends more than12 leagues s. to n. and is troublesome and dan-gerous to traverse.

Last edit over 2 years ago by kmr3934
541

541

CUBA.

cliurclies for divilie worship, was exported, in 1776,to the quantity of 12,550 arrobas, from a singleport of the Havana ; and all of it of as good aquality as is the wax of Venice. Although thecapital of this island is the city of its name, theHavana is, at the present day, looked upon as theprincipal. Here the governor and captain-generalof the kingdom resides ; and it has gained thispreference from the excellence of its port, and fromother qualifications, which will be found treated ofunder that article. We must here confine our-selves to what we have already said, a more diffuseaccount not corresponding to our plan, though,and if all were said of which the subjectwould admit, a very extensive history might bemade. The population consists of tiie followingcities, towns, and places.

Cilies. Las Piedras,

Havana, . Cubita,

Cuba, Vertientes,

Earacoa, San Pedro,

Holguin, Pamarejo,

Matanzas, Cupey,

Trinidad, Arroyo de Arenas,

Santa Maria del Rosario, Pilipinas,

San Juan de Taruco, .liguam,

Compostela. Caney,

Towns. Tiguabos,

Bayamo, El Prado,

Puerto del Principe, Moron,

S. Felipe and Santiago,

S. J uan de los Remedies, El Cano,

Santi Espiritus, Managua,

Santa Clara, Guines,

G uanavacoa, Rio Elanco,

Guamutas,

Settlements. Alvarez,

Consolacion, Planavana

Los Pinos,

Baxa,

Mantua,

Guacamaro,

Las Tuscas,

Y ara,

[Cuba, which, in 1774, contained only 371,628inhabitants, including 44,328 slaves, and from 5 to6000 free Negroes, possessed, in 1804, a popula-tion of 432,000 souls. The same island, in 1792,exported only 400,000 quintals of sugar ; but, in1804, its annual exportation of that article hadrisen to 1,000,000 of quintals. By a statement ofthe export of sugar from the Havana, from 1801 to1810 inclusive, it appears that the average for thelast 10 years has been 2,850,000 arrohas, or about644,000 cwt. a year. Notwithstanding this, Cuba

San Miguel,

Santiago de las Vegas.

Macuriges,

Guanajay,

El Ciego,Cacarajicaras,Pinal del Rio.

requires annual remittances from Mexico. Thenumber of Negroes introduced into Cuba, from1789 to 1803, exceeded 76,000 souls ; and duringthe last four years of that period, they amounted to34,500, or to more than 8600 annually. Accord-ingly, the population of the island, in 1804, con-sisted of 108,000 slaves, and 324,000 free persons,of whom 234,000 were whites, and 90,000 freeblacks and people of colour. The white popula-tion of Cuba forms therefore or .54 of thewhole number of its inhabitants. In Caracas, thewhites constitute .20 of the total population ; inNew Spain almost .19; in Peru .12; and in Ja-maica .10.

In speaking of the origin, manners, and customs,&c. of the natives of Cuba, we are to be understoodas giving also an account of those of Hispaniola,Jamaica, and Puerto Rico; for there is no doubtthat the inliabitants of all those islands were of onecommon origin ; speaking the same language, pos-sessing the same institutions, and practising similarsuperstitions. The fairest calculation as to theirnumbers, when first discovered, is 3,000,000. But,not to anticipate observations that will more pro-perly appear hereafter, we shall now proceed to theconsideration, -- 1. Of their persons and per sonalendowments.— 2. Their intellectual faculties anddispositions.— 3. Their political institutions.—4. Their religious riles. — 5. Their arts.

1. iYrsows. — Both men and women wore no-thing more than a slight covering of cotton clothround the waist; but in the women it extendedto the knees : the children of both sexes appearedentirely naked. In stature they were taller, butless robust than the Caribes. Their colour wasa clear brown, not deeper in general, accordingto Columbus, than that of a Spanish peasant whohas been much exposed to the wind and the sun.Like the Caribes, they altered the natural con-figuration of the head in infancy ; but after a dif-ferent mode (the sinciput, or fore-part of the headfrom the eye-brows to the coronal suture, was de-pressed, which gave an unnatural thickness andelevation to the occiput, or hinder part of the skull);and by this practice, says Herrera, the crown wasso srengthened that a Spanish broad-sword, insteadof cleaving the skull at a stroke, would frequentlybreak short upon it ; an illustration which gives anadmirable idea of the clemency of their conquer-ors ! Their liair was uniformly, black, withoutany tendency to curl ; their features were hardand unsightly ; the face broad, and the nose flat;but their eyes streamed with good nature, and al-together there was something pleasing and invitingin the countenances of most of them, which pro-]

Last edit over 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
547

CUBA.

547

16. Don Pedro Valdes, who was the first whowas invested with the captainship-general of theisland, which he executed until 1601.

17. Don Gaspar Ruiz de Pereda, until 1608.

18. Sancho de Alquiza, until 1616.

19. Don Francisco Venegas, until 1620.

20. The Doctor Damian Velazquez, until 1625.

21. Don Juan Bitriande Biamonte, until 1630,when he was removed to the presidency of Panama.

22. Don Francisco de Kiano y Gamboa, until1634.

23. Don Alvaro de Luna y Sarmiento, until1639.

24. The Colonel Don Diego Villalva, until1647.

25. The Colonel Don Francisco Gelder, until1650.

26. The Colonel Don Juan Montana, until1656.

27. The Colonel Don Juan de Salamanca, until1658.

28. The Colonel Don Rodrigo de Flores, until1663.

29. The Colonel Don Francisco Orejo Gaston,until 1664.

30. The Colonel Don Francisco Ledesma, until1670.

31. The Colonel Don Joseph de Cordoba, until1680.

32. Don Diego Antonio de Viana, until 1687.

S3. The Colonel Don Severino Manzaneda,

until 1689.

34. Don Diego de Cordoba, until 1695.

35. The Colonel Don Pedro Benitez> until 1704.

36. The Brigadier Don Pedro Alvarez, until1706.

37. Don Laureano de Torres, until 1708.

38. Don Luis Chacon, until 1712.

39. I’he Brigadier Don Vicente Raja, until1716.

40. The Brigadier Don Gregorio Guazo, until1718.

41. The Brigadier Don Dionisio Martinez de laVega, formerly colonel of the regiment of Galicia,until 1724.

42. Don Diego Penalosa, until 1725.

43. The Brigadier Don Juan Francisco Guemesy Horcasitas, formerly colonel of the regiment ofGranada, in 1734, until 1746, when he was pro-moted to the vice-royalty of Mexico.

44. The Brigadier Don Francisco AntonioTineo, captain of the regiment of Spanish guards,an ofBcer of singular accomplishments ; he enteredin the aforesaid year, and died a few days after hisarrival.

45. The Brigadier Don J uan Francisco Cagigal,of t-he order of Santiago ; he was governor of thegarrison of Cuba at the time that he was nominated,through the death of the predecessor, in 1747 ; hewas intermediate viceroy of Mexico, in 1756.

46. The Brigadier Don Juan de Prado, in-spector of the infantry, nominated in 1760 ; in histime the English besieged and took the Havana ;he was deposed from his situation, and made amember of the council of war, in 1763.

47. Don Ambrosio Funes de Villalpando, Countof Rida, a grandee of Spain, of the order of San-tiago, lieutenant-general of the royal armies ; no-minated to take possession of the place which hadbeen surrendered by the English in the treaty ofpeace, and to fortify the post of the Cabana, whichhe effected, and returned to Spain in 1765.

48. The Brigadier Don Diego Manrique ; hedied the same year, a short time after his arrival.

49. Don Pasqual de Cisneros, lieutenant-gene-ral of the royal armies, twice intermediate go-vernor.

50. Don Antonio Maria Bucareli Bailio, of theorder of San Juan, lieutenant-general of the royalarmies, in 1766 ; promoted to the vice-royalty ofMexico in 1771.

51. The Marquis de la Torre, knight of theorder of Santiago, lieutenant-general ; he cameover here in the same year, being at the time go-vernor of Caracas, and ruled until 1777, when hereturned to Spain.

52. The Lieutenant-general Don Diego JosephNavarro, who had been captain of grenadiers ofthe regiment of Spanish guards, and found* him-self exercising the government of the garrison ofTarragena in Cataluua, when he was nominatedto this, and in the same year that he left the formerplace ; this he kept until 1783, when he returnedto Spain.

53. Don Joseph de Espeleta, brigadier and in-spector of the troops of America ; nominated asintermediate successor in the aforesaid year.

Cuba, with the dedicatory title <rf Santiago,a capital city of the' former island (Cuba), founded byDiego Velazquez in 1511, with a good port de-fended by a castle, called the Morro, as is that ofthe Havana. It is the head of a bishopric suffra-gan to the archbishopric of St. Domingo, erected^in 1518. It has a convent of the religious orderof St. Domingo, and another of St. Francis ;it was at first populous and rich, and even at onetime contained 2000 house-keepers, but since thata commerce was established in the Havana,through the excellence of its port, and that thecaptain-general and the bishop have fixed their.

4 A 2

Last edit over 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
557

C U M A N A.

The elevation of the city above the level of thesea is 53 feet. In July, Duluc’s hydrometer ge-nerally indicates from 50° to 53° of humidity.

The maximum, 66°.

The minimum, 46°.

By Seaussure’s cyanometer, there are 24|° ofblue in the sky, whilst at Caracas there are only18, and in Europe generally 14.

The seat of the government of the two pro-vinces is at the city of Cnmana. The governor,nominated for five years, is also vice-patron, andin this capacity nominates to all vacant cures, andfills all the church offices, the appointment towhich forms a part of the prerogative of the crown.He has the administration of the finances of hisdepartment, as deputy of the intendants ; and inthis capacity he superintends the levying of thetaxes, decides disputes, directs the ordinary ex-pences, and receives the accounts of the offices ofadministration ; but the political relations Avith fo-reign colonies, and all military matters, depend onthe captain-general of Caracas. The governor isalso under the orders of the intendant in his fis-cal regulations and commercial measures. To the«. of the city of Cumana lies the gulf of Cariaco.The river Mansanares, which separates on thes. the city from the suburbs inhabited by theGuayqueris Indians, surrounds the s. and the ay.sides of the town. This is the only water that theinhabitants of Cumana drink. It has the inconve-nience of often being not limpid, though rarelyunwholesome. The city enjoys a healthy, butscarcely ever a fresh air ; the heat is continual.The sea-breeze is nevertheless very regular, andmoderates, during a great part of the day, theblaze of the sun. The only defence that , Cu-mana has is u fort, situated on an elevation rang-ing along the back of the city. The city itselfhas but a garrison of 231 troops of the line, and acompany of artillery. The militia increases thepublic force in time of Avar. The total number ofinhabitants is 24,000. The city is now four timesas large as it Avas fifty years ago. It increases Avithso much rapidity that the ancient boundaries notaffording convenient space for ncAv houses, peoplehave been obliged, within this short time, to buildupon the left bank of the Mansanares, to the w. ofthe village of the Guayqueris. These ncAv housesare already so numerous as to form a village com-municating Ay'ith the city by a bridge : and the in-habitants, for their convenience, had built, in1803, a church. The first street that was formedwas named Emparau, in honour of the governorof this name. All the houses of Cumanti are loAV,and rather solidly built. The frequent earthquakes

557

experienced here since these ten years, haveobliged them to sacrifice beauty and elegance topersonal safety. The violent shocks felt in De-cember 1797, thrcAV down almost all the stonebuild-ings, and rendered uninhabitable those that wereleft standing. The earthquake experienced herein November 1799, caused a variation of the needleof 45 minutes. According to M. de Humboldt,Cumana is exposed to these earthquakes in con-sequence of its proximity to the lake of Cariaco,Avhich appears to have some communication Aviththe volcanoes of Cumucuta, which vomit hydrogengas, sulphur, and hot bituminous water. It isobserved that the earthquakes happen only afterthe rains, and then the caverns of the Cuchivanovomit during night inflammable gas, which isseen to blaze 200 yards high. It is probable thatthe decomposition of the water in the slate marl,Avhich is full of pyrites, and contains hydrogenousparticles, is one of the principal causes of this phe-nomenon. The population of Cumana, amount-ing to 80,000 souls, is a great part composed ofwhite Creoles, amongst Avhom much natural capa-city is discovered. They are very much attachedto their native soil, and generally give themselvesup entirely to the occupation IhatEirth or fortunehas assigned them. Some are employed in agri-culture, commerce, and navigation, and others infishing. The abundance of fish found about Cu-mana enables them to salt an astonishing quantity,Avhich they send to Caracas and the other cities ofthese provinces, as well as to theWindAvard islands,from whence they import in return iron tools forhusbandry, provisions, and contraband merchan-dise. The cargoes are ahvays of little value.They are satisfied with small profits, Avhich theyaugment by the frequency of the voyages. Capi-tals of 4 or 5000 dollars, which in other placesAvould appear insufficient for any' commercialenterprise, support five or six families at Cu-mana. Activity and perseverance form almostthe only source of the comfort that reigns here.The Creoles of CumaiiciAvho engage in literary pur-suits are distinguished by their penetration, judg-ment, and application. They have not e.xactlythe vivacity' observable in the Creoles of Mara-caibo, but they compensate for this by superiorgood seiise and solidity of parts. The retail tradesof Cumana are carried on by Catalonians andpeople from the Canaries. Among the produc-tions in which this cit^ trades, the racno and cacuo-oil deserve to be mentioned. Medicinal plantsmight also form an important article of commerce,,were not the inhabitants ignorant of their qualities,and the manner of preparing them. There is-

Last edit over 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
All 26 records