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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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Aguarico, another settlement of the same pro-yince, and belonging to the same missions, andbearing the dedicatory title of San Estanislao.

Aguarico, a river of the same province andf overnment, being one of those which enter theNapo by the n. side. At its mouth, or entrance,begins the large province of the Encabellados ;and here it was that the Portuguese attempted toestablish themselves in 1732, invading it with acertain number of Piraguas, (small vessels), whichcame from Para. They were, however, throughthe well-timed precautions of the president of Qui-to, forced to retire without attaining their object.This river contains much gold in its sands, andits body is much increased by other streams, suchas those of the Azuela, Cofanes, Sardinas, and Du-ino. It descends from the grand Cordillera of theAndes, near the town of San Miguel de Ibarra,washes the territory of the Sucurabios Indians, andenters the Napo in lat. 1° 23' s.

AGUARINGUA, an ancient and large settle-ment of the nation of the Taironas Indians, in theprovince and government of Santa Marta.

AGUARO, a river of the province and go-vernment of Honduras. It enters the S. sea to thee. of Aguan.

Aguaro, Cano de, a river of the province andgovernment of Venezuela. It enters the Guarico,and is famous for abounding in fish, particularlya kind called pabon, which has a circular spot ofsky-blue and gold upon its tail, resembling an eye,and which is much esteemed for its excellent fla-vour.

AGUAS, a small river of the province andgovernment of Paraguay. It runs n. n. w. andenters the Uruguay close to the J uipa.

Aguas-blancas. See Yaguapiui.

Aguas-bellas, a small river of the pro-vince and government of Paraguay. It runs c.and enters the Parana.

Aguas-calientes, an alcaldia mayor of thethe kingdom of Nueva Galicia, and bishopric ofGuadalaxara, in Nueva España. Its jurisdictionincludes four head settlements of the district, andtwo large estates called the Pavellon, as also theestate Del Fuerte, in which quantities of grain andseed are cultivated. The principal settlement isthe town of the same name, of a moderate tempera-ture, its inhabitants consisting of 500 Spanish fa-milies, as also of some of Mustees and Mulattoes;and although some Mexican Indians arc to befound here, they merely come to traffic with theproductions of the other jurisdictions. It con-tains three convents ; one of the bare- footed Fran-ciscans, a sumptuous and well-built fabric ; one ofthe Mercenarios; and a third of San Juan de Dios,with a well-endowed hospital ; not to mentionseveral other chapels and altars in the vicinity.It is 140 leagues n. n. w. of Mexico, and 35 ofGuadaiaxara. Long. 101° 51' 30" w. Lat. 22° 2' n.

Aguas-calientes, another settlement in theprovince and government of Venezuela, of thekingdom of Tierra Firme, situate upon the coast.

AGUASTELAS, San Miguel de, a settle-ment of the head settlement of the district of SanAndres of Acatlan, and alcaldia mayor of Xalapa,in Nueva España. It is but lately established,and is one league s. of its head settlement.

AGUATEPEC, Santa Maria de, a settle-ment of the head settlement of the district andalcaldia mayor of Tecali in Nueva España. Itcontains 48 families of Indians.

AGUATLAN, the head settlement of the dis-trict of the alcadia mayor of Izucar in Nueva Es-pana. It was formerly a separate jurisdiction;but on account of its smallness, and the ill-fa-voured and craggy state of its soil, it was incorpo-rated with another close to it. It contains 46 Indianfamilies, and is 12 leagues e. of its capital.

AGUATUBI, a settlement of the province ofMoqui in Nuevo Mexico.

AGUATULCO, a river of the province andalcaldia mayor of Tegoantepec in Nueva España.It runs e. and enters the S. sea near the Capolita.

AGUEDA, Mono de Santa, a mountain ofthe w. coast of the straits of Magellan, in the SierraNevada (snowy sierra).

Agueda, a point or cape near the above moun-tain.

[AGUGA Cape, on the coast of Peru, S. Ame-rica, lies s. of Puira, in the 61° of s. lat. and in the81° of w, long.]

AGUIJO, San Miguel de, a settlement ofthe new kingdom of Leon.

AGUILA, Villa Gutierrez de la, a townof the alcaldia mayor of Xerez in Nueva España.It was formerly very considerable, and had a nu-merous population of Spaniards, when it wasmade a fortress against the Tepehuanes and Tarau-maras Indians. It is an alcaldia mayor ^ but itsjurisdiction is consolidated with another, on ac-count of its being a place of little consideration,and its population being very scanty, and livingin some small wards and estates in its district. Itlies at the c. entrance of the province of Nayarith,and is the boundary of the kingdom of NuevaGalicia, being nine leagues e. of Xerez.

Aguila, a very lofty mountain of the province

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anti government of Darien, near the n. coast, andthus "called from an eagle Avitli two heads, whichwas caught here in 1608, and which Avas sent tothe queen, Doha Maria-Ana of Austria, motherof Philip III. At its skirt is a bay, or swampyground, which is round, and has a very narroAVinlet. Forty-five leagues from Cartagena.

Aguila (point), a point or cape of the larger island ofthe Malvinas or Falkland isles ; thus named fromhaving been discovered by the French frigate, theAguila, or Eagle. It is one of those whith formtlie great bay or port.

AGUILUSCO, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district of Arantzan, and alcaldiamayor of Valladolid, in the province and bishop-ric of Mechoacan. It contains 32 families of In-dians, who employ themselves in sowing seed,cutting Avood, manufacturing vessels of fineearth en-Avare, and saddle-trees for riding.

AGUIRRE, a river of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela. It rises by the side of thecity of Niura, runs s. passes through the town ofSan Carlos, and enters the Sarara.

Aguirre (pastures), some pastures for young horses inthe province and corregimiento of Coquimbo, ofthe kingdom of Chile, between the rivers Ramosand Mamas,

AGUJA, Point of the, on the coast of TierraFirme, and of the province and government ofSanta Marta, between this city and Cape Chichi-bacoa. It is the part of land which projects far-thest into the sea.

Aguja, Point of the, another point on thecoast of the S. sea,, and of the province and corre-gimiento of Piura in Peru.

Aguja, Point of the. See article Eguille.

AGUR, Francisco, a settlement of the pro-vince and captainship of Espiritu Santo in Bra-zil, situate near the coast and the bay of EspirituSanto,

AGUSTIN, San, a capital city of the pro-vince and government of E. Florida, situate on thee. coast, in a peninsula, or narrow strip of land.It has a good port, which was discovered by Ad-miral Pedro Menendes de Aviles, on St. Augus-.tin’s day in the year 1565, which was his reasonfor giving the place this title, which has, however,been tAvice changed. He also built here a goodcastle for its defence. The city has a very goodparish church, and a convent of the Franciscanorder; and, as far as relates to its spiritual con-cerns, it is subject to the bishop of Cuba, who hasat various times proposed the erection of anabbey, but has not obtained his wish, although ithad been approved by the council of the Indies.

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It has two hospitals, one for the garrison troops,and another for the community ; it has also anhermitage, Avith the dedicatory title of Santa Bar-bara. It was burnt by Francis Drake in 1586;by Captain Davis, Avith the Bucaniers, in 1665 ;but it was immediately afterwards rebuilt. In1702 it Avas besieged by the English, under thecommand of Colonel Moore, who, failing in hisattempts to take the castle, which Avas defended bythe governor, Don Joseph de Zuniga, exhibitedhis revenge by burning and destroying the town.In 1744 the English returned to the siege, underthe command of General Oglethorp, who wasequally unsuccessful, in as much as it w^as mostvaliantly defended by the governor, Don Manuelde Montiano, who defied the bombardment of theenemy. This fort has a curtain of 60 toises long ;the parapet is nine feet ; and the terrace, or horizon-tal surface of the rampart, is 20 feet high, withgood bomb-proof casemates, and mounted Avith 50pieces of cannon, having also, on the exterior, anexcellent covered way. The city, although it isencompassed by a wall, is not strong, and its de-fence consists in 10 projecting angles. It was ced-ed, Avith the whole of the province, to the English,by the King ofSpain, in the peace of Versailles, in1762 ; and it remained in their possession till 1783,when it was restored by the treaty of Paris. Thebreakers at the entrance of the harbour haveformed two channels, whose bars have eight feet ofwater each. Long. 81° 40'. Lat. 29° 58'.

Agustin, San, a settlement and real of mines,of the province of Tarauraara, in the kingdotli ofNueva Vizcaya, which was formerly a populationof some consequence, and wealthy withal, fromthe richness of its mines, Avhich -have lately falleainto decay, and thereby entailed poverty upon theinhabitants. It is 26 leagues s. of the town of S,Felipe de Chiguagua.

Agustin, San, another small settlement orw ard of the head settlement of the district of Zum-pahuacan, and alcaldia mayor of Marinalco, inNueva España.

Agustin, San, another settlement of the headsettlement of the district of Nopaluca, and alcaldiamayor of Tepcaca, in Nueva España. It contains20 families of Indians, and is distant a little morethan a league from its head settlement.

Agustin, San, another, in the head settlementof the district of Pinoteca, and alcaldia mayor ofXicayan. It contains 70 families of Indians, whotrade in grain, seeds, and tobacco. Four leaguen. of its head settlement.

Agustin, San, another settlement of the dis-trict of Cuilapa, and the alcaldia mayor of Quatro

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CARACAS.

and it is, indeed, pretty generally believed thatthis cross was left here by the above apostle.

CARAC, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Canta in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of Lampian.

CARACARA, an ancient and small province ofCharcas in Peru, to the s. of Cuzco, and the lastof those conquered by the sixth Emperor or Inca.

CARACARES, a large lake of the province andgovernment of Paraguay. It is 26 leagues inlength, and has many fertile islands, inhabited bybarbarian Indians, and empties itself through acanal into the river Paraná on the e. side. It isin 30° 41' s. lat.

CARACAS, Santiago de Leon de, a capitalcity of the province of Venezuela, founded byDiego Losada in the year 1566, in a beautiful andextensive valley of more than four leagues inlength. It is of a very mild temperature, beingneither troubled with excessive heat or cold. It iswatered by four rivers, which fertilize its territory,and make it abound as well in delicate waters asin exquisite fruits and flowers: the streets are wideand straight, the buildings elegant and convenient,and it is ornamented by four marts. It is the seatof the bishopric, erected in the city of Coro in1532, and translated to this spot in 1636. It hasa beautiful cathedral church, besides some parishchapels, which are Nuestra Señora de Alta Gra-cia ; San Pablo, which is also an hospital, andNuestra Señora de la Candelaria, out of the wallsof the city. There is also an hospital De la Ca-ridad (of charity) for women ; a convent of the re-ligious order of Santo Domingo, in which is heldin high respect the wonderful image of the Virginof the Rosary, presented by Philip II. There isanother convent of San Francisco, in which ispreserved a piece of the wood of the cross left bythe Governor Don Martin de Robles Villafañate ;another of our Lady of La Merced ; a monasteryof religious women of La Concepcion ; another ofthe Carmelites Descalzas (barefooted) ; a college andseminary for the education of youth, with five ca-thedrals ; four hermitages dedicated to San Mau-ricio, Santa Rosalia de Palermo, La Divina Pas-tora, and La Santisima Trinidad. Charles II.granted to this city the privilege of allowing itsalcaldes to govern the province in the vacancy ofa governor ; and Philip V. permitted a commer-cial company of Biscayans to be established, whoreaped considerable affluence, especially in the ar-tiles of cacoa and sugar, the chief source of its re-venues ; but this company was abolished in thereign of Charles III. in the year 1778 ; which cir-cumstance was considered by the city and the pro-

vince as a most considerable privilege. The num-ber of inhabitants amounts to about 1000, besidesan infinity of people of colour by whom it is in-habited. The natives have shown themselves tobe of an ingenuous disposition, clever, affable, andcourteous. Its arms are a grey lion rampant in afield of silver, having between his arms a scollop-shell of gold, with the cross of Santiago ; and thecrest is a crown with five points of gold. It wassacked in 1566 by Sir Francis Drake, who camethither in an English cruiser ; also by the Frenchin 1679. It is three leagues distant from the portof Guaira. Long. 67° w. Lat. 10° 30' n.

The bishops who have presided in this city.

1. Don Rodrigo Bastidas, dean of the holychurch of St. Domingo, the chief of the visitationof the bishopric of Puertorico; elected on the 27thOctober 1535, and who died in 1542.

2. Don Miguel Gerónimo Ballesteros, dean ofthe church of Cartagena of the Indies ; electedin 1543.

3. Don Fr. Pedro de Agreda, of the order ofSt. Domingo, collegiate of San Gregorio of Val-ladolid ; presented to this bishopric in 1558, andtaking possession of it 1560. In his time the citywas sacked by the English : he died in 1580.

4. Don Fr. Juan de Manzanillo, of the order ofSt. Domingo ; presented in the year 1582 ; he re-built the church, and died in 1593.

5. Don Fr. Diego Salinas, of the order of St.Domingo, native of Medina del Campo, colle-giate of San Gregorio de Valladolid, prior in dif-ferent convents, procurator-general in the court,and elected bishop in the year 1600 : in the fol-lowing year he died.

6. Don Fr. Pedro Martin Palomino, of the orderof St. Domingo ; elected in 1601 : he died the sameyear.

7. Don Fr. Pedro de Oña, native of Burgos, ofthe order of our Lady of La Merced ; he was even-ing lecturer in the university of Santiago, electedbishop in 1601, canonized in the convent of Val-ladolid, and before he came to his church, waspromoted to the bishopric of Gaeta, in the king-dom of Naples, in 1604.

8. Don Fr. Antonio de Alcega, of the order ofSt. Francis ; he Avas formerly married, and heldthe office of accountant to the royal estates in Yu-catán, when he became a widower, and giving allhe possessed as alms to the poor, he took to a re-ligious life, and Philip III. being charmed withhis virtues presented him to this bishopric in1664 ; he celebrated the synod in Caracas theyear following, and died in 1609.

9. Don Fr. Juan de Bohorques, native of Mex-

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[crowded with poor of both sexes, who Iiave noother subsistence than what tliey derive from alms,and who prefer these means of living to that oflabour. It is feared that the indiscriminate cha-rity exhibited liere is productive of the worst ef-fects ; that it affords to vice the means of remain-ing vicious. The police are indeed acquaintedwith these abuses, but cannot repress them withoutthe imputation of impiety. To form a correct ideaof the number of mendicants that wander in the.streets, it is but necessary to know that the arch-bishop distributes generally alms every Saturday ;that each mendicant receives a half-escalin, orl-16th of a dollar ; and that at each of these piousdistributions there is given a sum of from 75 or 76dollars, wliich should make the number of beggarsat least 1200 ; and in this list are not included thosewho are ashamed to beg publicly, and to whomthe worthy prelate D. Francis d’lbarra, a Creoleof Caracas, distributes certain revenues in secret.The cabildo^ composed of 22 members, and se-conded by the alcaldes de barrio, who are magis-trates distributed throughout the wards of the city,would be more than sufficient to manage the af-fairs of the police ; but the presence of the higherauthorities, who wish to share the prerogatives ofcommand, has made a division of all matters ofpolice between the governor, the lieutenant-go-yernor, and a member of the audience, who, underthe title of judge of the province, exercises its func-tions in conjunction with the authorities just men-tioned.

25. Communications with the interior. — Caracas,the centre of all the political, judicial, fiscal, mili-tary, commercial, and religious concerns of its de-pendencies, is also naturally that of all the com-munication in the interior. The roads are almostevery where just traced, and nothing more. Themud and overflowing of the rivers, over whichthere are neither bridges nor passage-boats, renderthem impracticable in the rainy season ; and in nopart of the year are they convenient. They countthe distance by a day’s journey, and not by leagues :but a fair computation of a day’s journey is 10leagues, of 2000 geometrical paces each. Theorders transmitted by the governor to the severaltowns of the interior arrive there by expre.ss, andcommunications of whatever nature are returnedby the same means. There are no regular courierssetting out from the capital, excepting for Mara-caibo, Puerto Cabello, Sante Fe, Cumana, andGuayana. All the towns situate on the roads tothese four chief places enjoy the advantages of apost. The courier for Maracaibo sets out fromCaracas every Thursday evening at six o’clock ;

it carries the letters of Victoria, Tulmeco, Mara-cay, Valencia, St. Philip, Puerto Cabello, andCoro ; it is 10 days going from Caracas to Mara-caibo, and arrives from Maracaibo at Caracas ol’ vevery 15th day, but from Puerto Cabello everyTuesday. On the 6th and 22d of each month,a courier sets out from Caracas for Santa Fe ; itcarries the letters of San Carlos, Guanare, Araux,Tocayo, Barquisimeto, Barinas, Merida, Carta-gena, Santa Marta, and Peru ; and arrives, or oughtto arrive, the 4th and 20th of each month ; it isgenerally 42 days in going from Caracas to SantaFe. The courier of Cumana and Guayana arrivesat Caracas once a month ; it proceeds, or stops,according to the state of the roads and rivers.Five days after its arrival at Caracas it sets outagain. The letters for Guayana go directly fromBarcelona by a courier ; and those for Cumana andMargareta by another. This arrives at its placeof destination in 12 days, and that of Guayanain SO days.

26. With Spain . — The official letters from Spainarrive at Caracas every month. A king’s packetsails on one of the first three days of each monthfrom Coruna, touches at the Canaries to leavetheir letters, then sails for the Havanah, andleaves in its way to Puertorico the letters addresser!as well for that island as for tim government ofCaracas. The latter are immediately forwardedby one of the little vessels kept for this service.During war the mail from Spain, instead of touch-ing at Puertorico, leaves the letters for Caracasand its dependencies at Cumana, and those for thekingdom of Santa Fe at Cartagena, and finally al-ways proceeds to the Havanah, from whence itsdeparture for Spain is regular and periodical.The answers from Caracas, even those that are of-ficial, are sent to Spain by the merchant vesselswhich sail from Guaira to Cadiz.

27. Geographical and statistical notices of thecapt amship'general of Caracas, and present his-torij. — Depons’ Voyage to the e. part of TierraFirme, or the Spanish main, in S. America, com-prises an ample description of this region ; and isthe principal authority for the anterior and subse-quent notices. This territory is situate betweenthe 12th degree of«. latitude and the equinoctial.It comprehends

Venezuela, containing

500,000 inhabitants

Maracaibo,

100,000

Cumami,

80,000

Spanish Guayana,

54,000

Isle of Margareta,

14,000

728,000 ]

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C A R I B E.

It was formerly a very rich tract of land, si-tuate on the shore of the river Cazanare, a streamwhich crosses and stops the pass into the coun-try and for this reason there was a consider-able establishment formed here by persons whobelonged to tlie curacy of Santa Rosa de Chire.Its temperature is hot, but it is very fertile, andabounds in productions, which serve to provide forthe other settlements belonging to the same mis-sions : at present it is under the care of the reli-gious order of St. Domingo.

CARIBANA, a large country, at the presentday called Guayana Maritania, or Nueva Anda-iucia Austral. It extends from the mouth of theriver Orinoco to the mouth of the Marahon ; com-prehends the Dutch colonies of Esquibo, Surinam,and Berbice, and the French colony of Cayenne.It takes its name from the Caribes Indians, whoinhabit it, and who are very fierce and cruel,although upon amicable terms with the Dutch.Nearly the whole of this province is uncultivated,full of woods and mountains, but watered bymany rivers, all of which run for the most partfrom s. to e. and empty themselves into the sea ;although some flow from s. ton. and enter the Ori-noco. The climate, though warm and humid, ishealthy ; the productions, and the source of itscommerce, are sugar-cane, some cacao, wild wax,and incense. The coast, inhabited by Europeans,forms the greater part of this tract of country, ofwhich an account will be found under the respec-tive articles.

Caribana, a port on the coast of Tierra Firme,in the province and government of Darien, at theentrance of the gulf of Uraba.

CARIBE, a small port of the coast of TierraFirme, in the province and government of Vene-zuela, to the w. of cape Codera.

Caribe, Caribbee, or Charaibes, someislands close upon the shore of the province andgovernment of Cumana, near the cape of TresPuntas. [The Caribbee islands in the West In-dies extend in a semicircular form from the islandof Porto Rico, the easternmost of the Antilles, tothe coast of S. America. The sea, thus inclosedby the main land and the isles, is called the Ca-ribbean sea; and its great channel leads n. zo. tothe head of the gulf of Mexico through the sea ofHonduras. The chief of these islands are, SantaCruz, Sombuca, Anguilla, St. Martin, St. Bar-tholomew, Barbuda, Saba, St. Eustatia, St. Chris-topher, Nevis, Antigua, Montserrat, Guadalupe,Dcseada, Mariagalante, Dominica, Martinica,St. Vincent, Barbadoes, and Grenada. These areagain classed into Windward and Leeward isles bv

seamen, with regard to the usual courses of shipsfrom Old Spain or the Canaries to Cartagenaor New Spain and Porto Bello. The geographi-caltablesand maps class them into Great and LittleAntilles ; and authors vary much concerning thislast distinction. See Antilles. The Charaibesor Caribbecs were the ancient natives of the Wind-ward islands ; hence many geographers confine theterm to these isles only. Most of these were an-ciently possessed by a nation of cannibals, the ter-ror of the mild anti inotfensive inhabitants of His-paniola, who frequently expressed to Columbustheir dread of these fierce invaders. Thus, whenthese islands were afterwards discovered by thatgreat man, they were denominated Charibbeanisles. The insular Charaibs are supposed to beimmediately descended from the Galibis Indians,or Charaibes of S. America. An ingenious andlearned attempt to trace back the origin of the Ca-ribes to some emigrants from the ancient hemis-phere may be found in Bryan Edwards ; and itis to the valuable work of this author that we areindebted for the following illustrations of the man-ners and customs of this people. — The Caribesare avowedly of a fierce spirit and warlike dispo-sition. Historians have not failed to notice theseamong the most distinguishable of their qualities.Dr. Robertson, in Note X Cl II. to the first vol. ofhisHistory of America, quotes from a MS. Historyof Ferdinand and Isabella, Avrittenby Andrew Ber-naldes, the cotemporary and friend of Columbus,the folloAving instance of the bravery of the Caribes :A canoe with four men, two Avomen, and a boy, un-expectedly fell in with Columbus’s fleet. A Spanish,bark with 25 men was sent to take them; and the fleet,in the mean time, cut off their communication withthe shore. Instead of giving way to despair, theCaribes seized their arms with imdauntcd resolu-tion, and began the attack, wounding several ofthe Spaniards, although they had targets as wellas other defensive armour ; and even after thecanoe was overset, it was with no little difficultyand danger that some of them Avere secured, asthey continued to defend themselves, and to usetheir bows with great dexterity while swimmingin the sea. Herrera has recorded the same anec-dote. Restless, enterprising, and ardent, it wouldseem they considered war as the chief end of theircreation, and the rest of the human race as theirnatural prey ; for they devoured, without re-morse, the bodies of such of their enemies (themen at least) as fell into their hands. Indeed,there is no circumstance in the history of mankindbetter attested than the universal prevalence ofthese practices among them. Columbus was not]

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CARTAGENA.

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The antidote, however, is oil taken in abundanceinternally, and applied outwardly. Neither wheatnor barley are known here, but the place aboundsin maize and rice, of which they make cakes, andwhich are the common bread of the natives, andmore particularly so that called cazave^ being asort of cake made of the root yiica^ name, or mo-niato. There are also a great number of cottontrees. The arms of this city are a green crossupon a gold ground, with a lion rampant oneach side. It was sacked in 1593 by RobertBaal, a pirate ; in 1583, by Sir Francis Drake, 23years from the time of its being fortified, and notfrom its foundation, as according to Mr. La Ma-tiniere ; again iti 1695, by Mr. Ducase, assisted bythe adventurers or fiibustiers, who completely pil-laged it : but a great sensation having been causedamongst the inhabitants at the loss of a superb se-pulchre made of silver, in which it rvas usual ona good Friday to deposit the eucharist, they hadthe good fortune to obtain its restitution throughthe interest and favour of Louis XI F. TheEnglish, under the command of Admiral Vernonand Sir Charles Ogle, besieged this city in 1740,when, although its castles were destroyed, andit was completely besieged, it would not surren-der, being gloriously defended by the viceroyDon Sebastian de Esiava, and Don Bias de Lezo,who caused the English to abandon the enterprisewith precipitancy and with great loss. [For thisconduct on the part of the English, several reasonswere assigned besides the strength of the place ;namely, the mortality among the troops, wantof skill in the commanders, and certain ditferencesbetween the admiral and the general. The forti-fications which they demolished have since beenrepaired.] It is the only part of all America wherethere is etfective coin of a fourth part of a real insilver. Its inhabitants amount to 9160 souls incommunion. It has been the native place of manycelebrated persons, such are,

Don Augustin Samiento de Sotomayor, of the or-der of Santiago, viscount of Portillo.

Don Andres de la Vega, professor at Salamanca,a famous lawyer.

Fray Carlos de Melgarejo, a religious Domini-can, an excellent preacher, and a man of unble-mished life.

Don Caspar de Cuba and Arce, head collegiateof San Marcos de Lima, oidor of Chile.

Don Gonzalo de Herrera, Marquis of Villalta,governor of Antioquia.

Don Gregorio Castellar y Mantilla, governor ofCumana, and general of the armada of the guardof the coasts of Cartagena.

Don Joseph de Paredes, captain of infantry,knight of the order of Santiago.

Fray Joseph Pacheco, of the order of St. Au-gustin, master, visitor, and vicar-general i:i his pro-vince of the Nuevo Reyno.

The Father Joseph de Urbina, of the extin-guished company, rector of the college of SantaFe.

Don.Iuan Fernandez Rosillo, dean of the churchof his country, bishop of V^erapez and of Mecho-acan .

Fray Juan Pereyra, a religious Dominican.

Don Lope Duke Estrada, kiiight of the order ofSantiago.

It is in long. 75° 24' and lat. 10° 25' n. [Foraccount of the present revolutions, see Vene-zuela.]

Bishops who have presided in Cartagena.

1. Don Fray Tomas del Toro, a monk of theorder of St. Domingo, elected the . first bishop in1532; but being at Talavera, his country, at thetime, he unfortunately died before he was conse-crated.

2. Don Fray Geronimo de Loaisa, a Dominicanmonk, renowned for his virtue and talent, and forhis experience in Indian affairs ; he was elected inthe room of the former, was consecrated at Valla-dolid, and there he erected the church into a ca-thedral in 1538, the same year in which he enteredCartagena ; from hence he was promoted to thearchbishopric of Lima in 1542.

3. Don Fray Francisco de Santa Maria y Bena-vides, of the order of St. Gerome, of the illustriousfamily of the Marquises of Fromesta ; serving atthat time the Emperor in Flanders, he took to areligious life, and was elected bishop of Cartagenain 1543. The city, in his time, was plundered bytwo pirates, lieaded by the Spanisli pilot AlonsoVexines, who cominitted thisactout of revenge fora flogging he had received ; they also ill-treatedthe venerable prelate, who had the additional griev-ance, in the year L551, of witnessing the city inflames. In 1554 he was promoted to the churchof Modonedo in Galicia, and was succeeded inCartagena by,

4. Don Fray Gregorio de Beteta, a Dominicanmonk, brought up in the convent of Salamanca, andone of the twenty who went to the Nuevo Reynode Gratiada, from whence he passed over to Mex-ico to convert the Indians, and afterwards withthe same object to the provinces of Santa Marta,Uraba, ami Cartagena ; and being teacher amicurate in one of his settlements, he received theorder of presentation to this bishopric in 1555 ;although he endeavoured to decline the dignify,

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he was at length persuaded to accept it by the ac-clamations and remonstrances of all parties, andespecially of the vicar-general of his order; hebegan to preside without being consecrated ; butbeing yet full of scruples, he renounced the office,and without permission returned to Spain ; h^ thenwent to Koine, but being desired by his holiness toreturn to his diocese, he was said to have been somuch affected as not to have been able to prevailupon himself to enter the city : he returned, there-fore, immediately to the coast, and embarked forFlorida, with a view of converting some of theinfidels ; and with this object he again set off forSpain, in order to obtain his renunciation ; whenbeing at length tired with his wanderings, andAvorn out Avith age, he died in his convent of To-ledo in 1562.

5. Don Juan de Simancas, native of Cordova,collegian of San Clemente de Bolonia ; he enteredin 1560, went to be consecrated at Santa Fe, andupon his return, had the mortification to find thatthe suburbs of Xiximani had been sacked by someFrench pirates ; which disaster was again repeatedin the following year, 1561. This bishop, afterhaving governed his church for the space of 10years, and suffering much from the influence of ahot climate, left the see without a licence, andreturned to his country, where he died in1570.

6. Don Ft. Luis Zapata de Cardenas, of theorder of St. Francis, native of Llerena in Estre-madura, third commissary-general of the Indies ;elected bishop in 1570, promoted to the archbi-shopric of Santa Fe before he left Spain, and in hisplace was chosen,

7. Don Fr. Juan de Vivero, a monk of the or-der of St. Augustin, native of Valladolid ; hepassed over into America, was prior of the conventof Lima, founder of the convent of Cuzco, electedbishop, which he renounced ; nor would he ac-cept the archbishopric of Chacas, to which he waspromoted : he died in Toledo.

8. Don Fr. Dionisio de los Santos, of the orderof Santiago, prior of the convent of Granada, andprovincial of the province of Andalucia ; electedin 1573 : he died in 1578.

9. Don Fr. Juan de Montalvo, of the same orderof St. Domingo, native of Arevalo ; elected bishop,he entered Cartagena in 1579, passed over to SantaFe to the synod celebrated there by the archbishop ;and in 1583 had the mortification of seeing hiscity sacked, plundered, and destroyed by SirFrancis Drake; Avhich calamity had such a greateffect upon him, and well knowing noAV that hehad no means of relieving the necessities of the

poor, who were dependent upon him, he fell sickand died the same year.

10. Don Fr. Diego Osorio, of the same orderof St. Domingo ; he went over as a monk to Car-tagena, from thence to Lima and Nueva Espana,received the presentation to this bishopric in 1587,which he would not accept, and died in 1579, inMexico.

11. Don Fr. Antonio de Hervias, also a Domi-nican monk, collegian of San Gregorio de Valla-dolid, his native place, where he had studiedarts ; he passed over to Peru, and was the firstmorning-lecturer in the university of Lima, ma-nager of the studies, qualificator of the inquisition,vicar-general of the province of Quito, and after-wards presented to the bishopric of Arequipa,then to that of Verapaz, and lastly to that of Car-tagena, where he died in 1590.

12. Don Fr. Pedro de Arevalo, monk of the or-der of St. Gerome ; he was consecrated in Spain,and renounced the bishopric before he came totake possession of it.

13. Don Fr. Juan de Ladrada, a Dominicanmonk, native of Granada ; he A^'as curate and re-ligious instructor in the Indies, in the settlements ofSuesca and Bogota, vicar-general of his religionin the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, lecturer on thesacred scriptures and on theology in Santa Fe,'was consecrated bishop of Cartagena in 1596 : herebuilt the cathedral, established a choir of boysand chaplains, and made a present of a canopy tobe carried by the priests over the blessed sacra-ment when in procession ; he assisted at the foun-dation of the college of the regulars of the societyof Jesuits, and of that of the fathers called thebarefooted Augustins, on the mountain of LaPopa ; he had the satisfaction of having for hisprovisor the celebrated Don Bernardino de Al-mansa, a wise and virtuous man, who was after-Avards archbishop of Santa Fe ; he frequentlyvisited his bishopric, and after having governed17 years, died in 1613.

14. Don Fr. Pedro de Vega, a monk of thesame order of St. Domingo, native of Bubiercain the kingdom of Aragon, professor of theologyand of the sacred AA'ritings in the universities ofLerida and Zaragoza ; he entered Cartagena asbishop in 1614, and his short duration disappintedthe hopes he had so universally excited, for hedied in 1616.

15. Don Diego Ramirez de Zepeda, friar of theorder of Santiago, native of Lima, a renownedpreacher, and consummate theologist ; being atMadrid, he was elected, and died before he couldreach the bishopric.

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16. Don FV. Diego de Tores Atamairano, amonk of the order of St. Francis, native of Trux-illo in Estremadura, commissary-general of theprovinces of Peru ; he received his consecration atEiraa, entered Cartagena in 1620, and died in thefollowing year, 1621.

17. Don Fr. Francisco de Sotomayor, of theorder of St. Francis, native of San Tome, in thebishopric of Tuy, guardian of the convents inMontforte and Salamanca, difimdor general in thechapter which was celebrated at Rome ; elected tothe bishopric of Cartagena in 1622, and promotedto that of Quito before he left Madrid, in 1623.

18. Don Fr. Luis Ronquillo de Cordova, of theorder of the Santissirna Trinidad, native of Gra-nada, where he read arts and theology, was mi-nister in the convent of Malaga, and twice in that ofSeville, provincial and vicar-general of Andalucia ;he was elected bishop in 1630 : he governed eightyears, and returned to Spain without a licence ;he received notice of his promotion to the bishop-ric of Truxillo in Peru, which honour he declined,and retired to his convent in Granada, where hedied in 1642.

19. Don Fr. Christoval Perez de Lazarraga, ofthe order of San Bernardo, native of Madrid,qualificator of the inquisition ; he took to an eccle-siastical life when quite a child, was collegian ofthe college of Meira, afterwards of those of Sala-manca and Alcala, professor of philosophy, moraland theological, abbot of the college of Nuestra Se-hora ' de Salamanca, a most learned theologist ;elected and consecrated bishop of Chiapa, and be-fore he left the court promoted to the bishopric ofCartagena, of which he took possession in 1640 :he thrice visited his bishopric, and after a grievousillness of 90 days duration, died in 1648.

20. Don Francisco Rodriguez de Zepeda Val-carcel, native of Zamora ; he studied grammar inthe town of Garcia, jurisprudence in Salamanca,was professor of laws in Valladolid, abbot of Ci-fuentes, and canonical doctor of the church ofSiguenza ; elected bishop of Cartagena, of whichhe took possession in 1650 ; and having governedonly 11 months, he died in the following.

21. Don Diego del Castillo y Arteaga, native ofTudela ; he studied in the university of Alcala,was collegian of Malaga, professor of arts, hav-ing substituted this title for that of theology, cano-nical master of the church of Avila; presentedto the bishopric of Cartagena in 1632, which hedeclined.

22. Don Garcia Martinez Cabezas, native of thetown of Don Benito in Estremadura ; he was pub-

lic professor of the institutes, primate of canonsin the university of Maese Rodrigo de Sevilla,w hen he was adopted as provisor by the archbishopof Lima, Don Gonzalo de Ocampo, as he passedthrough that city ; he was doctoral canon of thechurch of Charcas, afterwards school-master, trea-surer, and archdeacon, from whence he went toLima as inquisitor, and was elected bishop of Car-tagena, but died before he took possession of hisoffice, in 1653.

23. Don Antonio Sanz Lozano, native of Cava-nillas, chief collegian iti Alcala, public professorof theology, a man of learning and of acute ge-nius ; being rector of his college, he was presentedby the king to the bishopric ot Cartagena, of whichhe took possession in 1661, governed with greatskill for 20 years, and was promoted to the arch-bishopric of Santa Fe in 1681.

24. Don Antonio dc Benavides and Piedrola,native of the city of Andujar, canon of Badajoz ;elected bishop of Cartagena in 1681 : his govern-ment being very troublesome, and disturbed by acessation of religious rites, occasioned by the cir-cumstance of the nuns of Santa Clara, who wereunder the care of the religious order of St. Fran-cis, having been put under the ordinary jurisdic-tion, he was called to the court, and arrived therein 1691 ; and not being willing to accept of anyother bishopric in Spain, he died in Cadiz.

25. Don Fr. Antonio Maria Casiani, monk ofBasilio, of the university of Alcala; elected in1713.

26. Don Francisco Gomez Calleja, doctoral Ca-non of the church of Zamora; elected in 1718.

27. Don Manuel Antoniode Silva, dean of Lima,named through promotion of the former, who nothaving accepted of the same, there became a dis-pute as to which was rightly entitled to the bishop-ric of Cartagena, when it was declared by thecourt in favour of the former, who governed from1725 till 1736.

28. Don Gregorio de Molleda y Clerque, nativeof Lima, consecrated at Rome with the title ofbishop of Isauria, domestic prelate to his holiness,and made bishop of Cartagena in 1736, afterwardspromoted to the see of Truxillo in 1740.

29. Don Diego Martinez Garrido, of the orderof Santiago, opponent to the professors in the uni-versity of Salamanca; elected in 1740: he diedin 1746.

30. Don Bernardo de Arbiza y Ugarte, nativeof Cuzco, in the university of which he studiedand graduated as doctor of both laws ; he waschief auditor of the royal audience of Panama,

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when he was promoted to the bishopric of Carta-gena in 1746, of which he took possession in thefollowing year, and governed until 1752, whenhe was promoted to the church of Truxillo.

51. Doii Bartolome Narvaez y Berrio, canon ofthis holy church of Cartagena, and native of thiscountry ; presented to this bishopric in^ 1752, andgoverned here until he died in 1754.

52. The Doctor Jacinto Aguado y Chacon, ca-non penitenciario of the holy church of Cadiz ;elected in 1754, and promoted to the bishopric ofArequipa before he embarked for this of Car-tagena.

33. Don Diego Antonio Valenzuela Faxardo,native of the city of Santa Fe of Bogota; electedin 1754 : he died in 1755.

34. The Doctor Don Manuel de Sosa Betancur,archdeacon of the holy church of Caracas ; electedin 1755 : he died in 1765.

35. Don Diego Peredo, native of the town ofLeon of Mechoacan ; elected in 1765, promotedto the bishopric of Yucatan in 1722.

36. Don Augustin de Alvarado y Castillo ; pro-moted to the bishopric of Santa Fe in 1774.

37. The Doctor t)on Bias Sobrino y Minayo ;elected in 1774, and promoted to the archbishopricof Quito in 1776.

38. Don Fr. Joseph Diaz de la Madrid, a monkof the Order of St. Francis, native of the city ofQuito ; elected in 1 777.

Governors of Cartagena.

1. Don Pedro de Heredia, founder of the city ;and its adelantado or governor, a native of Madrid,and a valorous conqueror, in 1532.

2. The Licentiate Badillo, nominated J uez deResidencia,; he exercised the government duringthe commission in 1536.

3. The, Licentiate Santa Cruz, judge of anothersecond residence, who became adelantado in 1537.

4. The Licentiate Miguel Diez de Armendariz;he entered in 1545, had for judge of his resi-dence the Licentiate Juan de Montano, oidor ofSanta F<5, whom he sent to Spain.

5. Don Pedro de Heredia, who for the secondtime was provisional governor until the year 1556,when he died, being drowned in the fleet whichwas wrecked in the Gordas sands.

6. The Doctor J uan de Maldonado, Jiscal of theaudience of Santa Fe in 1556.

7. Jorge de Quintanilla, provisionally nomi-nated by the audience of Santa Fe.

8. The Brigadier Don Go'izalo Ximinez deQuesada ; nominated by the audience as residen-tiary to the three former, in the same year, 1556.

9. Antonio de Castro ; provisionally nominated.

10. Juan de Bustos Villegas, nominated by theking ; he entered in 1 557, and was promoted tothe presidency of Panama in 1563.

11. Anton Davalos de Luna, a field-officer ; heentered in 1563, and governed till 1567, whenhe died.

12. Don Lope de Orozco, as provisional gover-nor in the same year.

13. Francisco Bahamonde y Lugo ; he enteredin 1572, and died in 1573.

14. Hernan Suarez de Villalobos, nominatedprovisonally by the audience of Santa Fe in 1574.

15. Pedro Fernandez del Busto, who entered inthe above year, and was promoted to the govern-ment of Popayan in 1577.

16. Don Pedro de Lodena, in 1593.

17. Don Pedro de Acuna, knight of the orderof San Juan, field-officer, in 1601 ; he had the titleof president of the Philippines, and died the sameyear.

18. Don Geronimo Suazo Casasola, of the habitof Santiago ; he died in 1605.

19. Don Francisco Sarmientode Sotomayor, no-minated in the interim, in 1606.

20. Don Diego Fernandez de Valazco, in 1608.

21. Don Diego de Acuna, in 1614.

22. Don Garcia Giron de Loaysa, who governeduntil 1620.

23. Don Diego de Escobar, knight of the orderof Santiago, who died whilst exercising the govern-ment.

24. Don Francisco de Berrio, nominated in thein the interim, in 1628.

25. Don Francisco de Murga, knight of the or-der of Santiago, a field-officer, and celebratedengineer ; appointed to fortify the Plaza, beingat the time governor of Marmora in Africa : h«died in 1634.

26. Don Nicolas de Larraspuru, nominated inthe interim, in 1636.

27. Don Gonzalo de Herrera, Marquis of Vil-lalta, nominated in the interim, in 1637, on accountof the former not having accepted the office.

28. Don Vincente de los Reyes Villalobos, pro-visional governor in the same year, 1637, being thegovernor of Moxos.

29. Don Melchor de Aguilera, a field-officer;he entered in 1638, was suspended and called toaccount by Don Bernardino de Prado, oidor ofSanta Fe.

30. Don Ortuno de Aldape ; being governor ofMuzo, he was nominated in the interim, in 1641.

31. Don Luis Fernandez de Cordova, of the or-

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der of Santiago, a commander of tlie galleons; hewas deposed and sent to Spain for having marriedwithout a licence; and in his place the audience ofSanta Fe nominated as provisional governor,

32. Don Francisco Rexe Corbalan, until arrivedthe right owner in,

33. Don Clemente Soriano, colonel of militia,in 1616 ; he died in the following year.

34. Don Pedro Zapata, colonel of militia, of theorder of Santiago ; nominated as governor jyrotempore in 1648.

35. Don Fernando de la Riva Agiicro, of theorder of Santiago, a field-officer, being governorof Puertorico ; he entered Cartagena in 1649, andwas promoted to the presidency of Panama in1634.

36. Don Pedro Zapata, twice nominated as pro-prietor in the aforesaid year ; but dying, his placewas filled pro tempore by,

37. Don Francisco Rexe Corbalan.

38. Don Juan Perez de Guzman, of the habitof Santiago, a field-officer, and governor of An-tioquia ; nominated provisionally, and afterwardsappointed to the government of Puertorico.

39. Don Diego de Portugal, colonel of militia,knight of the order of Alcantara; nominated in1659, through the circumstance of Don FernandoAgiiero being appointed governor of Cartagena inCadiz.

40. The Licentiate Don Manuel Martin de Pa-lomeque, nominated by the king ; he afterwardsbecame oidor of St. Domingo.

41 . Don Juan Perez de Guzman, the second timenominated as proprietor; he entered in 1661, andwas removed to the presidency of Panama in 1664.

42. Don Benito de Figueroa Barrantes, of thehabit of Alcantara, a field-officer ; he went as go-vernor of Larache in Africa in 1665, and fromthence to be president of Panama.

43. Don Joseph Sanchez Xiraenez, who wasgovernor of the island of Santa Catalina, nomi-nated to this government, which he did not exer-cise, having been found poniarded and killed inhis bed.

44. Don Antonio de Vergara Azearate, knightof the order of Santiago, nominated previouslyin 1668.

45. Don Pedro de Ulloa Ribadeneyra, of theonler of Santiago ; nominated in 1669.

46. Don Joseph Daza, general of the artillery.

47. Don Rafael Caspir y Sanz, colonel of mi-litia, native of Tortosa, nominated in 1678 ; inwhose time happened those weighty disputes withthe bishop Don Antonio de Benavides; he wassucceeded by,

48. Don Juan de Pando y Estrada, a field-of-ficer ; w ho took possession in 1684.

49. Don Martin de Ceballos y la Cerda, in 1686.

50. Don Diego de los Rios, a field-officer ; inhis time happened the sacking and taking of Car-tagena by the French, in 1695.

51. Don Juan Diaz Pimienta, knight of theorder of Caltrava, a field-officer, gentleman of thecluamberto the Emperor Leopold, of the house ofthe Marquises of Villareal, noted for his valourand military conduct in the siege of Buda, wherehe was wounded ; nominated as governor to con-sole the afflicted natives of Cartagena, taking withhim a certain number of Spansih troops from thekingdom of Galicia ; he entered in 1696, diedin 1706.

52. Don Joseph de Zuniga y la Cerda, of noless credit than the former ; he was governor ofFlorida at the time that he w'as elected to this, in1712, and which he exercised until 1718, whenhe returned to Spain in the unlucky fleet of Anto-nio Ubilla, which was lost in the channel of Baha-ma, the frigate in which he sailed being the onlyvessel saved.

53. Don Alberto de Bertodano, a renowned bri-gadier in Flanders, where he had lost an arm inaction ; he was nominated in 1720, and exercisedthe government until his death, in 1722.

54. Don Luis de Aponte, colonel of the regi-ment of the crown, afterwards brigadier, an officerof the greatest skill and renown of any in thearray ; he was nominated in 1723, and exercisedthe government until his death.

55. Don Juan Joseph de Andia, Marquis ofVillaherraosa, brigadier-general; nominated throughthe death of the general ; he entered Cartagena in1712, and governed till 1730, when he was pro-moted to the presidency of Panama.

56. Don Antonio de Salas, who had becui colo-nel of the regiment of infantry of Saboya ; he e.u-tered in 173i, and died in 1735.

57. Don Pedro Fidalgo, brigadier and captainof the royal Spanish guards ; promoted to this go-vernment in 1736 : he died in 1739.

58. Don Melchor de Navarrete, who was king^slieutenant ; he entered as provisional governorthrough the death of the proprietor : in his timethe town was besieged by the English until the ar-rival of the right owner,

59. Don Basilio de Gante ; who had risen <o therank of brigadier, at that time king’s lieutenantof the fortified town of Ceuta, when he was pro-moted to the government of this, in 1742 : he ex-ercised it till 1739, when he returned to Spain.

60. Don Ignacio de Sala, lieutenant-general, ua-

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lar way by a river of its name. It abounds inlarge alligators and mosquitoes, which render itsnavigation very troublesome. Its shores are co-vered with beautiful trees, which are inhabited bya variety of birds and apes of several species, whichmake an incredible chattering and noise. It wasby this river that the pirate John Morgan camewhen he took and sacked Panama in 1670. Itwas discovered by Hernando de la Serma in 1527,when he called it the river of Lagartos, but itsmouth was before discovered by Lope de Olanoin 1510. Here are found, at certain seasons, avery small fish of the size of a pin, called titles,and these are so abundant, that putting into thewater a large basket, it is certain to be drawn outfull ; they are fried, and make very savouryfritters.

CHAGRE, with the dedicatory title of San Lo-renzo, a settlement of the same province and king-dom ; situate upon the top of a mountain at theentrance or mouth of the former river. It has forits defence a strong castle, which was built by theorder of Philip 11. by the famous engineer J uanBautista Antoneli. This was taken by the pirateJohn Morgan, after having made a glorious de-fence, in 1668, when the settlement was burnt andsacked ; and in 1740 it was taken by the English,commanded by Admiral Vernon, who entirelydestroyed it ; its loss in that war being supplied bytwo strong batteries, which hindered the Englishfrom making a breach, for the third time, whenthey came with three frigates of war : but theywere driven back by Captain Don Juan de Her-mida, who was formerly captain of the regimentof Granada. In 1752 this castle was rebuilt, in themost perfect manner, by the lieutenant-generaland engineer Don Ignatio de Sala, governor ofCartagena, who came hither for this purpose byorder of the king. In this fortress several per-sonages of distinction' have been held prisoners,ami amongst others the Marquis of La Mina,])resiilent, governor, and captain-general of thekingiUmi in 1694. Is 13 leagues from Porto-belo.

CHAGUANES, an island of the river Orinoco,formed at its entrance into the sea by variouscanals or arms, is large and inhabited by Indiansof the Mariussa nation.

CHAGUARAMA, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela, situate on the con-fines of the province of Cumana, near the riverManapire.

CHAGUARAMA, a bay on the coast of the pro-vince of Cumaná, on the n. e. side ; being formedby the island of Trinidad, and by the mouths of

the channels of the Orinoco as far as the gulfTriste.

CHAGUAREM, a small river of the provinceand government of Venezuela, which runs s. andenters that of Los Aceytes.

CHAHUALTEPEQUE, Santiago de, a set-tlement of the district and alcaldía mayor of Mex-ilcaltzingo in Nueva España. It contains 138families of Indians, and is three leagues from itscapital.

CHAHUANTLA, a small settlement or wardof the alcaldía mayor of Guauchinango in NuevaEspaña ; annexed to the curacy of Naupan.

CHAIALA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Chayanta or Charcas in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Pocoata.

CHAILLON, Cabo de, a cape on the e. coastof lake Superior, in New France.

CHAINAR, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Tucumán ; situate on the shore ofthe river San Miguel.

CHAIPI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Parinacochas in Peru, annexed tothe curacy of the corregimiento of Pullo ; in whichwas venerated, ever since the time of the conquest,a beautiful image of the Virgen del Rosario, which,with the temple, was burnt a few years since, andthe parishioners being much afflicted at their loss,the Marquis of Selva Alegre, president of Quito,sent them another equal to the first : at the cele-bration of the festival people assemble from all theneighbouring districts.

CHAIUIN, a river of the province and govern-ment of Valdivia in the kingdom of Chile, whichruns s. e. and enters Valdivia near its entrance intothe sea.

CHALA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Cumaná in Peru.

Chala, with the distinction of Alta, anothersettlement of the province and corregimiento ofSaña in the same kingdom , situate on the shore ofthe river Chicama.

CHALA, another, with the addition of Baxa,in the same kingdom and province; situate nearthe former.

CHALA, a large and beautiful valley on the seashore, in the province and corregimiento of Cu-maná.

CHALA, a small port, frequented only by fisher-men, in the same province and corregimiento.

CHALACOS, a settlement and asiento of thesilver mines of the province and corregimiento ofPiura in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Huan-cabamba.

==CHALALA, a large river of the Nuevo Reyno

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11. Don Juan Zapata y Sandoval, nativeof Mexico, of the order of St. Augustin ; he cameto Spain, was regent of the college of San Gabrielde Valladolid, and elected bishop of Chiapa in1612 ; then promoted to the archbishopric of Gua-temala in' 1622.

12. Don Bernardino de Salazar y Frias, nativeof Burgos, canon of Jaen, .collegiate in the collegeof San Antonio de Portaceli de Siguenza ; pre-sented to the bishopric in 1622 : he died in 1623.

13. Don Alonzo Munoz, dean of the holy churchof Mexico, professor of theology ; he died beforehe was consecrated.

14. Don Agustin Ugarte de Saravia, elected in1628 ; he was promoted in 1630 to the arch-bishopric of Guatemala.

15. Don Fray Marcos Ramirez de Prado, of theorder of St. Francis, native of Madrid ; he studiedin Salamanca arts and theology with great credit,was guardian of the convent of Lucena, vice-com-missary general of the Indies, and guardian of theconvent of Granada, when he was elected bishopof Chiapa in 1632 ; he entered its church in 1635,and was promoted to that of Mechoacan in 1639.

16. Don Fray Christoval de Lazarraga, a monkof the order of St. Bernard, native of Madrid, wasmaster and professor in Salamanca, abbot of themonastery of that city, and qualificator of the in-quisition ; he was presented to the bishopric ofChiapa in 1639, and promoted to that of Carta-gena of the Indies in 1641.

17. Don Fray Domingo de Villaescusa, a monkof the order of St. Jerome, collegian in the col-lege of San Lorenzo el Real, prior of the monas-tery of Espeja, and of those of Parral de Segovia,of San Geronimo de Guisando of Madrid, visitorof the two Castillas, and general of his order ; waspresented to the bishopric of Chiapa in 1641, go-verned until 165 1 , when he was promoted to thechurch of Y ucatan.

18. Don JFrqy Francisco Nunez de la Vega, amonk of the order of St. Dominic.

19. Don Christoval Bernardo de Quiros, nativeof Tordelaguna, canon of the churches of Are-quipa, Quito, and of Lima, pro visor and vicar-general of the archbishopric, and judge of the in-quisition ; he was elected in 1660, and was pro-moted to the archbishopric of Popayan in 1670.

20. Don Manuel Fernandez de Santa Cruz ySahagun, a native of Palencia in Castilla deCuenca, in the university of Salamanca, first canonof Segovia, was elected in 1672, and before he ar-rived was promoted to Guadalaxara.

21. Don

22. Don

23. Don J uan Bautista Alvarez de Toledo, na-

tive of the town of San Salvador, in the provinceof G uatemala, of the religious order of St. Francis,professor in his religion, and prelate of many con-vents ; he was elected in 1708, and promoted to thearchbishopric of Guatemala in 1714. ,

24. Don

25. Don Fray Joseph Cubero Ramirez de Arel-lano, a monk of the order of Nuestra Senora de laMerced ; elected in 1734, governed 19 years, until1753, when he died.

26. Don Fray Joseph Vidal de Montezuma, ofthe order of Nuestra Senora de la Merced, a nativeof Mexico ; elected in 1753, governed till 1767,when he died.

27. Don Miguel de Cilieza y Velasco ;• electedin the above year, governed until 1768, when hedied.

28. Don Fray Lucas Ramirez, of the order ofSt. Francis ; he was promoted to the archbishopricof Santa Fe in 1769.

29. Don Fray Juan Manuel de Vargas y Ri-vera, a native of Lima, monk of the order of Nues-tra Senora de la Merced ; elected in the afore-said year of 1769, governed until 1774, when hedied.

30. Don Antonio Caballero y Gongora, untilthe following year of 1775, when he was promotedto the church of Yucatan.

31. Don Francisco Polanco, until 1785, whenhe died ; and,

32. Don Joseph Martinez Palomino Lopez deLerena, elected in 1786.

Chiapa, with the appellation of Mota, a settle-ment of the alcaldia mayor of Xilotepec in NucvaEspana. It contains 960 families of Otomies In-dians, and is seven leagues to the n. w. of its ca-pital.

CHIAPANTONGO, a settlement and headsettlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofXilotepec in Nueva Espana ; annexed to thecuracy of its capital, from whence it lies twoleaffues to the n. It contains 102 familes of In-dians.

CHIAPAS, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cinaloa.

CHIAPILLA, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Chiapa, and kingdom of Guate-mala, in the district of its capital.

CHIARA, a settlement of the province and bi-shopric of Huamanga in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of the parish of Santa Maria Magdalena inthat city, from whence it is three leagues distant.

CHIAUTLA, S. Andres De, a settlement andhead settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Tezcoco

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villa, president of the courts of chancery of Gra-nada and Valladolid, elected bishop ; he died inLima before he took possession.

7. Don Alonso Ramirez Granero, and not Pedro,as Gil Gonzalez will have it ; a native of V illaes-cusa in the bishopric of Cuenca, a collegiate ofthis city, dean of the church of Guadix, and Jiscalof the inquisition of Mexico ; elected archbishopin 1574 ; he governed until 1578.

8. Don Frai/ Juan de Vivero, native of Valla-dolid, of the order of St. Augustin ; he passedover to Peru, was prior of his convent of Lima,presented to the archbishopric .of Cartagena of theIndies, and to this archbishopric ; but these digni-ties he would not accept ; he returned to Spain, anddied in his convent of Toledo.

9. Don Alonso Ramirez de Vergara, native ofSegura de Leon, collegiate in Malaga, Alcala, andSalamanca, professor of arts, and canon of Malaga ;he was presented to the archbishopric of Charcasin 1594, and died in 1 603.

10. Don Fra^ Luis Lopez de Solis, native ofSalamanca, of the order of St. Augustin ; he passedover into Peru, where he was master of his reli-gious order, professor of theology, prior provin-cial, and qualificator of the inquisition; he waspromoted to the church of Quito, and to this me-tropolitan see.

11. Don Fra?y Ignacio de Loyola, a monk ofthe barefooted order of St. Francis ; he was commis-sary in the province of Pilipinas, and on his returnto Spain elected archbishop of Charcas.

12. Don Alonso de Peralta, native of Arequipa,archdeacon and inquisitor of Mexico, and arch-bishop of Charcas, where he died.

13. Don Frn^ Geronimo de Tiedra, native ofSalamanca, of the order of St. Domingo ; he wasprior of his convent, and preacher to the king, andarchbishop of Charcas in 1616.

14. Don Fernando Arias de Ugarte, native ofSanta Fe of Bogota, of whom we have treated inthe catalogue of the bishops of Quito ; he passedover from the archbishopric of Santa Fe to this in1630.

15. Don Francisco de Sotomayor.

16. Don FVr/y Francisco de Borja, of the orderof San Benito, master in the university of Sala-manca, and professor of theology ; elected bishopof Charcas in 1634.

17. Don Fru7/ Pedro de Oviedo, of the order ofSan Benito, native of Madrid ; he studied arts andtheoloijy in Alcala, was abbot of the monastery ofS. Cloclio, and difinidor of his order ; he was pro-moted from the bishopric of Quito to this arch-bishopric in 1645 : he died in 1649.

18. Don Juan Alonso de Ocon, native of LaRoja, collegiate-major of San Ildefonso in Alcala,doctor and professor of theology, curate of Ele-chosa in the archbishopric of Toledo, and of theparish of Santa Cruz of Madrid ; he was promotedfrom the church of Cuzco to this of La Plata.

19. Don Fray Gaspar de Villaroel, of the orderof St. Augustin, native of Riobamba ; he studiedin the royal university of Lima, and with the re-putation of being very learned, of which, indeed,his works bear testimony ; he was promoted fromthe church of Arequipa to this in 1658.

20. Don Bernardo de Izaguirre, native of To-ledo ; he was fiscal of the inquisition of Carta-gena and of Lima, and was promoted from thechurch of Cuzco to this metropolitan see.

21. Don Fray Alonso de la Cerda, of the orderof preachers, native of Lima, provincial of hisorder, bishop of Honduras ; from whence he waspromoted to this church.

22. Don Melchor de Lilian and Cisneros, nativeof Tordelaguna, of Avhom we speak in the cata-logue of the bishops of Santa Marta ; he was re-moved from the bishopric of Popayan in 1672,governed until 1678, when he was promoted tothe metropolitan see of Lima.

23. Don Bartolome Gonzalez de Poveda, whobecame archbishop, and governed until 1692.

24. Don Fray Diego Morcillo Rubio de Aunon,of the bishopric of La Paz in 1711, where he re-mained until 1724, when he was promoted to thearchbishopric of Lima.

25. Don Francisco Luis Romero, promoted fromthe archbishopric of Quito ; he governed until1725.

26. Don Alonso del Pozo and Silva, of thebishopric of Santiago of Chile.

27. Don Agustin Delgado, in 1743 ; governeduntil 1746.

28. Don Salvador Bermudez, from the aforesaidyear ; governed until 1747.

29. Don Gregorio de Molleda y Clerque, of thebishopric of Truxillo, in 1748 ; he governed until1758, when he died.

30. Don Cayetano Marcellano y Agramont, ofthe bishopric of Buenos Ayres, in 1758 ; he go-verned until 1761, when he died.

31. Don Pedro de Argandoua, promoted in theabove year ; he governed until 1776, when hedied.

32. Don Francisco Ramon de Herboso, whogoverned from 1776 to 1784.

33. Don Arqy Joseph Antonio de San Alberto,who governed in 178.5.

CHUQUISONGO, San Pedro de, a settlement

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CORIXAS, a river of the kingdom of Brazil,It rises in the sierra Bermeja, runs n. forming acurve, and eaters the Tocantines near that of LosMonges, according to tl>e account given by thePortuguese.

CORIXAS, some sierras of the same kingdom,which run s. s. e. and are a continuation of thesierra Bermeja ; they then run e. forming acurve, as far as the river Tocantines, and ex-tend their course on as far as the shore of theAraguaya.

CORK, a large bay in the e. coast of the islandof Newfoundland, between the cape Gull and theisland Tuliquet.

CORKAM, a fort of the English, in the pro-vince and colony of Connecticut, one of the fourwhich composQ New England ; situate near thecoast.

CORMA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Quispicanchi in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Papres.

CORMO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Canta in Peru ; annexed to the curacyof Atabillos Altos.

CORNE, an island of the N. sea, near thecoast of Florida, between the islands Vaisseauxand Massacre.

CORNEJO, an island of the S. sea, near thecoast of the province and corregimiento of Are-quipa, opposite the port of Arantae.

(CORNISH, a township in Cheshire county,New Hampshire, on the e. bank of Connecticutriver, between Claremont and Plainfield, about 15miles n. of Charlestown, and 16 s. of Dartmouthcollege. It was incorporated in 1763. In1775 it contained 309, and in 1790, 982 in-habitants.

(CORNWALL, a township in Addison county,Vermont, e. of Bridport, on lake Champlain, con-taining 826 inhabitants.)

(Cornwall, NEW, atownship in Orange coun-ty, New York, of whose inhabitants 350 aredectors.)

(Cornwall, a township in Litchfield county,Connecticut, about nine miles n. of Litchfield, 11s. of Salisbury, and about 40 w. by n. of Hartfordcity.)

(Cornwall, a small town in Upper Canada, onthe bank of Iroquois river, near lake St. Francis,between Kingston and Quebec, containing a smallchurch, and about 30 or 40 houses.)

(Cornwallis, a town in King’s county, in theprovince of New Brunswick, situated on the s. w.side of the basin of Minas ; 18 miles n. w. of Fal-mouth, and 55 n. w. of Annapolis.)

(Cornwallis, also a river in the »arae pro-vince, navigable for vessels of 100 tons five miles ;for vessels of 50 tons, 10 miles.

CORO, Santa Ana de, a city of the provinceand government of Venezuela, thus named in thetime of the Indians, after the district called Coriana.It was founded by Juan de Ampues in 1529.The Weltzers, under the orders of Nicholas Fe-derman, were the first Avho peopled it, giving it thename of Cordoba, to distinguish it from the othercity of the same name which had been founded byGonzalo de Ocampo in the province of Cumana,This name it afterwards lost, and took that ofCoro, which it preserves to this day, from a smallsettlement of Indians thus named. It is of a dryand hot temperature, but so healthy that physiciansare said here to be of no use. The territory, al-though sandy and lack of water, produces everykind of vegetable production ; so that it may besaid to abound in every thing that luxury or con^venience may require. Here are large breeds ofcow-cattle and goats, and a considerable numberof good mules. Its articles of merchandize, suchas cheese, tanned hides, and cacao, meet with aready sale in Cartagena, Caracas, and the island ofSt. Domingo. It has a reduced convent of the re-ligious order of St. Francis, and an hermitagededicated to St. Nicholas. The town is very rich.It was plundered, by the English in 1567. Itschurch was a cathedral, and the head of thebishopric, from the time that it was erected in1532 until 1636, when this title was transferred toSantiago of Caracas. It is two leagues distantfrom the sea, where there is a port insecure, butmuch frequented by trading vessels.

(From the time that the governor began to re-side at Caracas, in 1576, there remained no con-spicuous authority at Coro but the bishop andchapter, and they did all they could to follow th«governor; and indeed, not being able to leaveCoro by legal measures, they put tlieir wishesinto effect by flight, in 1636. At three leaguesfrom the city are lands where they cultivate withsuccess, if not with abundance, all the usual pro-duce of the country. The inhabitants, who aremuch addicted to indolence, glory that they aredescended from the first conquerors of the country ;and there is here, generally speaking, more rankthan wealth, and more idleness than industry. Thelittle trade that is carried on here consists in mules,goats, hides, sheep-skins, cheeses, &c. which comein a great measure from the interior, and thelarger part fromCarora; shipments of these ar-ticles are made for the islands. The most commonintercourse is with Cura 9 oa, from whence they2

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llio Naipi to Cartagena. The same way offersthe advantage of a very quick communication be-tween Cadiz and Lima. Instead of dispatchingcouriers by Cartagena, Santa Fe, and Quito, orby Buenos Ayres and Mendoza, good quick-sail-ing packet-boats might be sent from Cupica toPeru. If this plan were carried into execution,the viceroy of Lima would have no longer to waitfive or six months for the orders of his court. Be-sides, the environs of the bay of Cupica aboundswith excellent timber fit to be carried to Lima.We might almost say that the ground betweenCupica and the mouth of the Atrato is the onlypart of all America in which the chain of theAndes is entirely broken.]

CUPIN, a small river of the province and cap-tainship of Para in Brazil. It runs n. n. zo andenters the Guama, before it runs into the Amazo-nas or Maranon.

CUPIRA, a river of the province of Barcelona,and government of Cumana, in the kingdom ofTierra Firme. It rises in the serrania, and runsf. until it enters the sea, close to the settlement ofTucuyo.

CUPITA, Cano de, an arm of the riverOrinoco, which runs out by the w. side, and takesits course n. opposite the mouth of the Caura.

CUPLICOS, a river of the province and alcal-dia maijor of Tabasco in Nueva Espana, whichfalls into the sea in the bay of Mexico, between theDos Bocas and the Tabasco.

CUPO, a small river of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas, in the part possessed by thePortuguese. It rises in the territory of the Nou-rises Indians, runs s. and enters the Trqpibetas.

CUQUE, a large river of the province andgovernment of Darien, and kingdom of TierraFirme. It rises near the N. sea, to the e. of theprovince, and following an e. course, enters thecanal of Tarena.

CUQUIARACHI, a settlement of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits, in the province and government of LaSonora.

CUQUIO, the alcaldia mayor and jurisdictionof Nueva Espana, in the kingdom of Nueva Ga-licia, and bishopric of Guadalaxara ; is one of themost civilized and fertile, abounding in fruits andseeds, and being of a mild temperature. It iswatered by three rivers, which are the Verde onthe e. the Mesquital on the w. and the Rio Grandeon the s. in which last the two former becomeunited.

The capital is the settlement of its name, in-habited by a large population of Indians, some

Mmtets and Mulattoes, and a few Spaniards ;is 13 leagues to the n. e. of Guadalaxara, in long.268° ; and lat. 21° 40'. The other settlements are,Cantla== , ==Tenalucan,

Manalisco== , ==Quaquala,

Huisculco== , ==Ocotic,

Yagualica== , ==Tepunahuasco,

Acatico== , ==Yotahuacan,

Mestitlan== , ==Tacotan,

Nochistlan== , ==San Christoval,

Toyagua== , ==Iscatlan.

Apulco,

[CURA, with the surname of St. Louis de, issituate in a valley formed by mountains of a verygrotesque appearance ; those on the s. w. side arecapped with rocks. The valley is, however, fer-tile, and covered with produce, but the greaterpart of the property consists in animals. Thetemperature is warm and dry ; the soil is a reddishclay, which is extremely muddy in the rainy sea-sons ; the water is not limpid, although it is whole-some. The inhabitants are 4000, governed bya cabildo. In the church is an image of our Ladyof Valencianosy the claim to which was long asubject of dispute between the curate of Cura andthat of Sebastian de los Reynos ; and after a SO yearscontest, it was ordered by the bishop Don Fran-cisco de Ibarro to be returned to this place, whenit was received in a most triumphant manner. Thiscity is in lat. 10° 2' ; twenty-two leagues s. xo. ofCaracas, and eight leagues s. e, of the lake ofValencia.]

CURABICO, a river of the province and cap-tainship of Maranan in Brazil.

CURACOA, or Curazao, an island of theN. sea, one of the Smaller Antilles ; situate nearthe coast of the province and government of Vene-zuela. It is 30 miles long, and 10 broad, and is theonly island of any consideration possessed by theDutch in America. It was settled in 1527, by theEmperor Charles V. as a property upon theliouse ofJuan de Ampues ; is fertile, and abounds in sugarand tobacco, large and small cattle, also in very goodsaline grounds, by which the other islands are pro-vided : but its principal commerce is in a contra-band trade carried on with the coasts of TierraFirme ; on which account its storehouses are filledwith articles of every description imaginable.Formerly its ports were seldom without vessels ofCartagena and Portobelo, which were employedn the Negro trade, bringing home annually froiu1000 to 15,000 Negroes, with various other ar-ticles of merchandise, although this branch ofcom-merce has, from the time that it was taken up bythe English, greatly declined. On the s. part of

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CURAHUARI an ancient province of Peru, tothe n. of Cuzco. The Inca Capac Yupanqui,fifth Emperor, conquered and united it to the em-pire.

CURAHUASI, a settlement of tlie provinceand con eginiietito of Abancay in Peru, S3 leaguesdistant from the city of Cuzco.

CURAI, a settlement of the province and cor~regimiento of Caxatarabo in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Churin.

CURAL, a settlement of the province and cap-tainship of Rio Janeyro in Brazil ; situate on thecoast, opposite the Isla Grande.

CURAMA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Guayana. It enters the Meta, and losesits name.

CURAMPA, an ancient settlement of the pro-vince of Chinchasuyu in Peru. The Prince Ya-huar Huacar, eldest, son of the first Emperor, theInca Roca, took it by force of arms, and subjectedit to the crown. It was then one of the strongplaces of the province.

CURANARIS, a barbarous and numerous nationof Indians, divided into bodies of militia, who in-habit the woods near the river Bayari to the s. ofthe Maranon.

CURANTA, an islet or rocky shoal of thecoast of the kingdom of Chile, close to the point ofXosH umos.

CURAPO, a settlement of the missions whichare held by the religious Capuchins, in the pro-vince and government of Guayana.

CURAUAUA, a river of the kingdom of Chile,in the district and jurisdiction which belonged tothe city Imperial. It runs w. and forms Avith theEyou the great lake of Puren, out of which it runson the 5. w. side, uniting itself with the Cauten,or the Imperial.

CURASAY a large and navigable river of theprovince and government of Maynas in the king-dom of Quito. It rises in the paramos of 'i'a-cunga, and after running e. for more than 90leagues, enters the Napo ; first collecting the wa-ters of the Soetuno, Noesino, and Turibuno, onthen, and on the s. the Villano. The woods onthe s. are inhabited by some barbarous nations ofIquitos, Ayacores, and Scimugaes Indians, and the«. parts by the Yates and Zaparas.

CURARICARU, a river of the province andgovernment of Guayana. It rises in the countryof the Maraucotos Indians, runs e. and turning itscourse enters the Parime or Puruma.

CURASANA, a river of the province of Barcelona, and government of Cumana. It rises neartlie settlement of Cari, towards the c. runs s. and

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enters the Orinoco, near the Angostura, or narrowpart.

CURASCO, a settlement of the province andcorregimieyito of Cochabamba in Peru ; annexed tothe coracy of Ayruhanca.

CURASENI, a small river of the province andgovernment of San Juan de los Llanos in theNuevo Reyno de Granada. It runs e. and entersthe Orinoco between the settlements of the missionsAvhich were held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits, called Santa Teresa, and San Ignacio.

CURASIRI, a small river of the province andgovernment of Cumana. It rises in the serraniaof Ymataca, runs s. and enters the Cuyuni on then. side.

CURATAQUICHE, a settlement of the pro-vince of Barcelona and government of Cumana ;situate on the shore of the river Nevery, to the s.of the city of Barcelona.

CURAZAICILLO, a small river of the pro-vince and government of Mainas in the kingdomof Quito. It rises in the country of the AbijirasIndians, runs e. and turning afterwards to the n.enters the Napo, close to the settlement of Oravia.

CURAZILLO, or Curaza Chico, or Little,a small island of the N. sea, near the coast ofTierra Firme, and close upon the e. side of Cu-ra^oa.

CURBA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimknio of Larecaxa in Peruj annexed to thecuracy of Charazani.

CURBATI, a small settlement of Indians ofthe province and government of Maracaibo; an-nexed to the curacy of the city of Pedraza. Itsnatives, although few, are docile and well in-clined.

CURE River of, in the island of Guadalupe,one of the Antilles or Windward isles. It rises inthe mountains to the e. and enters the sea betweenthe bay of La Barque and the port of Las Gpa-yabas.

CURECA, a river of the province and captain-ship of Para in Brazil. It runs nearly due n.and enters that of Las Amazonas.

[CURIACO, a bay in Tierra Firme, S. Ame-rica, on the N. sea.]

CURIANCHE, an habitation or palace, builtby the first Emperor of the Incas, Manco Capac,of very large stones, and covered with straAv; fromAvhence the city of Cuzco has its origin. Thispalace was afterwards dedicated to the sun, andbecame converted into a temple, being the mostbeautiful and rich structure of any in Peru, in thetime of the Indians; the inside of it being casedAvitb gold, and the outside with silver, these metals

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s;iges the walls were cut Tery crooked, admittingfor a certain space only one person to pass at atime, and this sidewise, and with great difficulty,when shortly afterwards two raio^ht pass abreast.The exit was by a rock, worked in the same nar-row manner on the other side ; and this was alto-gether a plan adopted through prudence, and forthe better security against any sudden assault,since here a single man might defend himselfagainst a great number. In a magnificent chapelof the cathedra! is venerated a miraculous crucifix,which was presented by the Emperor Charles V.and which is called De los Temblores, from thecity having invoked it as a patron in the tremen-dous earthquake which happened here in 1590;also an image of Nuestra Senora de Helen, whichthey call La Linda, (the Beautiful), the gift of thesame royal hand. It is the second city of Peru,and inferior only to the capital of the kingdom.It was governed, after the time of the conquestsmade by the Spaniards, by a secular cabildo, com-posed of two ordinary alcaldes, a royal ensign,an alguaxil mayor, a provincial alcalde, a depo-sitor-general, 12 perpetual regidors, two alcaldesof the inquisition, and a regidor, nominated an-nually, with the title of judge of the natives, whois entrusted with the causes of the Indians; thesehaving also a protector, nominated every twoyears by the viceroy of Lima. This cabildo main-tains, through the grant of the Emperor CharlesV. the same privileges as the cabildo of Burgos.The city has also many other prerogatives, withthe title of Gran Ciudad, and Cabeza, or head ofthe kingdoms and provinces of Peru, in rewardfor its having supported the crown against thetraitor Diego de Almagro, in the conflicts that hemaintained with Francis Pizarro, and from itsliaving taken him prisoner in 1553, in the cele-brated battle of Las Salinas, a league from Cuzco ;also from its having refused to acknowledge thetitle of governor of Peru, assumed by Diego deAlmagro the younger, supporting, in preference,the legitimate government. Again, when the Li-centiate Christoval Vaca de Castro arrived, think-ing to be governor, the people of Cuzco took himprisoner, under the orders of the lieutenant-gover-nor, Diego Salazar de Toledo, and the ordinaryalcalde, Antonio Ruiz de Guevera, and kept himin confinement until he was beheaded in that placeby the same person that executed his father. Forthese services, and for the valuable presents,which on several occasions it has made to thecrown, this city was allowed to be by the laws ofthe Indies, and, as appears by its records, one ofthe first cities in all Castilla, having a priority of

vote ; and in 1783, it was ordered by the king ofSpain, that in consideration of the resistance itoffered in the late rebellion of the Indians of theprovince of Tinta and the other immediate pro-vinces, it should be endowed with the title ofMost Noble, Most Loyal, and Most Faithful, andthat it should enjoy the same privileges as Lima.In 178i, the office of corregidor was extinguished,and his Majesty established an intendant and go-vernor vice-patron; and in 1787, the tribunal ofroyal audience, composed of a president, fouroidors, and aJiscaL It has for arms a golden castleupon a blue field, with various trophies andcolours on the sides, and an eagle at the top. Ithas been the native place of many illustrious men,and of these are,

Don Bernardo de Aviza y Ugarte, oidor ofPanama, bishop of Cartagena and Truxillo, andelected archbishop of Charcas.

Don Cayetano Marcellano y Agramont, bishopof Buenos Ayres, and archbishop of Charcas.

Don Gabriel de Ugarte, royal ensign of the saidcity.

Don Diego Esquivel and Navia, dean of itschurch.

Don Ignacio de Castro, curate of San Geronimoand rector of the university.

Don Francisco Espinosa and Medrano, alias ElLunarejo, magistral canon of its church,

Don Francis Xavier de Lagos, penitentiarycanon.

The Father Maestro Fray Pedro de la Sota, ofthe order of La Merced ; a subject who was oftenconsulted by the viceroys in matters of the utmostimportance.

The Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, a celebratedhistorian of Peru.

Its jurisdiction, although it may retain the titleof province, is so reduced as to extend merely asfar as the district of the city, notwithstanding itformerly comprehended all the neighbouring pro-vinces, until the president, Lope Garcia de ()astro,established in each of these separate corregidors.Its principal commerce consists in the very largequantity of sugar which is made in the neighbour-ing jurisdictions, and where the inhabitants havemany sugar plantations ; that of San Ignacio dePachachaca, in the boundaries of the jurisdictionof Abancay, and formerly belonging to the re-gulars of the extinguished company of Jesuits,being the most celebrated. Tliere is made here avast quantity of baize and ordinary cloth, calledpanete, woven stuffs, saddles, floor-carpets, andtucuyo, which is an ordinary kind of linen usedas clothing by the poor; galloons of gohl, silver,

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