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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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ico, of the religious order of St. Dominic ; electedbishop in 1610, and was from thence translated tothe bishopric of Oaxaca.

10. Don Fr. Gonzalo de Angulo, of the orderof St. Francis, native of Valladolid ; he was su-perior of the convent of Segovia, difinidor of theprovince of Castilla, qualificator of the inquisi-tion ; elected bishop in 1617, visited his bishopric,where he spent more than three years, confirmed3000 persons, and founded many grammar-schools ;he died in 1633.

11. Don Juan Lopez Agurto de la Mata, na-tive of the Mandof Tenerife, canon of the churchof the Puebla de los Angeles, prebendary of thatof Mexico, rector of the college of Los Santos,and lecturer in its university ; he was elected bishopof Puertorico in 1630, and promoted to this in1634 ; in which time the cathedral was removedfor the sake of security: in 1637 he died.

19. Don Fr. Mauro de Tobar, of the order ofSt. Benedict, native of Villacastin, prior and ab-bot of the monastery of Valladolid, and afterwardsof Monforte, preacher to Philip IV. ; elected tothis bishopric in 1639: immediately upon his tak-ing possession of it a great earthquake happened,and destroyed the cathedral, which he was rebuild-ing, when he was translated to the bishopric ofChiapa in 1655.

13. Don Fr. Alonso Briceño, of the order of LaMerced, of the province and kingdom of Chile;he entered Caracas in the year 1659, and diedin 1667.

14. Don Fr. Antonio Gonzales de Acuña, of theorder of St. Dominic, postulador in the court ofRome ; he was elected bishop in 1676, and diedin 1682.

15. The Doctor Don Diego de Baños and Soto-mayor, native of Santa Fe of Bogotá, head colle-giate of the college of the Rosario in this city,honorary chaplain to Charles II. and canon ofCuenca ; he was promoted to the mitre of SantaMarta in 1684 ; he founded the Tridentine col-lege, having endowed the same with professorshipsand revenues ; and being removed to the arch-bishopric of Santa Fe, he died in the year 1706.

16. Don Fr. Francisco del Rincon, of the reli-gious order of the Minims of St. Francis de Paula,native of Valladolid ; he was promoted to thearchbishopric of Domingo in 1711, and fromthence to that of Santa Fe in 1717.

17. Don Juan Joseph de Escalona y Calatayud,was born at Rioja, became doctor of theology atSalamanca, canon of Calahorra, and first chap-lain in the court of Madrid ; he was elected bishop

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of Caracas, for his charity to the poor, in the year1719, and thence translated to the bishopric of Me-choacau in 1728.

18. Don Joseph Feliz Valverde, native of Gra-nada ; he passed his youth at Mexico, where hewas collegiate of the college of San lldefonso, doc-tor of theology, and of both laws, magistrate anddean of the church of Oaxaca ; elected bishop in1731, and promoted to the church of Mechoácan ;which last appointment he declined : he diedin 1741.

19. Don Juan Garcia Padiano ; who took pos-session in 1742, and died in 1746.

20. Don Manuel Breton, doctoral canon of thechurch of Badajos ; he died in going over to beconsecrated at Cordova in 1749.

21. Don Manuel Machado y Luna, honorarychaplain to his Majesty, and administrator of thecollege of Santa Isabel, native of Estremadura :he studied at Salamanca, obtained the title of pri-mate of canons ; reputed for one of the wisest inecclesiastical discipline ; was made bishop of Ca-racas in 1750, and died in 1752.

22. Don Francisco Julian Antolino, native ofZamora, an eminent theologist, penitentiary ca-non of Badajoz, and bishop of Caracas in 1753 :he died in 1755.

23. Don Miguel Argüelles, principal theologist,and curate in the archbishopric of Toledo ; electedbishop in 1756, and immediately after auxiliarybishop of Madrid.

24. Don Diego Antonio Diaz Madroñero, nativeof Talarrubias in Estremadura, vicar of the cityof Alcalá ; he entered upon his functions in 1757,and died in 1769.

25. Don Mariano Marti, of the principality ofCataluña, ecclesiastical judge and vicar-generalof the archbishopric of Tarragona, doctor in theuniversity of Cervera ; he was promoted to thebishopric of Puertorico in 1770.

Governors and Captains-General of the provinceof Caracas, or Venezuela.

1. Ambrosio de Alfinge ; nominated first gover-nor, and elected by the Weltzers: he drew up thearticles of stipulation with the Emperor in the con-quest of Venezuela ; was founder of the city ofCoro ; took possession of the government in 1528,and retained it till 1531, when he was killed by theIndians in satisfaction of the cruelties he had com-mitted.

2. Juan Aleman, related to the Welzers ; he, byway of precaution, assumed the title of governorwhile the place was vacant, and held it until thearrival of the proper person.

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years after Cumana, 39 after Coro, 33 afterBarcelona, and 15 after Barquisimeto.

2. Ils privileges.— It is the capital, not only ofthe province of Venezuela, but likewise of thatimmense extent of country occupied by the go-vernments of Maracaibo, Barinas, Guayana, Cu-mana, and the island of Margareta ; since it is theseat as well of the captain-generalship, the political 'and military authority of which extends over allthese provinces, as of the royal audience, of theintendancy, and of the consulate, the jurisdictionof which extends as far as the captain-general-ship.

3. Temperature.— Its temperature does not atall correspond with its latitude ; for, instead ofinsupportable heat, which, it would appear,ought to reign so near the equator, it, on thecontrary, enjoys an almost perpetual spring. Itowes this advantage to its elevation, which is 460fathoms above the level of the sea. Thus, al-though the sun has the power usual in such a lati-tude, the elevated situation of Caracas counter-balances its influence. The transitions from heatto cold are great and sudden, from whence nume-rous diseases arise; the most common of which arecolds, called by the Spaniards catarros.

4. Meteorology.— Height of Fahrenheit’s ther-

mometer at Caracas.

In the winter.

Generally at 6 A. M 58°

2 P. M. ' ... 73

10 P. M 68

The maximum .... 76The minimum . . . .52

In the summer.

Generally at 6 A. M 72°

2 P. M 79

10 P. M 75

Maximum . . . . .85

Minimum ..... 69Humidity, according to the hydrometer of Duluc.

Generally 47

Maximum 58

Minimum 37

The mercury, which rises in the most s. partsof Europe, and in the variations of the atmo-sphere to 1 l-12ths of the Paris inch, ascends only2-12ths in the e. parts of Tierra Firme. They ob-serve at Caracas, in all the seasons, four small at-mospherical variations every 24 hours, two in theday, and two in the night.

5. Blue of the skies by the cyanometer of Seaus-sure.

Generally .... 18

6. Oxigen and nitrogen gas. — Of 100 parts, 28of oxj'^gen and 72 of nitrogen.

The maximum of the first is 29The minimum . . . 27f

7. Variation of the needle.

Sept. 27th, 1799 . . 4° 38' 45"

8. Inclination of the dipping needle. Generally^^4-so- Oscillation of the pendulum : in 15 minutes,1270 oscillations.

9. Situation. — The city of Caracas is built in avalley of four leagues in length, in a direction frome. to w. and between that great chain of mountainsAvhich runs in a line with the sea from Coro to Cu-mana. It is, as it were, in a basin or hollow form-ed by this chain ; for it has mountains of equalheight to the n. and to the s. The city occupies aspace of 2000 square paces ; the ground on whichit stands remains as nature formed it, art havingdone nothing towards levelling it, or diminishingits irregularities. The declivity is every wheredecidedly from the s. : the whole of it is 75 fa-thoms perpendicular from the gate De la Pastorato the n. unto the river Guaire, which bounds thecity to the s.

10. Its waters. — It derives its waters from foursmall rivers. The first, which is called Guaire,bounds it entirely on the s. part without pene-trating into the city. Although this be scarcelyconsiderable enough to deserve the name of a river,it is too large to pass by the name of a rivulet. Thesecond, which bears the name of Anauco, watersthe e. side of the town ; and the part where it ap-proaches nearest is called Candelaria, where thereis built a handsome bridge, facilitating the com-munication with the valley of Chacao. The thirdis the Caroata : its course is from n. to s. throughall the w. part of the city, and separates it fromthe quarter called St. John, which parts are unitedby a stone bridge of a sufficiently solid construc-tion, but the regularity of which does not equalthat of the Candelaria. The fourth is named Ca-tucho, to which the city owes the waters of an in-finite number of public and private fountains ; yetthe inhabitants of Caracas, insensible to its bene-fits, suffer it to run in the same channel that timehas made for it, and amidst all the deformitieswhich the rains have occasioned ; for the fourbridges of communication which are thrown acrossit are rather to be considered the offsprings of ne-cessity than as objects of ornament. These fourrivers, after having served all the domestic uses ofthe city, run in one single channel across the valleyof Chacao, which is covered Avith fruits, provi-sions, and merchandize ; and, mixing their wa-]

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[ments ; the very cornices appear to have beendipped in gold, whilst superb carpets are spreadover the part of llie floor whereon the seats of ho-nour are placed ; the furniture is arranged in thehall in such a manner that the sofa, which formsan essential part of it, stands at one end withchairs on the right and left, and opposite the prin-cipal bed in the house, which stands at the otherextremitj, in a chamber, the door of which is keptopen, or is equally exposed to view in an alcove.These apartments, always very elegant and high-ly ornamented, are in a manner prohibited to thosewho inhabit the house : they are only opened, witha few exceptions, in honour of guests of superiorrank.

14. Public buildings. — The city of Caracaspossesses no other public buildings than such asare dedicated to religion. The captain-general,the members of the royal audience, the intendant,and all the officers of the tribunal, occupy hiredhouses ; even the hospital for the troops is a pri-vate house. The contaduria, or treasury, is theonly building belonging to the king, and its con-struction is far from bespeaking the majesty of itsowner. It is not so with the barracks ; they arenew, elegantly built, and situate in a spot where thesight breaks upon the city, and are two storieshigh, in which they can conveniently lodge 2000men. They are occupied only by the troops ofthe line ; the militia having barracks of their own,consisting of a house, at the opposite part of thecity.

15. Archbishopric. — Caracas is the seat of thearchbishopric of Venezuela, the diocese of whichis very extensive, it being bounded on the n. bythe sea, from the river Unare to the jurisdiction ofCoro ; on the e. by the province of Cumana, onthe s. by the Orinoco, and on the w. by thebishopric of Merida. Caracas was erected intoan archbishopric in 1803. The annual revenueof the archbishopric depends on the abundance ofthe harvests and the price of commodities, onAvhich they take the titlies : these tithes are equallydivided between the archbishopric, tlie chapter,the king, and the ministers of religion. Thefourth part, belonging to the prelate, amounted onan average, before the war terminated by the treatyof Amiens, to 60,000 dollars per annum. Thedecrease of cultivation will for a long time pre-vent the episcopal revenues amounting to theabove sum. Indeed the archbishop does noteven enjoy the whole of this fourth part of thetithes, the king having reserved to himself theapplication of the third of this quarter, and charg-ing upon it certain pensions. The seat of this

archbishopric was established at Coro in 1532,and translated to Caracas in 1636.

16. Cathedral. — The cathedral church does notmerit a description but from the rank it holds inthe hierarchy ; not but that the interior is deco-rated with hangings and gilding, and that thesacerdotal robes and sacred vases are sufficientlysplendid, but that its construction, its architec-ture, its dimensions, and its arrangements, arevoid of majesty and regularity. It is about 250feet long and 75 broad ; it is low and supported inthe interior by 24 pillars in four rows, which runthe whole length of the cathedral. The two centrerows form the nave of the church, which is 25feet broad ; the other two rows divide the aisles atequal distances of 12| feet, so that the nave aloneis of the width of the two aisles, which are on itsright and left. The chief altar, instead of being,like the Roman altars, in the centre, is placedagainst the wall. The choir occupies one halfof tlie nave, and the arrangement of the churchis such, that not more than 400 persons can seethe officiating priest at whatever altar he may beperforming tlie service. The exterior does notevince any taste or skill in the architect ; thesteeple alone, without having received any em-bellishment from art, has at least the merit of aboldness to which the cathedral has no pretensions.The only clock in Caracas is in this steeple ; itstrikes the quarters, and keeps time pretty well.The humble architecture of the first church inCaracas springs from a source highly honourableto the inhabitants, and which we are thereforebound to relate : The episcopal chair having beentranslated from Coro to Caracas, (as we have be-fore observed), in 1636, there was no necessityuntil this period for a cathedral in this city ; andwhen they had begun to carry into execution aproject of erecting a magnificent church, therehappened, on 11th June 1641, a violent earth-quake, which did great damage in the city. Thiswas regarded as an admonition of heaven to makethe fabric more capable of resisting this sort ofcatastrophe, than of attracting the admiration ofthe curious. From this time, therefore, they nolonger thought of, or rather they renounced, all ideasof magnificence, to give the building nothing butsolidity. But as they have never since expe-rienced any shock of an earthquake, they haveresumed the project of building a handsome ca-thedral.

17. Religious customs, — The people of Caracas,like all the Spaniards, are proud of being Chris-tians, and are very attentive to the duties of re-ligion, that is to the mass, days of obligation, to]

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The antidote, however, is oil taken in abundanceinternally, and applied outwardly. Neither wheatnor barley are known here, but the place aboundsin maize and rice, of which they make cakes, andwhich are the common bread of the natives, andmore particularly so that called cazave^ being asort of cake made of the root yiica^ name, or mo-niato. There are also a great number of cottontrees. The arms of this city are a green crossupon a gold ground, with a lion rampant oneach side. It was sacked in 1593 by RobertBaal, a pirate ; in 1583, by Sir Francis Drake, 23years from the time of its being fortified, and notfrom its foundation, as according to Mr. La Ma-tiniere ; again iti 1695, by Mr. Ducase, assisted bythe adventurers or fiibustiers, who completely pil-laged it : but a great sensation having been causedamongst the inhabitants at the loss of a superb se-pulchre made of silver, in which it rvas usual ona good Friday to deposit the eucharist, they hadthe good fortune to obtain its restitution throughthe interest and favour of Louis XI F. TheEnglish, under the command of Admiral Vernonand Sir Charles Ogle, besieged this city in 1740,when, although its castles were destroyed, andit was completely besieged, it would not surren-der, being gloriously defended by the viceroyDon Sebastian de Esiava, and Don Bias de Lezo,who caused the English to abandon the enterprisewith precipitancy and with great loss. [For thisconduct on the part of the English, several reasonswere assigned besides the strength of the place ;namely, the mortality among the troops, wantof skill in the commanders, and certain ditferencesbetween the admiral and the general. The forti-fications which they demolished have since beenrepaired.] It is the only part of all America wherethere is etfective coin of a fourth part of a real insilver. Its inhabitants amount to 9160 souls incommunion. It has been the native place of manycelebrated persons, such are,

Don Augustin Samiento de Sotomayor, of the or-der of Santiago, viscount of Portillo.

Don Andres de la Vega, professor at Salamanca,a famous lawyer.

Fray Carlos de Melgarejo, a religious Domini-can, an excellent preacher, and a man of unble-mished life.

Don Caspar de Cuba and Arce, head collegiateof San Marcos de Lima, oidor of Chile.

Don Gonzalo de Herrera, Marquis of Villalta,governor of Antioquia.

Don Gregorio Castellar y Mantilla, governor ofCumana, and general of the armada of the guardof the coasts of Cartagena.

Don Joseph de Paredes, captain of infantry,knight of the order of Santiago.

Fray Joseph Pacheco, of the order of St. Au-gustin, master, visitor, and vicar-general i:i his pro-vince of the Nuevo Reyno.

The Father Joseph de Urbina, of the extin-guished company, rector of the college of SantaFe.

Don.Iuan Fernandez Rosillo, dean of the churchof his country, bishop of V^erapez and of Mecho-acan .

Fray Juan Pereyra, a religious Dominican.

Don Lope Duke Estrada, kiiight of the order ofSantiago.

It is in long. 75° 24' and lat. 10° 25' n. [Foraccount of the present revolutions, see Vene-zuela.]

Bishops who have presided in Cartagena.

1. Don Fray Tomas del Toro, a monk of theorder of St. Domingo, elected the . first bishop in1532; but being at Talavera, his country, at thetime, he unfortunately died before he was conse-crated.

2. Don Fray Geronimo de Loaisa, a Dominicanmonk, renowned for his virtue and talent, and forhis experience in Indian affairs ; he was elected inthe room of the former, was consecrated at Valla-dolid, and there he erected the church into a ca-thedral in 1538, the same year in which he enteredCartagena ; from hence he was promoted to thearchbishopric of Lima in 1542.

3. Don Fray Francisco de Santa Maria y Bena-vides, of the order of St. Gerome, of the illustriousfamily of the Marquises of Fromesta ; serving atthat time the Emperor in Flanders, he took to areligious life, and was elected bishop of Cartagenain 1543. The city, in his time, was plundered bytwo pirates, lieaded by the Spanisli pilot AlonsoVexines, who cominitted thisactout of revenge fora flogging he had received ; they also ill-treatedthe venerable prelate, who had the additional griev-ance, in the year L551, of witnessing the city inflames. In 1554 he was promoted to the churchof Modonedo in Galicia, and was succeeded inCartagena by,

4. Don Fray Gregorio de Beteta, a Dominicanmonk, brought up in the convent of Salamanca, andone of the twenty who went to the Nuevo Reynode Gratiada, from whence he passed over to Mex-ico to convert the Indians, and afterwards withthe same object to the provinces of Santa Marta,Uraba, ami Cartagena ; and being teacher amicurate in one of his settlements, he received theorder of presentation to this bishopric in 1555 ;although he endeavoured to decline the dignify,

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and government of Neyba in the kingdom of Gra-nada. It rises in the paramo or mountain desertofQuindiu, traverses and waters the valleys ofLas Lanzas, and unites itself witli that of SanJuan, taking the name of Coello, from a Spaniardof this name having been drowned in it. It thenenters the Magdalena.

COMBEJU, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Rey in Brazil ; situate at the sourceof the river Curitaba.

COMBERUI, Bay of, on the coast of the pro-vince o.i\6. captainship of Rey in Brazil. It liesbetween the bay of Tasay and the island of Gallo.

COMBES, a settlement of the island of Bar-badoes, in the district of the parish of St. George.

COMBINCUMA, a spacious, and but littleknown country of the kingdom of Quito. It isfull of woods, in which there are many wild beastsand snakes of various kinds, and it is watered bymany rivers, all of which enter the s. side of theMaranon. Amongst the various nations whichinhabit it is that of the Tontones.

COMBITA, a settlement of the province andcorregirniento oi Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada. It is of a cold temperature, and pro-duces the fruits corresponding with its climate.It contains 100 house-keepers, and as many otherIndians, and is two leagues to the n. zo. of itscapital.

COMBLES, Los Cinco, a settlement andparish of the island of St. Christopher, one of theAntilles ; situate on the shore of the n. w. coast,and in the part formerly possessed by the Eng-lish.

COMBOY, a rocky shoal of the N. sea, to thes. of that of La Vivora.

COMEAPA, a settlement of the province andulcaldia mayor of Los Zoques in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

COMECUERO, a river of the province andgovernment of Honduras in the kingdom of Guate-mala. It runs into the gulf which has tlie nameof the province.

COMETA, PUNTA DE, a point or cape ofthe Caico Grande, or Del N. (of the N.) on the n. e.coast.

Cometa, a shoal of rocks, near upon the n. e.coast of the island of Caico Grande, or Del N.and by the former point, from whence it takes itsname.

(COMFORT Point is the s. easternmost partof Elizabeth City county in Virginia, formed byJames river at its mouth in Chesapeak bay. PointComfort lies 19 miles w. by n. of cape Henry.]Comfort Point, another point, which is also

of the same coast and province as the former, andwithin that bay, being one of the points which formthe entrance of the river York.

Comfort Point, another, on the s. coast ofHudson’s bay, in the province of this name.

COMICHIGELES, Sierra de, in the pro-vince and government of Tucumán, and boundedby the sierra of Cuyo, in the kingdom of Chile. Itruns from 5. s. e. on the shore of the Concara, andin fact follows the course of that river.

COMISARIO, Punta del, a long strip ofland which runs into the sea on the coast of theprovince and government of Cartagena, betweenthis city and the point of S. Bernardo.

COMISTAHUACAN, a settlement of the pro-vince and alcaldia mayor of Los Zoques in thekingdom ol' Guatemala.

COMITLAN, a settlement of the province and'alcaldia mayor of Chiapa in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

COMITLAN, another settlement, in the pro-vince and alcaldia mayor of Capanabastla in thesame kingdom.

(COMMANOES, one of the Small Virginisles, in the W. Indies, situate to the n. n. e. ofTortilla.)

COMOCAUTLA, San Pedro de, a settle-ment of the head settlement of Zapotitlan, andalcaldia mayor of Xacatlan, in Nueva Espana,three leagues distant from its head settlement.

COMO-LEWU, or Rio de los Sauces, call-ed also Gran Desaguadero. See Sauces.

COMONDU, San Joseph de, a settlementof the missions which were held by the regularsof the company of Jesuits in the province of Ca-lifornia ; situate near the sea-coast, between thesettlements of La Concepcion and San FranciscoXavier.

COMONDU, San Joseph de, a bay of this pro-vince, between the bay of Concepcion and theisland of Carmen.

COMOPORO, a settlement of the governmentof Maracaibo in the province of Venezuela;situate on the coast of the lake towards the e. part.

COMORI, Crique de, a creek and establish-ment of the French, in their possessions inGuayana.

COMORIPA, or Comoriopa, as some willhave it, a settlement of the province of Ostimuriin Nueva Espana; situate on the shore of the riverHiaqui, between the settlements of Cocoria andTecoriona.

COMPOSTELA, a province and alcaldiamayor of Nueva Galicia. Its jurisdiction extendsfrom the mouth of the large river San Pedro, as

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21. Don Fray Pedro de Espineira ; elected in1762 ; he governed until his death, in 1778.

22. Don Francisco Joseph de Maran ; electedin 1779.

Concepcion de la Vega, another city, inthe island of St. Domingo, founded by the AdmiralChristopher Columbus, on a beautiful and spaciousplain, or Uanura^ celebrated for a conquest gainedon it by a numerous army of Indians. It has a goodparish church, erected into a bishopric, and wliichwas afterwards done away with in 1605, it beingthen embodied with the archbishopric of S. Do-mingo. it has also a convent of the religiousorder of St. Francis, in which is deposited andvenerated the first cross that the discoverer and con-queror of this country planted here ; which, al-though the Indians have endeavoured with all theirmight to break and destroy, has resisted all theireftbrts. Twenty-five leagues from the capital ofS. Domingo.

(Concepcion, a town of the province and go-vernment of Paraguay ; situate on the e. side ofthe river Paraguay, about SO leagues n. of Asun-cion. Lat. 23'^ 23' 8" s. Long. 57° 16" <®.)

(Concepcion del Pao, a city of the provinceand government of Caracas ; composed of the in-habitants of Trinity, of Margareta, and of Caracas,who owned the folds in the plains near the Ori-noco, to the s. of Barcelona ; they here succes-sively fixed their dwellings, for the purpose ofbeing in the centre of their property, and of super-intending it themselves. In 1744 the number ofthese houses were found considerable enough to ac-quire the name of village. There are only 2300people of all classes here, subsisting will] facilityby Ihe fertility of the soil. The air and water aregood, and the only inconveniences the inhabitantsexperience are an excessive lieat, and inundationsarising from the long and heavy rains. The produceof the land is merely the provisions common to theCQuntry. The wealth of the inhabitants consistsentirely in cattle, which they export to Trinity,liia Guarapiche or Orinoco, This village, nowa city, is distinguished from St.John the Baptistdel Pao, situate in the province of Venezuela, bythe title of Concepcion del Pao. Lat. 8° 42' n.Long. 65° 10' ra.)

Concepcion, a settlement, the capital of theprovince and corregiwicnlo of Xauja in Peru.

Concepcion, another, of tlie same province andcorregimiento, in which there is a convent of thereligious order of St. Francis.

Concepcion, another, of the province and cor-regimknto of Lucanas in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Otoca.

Concepcion, another, of the same province andkingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Paraisancos.

Concepcion, another, of the province and cor-regimiento of Chichas and Tarija in the same king-dom, and of the district of the former.

Concepcion, another, of the province and cor-regimienlo of Vilcas Huaiman in the same king-dom ; annexed to the curacy of Vizchongo.

Concepcion, another, of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Leon in Nueva Espana, andof the bishopric of Mechoacan ; annexed to thecuracy of Rincon. It contains 208 families of In-dians, 100 of Spaniards, and ^0 oi Mustees. Itproduces wheat, maize, and other seeds, and is aquarter of a league from its curacy, and fourleagues from the capital.

Concepcion, another small settlement or ward,united to that of Tequiszillan, of ihealcaldia mayorof Theotihuacan in the same kingdom.

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichare held by the religious order of St. Francis, inthe province of Texas and kingdom of Nueva Es-pana. It is 112 leagues to the e. n. e. of the pre-sidency of San Antonio de Bejar.

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province and government of Mainas,of the kingdom of Quito ; situate on the shore ofthe great river Maranon, on a point of land formedby the same, and where this river is entered by theApena and the Guallaga,

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province of Tepeguana, and kingdomof Nueva Vizcaya; situate on the bank of theriver Florido, near the settlement and real of themines of Parral.

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichbelong to the religion of St. Francis, in the pro-vince of Taraumara, and kingdom of Nueva Viz-caya, lying 17 leagues distant between the s. ands. w. of the real of the mines of San Felipe de Chi-guagua.

Concepcion, another, with the surname ofAchaguas, being composed of Indians of this na-tion, in the kingdom of Granada ; of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits in Orinoco; situate on the shore of theriver Meta.

Concepcion, another settlement, the capital ofthe province and captainship of Itamaraca in Bra-zil ; situate on the top of a mountain by the sea-side. It has a magnificeut parish church, and isgarrisoned by two companies of troops, it con-tains 300 housekeepers, and has three large sugar.

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(bring in exchange dry goods, and this they doeither by avoiding the vigilance of the guards, orby purchasing a connivance. The population ofCoi^ is composed of 10,000 people of all colours ;few slaves are to be seen here, since the Indians,although they everywhere else have a particularpartiality for the blacks, entertain a decided aver-sion against them in this city. This antipathywas very useful in 1797 to the public tranquillity,for when the Negro slaves employed at w ork inthe fields, wished to follow the example of theblacks of St. Domingo, and selected chiefs, underwhom they committed some robberies, the In-dians of Corojoined the white people, and marchedagainst the rebels with most extraordinary cou-rage ; the revolt was thus suppressed almost assoon as it broke out ; the ring-leaders were hang-ed, and every thing was restored to order ; therebel army never amounted to more than 400blacks. All work at Coro is done by Indians,notwithstanding the wages are very low ; indeedthey li ve here with so much parsimony that a per-son cannot fetch fire from his neighbour’s withoutcarrying in exchange a piece of wood of the sizeof the firing he takes away, and even this is notalways done without difficulty. The city has nospring, and the water they drink is brought fromthe distance of half a league by asses in barrels, ofwhich two compose a load. The houses, thoughoriginally well built, bear evident marks of misery,and of the ravages of time; those belongingtothe Indians are yet more pitiful. The streets runin parallel lines, but are not paved ; the publicbuildings consist of a parish church, formerly acathedral, which title is yet given to it by the in-habitants, although for more than 160 years ithas been without a bishop or a chapter, the dutybeing performed by two curates, belonging to aconvent containing about seven or eight Francis-cans, and to a parish church in which are threemonks of the same order. The civil power isexercised by a cahildo. Since 1799, a militarycommandant has been established here, who sharesat the same time the judicatory authority, and thatof the police ; his revenue being 2000 dollars perannum. Two miles to the n. of Coro is an isthmusof about one league in breadth, which joins tlie pen-insula of Paragona to the continent ; it stretches outfrom the s. w. to n. w. about 20 leagues ; is inhabit-ed by Indians and a few whites, whose only em-ployment is the rearing of cattle, which they smug-gle over in great numbers to Cura^oa ; thebutchers’ shops of that island being always bettersupplied than those of the principal cities of TicrraFirme.

VOL. I,

This was the only city of Venezuela, exceptMaracaibo, which had not declared independenceon the 2Ist August 1811. See Venezuela.The city is in lat. 11° 24' n. and long. 69° 40'; itis a league distant from the sea, SO leagues w. ofCaracas, 33 n. of Barquisimeto, and 55 of Mara-caibo.)

Coro, a settlement of the province and coregi-miento of Pastos in the kingdom of Quito ; situateon the shore of the river Cascabeles, where thisenters the Caqueta.

Coro, another, of the province and corregi-mienlo of Carangas in Peru, and of the arch-bishopric of Charcas ; annexed to the curacy ofCorquemar.

COROA Grande, a settlement of the provinceand captainship of Pará in Brazil ; situate on theshore of the river Tocantines.

COROA, a large shoal near the coast of the pro-vince and captainship of Marañan in Brazil, atthe entrance of the river Coras.

COROAIBO. SeeCossA.

COROBAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chachapoyas in Peru, inwhich is venerated a miraculous image of NuestraSenora de Guadalupe. Near it are two caves,each capable of containing 50 horsemen with theirspears erect.

COROBAMBA, another settlement in the aboveprovince and kingdom.

COROBANA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana, which, according to Mr.Beilin, in his chart and description of the course ofa part of the Orinoco, runs continually n. andenters this river near where it runs into the sea.

COROCOTO, a settlement of Indians, of theprovince and corregimiento of Cuyo in the king-dom of Chile; situate on the shore of one of thelakes of Huanacache, distinct from the followingtown.

COROCOTO, a town of the above province andcorregimiento, a reduccion of the Pampas Indians ;situate on the shore of the river Tunuyan, nearthe high road which leads from Mendoza to BuenosAyres, in the district of which are tiie estates ofCarrizal Grande, Carvalillo, Lulunta, and Men-docinos.

COROCUBI, a river of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions.It is small, runs s. and enters the Negro, forminga dangerous torrent or whirl-pool, which bears thesame name.

COROI, a settlement of the missions wliicli be-long to the French in Guayana; situate near th«coast, and at the mouth of the river Kourrou.

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figure, with four bastions, built wfili stockades.There were, some years since, about 2000 whiteinhabitants and 7000 slaves. They cultivate In-dian corn, tobacco, and indigo; raise vast quan-tities of poultry, wliich they send to New Or-leans. They also send to that city squared timber,staves, &c.]

COUQUECURA, a settlement of Indians ofthe province and corregimiento of Itata in thekingdom of Chile; situate on the coast.

COURIPI, a river of the province of Guay-ana==, in the F rench possessions.

COUSSA, a settlement of the English, in S.Carolina ; situate on the shore of the river of itsname.

Coussa, another settlement, in the same pro-vince and colony, on the shore of a river of thesame denomination. This river runs n. w. and en-ters the Albama.

COUSSARIE, a river of the province of Guay-ana, in the part possessed by the French. It entersthe Aprouac,

COUSSATI, a settlement of Indians of S. Ca-rolina ; situate on the shore of the river Albama.

COUUACHITOUU, a settlement of Indians ofS. Carolina, in which the English have an esta-blishment and fort for its defence.

COUUANCHI, a river of the province andcolonj'^ of Georgia, which runs e, and enters theOgeclii.

COUUANAIUUINI, a river of the provinceof Guayana, in the part which the Frenchpossess.

(COVENTRY, a township in Tolland county,Connecticut, 20 miles e. of Hartford city. ’’ It wassettled in 1709, being purchased by a number ofHartford gentlemen of one Joshua, an Indian.)

(Coventry, in Rhode Island state, is then. easternmost township in Kent county. Itcontains 2477 inhabitants.)

(Coventry, a township in the n. part of NewHampshire, in Grafton county. It was incorpo-rated in 1764, and contains 80 inhabitants.)

(Coventry, a township in Orleans county,Vermont. It lies in the n. part of the state, atthe s. end of lake Memphremagog. Black riverpasses through this town in its course to Memphre-magog.)

(Coventry, a township in Chester county,Pennsylvania.)

(COW AND Calf Pasture Rivers are headbranches of Rivanna river, in Virginia.)

(COWE is the capital town of the CherokeeIndians ; situated on the foot of the hills on bothsides of the river Tennessee. Here terminates the

great vale of Cowe, exhibiting one of the mostcharming, natural, mountainous landscapes thatcan be seen. The vale is closed at Cowe by aridge of hills, called the Jore mountains. Thetown contains about 100 habitations. In the con-stitution of the state of Tennessee, Cowe is de-scribed as near the line which separates Tennesseefrom Virginia, and is divided from Old Chota,another Indian town, by that part of the GreatIron or Smoaky mountain, called Unicoi or Unacamountain).

COWETAS, a city of the province and colonyof Georgia in N. America. It is 500 miles distantfrom Frederick, belongs to the Creek Indians,and in it General Oglethorp held his conferenceswith the caciques or chiefs of the various tribescomposing this nation, as also with the deputiesfrom the Chactaws and the Chicasaws, who in-habit the parts lying between the English andFrench establishments. He here made some newtreaties with the natives, and to a greater extentthan those formerly executed. Lat. 32° 12' n.Long. 85° 52' w. (See Apalachichola Town.)

(COWS Island. See Vache.)

(COWTENS, a place so called, in S. Carolina,between the Pacolet river and the head branch ofBroad river. This is the spot where General Mor-gan gained a complete victory over Lieutenant-co-lonel Tarleton, January 11, 1781, having only 12men killed and 60 wounded. The British had 39commissioned officers killed, wounded, and takenprisoners ; 100 rank and file killed, 200 wounded,and 500 prisoners. They left behind two piecesof artillery, two standards, 800 muskets, 35 bag-gage waggons, and 100 drago"on horses, which fellinto the hands of the Americans. The field ofbattle was in an open wood.)

COX, a settlement of the island of Barbadoes,in the district of the parish of San Joseph, nearthe e. coast.

Cox, another settlement in the same island,distinct from the former, and not far distantfrom it.

COXCATLAN, S. Juan Bautista de, asettlement and head settlement of the district of thea/caMa mayor of Valles in Nueva Espana ; situateon the bank of a stream which runs through aglen bordered with mountains and woods. It con-tans 1131 families of Mexican Indians, SO of Spa-niards, and various others of Mulattoes and Jlfus-tees, all of whom subsist by agriculture, and inraising various sorts of seeds, sugar-canes, andcotton. Fifteen leagues from the capital.

Coxcatlan, another settlement and head settle-ment of the alcddia mayor of Thehuacan in the

fr

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shoal of rock, Vfliich runs into the sea at the en-trance of the river Maranan, in the same pro-vince.

CUMAIPI, a small river of the country of LasAmazonas, or part of Guayana possessed by thePortuguese. It runs c. under the equinoctial line,and enl^ers tlie Marailon, at its mouth or entranceinto the sea.

CUMANA, a province and government of S.America, called also Nueva Andalucia ; though,properly sj)eaking, the latter is only a part of Cu-inana, which contains in it also other provinces.It extends 76 geographical leagues from e. to w.from the point of Piedra, the oriental extremity ofTierra Firme, on the coast of Paria, and greatmouth of Drago, as far as the mouth of the riverUnare, the deep ravines of which form, as it Avere,limits to the w. between this province and that ofVenezuela; the waters of the aforesaid river run-ning for a great distance towards the serramaor settlement of Pariguan ; from wliich point theline of division is undecided as far as the riverOrinoco, 20 leagues to the s. From the w. to s.it is 270 leagues, namely, from the sea-coast to thegreat river or country of Las Amazonas, the terri-tory of which is divided by the renowned riverOrinoco. On the e. it is terminated by the sea,which surrounds the coast of Paria, the gulfTriste, the mouths of the Orinoco, the riverEsquivo and Cayenne ; on the s. no. it is boundedby the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, which extendsits limits as far as the river Orinoco, being dividedby this river from Guayana. It is a continued ser-Tanitty running along the whole coast from e. to w.being nine or 10 leagues wide ; and although it isnot without some llanos or extensive plains, theseare but little known, and are entirely impassable,owing to the swamps and lakes caused by the in-undations of the rivers which flow down from thesierra. The sierra, in that part which looks to then. is barren, and in the vicinities of the coast thesoil is impregnated with nitre, and is unfruitful.The temperature is healthy but cold, especially atnight. The most common productions of this pro-vince are maize, which serves as bread, supplyingthe want of wheat, ^uca root, of which anotherkind of bread is made, cosabe, plantains, and otherfruits and pulse peculiar to America ; also cacao,although with great scarcity, and only in the n.part ; and sugar-canes, which are only cultivatedin a sufficient degree to supply the sugar consumedhere. It has some cattle ; and although there aremeans of breeding and feeding many herds, thenatives choose rather to supply themselves from

ANA.

the neighbouring province of Barcelona, notwith-standing the difficulty of bringing them hither oversucli rugged and almost impassable roads. Tliewhole of the coast yields an immense abundance offish, also of shell fish of various kinds, and of themost delicate flavour. Of these the consumjitiouis very great, and a great proportion of them aresalted, and carried to the inland parts ; and to theprovince of Venezuela alone upwards of 6000quintals yearly. It has several convenient and se-cure ports and bays, and indeed the whole coast iscovered with them, as the sea is here remarkablycalm, and peculiarly so in the celebrated gulf ofCariaco, as also in the gulfs of the lake of Obispo,Juanantar, and Gurintar. It has many very abun-dant saline grounds, so much so, that the wholecoast may be looked upon as forming one ; sincein any part of it as many might be established aswere necessary ; and this without mentioning thatcelebrated one of Araya, and those of the gulfTriste, between the settlements of Iraca and Soro,and the Sal Negra, (Black Salt), used only by theIndians. In this province there are only threerivers of consideration, that of Cariaco, of Cumana,and of Guarapiche : the others which flow downfrom the serrama are of little note, and incorporatethemselves with the former before they arrive inthe valley. Its jurisdiction contains six settle-ments belonging to the Spaniards, seven belongingto the Indians, 13 to the missions supported bythe Aragonese Capuchin fathers, and 16 belong-ing to the regular clergy. [From the river Unareto'the city of Cumana, the soil is very fertile.From the Araya to the distance of between 20 and25 leagues, more to the e. the coast is dry, sandy,and unfruitful. The soil is an inexhaustible mineboth of marine and mineral salt. That which isnear the Orinoco is fit only for grazing, and this isthe use to which it is put. It is here that all thepens of the province are kept. All the rest of thiscountry is admirably fertile. The prairies, thevalleys, the hills, proclaim by their verdure and bythe description of the produce, that nature has de-posited here the most active principles of vegetablelife. The most precious trees, the mahogany, theBrazil and Campechy woods, grow even up to thecoast of Paria ; and there are found here manyrare and agreeable birds. In the interior of the go-vernment of Cumana are mountains, some of Avhichare very high : the highest is the Tumeriquiri,which is 936 fathoms above the surface of the sea.The cavern of Guacharo, so famous among the In-dians, is in this mountain. It is immense, andserves as an habitation for thousands of night birds, 14 B 2

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