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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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In its vicinity is a reservoir, formed of hewn stone, which serves at once to catch the waters as they come down from the sierra, and to conduct them to Tepcaca, three leagues N N W of its capital.

ACAXUCHITLAN the head settlement of the alcaldía mayor of Tulazingo, to the N E. It contains 406 Indian families, and is a curacy of the bishopric of La Puebla de los Angeles. Distant four leagues to the E of its capital.

ACAYUCA, the alcaldía mayor of Nueva España, and of the province of Goazacoalco. Its jurisdiction is very extended, and consists, for the most part, of places of a hot and moist temperature, but so fertile is it that it gives annually four crops of maize; and as there is no demand for this production in the other provinces, it follows, of course, that the Indians here are little given to industry. Indeed the ground never requires the plough, and the whole of their labours during the seedtime consist merely in smoothing the surface of the mountains, and in scratching up the ground with a pointed stick. It is at times infested by locusts, which destroy the plants and crops ; and having never been able to find a remedy against this evil, the inhabitants had recourse to the protection of the virgin of La Conception, which is revered in the head settlement of the district of the Chichimecas ; and it is said that, owing to her mediatory influence, the plague has been thought to diminish. This province is watered by the abundant river of the Goazacoalco. The settlements of this alcaldía are, Xocoteapa, Macayapa, Menzapa, Molocan, Theimanquillo, Tinantitlan, Chinameca, Zoconusco, Olutla, Otcapa, Pochutla, Ostitan, Cozolcaque, Ixhuatla, Macatepeque.

another, the capital of the above, situate on the coast of the N. sea. Its inhabitants are composed of 30 families of Spaniards, 296 of Indians, and 70 of Mustees and Mulattoes. It lies a little more than 100 leagues S E of Mexico. Lat. 17° 53' N Long. 94° 46' 30" W.

another, settlement in the alcaldía mayor of Pachuca, in the kingdom of Nueva España, annexed to the curacy of Tezayuca, and containing 100 Indian families.

Acacingo, the head settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Tepcaca, situate in a plain of a mild temperature, and watered by two streams which run close to all the houses of the settlement, to the great comfort of the inhabitants. In the middle of the above plain there is a beautiful fountain, a convent of the religious order of St. Francis, a very ancient building, and some other buildings, which have been erected since the conquest of the country. The parish church is a piece of the most ancient architecture. The inhabitants are composed of 150 families of Spaniards, 104 of Mustees, 31 of Mulattoes, and 700 of Indians; 3 1/4 leagues E to the NE of its capital.

ACAZUTLA, a port of the S sea, on the coast of the province of the alcaldía mayor of Zuchitepec, in the kingdom of Guatemala, between the point of Los Remedios, and the settlement of Guapaca. [Lat. 14° 42' N Long. 90° 3'.]

ACCHA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru, situate on the skirt of a mountain, which has a prominence, seeming as though it were about to fall upon the settlement. This mountain is constantly dwindling away without any assignable cause. Lat. 13° 19 s. Long. 71° 13' W

ACCHA-AMANSAIA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru.

ACCHA-URINZABA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masque in Peru.

Aceites, a river of the province and government of Caraccas, in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises in the mountains, and enters the Orituco.

[ACCOCESAWS. The ancient town and principal place of residence of these Indians is on the W side of Colorado of Rio Rouge, about 200 miles S W of Nacogdoches, but they often change their place of residence for a season : being near the bay, they make great use of fish, oysters &c.; kill a great many deer, which are the largest and fattest in the province ; and their country is universally said to be inferior to no part of the province in soil, growth of timber, goodness of water, and beauty of surface; they have a language peculiar to themselves, but have a mode of communication by dumb signs, which they all understand: number about 80 men. Thirty or forty years ago, the Spaniards had a mission here, but broke it up, or moved it to Nacogdoches. They talk of resettling it, and speak in the highest terms,of the country.]

[ACCOMACK County, in Virginia, is situated on a peninsula, bounded N by Maryland, E by the ocean, and on the W by Chesapeak bay, and contains 13.959 inhabitants, including 4.262 slaves.]

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CARACAS.

and it is, indeed, pretty generally believed thatthis cross was left here by the above apostle.

CARAC, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Canta in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of Lampian.

CARACARA, an ancient and small province ofCharcas in Peru, to the s. of Cuzco, and the lastof those conquered by the sixth Emperor or Inca.

CARACARES, a large lake of the province andgovernment of Paraguay. It is 26 leagues inlength, and has many fertile islands, inhabited bybarbarian Indians, and empties itself through acanal into the river Paraná on the e. side. It isin 30° 41' s. lat.

CARACAS, Santiago de Leon de, a capitalcity of the province of Venezuela, founded byDiego Losada in the year 1566, in a beautiful andextensive valley of more than four leagues inlength. It is of a very mild temperature, beingneither troubled with excessive heat or cold. It iswatered by four rivers, which fertilize its territory,and make it abound as well in delicate waters asin exquisite fruits and flowers: the streets are wideand straight, the buildings elegant and convenient,and it is ornamented by four marts. It is the seatof the bishopric, erected in the city of Coro in1532, and translated to this spot in 1636. It hasa beautiful cathedral church, besides some parishchapels, which are Nuestra Señora de Alta Gra-cia ; San Pablo, which is also an hospital, andNuestra Señora de la Candelaria, out of the wallsof the city. There is also an hospital De la Ca-ridad (of charity) for women ; a convent of the re-ligious order of Santo Domingo, in which is heldin high respect the wonderful image of the Virginof the Rosary, presented by Philip II. There isanother convent of San Francisco, in which ispreserved a piece of the wood of the cross left bythe Governor Don Martin de Robles Villafañate ;another of our Lady of La Merced ; a monasteryof religious women of La Concepcion ; another ofthe Carmelites Descalzas (barefooted) ; a college andseminary for the education of youth, with five ca-thedrals ; four hermitages dedicated to San Mau-ricio, Santa Rosalia de Palermo, La Divina Pas-tora, and La Santisima Trinidad. Charles II.granted to this city the privilege of allowing itsalcaldes to govern the province in the vacancy ofa governor ; and Philip V. permitted a commer-cial company of Biscayans to be established, whoreaped considerable affluence, especially in the ar-tiles of cacoa and sugar, the chief source of its re-venues ; but this company was abolished in thereign of Charles III. in the year 1778 ; which cir-cumstance was considered by the city and the pro-

vince as a most considerable privilege. The num-ber of inhabitants amounts to about 1000, besidesan infinity of people of colour by whom it is in-habited. The natives have shown themselves tobe of an ingenuous disposition, clever, affable, andcourteous. Its arms are a grey lion rampant in afield of silver, having between his arms a scollop-shell of gold, with the cross of Santiago ; and thecrest is a crown with five points of gold. It wassacked in 1566 by Sir Francis Drake, who camethither in an English cruiser ; also by the Frenchin 1679. It is three leagues distant from the portof Guaira. Long. 67° w. Lat. 10° 30' n.

The bishops who have presided in this city.

1. Don Rodrigo Bastidas, dean of the holychurch of St. Domingo, the chief of the visitationof the bishopric of Puertorico; elected on the 27thOctober 1535, and who died in 1542.

2. Don Miguel Gerónimo Ballesteros, dean ofthe church of Cartagena of the Indies ; electedin 1543.

3. Don Fr. Pedro de Agreda, of the order ofSt. Domingo, collegiate of San Gregorio of Val-ladolid ; presented to this bishopric in 1558, andtaking possession of it 1560. In his time the citywas sacked by the English : he died in 1580.

4. Don Fr. Juan de Manzanillo, of the order ofSt. Domingo ; presented in the year 1582 ; he re-built the church, and died in 1593.

5. Don Fr. Diego Salinas, of the order of St.Domingo, native of Medina del Campo, colle-giate of San Gregorio de Valladolid, prior in dif-ferent convents, procurator-general in the court,and elected bishop in the year 1600 : in the fol-lowing year he died.

6. Don Fr. Pedro Martin Palomino, of the orderof St. Domingo ; elected in 1601 : he died the sameyear.

7. Don Fr. Pedro de Oña, native of Burgos, ofthe order of our Lady of La Merced ; he was even-ing lecturer in the university of Santiago, electedbishop in 1601, canonized in the convent of Val-ladolid, and before he came to his church, waspromoted to the bishopric of Gaeta, in the king-dom of Naples, in 1604.

8. Don Fr. Antonio de Alcega, of the order ofSt. Francis ; he Avas formerly married, and heldthe office of accountant to the royal estates in Yu-catán, when he became a widower, and giving allhe possessed as alms to the poor, he took to a re-ligious life, and Philip III. being charmed withhis virtues presented him to this bishopric in1664 ; he celebrated the synod in Caracas theyear following, and died in 1609.

9. Don Fr. Juan de Bohorques, native of Mex-

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CAR

Of Guadalupe, between the Three Rive*‘s and theAgujero del Ferro.

Carbet Point, on the s. coast of lake Superior,in New France, opposite the island of Philipeaux.

Carbet, a river of the island of Guadalupe,which tuns nearly e. and enters the sea betweenthe Grande and the Orange.

CARBON, Island of, situate in the middle ofa lake on the coast of the province and govern-ment of Buenos Ayres.

Carbon, Monte de, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Puchacay in the king-dom of Chile; situate upon the coast and on theshore of the bay of Culumo, near the mouth ofthe river Biobio.

CARBONIERE, a settlement of the island ofNewfoundland, situate on the e. coast, on theshore of the bay of Concepcion.

CARCAI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Lucanas in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Soras. It has a hot spring of water ofvery medicinal properties, and its heat is so greatthat an egg may be boiled in it in an instant.

CARCARANAL, a river of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres. It rises in the pro-vince of Tucuman, in the mountains of the cityof Cordoba, runs nearly from e. torw. with thename of Tercero, and changing it into Carcara-iial, after it becomes united Avith the Saladillo, joinsthe Plata, and enters the Salado and the Tres Hec-manas.

CARCAZI, a settlement of the government andJurisdiction of Pamplona in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, situate betAveen two mountains, whichcause its temperature to be very moderate. It pro-duces much Avheatand maize ; in its cold parts suchfruits as are peculiar to that climate, and in themilder parts sugar-cane. Its neighbourhoodabounds Avith flocks of goats ; and the number ofinhabitants may amount to about 200 Spaniardsand 30 Indians. It is situate on the confines Avhichdivide the jurisdictions of Tunja and Pamplona.

CARCHIPOR, a river of the province and go-vernment of Cayenne in the kingdom of TierraFirme. It rises in the mountains of the same pro-vince, and runs into the sea on the side of capeOra nge.

(CARDIGAN, about 20 miles e. of Dartmouthcollege, New Hampshire. The township ofOrange once bore this name, which see.)

CARDIN, a settlement of the province of Ve-nezuela and government of Maracaibo, situate onthe shore of the coast, in the interior of the gulfformed by the peninsula of cape San Roman.

CARDINALES, Sombreros de. See articlePitangoas.

CARDOSO, Real de, a settlement and realof gold mines in the province and captainship ofTodos Santos in Brazil; situate on the shore ofthe large river of San Francisco, to the n. of thevillage of Tapuyas.

CAREHANEU, a small river of Pennsylvania,which runs w. and enters the Ohio.

CAREN, a valley or meadow-land of the king-dom of Chile, renowned for its pleasantness, beauty,and extent, being five leagues in length; also fora fountain of very delicate and salutary water,which, penetrating to the soil in these parts, ren-ders them so exceedingly porous, that a person tread-ing somewhat heavily seems to shake the groundunder him. There is an herb found here that keepsgreen all the year round: it is small, resemblingtrefoil, and the natives call it caren: it is of a veryagreeable taste, and gives its name to the valley.

CARENERO, a bay of the coast of the king-dom of Tierra Firme in the province and govern-ment of Venezuela. It is extremely convenientfor careening and repairing ships, and from thiscircumstance it takes its name. It lies behind capeCodera towards the e.

CARET, Anse be, a bay of the island of St.Christopher, one of the Antilles, on the n. e. coast,and in the part possessed by the French beforethey ceded the island to the Englissh. It is be-tween the bays of Fontaine and Morne, or Fuenteand Morro.

=CARETI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Darien, and kingdom of Tierra Firme.It rises in the n. mountains, and enters the sea iathe bay of Mandinga.

CAREU, a settlement of the island of Barba-does, in the district of the parish of Christchurch.

CARGONACHO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Castro Vireyna in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Philpichaca.

CARGUAIRASO, a lofty mountain and vol-cano of the province and corregimiento of Rio-bamba in the kingdom of Quito. It is in the dis-trict of the asiento of Ambato, covered with snowthe whole year round. Its skirts are covered withfine crops of excellent barley. In 1698 this pro-vince was visited by a terrible earthquake, whichopened the mountain and let in a river of mud,formed by the snows which were melted by thefire of the volcano, and by the ashes it threw up.So dreadful were the effects of this revolution thatthe whole of the crops were completely spoiled ;and it was in vain that the cattle endeavoured to-

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C A U

C A U

(Catherine’s Isle, a pleasant island on theharbour of Sunburj, in the state of Georgia.)

(Cathehine’s Isle, a small productive islandon the s. coast of St. Domingo, 20 leagues e. ofthe town of St. Domingo.)

(CATHERINE's Town, in Ontario county, NewYork, lies three miles s. of the 5 . end of Senecaake.)

Catilina, a bay of tlie e. coast of the island ofNewfoundland, between the capes Santos andNuevo.

(CATO, a military township in New York state,12 miles s. e. of lake Ontario, and about 20 s. ofOswego fort.)

CATOA, a river of the province and country ofLas Amazonas. It rises in tlie mountains of theAndes, runs n. and enters the Marailon on the s.side, between the rivers Coari and Coyame.

(==CATORCE, or La Purissima ConcepcionDe Alamos de Catorce==, one of the richest minesof New Spain, and in the intendancy of San LuisPotosi. The real de Catorce, however, has onlybeen in existence since 1773, when Don SebastianCoronado and Don Bernarbe Antonio de Zepedadiscovered these celebrated seams, which yield an-nually the value of more than from 18 to ^20 mil-lions of francs, or from 730,460/. to 833,500/.sterling.)

(CATTAHUNK, one of the Elizabeth isles, inthe state of Massachusetts. See Buzzard’sBay.)

CATUARO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Cumaná in the kingdom of TierraFirme ; situate near to and s. of the city of Ca-riaco.

CAUACUAN, a river of the province and cap-tainship of Rey in Brazil. It runs e. and entersthe Uruguay, between the rivers Ipau and Pi-ricaya.

CAUAIAMA, a small river of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres. It runs e. and en-ters the Uruguay, between the rivers Guarey andBracuaenda.

CAUAILLON, a settlement and parish of theFrench, in their possessions in St. Domingo ; situ-ate on the coast and at the w. head, near the bayof its name, between the settlements of Torbec andLos Cayos.

CAUAIU, a small river of the same provinceand government as the former. It runs w. andenters the Parana, between the rivers Verde andYocare-mini.

Cauaiu, a bay of the same island, opposite theIsla Vaca or Cow island.

CAUALA, a settlement of the province and cap-iainship of Espiritu Santo in Brazil ; situate > 1 . ofVillarica.

CAU-ALLERIZAS, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Yaguarsongo in the king-dom of Quito.

CAUANA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Conchucos in Peru.

CAUASAN, San Francisco Xavier de, atown of the province of Copala, and kingdom ofNueva Vizcaya ; situate in the midst of the sierraof Topia, on the coast of the S. sea, on the shoreof the river Plastin. It has a small port for lesservessels, which has oftentimes been invaded byenemies. It is a curacy administered by the cler-gy, and to which two small settlements of MexicaaIndians are annexed.

CAUCA, a large and copious river of the pro-vince and government of Popayán, which risesin the mountains of the government of Mariquita,and running 160 leagues from s. to?i. in whichcourse it collects the ’waters of many other rivers,it passes near the cities of Popaj'iin, Buga, Cali,and Anserma ; from whence it is navigable until itenters the large river of the Magdalena. It is verynarrow where it passes through the cities of Po-payan and Antioquia, and forms the letter S, tak-ing its course through rocks, which render its na-vigation very dangerous. The Indians, however,are so dexterous in guarding their canoes fromrunning against the rocks by paddles, that it isvery seldom indeed that any accident occurs tothem. They call this strait Las Mamas de Cara-manta, from a city which was here of this name.Many make this navigation for the purpose ofavoiding a round-about journey of many days, andin a bad road through the mountains ; and it issaid that some have had the good fortune to dis-cover a route by water free from all difficulties,and that this was actually made by the pontificateof the bishop of Popayan, Don Diego de Mon-toy.

Cauca, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela. It runs n. and entersthe sea at the mouth of the Golfete or Littlegulf.

CAUCAQUA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Venezuela ; situate near the riverTuy, opposite the cape of Codera.

CAUCHUPIL, a river of the kingdom of Chile;it runs to the s. s. e. and then turning s. enters theLebo.

CAUIAN, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Para in Brazil ; situate on the

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C A X

C A X

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from six to 20 feet diameter, worn almost perfectlysmooth, into the solid body of a rock.]

(CAVIANA, an island in S. America, towardsthe n. w. side of Amazon river. Lat. 30' n.)

(CAVOGLIERO, a bay on the side of theisland of St. Domingo, at the mouth of the riverRomaine, 24 leagues e. of St. Domingo.)

CAXABAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Riobamba in the kingdom ofQuito.

Caxabamba, another settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huamachuco in Peru.

CAXACAI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru.

CAXAMARCA, a province and corregimientoof Peru, in the bishopric of Truxillo ; boundeds. e. by the province of Caxamarquilla, e. by thatof Chachapoyas, n.w. by that of Luya and Chil-Igos : all these three being situate at that part oft^e Maranon which serves as a limit to this pro-vince of Caxamarca. It is bounded ». by the pro-vince of Jaen, n. w. by that of Piura, w. by thatof Saha and by a part of Truxillo, and s. by thatof Huamachuco. It is in length 40 leagues froms. e. ion. w. ; and in breadth, or across, 36 leagues.To enter it through the province of Truxillo, whichis the grand road, it is necessary to pass the cordil-lera, which is not here so lofty as in the s. pro-vinces. This province, however, abounds witheminences which are branches of the cordillera;and on account of the height and situation ofthese, a great variety of temperature is experienced,some parts being subject to an intense heat, andothers to , a severe cold. Thus it partakes of thenature of the sierra, and its uneven figure no lesscorresponds with it : but it is for the most part of agood temperature, particularly in the capital. Theprovince abounds greatly in all kinds of fruits andcattle : in it are fabricated cloths, baizes, blankets,canvas for sails of ships, and cotton garments of aVery fine and excellent quality. Formerly its prin-cipal commerce was in swine ; at present it is not,though these animals still abound in some parts.It is watered by many rivers, of which those risingon the w. side of the cordillera, as the Sana, Lam-bay eque, and those passing through the provinceof Truxillo, all enter the S. sea. The others,amongst which that of the Criznejas is the largest,incoporate themselves with the Maranon. On itsshores are lavaderos, or washing-places of gold;and its rivers in general abound in very good andwholesome fish. Besides the fruits and the pro-ductions of every kind found in this province, ithas to boast many gold and silver mines, some ofwhich are worked. There a e also some of copper,

very fine lead, brimstone, and alcaparrosa. To-wards the n. part, where it touches the province ofJaen, are found some bark-trees, the production ofwhich, although not equal to the trees of Loxa, isof the colour of heated copper, and possesses allthe virtues of the common bark. Here are alsomany medicinal herbs, and amongst them the cele-brated calagimla. In the time of the Indians, andbefore the conquest, it was so well peopled that itsnatives formed upwards of 500 settlements. Atpresent they amount to 46,000, being divided into46 settlements. The capital bears the same title,and the repartimiento of the corregidor used toamount to 80,000 dollars, and it paid an alcavalaof 640 dollars per annum.

The settlements are.

Caxamarca, the ca-pital,

Santa Catalina,

San Pedro,

San Joseph,Cherillo,

Jesus,

Asuncion,

Contumaza,

Cascas,

Guzrnanga,

San Benito,

Trinidad de Chetu,S. Francisco doCay an,

Santa Cruz,

Pion,

Santa Catalina deChugod,

San Pablo de Cha-lique,

S. Luis de Tuniba-din,

S. Bernardino de

S. Juan de Llallan,Nepos,

Tinguis,

San Miguel de Pal-laques,

Celedin,

Sorocucho,

San Marcos,Catacachi,Amarcucho,Ichocan,

San Juan de Huam-bos,

Cochabamba,

Llama,

Cachen,

Cutervo,

Queracoto,

Chachopin,

Tocmocha,

Zocota,

Todos Santos deChota,Tacabamba,Yauyucan.

its figure is

Nice,

The capital is large and handsomeirregular, and it is situate upon a level plainT Thehouses are of clay, and the streets are wide andstraight. The parish church, Avhich has threenaves, is of finely worked stone, and the buildingexpences of it Avere defrayed by King Charles II.in the time of the viceroy the Duke of La Palata,in 1682. It has a parish of Spaniards, calledSanta Catalina ; two of Indians, which are SanPedro and San Joseph ; two convents of the orderof St. Francis, one of the Observers, and anotherof the Recoletans ; an hospital and a convent ofBethlemites, a monastery of nuns of La Concepcion,an house of entertainment of Nuestra Senora de

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CAY

CAY

caldia mayor of Zacattan, in Nueva España, fiveleagues from its head settlement.

CAXIBARI, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Itamaraca in Brazil, situate near thes. side of the town of La Concepcion.

CAXICA, or Busongote, a settlement of thecorregimiento of Zipaquira in the Nuevo Reynode Granada, is of a moderately cold temperature,being agreeable and healthy, and producing muchwheat, maize, barley, and other productions inci-dental to a cold climate. Its population amountsto 150 families, and as many families of Indians,who had in it a capital fortress, in which the Zipaor king of Bogota shut himself up in order to de-fend the entrance into his kingdom against theSpaniards: he was, however, routed and taken byGonzalo Ximenez de Quesada in 1537. Is fiveleagues to the n. of Santa Fe.

CAXITITLAN, the alcaldia mayor and dis-trict or jurisdiction of the kingdom of Nueva Ga-licia, and bishopric of Guadalaxara : in its districtis a large, fertile valley, abounding in every kind ofseed, as maize, wheat, French beans, and varioussorts of pulse : is of a mild temperature, and thedistrict of its jurisdiction consists of six settlements :in it is the great lake or sea of Chapala : it is sevenleagues s, e. of Guadalaxara. Long. 102° 43'. Lat.20° 35'.

San Luis, Istahuacan,

Cuyatan, Santa Cruz,

Coscomatitlan, Axixiqui.

CAXITLAN, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Almololoyan, and alcaldia mayor of Colina,in Nueva España : it contains 30 families of Spa-niards, 20 of Mustees, and five of Mulattoes : inits district are various estates of palms of Cocos,(palmasde Qocos)^ and some herds of large cattle :is seven leagues to the w. of its head settlement.

(CAYAHAGA, or Cayuga, sometimes calledthe Great River, empties in at the s. bank of lakeErie, 40 miles e. of the mouth of Huron ; havingan Indian town of the same name on its banks. Itis navigable for boats ; and its mouth is wide, anddeep enough to receive large sloops from the lake.Near this are the celebrated rocks which projectover the lake. They are several miles in lengtl),and rise 40 or 50 feet perpendicular out of thewater. Some parts of them consist of several strataof different colours, lying in a horizontal direction,and so exactly parallel, that they resemble thework of art. The view from the land is grand,but the water presents the most magnificent pros-pect of this sublime work of nature ; it is attended,however, with great danger ; for if the least stormArises, the force of the surf is such that no vessel

can escape being dashed to pieces against the rocks .Colonel Broadshead suffered shipwreck here in thelate war, and lost a number of his men, when astrong wind arose, so that the last canoe narrowlyescaped. The heathen Indians, when they passthis impending danger, offer a sacrifice of tobaccoto the water. Part of the boundary line betweenthe United States of America and the Indiansbegins at the mouth of Cayahaga, and run‘< up thesame to the portage between that and the Tuscarawabranch of the Muskingum. The Cayuga nation,consisting of 500 Indians, 40 of whom reside in theUnited States, the rest in Canada, receive of thestate of New York an annuity of 2300 dollars, be-sides 50 dollars granted to one of their chiefs, as aconsideration for lands sold by them to the state,and 500 dollars from the United States, agreeablyto the treaty of 1794. See Six Nations.)

CAYENNE, a large island of the province andgovernment of Guayana : it is six leagues in lengthfrom n. to s. and three quarters of a league in itsbroadest part. On the n. side it has the sea, onthe VO . the river Cayenne, on thee, the Ou>ti, andon the s. an arm which is formed by this and theOrapii. The soil is excellent, fertile, and irrigatedby many streams. That part whicli looks to then. is the most pleasant and healthy ; and in it aremany mountains well cultivated and covered withcountry seats. The part facing the s. is muchlower, and abounds in meadows, called salanas,and which arc inundated in the rainy seasons.The point of the island formed by the mouth ofthe river Cayenne, is called Caperoux, where thereis a fortress with a French garrison, and below thisa convenient and large port, capable of containingin security 100 ships. The French establishedthemselves in this island in the year 1625, andabandoned it in 1654, when the English enteredit, and were routed by Mr. de la Barre, in the year1664. The Dutch had their revenge in 1676 : butthe year following it was recovered by the French,under the command of D’Estrees, on whom the ce-lebrated Jesuit Carlos de la Rue made the followinginscription :

Joanni

Comiti Eslrceo

Vice AmeralioCayana. TabacoVI. CaptisBatavorumAmericana classedeleta

Colonii. excisis.

[The capitulation of Cayenne to the Englisharms, in conjunction with the Portuguese, took

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C E D

DEL PUERTO, a city of the province and go-vernment of Antioquia in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; founded by Gaspar de Kodas, on thespot of the Matanza of Valdivia, in 1676. It haschanged its place several times, on account of thebadness of.its temperature : and, lastly, in the year1588, it was removed by Francisco Redondo tothe spot where it now stands : is one league fromthe river Cauca, on a very steep declivity, whichis also of an unhealthy temperature, althoughabounding greatly in gold mines, which are,however, but little worked. Jt is the nativeplace of,

Fr. Marcos Vetancur, provincial of St. Domingoin Santa Fe:

Fr. Lorenzo de Figueroa, of the province ofSan Francisco :

Don Andres de Vetancur, elected bishop ofLa Concepcion in Chile;

Fr. Diego de Figueroa, provincial of San Augus-tin in Santa Fe : and

Don Luis de Vetancur, precentor of Quito, in-quisitor of Lima, and bishop-elect of Popayan ;all brothers, and men of singular virtue andlearning.

CEAPA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chilques and Marques in Peru; an-nexed to the curacy of Pampacucho.

CEBACO, a settlement of the province andalcaldia major of Matagalpa in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CECIL, a county, being one of the ten whichcompose the colony and province of Maryland.

(Cecil, a township in Washington county,Pennsylvania.)

CECILIA, Dona, a settlement of the provinceand government of Santa Marta in the kingdomof Tierra Firme ; situate on the shore of the largeriver Magdalena, opposite the lake Zapatosa, threeleagues from the town of Mompox.

CECONTEPEC, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldia major of San Salvador in the king-dom of Guatemala.

(CEDAR Point, a port of entry in Charlescounty, Maryland, on the e. side of Potowmacriver, about 12 miles below port Tobacco, and 96s. by w. of Baltimore. Its exports are chiefly to-bacco and Indian corn, and in 1794 amounted invalue to 18,593 dollars.)

(Cedar Point, a cape on the w. side of Dela-ware bay, in St. Mary’s county, Maryland.)

(Cedar Lick, a salt spring in the state of Ten-nessee, 19 miles from Nashville, four from Bigspring, and six from Little spring.)

Cedar, a river of the province and colony of

C E N

Pennsylvania, which traverses New Jersey, andenters the sea.

Cedar, another small river of the province andcolony of Delaware, which runs e. and enters thesea in the bay of its name.

Cedar, a small island of South Carolina; situatewithin the strait of Parapticoe.

Cedar, another island of the province and co-lony of Maryland, between that of Chingoteagand that of Little Matompkin.

CEDAZOS, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Zapopan in Nueva Es-paña, in which dwell some Maslees, Mulattoes,and Indians, who live by cultivating seeds.

CEDROS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Paucartambo in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Challabamba.

Cedros, another settlement in the province andgovernment of Cinaloa ; situate on the shore of theriver Mayo, on the confines of the province ofAstimuri.

Cedros, a river of New France or Canada.It runs s. e. and enters the lake Erie near themouth of the strait of Misigagues.

CEGUEHUE, a small river of the provinceand government of Quijos y Macas in the king-dom of Quito. It enters, a little way from itssource, into the Azuela.

CELAYA, a town of the intendancy of Gua-naxuato in the kingdom of Nueva Espana.Sumptuous edifices have been recently constructedhere, as also at Queretaro and Guanaxuato. Thechurch of the Carmelites of Celaya has a fineappearance ; it is adorned with Corinthian andIonic columns. Its height is 1833 metres, or 6018feet.

CELEDIN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru.

CELLACACA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chichas and Tarija in Peru.

CENDRE, a cape or point of land of the coastof Acadia.

CENEGUANGA, a settlement of the provinceand government of Santa Marta in the kingdom ofTierra Firme; situate on the coast near the riverPiedras.

CENEGUETAS, a settlement of the provinceand government of Guayaquil in the kingdom ofQuito.

CENGUYO, San Pedro de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Yrimbo, and alcaldia mayorof Maravatio, in the bishopric of Mechoacan,and kingdom of Nueva Espaiia. It contains 60families of Indians, and is two leagues to the n. zo.of its head settlement.

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ters the sea between the river Rosa and the settle-ment and parisli of Cul de Sac.

CERICUNCUA, a bay of the coast of Brazil,in the province and captainship of Seara, betweenthe port of Tortuga and the settlement of NuestraSeilora del Rosario.

CERINZA, a settlement of the corregimiento ofTunja in tlie Nuevo Reyno de Granada, is of acold temperature, and abounds in cattle and theproductions peculiar to the climate. It contains300 families, and lies in a valley, from which ittakes its name.

CERMEN, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Venezuela ; situate on the side ofthe town of San Felipe, towards the e. betweenthis town and the settlement of Agua Culebras, onthe shore of the river Iraqui.

CERRALUO, a town and presidency of theNuevo Reyno de Leon, garrisoned by a squadronof 12 soldiers and a captain, who is governor ofthis district, for the'purpose of restraining the bor-dering infidel Indians. Between the e. and n. isthe large river of this name ; and from this begins atract of extensive country, inhabited by barba-rous nations, who impede the communication andcommerce Avith regard to this part and the pro-vinces of Tejas and Nuevas Felipinas. Is 35leagues to the e. of its capital.

Cerraluo, a bay of the coast and gulf of Ca-lifornia, or Mar Roxo de Cortes, opposite an islandwhich is also thus called ; the one and theother hav-ing been named out of compliment to the Marquis ofCerraluo, viceroy of Nueva Espana. TJie afore-said island is large, and lies between the formerbay and the coast of Nueva Espana.

CERRITO, a settlement of the island and go-vernment of Trinidad, near the n. coast, and to thee. of the capital of San Joseph de Oruna.

Cerrito Verde, an open and insecure port inthe bay of La Concepcion, of the kingdom ofChile, and Pacific sea.

Cerrito, another, with the surname of SantaAna. See Ctuayaquie.

CERRITOS, a small settlement of the jurisdic-tion of Orizava, and alcaldia mayor of Ixmiquil-pan, in Nueva España.

Cerritos, another settlement in the provinceand goverment of Popayán.

CERRO, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Angaraes in Peru.

Cerro, another, in the province and corregi-miento of Porco in the same kingdom.

Cerro, another, with the surname of Negro,in the province and corregimiento of Rede, and king-dom of Chile ; situate at the source of the river Itan.

==Cerro, another, called San Miguel de CerroGordo==, which is a garrison of the province of Te-peguana in the kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya. Itssituation is similar to the road which leads to it,namely, a plain level surface ; although, indeed,it is divided by a declivity, in ivhich there is apool of water, and by Avhich passengers usuallypass. This garrison is the residence of a captain,a Serjeant , and 28 soldiers, who are appointed tosuppress the sallies of the infidel Indians. In itsvicinity is a cultivated estate, having a beautifulorchard, abounding in fruit-trees and in zepas,which also produce fruit of a delicious flavour.The garrison lies 50 leagues n. w. of the capitalGuadiana.

Cerros, San Felipe de los, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Uruapa, and alcaldia mayorof Valladolid, in the province and bishopric ofMcchoacan. It contains 26 families of Indians,and lies eight leagues to the e. of its head settle-ment, and 10 from the capital.

Cerros, another, in the province and corregr-miento of Castro-Vireyna in Peru.

CESARA, a large and copious river of theNuevo Reyno de Granada, which was called bythe Indians Pompatao, meaning in their idiom,“ the lord of all rivers,” is formed of severalsmall rivers, which flow down from the snowysierras of Santa Marta. It runs s. leaving the ex-tensive llamtras of Upar until it reaches the lakeZapatosa, from whence itj issues, divided into fourarms, which afterwards unite, and so, following acourse of 70 leagues to the w, enters the Magda-lena on the <?. side, and to the s. of the little settle-ment called Banco.

CESARES, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe kingdom of Chile towards the s. Of themare told many fabulous accounts, although theyare, in fact, but little known. Some believe themto be formed of Spaniards and Indians, being thoseAvho Avere lost in the straits of Magellan, and be-longed to the armada which, at the beginning ofthe conquest of America, Avas sent by the bishop ofPlacencia to discover the Malucas. Others pre-tend that the Arucanos, after they had destroyedthe city of Osonio, in 1599, took aAvay with themthe Spanish Avomen ; and that it Avas from the pro-duction of these Avomen and the Indiatis that thisnation of the Cesares arose. Certain it is, that theyare of an agreeable colour, of a pleasing aspect,and of good dispositions. They have some lightof Christianity, live without any fixed abode ; andsome have affirmed that they have heard the soundof bells in their territorj". It Avas attempted in1638, by the governor of Tucuman, Don Geronimo

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Cotagaitilla,Escara,Chacnacocha,Chequelti,Colnaca,Calccha,Tomola,Tumula,Estarca,

Tupisa,

Oploca,

Tatasi,

Ingenio del Oro

Nueva Cbocaya,Talina,

Verque,

Chacapa,

Clioroma,

Libilibi,

Moraya,

Moxo,

Tojo,

Sococha,

Remedios,

Chisloca,

Suipacha.

And in the district of Tarija,

Tarija de Vieja, La Concepcion,

San Bernardo de Tarija, Berraeo.

The district of Tarija is a territory full of que-hradas and craggy mountains, as far as the punasand lofty plains of Escayache and Tacsora, wherethere are two salt lakes. It is composed of fourfertile valleys lying on the skirts of hills, and inthese are found human bones of a prodigious size,petrified, shin-bones of a yard and a quarter long,and teeth larger than a fist. In the midst of one ofthese valleys is the town of San Bernardo de Tarija,which is the capital of the province. Its reparti-miento used to amount to 82,350 dollars, and itsalcavala to 558 dollars per annum. For the settle-ments of this district, see above.

Chichas, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Condesuyos de Arequipa in thesame kingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Sala-manca.

Chichas, a river of the province and govern-ment of Tucumán, in the district and jurisdictionof the city of Xuxuy, which divides this city fromthat of the capital of San Miguel.

(CHICHESTER, Upper and Lower, twotownships in Delaware county, Pennsylva-nia.)

(Chichester, a small township in Rocking-ham county, New Hampshire, about 35 miles n. w.of Exeter, and 45 from Portsmouth. It lies onSuncook river, was incorporated in 1727, andcontains 491 inhabitants.)

CHICHIBACOA, Cabo de, a cape on thecoast of the province and government of SantaMarta, and kingdom of Tierra Firrae ; 80 leaguesto the w. of that city.

CHICHICAPA, a settlement and capital of thealcaldia mayor of the province and bishopric ofOaxaca in Nueva Espana. It is of a mild tem-perature, and was anciently the real of the mostesteemed silver mines; but is at present muchfallen of, the working of the mines having been for

the most part abandoned from the want of hands,in as much as the natives have given themselvesup to the trade of cochineal, in which its territoryabounds : it produces also much seed and maize.Its jurisdiction includes some of the finest andrichest provinces. It consists of five head settle-ments of districts, to which are subject as manyother. Its capital contains 430 families of Indians,and some of Spaniards, Muslees, and Mulattoes.Ninety leagues s. e. of Mexico. The other settle-ments are.

Zimitlan,Tepezimatlan,La Magdalena,Atzozola.

Rio Hondo or Thequila,

San Agustin de Losi-

cha,

Tetipai,

Cozan tepee,

CHICHICATEPEC, a settlement and head set-tlement of the alcaldia mayor of Villalta in NuevaEspana, is of a cold temperature, contains 26 fa-milies of Indians, and is seven leagues to the s. e.of its capital.

CHICHICOAUTLA, St. Francisco de, asettlement and head settlement of the alcaldia mayorof Metepeque in Nueva Espana. It contains 91families of Indians.

CHICHIMEQUILLA, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district of Zitaquaro, and alcaldiamayor Maravatio, in the bishopric of Mechoacanand kingdom of Nueva Espana. It contains 84families of Indians, and is a quarter of a league tothe s. of its head settlement.

CHICHIQUILA, a settlement of the head set-tlement of Quinuxtlan, and alcaldia mayor of SanJuan de los Llanos, in Nueva Espana. It contains180 families of Indians.

CHICHOI, a settlement of the province andkingdom of Guatemala.

CHICHOPON, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Xuambos.

CHICIBICHE, a point of the coast of the pro-vince and government of Venezuela, opposite theisland of Aves.

(CHICKAHOMINY, a small navigable riverin Virginia. At its mouth in James river, 37miles from point Comfort, in Chesapeak bay, is abar, on which is only 12 feet water at commonflood tide. Vessels passing that may go eightmiles up the river; those of 10 feet draught 12miles ; and vessels of six tons burden may go 32miles up the river.)

(CHICKAMACOMICO Creek, in Dorchestercounty, Maryland, runs s. between the towns ofMiddletown and Vienna, and empties into Fishingbay.)

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smaller size, are more delicate, and of superiorflavour to those caught in Newfoundland. Am-bergris is also found upon the coast. The moun-tains abound in trees of the most beautiful kind,laurels, oaks of four sorts, the carob-tree, thewood of M'hich is extremely hard, reulis, cinna-mon-trees, Cyprus, sandal, paraguas, hazel-nut,ivall-nut, volos, and alerces, which are a kind ofcedar, of which they make planks in great num-bers to carry to Lima and other parts. Many ofthese trees are green the whole year round, fromthe moisture and shelter they derive from the cor-dillera, which contains in its bowels much fire, asappears from the volcanoes found upon it, andwhich are 12 in number, without counting manyothers, even as far as the straits of Magellan. Al-though these mountains and woods are so immense,beasts of a savage kind are rarely to be found, ex-cepting such, now and then, as a tiger or leopard ;but there are great numbers of deer, stags, vicunas,and Imanacos, which served as food for the In-dians; as likewise of birds, as ducks, vandurrias,swans, herons, kites, doves, piuguenes, tarlales,parrots, hawks, falcons, goshawks ; and many sing-ing birds, as goldfinches, larks, starlings, diucas,trillies, and many others. Its present vegetableproductions are wheat, barley, Indian wheat, grainsof different kinds, oil of the finest olives, excellentwines, much esteemed in Peru; all kinds of suc-culent fruits, oranges, lemons, innumerable sorts ofapples, and every kind of garden herb. Flax andliemp is cultivated here, from which they makerigging for vessels trading to the S. seas ; and thiscould be supplied in a proportion equal to any de-mand. This kingdom keeps up a considerabletrade with Peru ; for, one year with the other, itsends to Lima from 150 to 180,000 bushels ofwheat, 120,000 quintals of grease, much wine,and other productions, as almonds, nuts, lentils,a sort of wild marjoram and bastard saffron ; andtakes in exchange sugar and cloths of the country.It derives also great emolument from large herdsof the cow kind, from flocks of sheep and goats,of the skins of which they procure fine tanned lea-ther, leathern jackets, sharaois leather, and soles ofshoes : from these animals is also procured muchfat or tallow. Flere are numerous breeds of mostbeautiful horse.s, and some of these, from excellingall the others in the swiftness of their paces, arecalled aguiliUias. It also abounds in mules, andit would still more so, if, as formerly, they werein request at Peru, where their skins were usedinstead of fine cloths and carpets. Baizes arc stillmade ; as likewise some sorts of small cord, coarse€tutfs, and many kinds of sackcloth, which is the

common vesture, and consists of a square garment,with an opening to admit the head ; but manylooms have been lost through a want of Indians inthe manufactories. The greater part of thesepeople still prefer their original uncivilized state,depending upon the natural fruits of the earth forfor their food ; for, besides the productions aboveenumerated, they used to gather, without thetrouble of cultivation, all sorts of delicious fruits,such as pines, though different from those of Eu-rope; and to make excellent chiclia of the murtilla.Indeed the luxuriance and abundance of delicateflowers, and aromatic and medicinal herbs, is al-most incredible ; of the last the following are themost esteemed for their virtue, viz. the cancliala-gua, quinchemali, alhahaquilla, and culen. Itcontains many mines of the richest gold, silver,copper, lead, tin, quick-silver, brimstone, load-stone, and coal : yielding immense riches, whichthe Indians never appreciated, nor even gavethemselves the least trouble about, until the con-quest of the Incas, who began to work them ;sending portions of gold to Cuzco for the orna-ment of the temples and palaces, rather by way ofgift than of tribute. The incursions and rebel-lions of the Indians, principally of the Arauca-nians, who, in the year J599, took and destroyedsix cities, viz. Valdivia, Imperial, Angol, SantaCrux, Chilian, and Concepcion, is the cause whythe population is in many places not large, andthat it consists of poor people, living in smallcommunities ; the fact being, that they are alwaj^sliving in constant dread of a surprise from the In-dians; not but that on the confines there are gar-risons, well defended by Spanish troops, with ne-cessary provisions of artillery, victuals, and am-munition. The war which has from the begin-ning been sustained by the Spaniards against thesemost ferocious Indians, has tended greatly to re-duce the numbers of the former ; some havingbeen killed on the spot, and others doomed to beslaves to their indignant conquerors. Indeed,when it was found that arms were of no availagainst them, some missionaries of the society ofthe Jesuits were sent among them, in the year1612, in order to propagate the gospel ; when theFathers Horacio Vechi and Martin de Arandasuffered martyrdom at their hands: after which atreaty of peace was made by the Governor Mar-quis de Baides, A. D. 1640, and which has sincebeen renewed yearly ; their deputies coming re-gularly to the capital to receive the presents fromthe king of Spain. They have, notwithstanding,at different times broken the treaty, making in-cursions into the Spanish towns, and their manner4

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CHILE.

of declaring war is by sending from town to townan arrow clenched in a dead man’s hand,which they call comocatoria; and this they didin the year 1723, making terrible havoc andslaughter. This kingdom is evidently, fromwhat has been asserted, the most fertile, abun-dant, rich, and delightful region of all America ;to which Nature has granted, in profusion, allthat she has given to others, either with a sparinghand, or at too high a price. The people areliealthy and robust. The wind which generallyprevails is thes. w. and the Puelche, which comesfrom the cordillera, is somewhat troublesome. [ThePuelche wind takes its name from some Indians socalled, and from whose country it blows.] Chileis divided into two bishoprics, suffragan to thearchbishopric of Lima ; and these are of Santiagoand La Concepcion. It is governed by a president,governor, and captain-general, which title wasfirst possessed by Doii Melchor Bravo de Saravia,and its government is divided into 18 provincesor districts, which are,

Cuyo,

Copiapo,

l-a Serena or CoquimbiQuillota,

Aconcagua,

Santiago,

Melipilla,

Rancagua,

Colchagua,

And the islands of Juatal is Santiago.

Catalogue of the barbarous Nations and principalPlaces in the kingdom of Chile.

Nations. Mountains.

Chacao,

Chilian,

Concepcion.

Confines,

Copiapo,

Coquimbo or La Se-

rena,

Imperial,

Loyola,

Mendoza,

Osorno,

Santiago,

San Juan de la Fron-tera,

San Luis de Loyola,Valdivia,

Valparaiso,

Villarica.

Forts.

Arauco,

Los Angeles,

Eyou,

Guasco,

Y tata,

Labapi,

Laxa,

Lebo,

Ligua,

Liman,

Limathi,

Longatoma,

Mapocho,

Mataquito,

Maule,

Maypo,

Nubbe or Nuble,Pereroa,

Poangue,

Queule,

Ralemo,

Salado,

Teno,

Maule,

Tucapel,

Tongoy,

Ytata,

Yumbel.

Topocalma,

Chilian,

Promontories.

Turuyan,

Estancia del Rey or

Ballena,

Uten.

Rede,

Carnero,

Ports.

Puchacay,

Cauten,

Castro,

La Concepcion,

Changui,

Cauten,

Valdivia,

Feliz,

Cerrito Verde,

Chiloe,

Villiva,

Chacao,

Fernandez. The capi-

Rivers.

Andalie,

Cumberland,

Guasco,

Antallis,

Araucanos,

Cauquis,

Chauracabis,

Guarpes,

JUncos,

Pequenches,

Pevinges,

Pincus,

Poyas,

P niches,Yanacunas.

Lakes.

Aguas Calientes,Guanacache,Mallabauquen,Padaguel,

Puren.

Antojo,

Chilian, vole.

Chuapa, vole.

Estancia de Rey, gold,Larapangui, silver,Ligua, vole.

Llaon, gold,Llupangui, gold,Notuco, vole.

Payen, lead,

Peteroa, vole.

Petorca, gold,Quillacoya, gold,Sinn, vole.

Yapel, gold.

Cities.

Calbuco,

Canetej

Castro,

Arancagua,

Biobio,

Buono,

Cachapoal,

Cauquenes,

Cauren,

Cauten,

Chavin,

Civapa,

Claro,

Copiapo,

Curarahua,

De Lora,

De la Sal,

Paracas,

Quillin,

Talcaguano,

Tome,

Tongoy.

Isles.

Chiloe,

Clones,

Farallones,

Fernandez,

Guaiteca,

Moche,

Quiriquina,

Santa Maria.

Catalogue of the Presidents, Governors, and Cap-tains-general of the Kingdom of Chile.

1. The Adelantado Pedro de Valdivia, conquer-or of the kingdom; he served much, and withgreat valour, in the conquest of Peru, was a colo-nel of foot under Francis Pizarro, entered in theyear 1537, founded the first towns, and governeduntil the year 1551 ; he was made prisoner, fight-

2

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CHILE.

[lized state.— ‘6 The metals.— 1 . Substitute forwriting.

Chap. II. Fi rst expedition of the Spaniards inChile.— Encounters with the natives., with varioussuccess, until the alliance formed between theSpaniards and Promaucians.

1. Almagvo marches against Chile. —2. Road fromPeru to Chile.-— o. Kindhj received at Copiapo.—4. First European blood shed.— 5. Battle withthe Promaucians.— Q. Expedition abandoned,and why.—l. Valdivia marches against Chile.—8. Province of St. Ja go describe'd.—'il. The ca-pital founded.— \0. Steady enmitnj of the Mapo-chinians.—l\. The mine of Quillota.— 12. The

compassionate ulmena. 13. Recruits fom

Peru, under Monroy.—-\t^. Stratagem of theQuillotanes.-—\5. Serena founded.— \Q. Pro-maucian cdlies.—ll . Valdivia sets sail for Peru,and returns with men and supplies.— \8. Con-cepcion founded.

Chap. III. Of the character and manners of theAraucanians .

1. Local situation.— 2. Character .-—3. Dress.—

4. Dwellings.— b. Division of the Araucanian

state.— 6. Its political form.-— 7. Civil institu-tions.— 8. Military system.— 3. Their arms,and mode of making av/r.— -10. Division of thespoil.— 1\. Sacrifice after the war. — \2. Con-gress of peace.— 13. System of religion.—!^.Funeral ceremonies.— \b. Division of time.—16. Astronomical ideas.— \7. Measures.— \8.Phetoric.— \9. Poetry . — 20. Medical skill.— -21. Commerce.— 22. National pride.— 23. Kind-ness towards each other.— 2^. Mode of saluta-tion. 25. Proper names.-— 20. Domestic em-

ployments. — 27. Food. -— 28. Music, and otherdiversions.

Chap. IV. The wars of the Araucanians with theSpaniards, and concomitant events.

1. The Toqui Aillavila.—2. The Toqui Lincoyan.—3. Imperial founded.---!^. Villariqa founded. —

5. The Cunches.—G. Valdivia founded.-— 7 . For-tresses of Fiiren, Tucapel, and Araiico built.—8. City of the Frontiers founded. -— 9. Threeprincipal military offices instituted at Concepcion.

— \Q. The Toqui Caupolican. 11. Valdivia

slain.— Lautaro appointed lieutenant-general,—12. The mountain Mariguenu. 13. The Go-

vernor Villa gr an. —1^. Conception destroyed.—15. The small-pox appears.-— \0. Decision ofthe audience of Lima 1 'especting the governors.-—17. Concepcion rebuilt, and destroyed by Lau-taro.— Lautaro arrives at Santiago.— 19.Death of Lautaro.— 20. Caupolican raises thesiege of Imperial.— 21. The Governor Don Gar-

cia Hurtado de Mendoza.— 22. Caupolican takenprisoner and impaled.— 23. Cahete founded.—24. The Cur.ches, their curious embassy and stra-tagem.— 25. Archipelago of Chiloe discovered.-—26. City of Osorno founded.— 27 . Caupolican theSecond.— 28. The Guarpes subjected.— 29. St.Juan and Mendoza founded,— 30. Villagran re-instated. — 31. The province of Tucuman re-stored, afterwards retaken. 32. Cahete de-stroyed.— 33. Pedro Villagran. ---34. The To-qui Pcdllataru,— 35. Archipelago of Chiloe sub-jected; description of the same ; its inhabitants,fc.-—36. The court of audience established.—

37. Suppression of the tribunal of audience.— -

38. Description of the Pehuenches .—39 . De-scription of the Chiquillanians . — 40. Landingand defeat of the English.— ^1. Nature oj thewar in anno 1589. — 42. Independence restored.--43. Expedition of the Dutch.-— All theSpanish settlements destroyed.— 1^5. Court of au-dience re-established.— i6. Ineffectual efforts ofPhilip III. to establish a lasting peace. — VI .Second expedition of the Dutch.— F8. Secondexpedition o f the English.— ^9. Peace at lengthconcluded.-— 50. Last expedition of the Dutch.— 51. Dreadful earthquake. — 52. Commercewith the French.— 53. How the Pehuenches be-came inimical to the Spaniards.— 51. Peace re-stored.

Chap. V. Present state of Chile.

1. Civil government.— 2. Military force.— -3. Ec-clesiastical government. 4. The cities anddwellings.— 5. Population.— 6. Chilian Creoles.—7. ^ate of arts and sciences.— 8. The pea-santry .—9. Dress, S;c.— 10. Diseases; small-pox, how cured.— 11 . Manners, moral and phy-sical. 12. Internal and external commerce,

mines, imports, and exports. — 13. Natural divi-sions.— U. Poliiiced divisions.— 15. Climate.— -16. Of rain. — 11 . Winds.— -IS. Meteors.— 19.Volcanoes. — 20. Earthquakes. —21. Some de-tail of productions.— 22. Present revolution.

Chap. I.

Origin and language of the Chilians .—Conquestof the Peruvians, and state of Chile before thearrival of the Spaniards.-— What was then itspolitical establishments, government, and arts.Of the origin and huiguage of the Chilians, notraces are to be found further back than the middleof the 15th century, -which was the time when (hePeruvians first began (heir conquests in this de-lightful country. It is the general opinion thatAmerica was settled from the n. e. part of Asia,but the opinion entertained by the Chilians is, (hat '3 E 2

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[ auxiliaries, from whence has sprung that rootedantipatliy which the Araucanians preserve againstthe residue of that nation. In the course of theyear 1546, Valdivia, having passed the Maule,proceeded in his career of victory to the riverItata ; but being defeated there, he relinquishedhis plans of proceeding farther, and returned toSt. Jago.

17. Valdivia sets sail for Peru ^ and returns withmen and supplies . — Being disappointed in hissuccours from Peru, he, in 1547, was on tlie eveof his departure for that country, when Pastenesarrived, but without any men, and bringing newsof the civil war which had broken out between theconquerors of the empire of the Incas. Neverthe-less, persuaded that he miglit reap an advantagefrom these revolutions, he set sail with Pastene forPeru, taking with him a great quantity of gold;on his arrival he served, in quality of quarter-mas-ter-general, in the famous battle that decided thefate of Gonzalo Pizarro. Gasca, the president, whounder the royal standard had gained the victory,pleased with the service rendered him upon thisoccasion by Valdivia, confirmed him in his otliceof governor, and furnishing him with an abun-dance of military stores, sent him back to Chilewith two ships filled with those seditious adven-turers, of whom he was glad of an opportunity tobe disembarrassed. The Copiapins, eager to re-venge the murder of their prince, killed about thesame time 40 Spaniards, who had been detachedfrom several squadrons, and were proceeding fromPeru to Chile ; and the Coquirnbanes, instigatedby their persuasion, massacred alt the inhabitantsoi’ the colony lately founded in their territory,ra,zing the city to its foundation. Francis Aguirrewas immediately ordered there, and had severalencounters with them with various success. In1549 he rebuilt the city in a more advantageoussit nation ; its inhabitants claim him as their founder,and the most distinguished of them boast them-selves as his descendants. After a contest of nineyears, and almost incredible fatigues, Valdivia,conceiving himself well established in that part ofChile which was under the dominion of the Peru-vians, distributed the land among his soldiers,assigning to each, under the title of commandery,a considerable portion, with the inhabitants liv-ing thereon. By this means, having quieted therestless ambition of his companions, he set outanew on his march for the s. provinces, with arespectable army of Spanish and Proraauciantroops.

18. Concepcion founded. — After a journey of150 miles, he arrived, without encountering many

obstacles, at the bay of Penco, which had beenalready explored by Pastene, where, on the 5th ofOctober 1550, he founded a third city, called Con-cepcion. The situation of this place was veryadvantageous for commerce from the excellence ofits harbour, but, from the lowness of the ground,exposed in earthquakes to inundations of the sea.Accordingly we find it destroyed in this mannerby an earthquake that occurred on the 8th of J uly1730, and the 24th of May 1751; for this reason,the inhabitants established themselves, on the 24thof November 1764, in the valley of Mocha, threeleagues s. of Penco, between the rivers Andalienand Biobio, where they founded New Concepcion,The harbour is situated in the middle of the baycalled Talgacuano, a little more than two leaguesw. of Mocha ; a fort is now all the building that isleft at Penco. But to return to our history, theadjacent tribes perceiving the intention of theSpaniards to occupy this important post, gave in-formation of it to their neighbours and friends theAraucanians, who foreseeing that it would not belong before the storm would burst upon their owncountry, resolved to succour their distressed allies,in order to secure themselves. But before we pro-ceed to relate the events of this war, it may bemore advisable to give some account of the cha-racter and manners of that warlike people, whohave hitherto, with incredible valour, opposed theoverwhelming torrent of Spanish conquest, andfrom henceforward will furnish all the materials ofour history.

CUAP. III.

Of the character and manners of the Arauca-nians.

1. Local situation . — The Araucanians inhabitthat delightful country situate between the riversBiobio and Valdivia, and between the Andes andthe sea, extending from 36° 44' to 39“ 50' of s.latitude. They derive their appellation of Arau-canians from the province of Arauco, which,though the smallest in their territory, has, likeHolland, given its name to the whole nation,either from its having been the first to unite withthe neighbouring provinces, or from having atsome remote period reduced them under its do-minion. This people, ever enthusiastically at-tached to their independence, pride themselves inbeing called auca, which signifies frank or free ;and those Spaniards who had left the army in theNetherlands to serve in Chile, gave to this countrythe name of Araucanian Flanders, or the InvincibleState ; and some of them have even had the mag-nanimity to celebrate in epic poetry tlie exploits]

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[in case of a siege. Modern geographers speak ofit as a city not only existing in the present time,but as very stongly fortified, and the seat of abishopric, when it has been buried in ruins formore than 200 years.

4. Villarua founded. — About the same time hedispatched Alderete, one of liis officers, with 60men, to form a settlement on the shore of the greatlake J^auquaiy to which he gave the name of Vil-larica, from the great quantity of gold that hefound in its environs. In the mean time, havingreceived fresh reinforcements, he commenced hisinarch towards the s. still kept in view byliincoyan, whom timid caution constantly pre-vented from offering himself to his enemy.

5. The Clinches. — In this manner the Spanishcommander traversed, with little loss, the Avholeof Araucania from n. to s. ; but at his arrivalat the Calacalla, which separates the Arau-canians from the Cunches, he found the latter inarms determined to oppose his passage. Whilehe was deliberaling what measures to pursue, awiiman of the country, called Recloma, had theaddress to jiersuade the Cunchese general to fa-vour the strangers ; and without foreseeing theconsequences, he permitted them to pass unmo-lested. The Cunches form one of the most valiantnations of Chile : they inhabit that tract of countrywhich lies upon the sea, between the river Cala-ealla, at present called Valdivia, and the Archi-pelago of Chiloe. They are the allies of theAraiicanians, and mortal enemies to the Spaniards,and are divided into several tribes, which, likethose in the other parts of Chile, are governed bytheir respective uhnenes.

6. Valdivia founded. — The Spanish com-mander having passed the river with his troops,founded upon the southern shore the sixthcity, called Valdivia, being the first of theAmerican conquerors who sought in this man-ner to perpetuate his family name. This set-tlement, of which at present only the fortress re-mains, in a few years attained a considerable de-gree of celebrity, not only from the superior fine-ness of the golcl dug in its mines, which obtainedit the privilege of a mint, but from the excellenceof its harbour, one of the most secure and plea-sant in the S. sea. The river is very^ broad,and so deep, that ships of the line may anchorwithin a few feet of the shore ; it also forms seve-ral other harbours in the vicinity.

7. For tresses of Puren, Tucapel, and Araucobuilt. — Valdivia, satisfied with the conquests, orrather incursions, that he had made, turned back,and in repassing the provinces of I\iren, Tucapel,

and Arauco, built in each of them, in 1553, a for-tress, to secure the possession of tire others ; as hewell knew that from these provinces alone he hadto apprehend any attempt that might prove fatalto his settlements. Ercilla says, that in this expe-dition the Spaniards had to sustain many battleswith the natives ; which is highly probable, as thecontinuance of Lincoyan in command can on noother principle be accounted for. Without re-flecting upon the imprudence of occupying solarge an extent of country with so small a force,Vahlivia had the farther rashness, on his return toSantiago, to dispatch P'rancis de Aguirre, with200 men, to conquer the provinces of Cujo andTucuman, situated to the e. of the Andes.

8. Cilj/ of the Frontiers founded. — The Spanishgeneral, indefatigable in his plans of conquest, re-turned also himself to Araircania; and in theprovince of Encol founded the seventh and lastcity, in a country fertile in vines, and gave it thename of the City of the Frontiers. This name,from events which could not possibly have been inthe calculation of Valdivia, has become strictlyapplicable to its present state, as its ruins are, inreality, situated upon the confines of the Spanishsettlement in that part of Chile. It was a richand commercial city, and its wines were trans-ported to Buenos Ayres by a road over the cor-dilleras.

9. Three principal military offices instituted atConcepcion . — After having made suitable provi-sions for this colony, Valdivia returned to his fa-vourite city of Concepcion, where he institutedthe three principal military offices ; that of quar-ter-master-general, of serjeant-major, and of com-missary ; a regulation which has, till within a fewyears, prevailed in the royal army of Chile. Atpresent only two of these offices exist ; that of thequarter-master-general, who is also called the in-tendant, and resides in the city of Concepcion,and that of the serjeant-major.

10. The Toqui Caupolican. — The next toquiwho distinguished himself in the Araucanianwars, and who succeeded Lincoyan in command,was Caupolican ; he evinced a spirit of much en-terprise and cunning, and succeeded in drivingthe S])aniards from the forts of Arauco and Tuca-pel, which Avereby his orders completely destroyed.In a succeeding battle we find this commander,from the loss of a number of his men, flying inconfusion before the Spanish artillery, and suffer-ing all the horror and disgrace attendant upon anapparent defeat, when, in a momentous crisis, ayoung Araucanian, called Lautaro, whom Valdi-via in one of his incursions had taken prisoner,]

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[baptized, and made his page, instigated by sliamefor his countrymen, quitted the victorious party,and by encouragement and entreaties prevailedupon the Araucaniaiis to return to the conflict.Thus was changed the fate of the day : of theSpanish army only two Prornaucians had the for-tune to escape: and this may be considered anepoch in the liistory of Araucanian valour, notonly from the event of the battle itself, but as be-ing the dawn of that glory which ever after signa-lized the armies of that nation under the hap])yauspices of the Araucanian Hannibal, the greatandvaliant Lautaro.

11. Valdivia slain ; Lautnro appointed lieute-nant-general. — After the deatli of V^aldivia, whowas taken prisoner in the battle, and dispatchedby an old nlnien whilst pleading for his life in anassembly of ulmenes, the young Lautaro was ap-pointed lieutenant-general extraordinary to Can-polican, with the privilege of commanding inchief another army, which he intended to raise toprotect tlie frontiers from the invasion of the Spa-niards. In the mean time the Spanish inhabitantsof the City of the Frontiers and of Puren, think-ing themselves insecure within their walls, retiredto Imperial. The same was the case of those ofVillarica, who abandoned their houses, and tookrefuge in Valdivia. Thus had the Araucaniaiisonly these two places to attack. Caupolicanhaving determined to besiege them, committedto Lautaro the care of defending the n. fron-tier.

12. The mountain Mariguenu. — The youngvicc-toqui fortified himself upon the lofty moun-tain of Mariguenu, situated on the roatl whichleads to the province of Arauco, supposing, as ithappened, that the Spaniards, desirous of reveng-ing the death of their general, would take thatroad in search of Caupolican. This mountain,which on several occasions has proved fatal to theSpaniards, has on its summit a large plain inter-spersed with shady trees. Its sides are full ofclefts and precipices ; on the part towards thew. tlie sea beats with great violence, and thee. is secured by impenetrable thickets. A wind-ing bye-path on the n. was the only road thatled to the summit of the mountain.

13. The Governor Villagran . — Fillagran, wdiohad succeeded Valdivia in the government, w as notable to cope with the valour and militar\' prowessof Lautaro. Without entering into particulars ofa desperate battle Avhich w'as fought between thesetwo commanders, we shall content ourselves withobserving, that the result was the immediate eva-cuation of Concepcion ; as Villagran, thinking it

impossible to defend that city, embarked precipi-tately the old men, the women, and children, onboard of two ships which were then fortunately inthe harbour, with orders to the captains to con-duct part of them to Imperial, and part to Val-paraiso ; while with the rest of the inhabitants heproceeded by land to Santiago.

II. Concepcion destroyed . — Lautaro, on enter-ing the deserted city, found in it a very greatbooty, as its commerce and mines had rendered itvery opulent; and the citizens, more attentive tosave their lives than their riches, had, on their de-parture, taken scarcely any thing with them ex-cept a few provisions. After having burned thehouses, and razCd the citadel toils foundation, thevictor returned with his army to celebrate histriumph in Arauco. But although Lautarowas til us successful, Caupolican was obliged toraise the siege of Imperial and Valdivia ; theseplaces having had strong reinforcements throwninfo them by Villagran.

15. The small-pox appears. — It was at this aw-ful period, when he, availing himself of the ab-sence of his enemy, was ravaging the country inthe vicinity of Imperial, and burning the housesand crops, that the Araucanians were visited bytliat baneful enemy of mankind, the small-pox, sup-posed to have been communicated by some of theSpanish soldiers, who were either infected at thetime, or Avho had but recently recovered from it.It made the greatest ravages; and we hear thatof the several districts of the country there wasone whose population amounted to 12,000 per-sons, of which number not more than 100^escaped with life. This pestilential disorder had,to be sure, already made its appearance a fewyears before in some of the n. provinces, butthose of the s. had been for more than a cen-tury exempt from its ravages, from the precautionsemployed by the inhabitants (o prevent all com-munication with the infected countries. WhilstVillagran was employing all his attention in main-taining, as far as possible, the Spanish power, hisattentio!: was drawn off to the claims of FrancisAguirre, who, in Valdivia’s instructions, liadbeen named the second as governor ; and who, onlearning the death of that general, determined topossess himself of the government either by favouror force.

16. Decision o f the audience of Lima respectingthe governors. — His pretensions must infalliblyhave produced a civil war between Viliagran andhimself, had they not both consented to submittheir claims to the decision of the royal audienceof Lima. This court, whose jurisdiction at that]

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ftime (1555) extended over the whole of S.America, did not think proper to commit the go-vernment to either, but in their place directed thattlie corre^idors ot the city should have the com-mand, each in his respective district, until furtherorders.

17. Concepcion rehuiU^ and destroyed by Lau-taro . — Upon a remonstrance of the inhabitants tothe court of audience, Villagran was afterwardsappointed to the command, but merely, however,with the ti(l<‘ of correffidor, receiving orders atthe same time to rebuild the city of Concepcion.No sooner was this order executed, than the youngLantaro rallied his array, and, exasperated againstwhat he termed “ obstinacy,” passed the Biobiowithout delay, and attacked tlie Spaniards, whoimprudently confiding in their valour, awaitedhim in the open plain. The first encounter de-cided the fate of the battle. The Amucanians en-tered the fort with those citizens who fled withprecipitation, and killed a great number of them ;some indeed embarked in a ship which was in theport, and others fled into the woods. Thus Lau-taro, having plundered and burned the city asbefore, returned laden with spoils to his wontedstation. Continued victories had so heightenedthe confidence of this commander, that nothingappeared to him impossible, and he formed thedetermination of attacking the Spaniards in theirvery capital, of carrying his arms against Santiagoitself. He accordingly passed with a chosen bandof 600 followers through the country of the Pro-maucians, where his indignation did not fail toI vent itself upon these people : a people detestedby him for having submitted to the Spanish yoke.The inhabitants of Santiago could not at first be-lieve it possible that he should have had the bold-ness to undertake a journey of SOO miles in orderto attack tliem ; but being undeceived as to thefact, thought proper to make some preparations ofdefence.

18. Lauiaro arrives at Saiitiago . — Lautaro hadnow encamped his army in a low meadow, on theshore of the Matiquito ; a measure he had beenobliged to adopt from repeated loss he had sus-tained in some skirmishes with young Villagran,who had taken the command on account of his fa-tlier being confined by sickness ; but the fatherhaving recovered his health, and being stronglysolicited by the citizens, who every moment ex-pected to see the Araucaniaris at their gates, atlength, in 1556, began his march with 196 Spa-niards, and 1000 auxiliaries, in search of Lautaro;but too well remernberingthe defeat of Mariguenu,he resolved to attack him by surprise. With this

intent ho quitted the great road, secretly directedhis march by the sea-shore, and under the guid-ance of a spy, by a private path, came at day-break upon the Araucanian encampment,

19. Death of Lautaro. — Lautaro, who at thatmoment had retired to rest, after having been uponguard, as was his custom during the night, leap-ed from his bed at the first alarm of the sentinels,and ran to the entrenchments to observe the enemy ;at this moment a dart, hurled by one of the Indianauxiliaries, pierced his heart, and he fell lifelessin the arms of his companions. It would seemthat fortune, hitherto propitious, was desirous byso sudden a death to save him from the mortifica-tion of finding himself, for the first time in his life,defeated. It is, however, not improbable that hisgenius, so fertile in expedients, would have sug-gested to h ira some plan to have baffled the at-tempts of the assailants, if this fatal accident hadnot occurred. Encouraged by this unexpectedsuccess, Villagran attacked the fortifications on allsides, and forced an entrance, notwithstandingthe obstinate resistance of the Araucanians, who,retiring to an angle of the works, determined ra-ther to be cut to pieces than to surrender them-selves to those who had slain their beloved general.In vain the Spanish commander repeatedly oileredthem quarter ; none of them accepted it, exceptinga few of the neighbouring Indians who happenedto be in their camp. The Araucanians perishedto a man, after having fought with such obstinacy,that a few of the last souglit their death by throw-ing themselves on the lances of their enemies.This victory, which was not obtained withoutgreat loss by the victors, was celebrated for threedays in succession in Santiago, and in all the otherSpanish settlements, with the utmost demonstra-tions of joy. The Spaniards felicitated themselveson being at last freed from an enemy, who at theearly age of 19 had already obtained so manyvictories over their nation, and who possessed ta-lents capable of entirely destroying their establish-ments in Chile, and even harassing them in Peru,as he liad resolved upon, when he had restored theliberty of his native country. The Araucanianstor a long time lamented the loss of their valiantcountryman, to whom they owed all the successof their arms, and on whose conduct and valourth(*y entirely relied for the recovery of their liber-ties. His name is still celebraied in their heroicsongs, and his actions proposed as the most glo-rious model for the imitation of their youth.

20. Caupolican raises the siege of Imperial.But above all, Caupolican felt this fatal loss; ashe was a sincere lover of his country, far from]

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[order to practise his troops, and subsist them attlie expence of the enemy ; and after defeatingone of V^illagran’s sons, who, with n large force,

I came to give him battle, he marched against Ca-

nete ; but V^illagran, convinced of the imposibilityV of defending it, anticipated him by withdrawing

all the inhabitants, part of whom retired to Impe-rial, and part to Concepcion. The Araucanians, ontheir arrival, did not fail to destroy this city ; tlieyset it on lire, and in a short time it was entirelyconsumed.

i 33. Pedro Villagr an. -—In the mean time Vil-

lagran, more the victim of grief and mental anxietythan of his disoider, died, universally regretted bythe colonists, who lost in him a wise, humane,and valiant commander, to whose prudent con-duct they had been indebted for the preservationof their conquests. Before his death he ap-pointed as his successor, by a special commis-sion from the court, his eldest son Pedro, whose‘ mental endowments were no way inferior to hisfather’s. The death of the governor appeared toAntiguenu to present a fav;ourable opportunity toundertake some important enterprise. Havingformed his army, which consisted of 4000 men,into two divisions, he ordered one, under the com-mand of his vice-toqui, to lay siege to Concep-I cion, in order to attract thither the attention of the

1 Spaniards, while with the other he marched against

the fort of Arauco. The siege was protracted toa considerable length ; the commanders thereforedetermined to settle the affair by single combat;but after having fought, with the greatest obstinacyfor the space of two hours, they were separated bytheir men. But what force had not been able toeffect, was performed by famine. Several boats; loaded with provisions had repeatedly attempted

in vain to relieve the besieged : the vigilance ofthe besiegers opposed so insuperable an obstacle,|j| that Bernal, the commander, saw himself at length

'■ compelled to abandon the place. The Araucanians

J permitted the garrison to retire without molestation,

and contented themselves with burning the housesand demolishing the walls. The capture of An-gol, after that of Cahete and Arauco, appearedI easy to Antiguenu, but the attempt cost him his

I • life ; for after the most brilliant feats of valour andintrepidity, he was forced along with a crowd ofsoldiers who fled, and, falling from a high bank intoa river, Avas drowned.

34. The U'oqui Paillataru — Antiguenu had for' , successor in the toquiate Paillataru, the brother or

I cousin of the celebrated Lautaro. During the same

:i time a change was made of the Spanish governor.

Rodrigo de Quiroga, Avho bad been appointed to

’ ‘ VOI.. I.

that office by the royal audience of Lima, beganhis administration by arresting his predecessor,and sending him prisoner to Peru. Having re-ceived a reinforcement of 300 soldiers in 1665,he entered the Araucanian territory, rebuilt thefort of Arauco, and the city of Canete, con-structed a new fortress at the celebrated post ofQiiipeo, and ravaged the neighbouring provinces.Towards the end of the following year he sent theMarshal Ruiz Gamboa with 60 men to subject theinhabitants of the Archipelago of Chiloe ; thatofficer encountered no resistance, and founded inthe principal island the city of Castro and the portof Chacao.

35. Ar hipelago of Chiloe subjected ; descriptionof the same, iis inh(d)itanis, &c. — The islands ofthe Archipelago amount to 80, and have to all ap-pearance been produced by earthquakes, owingto the great number of volcanoes, with whichthat country formerly abounded. Every part ofthem exhibits the most unquestionable marks offire. Several mountains in the great island ofChiloe, which has given its name to the ArchipC'lago, are conqmsed of basaltic columns, whichsome authors s rongly urge could have been pro-duced only by the operation of fire. The nativeinhabitants, though descerided from the continentalChilians, as them appearance, their manners, andtheir language all evince, are nevertheless of a verydifferent character, being of a pacific, or rather atimid disposition. They made no opposition, aswe have already observed, to the handful of Spa-niards who came there to subjugate them, although^their population is said to have exceeded 70,000 ;nor have they ever attempted to shake off the yokeuntil the beginning of the last century, Avhen an in-surrection of no great importance was excited, andsoon quelled. The number of inhabitants at presentamounts to upwards of 11,000; they are dividedinto 76 districts or ulrnenates, the greater part ofwhich are subject to the Spanish commanders, andare obliged to render personal service for fifty daysin the year, according to the feudal laws, whichare rigidly observed in this province, notwithstand-ing they have been for a long time abolishedthroughout the rest of the kingdom. 'I'iieseislanders generally possess a quickness of'ctipacity,and very readily learn whatever is taught them.They haAm a genius for mechanical arts, an<l excelin carpentry, cabinet-making, and turnery, from thefrequent occasions Avhich they have to exercisethem, all their churches and houses being built ofwood. They are very good manufaefurersof linenand woollen, Avith which they mix the feathers ofsea-birds, and form beautitul coverings for their]

L

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[beds. From their swine, which are very nume-rous, they make excellent haras, the most esteemedof any in S. America. Notwithstanding thegreat quantity of timber taken from them, theseislands are covered with thick woods ; and as itrains there almost incessantly, the cultivatedgrounds continue w'et the whole year. From henceit follows that the inhabitants, although they havecattle, make no use of them for ploughing, but tillthe earth in a very singular manner. About threemonths- before sowing time they turn their sheepupon their lands, changing their situation everythree or four nights. When the field is sufficientlymanured in this manner, they strew the grain overit. One of their strongest men then attempts toharrow it by means of a machine formed of twolarge sticks of hard wood, made sharp, and fas-tened together, which he forces against the groundwith his breast, and thus covers the seed. Not-withstanding this imperfect tillage, a crop of wheatwill yield them ten or twelve for one. They alsoraisegreat quantities of barley, beans, peas, qidnoa^and potatoes, which are the largest and best of anyin Chile. From the excessive moisture of the at-mosphere, the grape never acquires sufficient ma-turity to be made into wine, but its want is suppliedby various kinds of cider, obtained from applesand other wild fruits of the country. The neces-sity they are under of often going from one islandto another, where the sea is far from deserving thename of the Pacific, renders the Chilotes excellentsailors. Their 'pirogues are composed of three orfive large planks seAved together, and caulked Avitha species of moss that groAvs on a shrub. Theseare in great numbers throughout the Avhole of theArchipelago, and are managed Avith sails and oars,and in these frail skiffs the natives Avill frequentlyventure as far as Concepcion : and here it maynot be improper to observe, that the Indians, Avhoform the principal part of the sailors of the S. seas,are very cictive and docile, and excellent seamen.These people are fond of fishing, an occupation towhich they are led from the great variety of fishwith which their coasts abound. Large quantitiesof these are dried and seiit to foreign countries.They likcAvisc dry the testaceous kinds, particularlythe conchs, the chimps, and thepfio’cs. P'or thispurpose they arrange them in a long trench, co-vering them Avith the targe leaves of the panlcetincloria. Over these they place stones, on Avhichthey make a hot fire for several hours. They thentake the roasted animals from their shells, andstring them upon threads, Avhich they hang forsome time in the smoke : in this manner they findthem to keep very well, and so carry them to Cujo,

and other places at a distance from the sea. Assoon as the Christian religion was preached inChiloe, it was readily embraced by the natives, whohave ever since continued faithful and obedient toits precepts. Their spiritual concerns are underthe direction of the bishop of Concepcion, andtheir temporal were administered by a governorappointed by the captain-general of Chile ; but in1792 it was vested in the viceroyalty of Lima.The Spaniards at present established in this Archi-pelago amount to about 15,000, and its commerceis conducted by means of three or four shipswhich trade there annually from Peru and Chile.These purchase of the natives large quantities ofred cedar boards, timber of different kinds, suitablefor carriages, upwards of 2000 ponchos of variousqualities, hams, pilchards, dried shell-fish, whitecedar boxes, cloaks, embroidered girdles, and asmall quantity of ambergris, which is found uponthe shores; giving in exchange wine, brandy, to-bacco, sugar, herb of Paraguay, salt, and severalkinds of European goods. Independently of theabove trade, Chiloe has of late years been made anentrepot of illicit commerce betAveen the Spanishcolonies, and English and N. American shipsengaged in the S. sea fishery.

36. The court of audience established . — But toreturn to our history, the continuation of the war,and the great importance of the conquest, finallyinduced Philip II. to erect a court of royal audi-ence in Chile, independent of that of Peru. Thissupreme tribunal, embracing the political, as Avellas military administration of the kingdom, andbeing composed of four judges of law, and a fiscal,made, on the 13th of August 1567, its solemn entryinto Concepcion, Avhere it fixed its residence. Im-mediately on assuming its functions, it remoA^edQuiroga from the government, and gave the com-mand of the army, Avith the title of general, to RuizGamboa. The military government of the royalaudience Avas soon found to be inadequate to thepurpose of its establishment, and accordingly DonMclehor de Bravo was, in 1568, invested with thetriple character of president, governor, and cap-tain-general of Chile. BetAveen him and Paillatarusome serious battles Avere fought, though not suchas to alter the general state of alfairs, when, untiltlie death of the latter commander, (a period ofabout four years), the tAvo belligerent nations ob-served a truce or suspension of arms. This Avasprobably OAving in a great measure to the generalconsternation caused by a dreadful earthquakewhich Avas felt throughout the country, and did greatinjury to the Spanish settlements, partieularly thecity of Concepcion, which Avas entirely destroyed.]

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[ChiquUIanians, whom some have erroneously sup-posed to be a part of the Pehuenches, live to then. e. of them, on the e. borders of the Andes.These are the most savage, and of course the leastnumerous of any of the Chilians ; for it is an esta-blished fact, that the ruder the state of savage life,the more unfavourable it is to population. Theygo almost naked, merely wrapping around themthe skin of the guanaco : their language is guttural,and a very corrupt jargon of the Chilian. It isobservable that all the Chilians who inhabit the e.valleys of the Andes, both the Pehuenches, thePuelches, and the Huilliches, as well as the Chi-quillanians, are much redder than those of theircountrymen who dwell to the zo. of that mountain.All these mountaineers dress themselves in skins,paint their faces, live in general by hunting, andlead a wandering and unsettled life. They are noother, as we have hitherto observed, than the somuch celebrated Patagonians, who have occasion-ally been seen near the straits of Magellan, and havebeen at one time described as giants, and at an-other as men a little above the common stature. Itis true, that they are, generally speaking, of a loftystature and great strength.

40. Landing and defeat of the Engish. — Nowwhilst the Araucanians endeavoured to oppose theprogress of the Spaniards in their country, andwhilst Don Alonzo Sotomayor, who succeeded Ro-drigo Quiroga in the government, was strenuouslyexerting his influence to [suppress the Pehuenchesand the Chiquillanians on the e. the English alsohad planned an expedition to these remote parts.On the 21st July 1586, Sir Thomas Cavendishsailed with three ships from Plymouth, and in thefollowing year arrived on the coast of Chile. Helanded in the desert port of Quintero, and endea-voured to enter into a negociation with the nativesof the country. But his stay there was of shortcontinuance ; he rvas attacked by Alonzo Molina,the corregidor of Santiago, and compelled to quitthe coast with the loss of several of his soldiers andseamen.

Sect. III. Comprising a period of 201 years^from 1586 to 1787.

The history of the Araucanians, with regard totheir Avars with the Spaniards in the above period,Avould form little more than a recapitulation ofbattles similar to those already described, but bear-ing, nevertheless, a corroborative testimony to theexertions which a brave and generous people Avillever exhibit for the just maintenance of their na-tural rights. The interest of these wars must,therefore, have been in a great measure anticipated,

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and they will consequently be treated of in a man-ner much more general than those which have beenalready mentioned; and this, since they will allowspace for the more free detail of other politicalevents.

41. Nature of the war in anno 1589. — In thetoquiate of Guanoalca, in 1589, the Spanish go-vernor, Don Alonzo Satomayor, apprehensive thathe should not be able to defend them, or not con-sidering them of sufficient importance, evacuatedthe forts of Puren, Trinidad, and Spirito Santo,transferring the garrison to another fortress whichhe had directed to be built upon the river Puchan-qui, in order to protect the city of Angol : so thatthe war now became in a great measure reducedto the construction and demolition of fortifications.To the Toqui Guanoalca sncceeded Quintuguenuand Paillaeco, and it has been observed that therepeated victories gained over them by the Spa-niards, and which they held as the cause of suchexultation, were but the preludes of the severestdisasters that they had ever experienced inChile.

42. Independence restored. — After the death of thelast mentioned toqui, the Araucanians appointed tothe chief command the hereditary toqui of the se-cond uthal-mapu, called Paillamachu, a man ofa very advanced age, but of wonderful activity.Fortune, commonly supposed not to be propitiousto the old, so far favoured his enterprises, that hesurpassed all his predecessors in military glory,and had the singular felicity of restoring his coun-try to its ancient state of independence. Owing tothe continued successes of this general, on the 22dof November 1598, and under the government ofLoyola, not only the Araucanian provinces, but thoseof the Cunchese and Huilliches were in arms, andeven the whole of the country to the Archipelagoof Chiloe. It is asserted, that every Spaniard whohad the misfortune of being found without the gar-risons was put to death ; and it is certain that thecities of Osorno, Valdivia, Villarica, Imperial,Canete, Angol, Coya, and the fortress of Arauco,were nil at once invested with a close siege. Butnot content with this, Paillamachu, without loss oftime, crossed the Biobio, burned the cities of Con-cepcion and Chilian, laid waste the provinces intheir dependence, and returned loaded rvitli spoilto his country. In some successive battles he like-wise caused the Spaniards to cvacute the fort ofArauco, and the city of Canete, and obliged the in-habitants to retire to Concepcion. On the 14th ofNovember 1599, he caused his army to pass thebroad river Calacalla or Valdivia, by swimming,stormed the city at day-break, burned the houses, J

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[European gazettes of that period, at which timethe war had cost the royal treasury and individuals1,700,000 dollars.

54. Peace restored . — The same year an accom-modation' was agre(?d on; and by this it was al-lowed that the Araucaiiians should afterwards havea minister resident in the city of St. Jago. Withrespect to the other articles of the peace, it is suf-ficient fo state, that the treaties of Quillan andNegrete were by mutual consent revived. On thedeath of Gonzaga, the court of Spain sent DonAugustin Jaiiregui to govern Chile, who has sincefilled with universal approbation the important of-fice of viceroy of Peru. His successor, DonAmbrosio Benavides, has rendered the countryhappy by his wise and beneficent administration.

Chap. V.

Present slate of Chile.

From the brief relation that we have given ofthe occurrences in Chile since its discovery, it willbe seen that its possession has cost Spain moreblood and treasure than all the rest of her settle-ments in America. The Araucanians, occupyingbut a small extent of territory, have with far in-ferior arms not only been able to counterbalanceher power, till then reputed irresistible, but toendanger the loss of her best established possessions.Though the greater part of her officers had beenbred in that school of war, the Low Countries, andher soldiers, armed with those destructive wea-pons before which the most extensives empires ofthat continent had fallen, were considered the bestin the world, yet have these people succeeded inresisting them. The Spaniards, since losingtheir settlements in Araucania, have prudentlyconfined their views to establishing themselvesfirmly in that part of Chile Avhich lies betweenthe s. confines of Peru and the river Biobio,and extends from lat. 24° to 36|° 5. : this they havedivided into 13 provinces. They also possess thefortress of Valdivia, in the country of tiie Cuu-chese, the Archipelago of Chiloe, and the islandof Juan Fernandez.

1. Civil government . — These provinces are go-verned by an officer, who has usually the rank oflieutenant-general, and combines the title of pre-sident, governor, and captain-general of the king-dom of Chile, lie resides in the city of St. Jago,and is solely dependent upon the king, e.xcept incase of war, when, in certain points, he receiveshis directions from the viceroy of Peru. In qua-lity of captain-general he commands the army, andhas under him not only the three principal officersof the kingdom, the quarter-master, the serjeant-

major, and the commissary, but also the four go- .vernors of Chiloe, Valdivia, Valparaiso, and JuanFernandez. As president and governor, he has thesupreme administration of justice, and presidesover the superior tribunals of that capital, whosejurisdiction extends all over the Spanish provincesin those parts. The principal of these is the tri-bunal of audience, or royal senate, whose decisionis final in all causes of importance, both civil andcriminal ; and is divided into two courts, the onefor the trial of civil, and the other for the trial ofcriminal causes. Both are composed of severalrespectable judges, called auditors, of a regent, afiscal or royal procurator, and a protector of theIndians. All these officers receive large salariesfrom the court. Their judgment is final, exceptin causes Avhere the sum in litigation exceeds10,000 dollars, when an appeal may be had tothe supreme council of the Indies. The other su-preme courts are those of finance, of the cruzada,of vacant lands, and the consulate or tribunal ofcommerce, which is wholly independent of anyother of that kind. The provinces are governedby prefects, formerly called corregidors, but atpresent known by the name of sub-delegates ; these,according to the forms of their institution, shouldbe of royal nomination, but owing to the distanceof the court they are usually appointed by thecaptain-general, of whom they style themselvesthe lieutenants, d hey have jurisdiction both ofcivil and military affairs, and their emoluruents ofoffice depend entirely upon their fees, whichare by no means regular. In each capital of aprovince there is, or at least should be, a munici-pal magistracy, called the cabildo, which is com-posed, as in other parts of the Spanish dominions,of several members, called regidores, who are ap-pointed for life, of a standard-bearer, a procura-tor, a forensic judge, denominated the provincialalcalde, an alguazil or high sllerift, and of twoconsuls or burgo-masters, called alcaldes. Thelatter are chosen annually from among the princi-pal nobility by the cabildo itself, and have juris-diction both in civil and criminal causes in thefirst instance.

2. Military force.— The inhabitants are dividedinto regiments, which are obliged to march to thefrontiers or the sea-coast in case of war. In 1792there were 15,856 militia troops enrolled in the twobishoprics of Santiago and Concepcion; 10,218 inthe first, and 5638 in the latter. Besides this re-gular militia, there are a great many city militias,that are commanded by commissaries, who act ascolonels. A sufficient force also of regular troopsfor the defence of the country is maintained by]

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[{he king. All the veteran troops in Cliile do notexceed 2000, and these consist of artillery, dra-goons, and infantry. The infantry as well as theartillery is under the command of two lieutenant-colonels.

3. Ecdesiasikal government .— respects theecclesiastical government, Chile is divided intothe two large dioceses of St. Jago and Concepcion,which cities are tlie residencies ot the bishops,who are suffragans to the archbishop of Lima.The first diocese extends from the confines of Peruto the river Maule, comprehending the provinceof Cnjo upon the other side of the Andes. Thesecond comprises all the rest of Chile, with theislands, although the greater part of this extent isinhabited by pagans. The cathedrals are sup-plied with a proper mmiber of canons, whose re-venues depend upon the tithes, as do those of thebishops. The court of inquisition at Lima hasat St. Jago a commissioner with several subalternofficers. Pedro Valdivia, on his first enteringChile, brought with him the monks of the orderof Mercy ; and about the year 1553, introducedthe Dominicans and strict Franciscans. The Au-gustins established themselves there in 1595; andthe Hospitallers of St. John of God, about thethe year 1615. These religious orders have all anumber of convents, and the three first form dis-tinct jurisdictions. The brothers of St. John ofGod have the charge of the hospitals, under acommissary, who is dependent upon the provin-cial of Peru. These are the only religious frater-nities now in Chile. The Jesuits, who came intoChile in 1593, with the nephew of their founder,Don Martin de Loyola, formed likewise a separateprovince. Others have several times attempted,but without success, to form establishments, theChilians having always opposed the admission ofnew orders among them. In St. Jago and Con-cepcion are several convents of nuns ; but theyare the only cities that contai?i them.

4. The cities and dwellings . — The cities arebuilt in the best situations in the country. Manyof them, however, w ould have been better placed,for the purposes of commerce, upon the shores ofthe large rivers. This is particularly the case withthose of more recent construction. The streetsare straight, intersecting each other at right angles,and are 36 French feet in breadth. On accountof earthquakes the houses are generally of onestory ; they are, however, very commodious,whitewashed without, and generally painted within.Each is accommodated with a pleasant garden, ir-rigated by an aqueduct which furnishes water forthe use of the family. Those belonging to the

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wealthier classes, particularly the nobility, arefurnished with much splendour and taste. Theinhabitants perceiving that old buildings of twostories have resisted the most violent shocks, ha\ eof late years ventured to reside in the upper rooms,and now begin to construct their houses in theEuropean naanner. In consequence of this thecities have a better appearance than formerly ; andthe more so, as instead of forming their houses of clayhardened in the sun, which was supposed less liableto injury, they now employ brick and stone. Cel-lars, sewers, and wells, were formerly much morecommon than at present; a circumstance whichmay have contributed to render the buildings moresecure from earthquakes. The churches are ge-nerally more remarkable for their wealth than theirstyle of architecture. The cathedral and thechurch of the Dominicans in the capital, whichare built of stone, are however exceptions. Thefirst was constructed at the royal expcnce, underthe direction of the Bishop Don Manuel Alday,an excellent and learned prelate; it is built in amasterly style, and is 384 French feet in front.The plan was drawn by two English architects,who superintended the work : but when it washalf finished they refused to go on, unless theirwages were increased. In consequence of this tliebuilding was suspended, when two of the Indianswho had worked under the Englishmen, and hadsecretly found means of instructing themselves inevery branch of the art, offered to complete it :which they did with as much skill and perfectionas their masters themselves could have displayed.In the capital the follow ing edifices are also worthyof remark : the barracks for the dragoons, themint, which has been lately built by a Homan ar-chitect, and the hospital for orphans.

5. Population . — Spanish Chile, in consequenceof the freedom granted to its maritime trade, ispeopling with a rapidity proportioned to the salu-brity of its climate and the fertility of its soil. Itspopulation in general is composed of Europeans,Creoles, Indians, Negroes, and Musters. TheEuropeans, except a few French, English, andItalians, are Spaniards, who for the most part arefrom the s. provinces of Spain. D. Cosrne Bueno,whose manuscript account of Peru is stated byRobertson, as having been drawn up in 1764,(though the copies w hich v/e have seen of this workcontain facts of a later date by at least 20 years),ffives to Chile a population of 240,000 souls.Malespina, who visited that country in 1790, is ofopinion that this estimate, is greatly under thetruth ; and we hove been lately informed, on goodauthority, that the present population of Chile]

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[their masters, tliat the greatest punishment inflictedon them would be to sell them to others. Mastersnevertheless exercise the rights of fathers of fami-lies over their slaves, in correcting them for theirfaults.

12. Internal and external commerce, mines,imports, and exports. — The internal commerce ofChile has been hitherto of very little importance,notwithstanding the advantages that the countryoffers for its encouragement. Its principal source,industry, or more properly speaking, necessity, iswanting. An extensive commerce is correlativewith a great population, and in proportion as thelatter increases, the former will also be augmented.Hitherto it may be said, that of the two branchesthat in general give birth to commerce, agricultureand industry, the first is that alone which animatesthe internal: commerce of Chile, and even thatpart of the external which is carried on with Peru.The working of mines also occupies the attentionof many in the provinces of Copiapo, Coquimbo,and Quillota ; but the industry is so trifling thatit does not deserve the name. Notwithstanding theabundance of its fruits and materials of manufacture,as flax, wool, hemp, skins and metals, which mightproduce a flourishing commerce, it is conductedbut languidly. The’inhabitants employ themselvesonly in making ponchos, stockings, socks, carpets,blankets, skin-coats, saddles, hats, and other smallarticles chiefly made use of by the common orpoorer class of people, since those of the middlerank employ those of European manufacture.These, but more particularly the sale of hides andtanned leather, which they have in great plenty,with that of grain and wine, form the whole of theinternal commerce of the kingdom. The external,which is carried on with all the ports of Peru, par-ticularly Callao, arises from the exportation offruits ; this amounts to 700,000 dollars annually,according to the statements given in the periodicalpublications at Lima. The commerce betweenChile and Buenos Ayres is quite otherwise, sincefor the herb of Paraguaj/ dXone, it is obliged to ad-vance 300,000 dollars annually in cash ; theother articles received from thence are probablypaid for by those sent thither. In the trade withSpain, the fruits received from Chile go but a littleway in payment of more than a million of dollars,which are received from thence annually in Euro-pean goods, either directly, or by the way ofBuenos Ayres, and sometimes from Lima. Gold,silver, and copper, are the articles which formnearly the whole of this commerce, since the hidesand vicuna wool are in such small quantities as torender them of little importance.

Notwithstanding theworkingofthe mines in Chilehas in a great measure been relinquished from theex-pence,and from the impediments offered by the war-like spirit of the Araucanians, there are more than athousand now in work between the cities of Co-quimbo and Copiapo, besides those of the provinceof Aconcagua ; and it is a matter of fact that theproduce of its mines has been increasing eversince that the passage into the S. sea by cape Hornwas frequented by the Spanish merchants. Thegold coined in the capital was lately regulated at5200 marks annually ; but the present yearly pro-duce of the mines, as calculated from the amountsof the royal duties, and therefore considerablyunder the truth, amounts to 10,000 Spanish marksof pure gold, and 29,700 do. of pure silver. Thevalue in dollars of both is 1,737,380; the goldbeing estimated at 145i*#^ dollars, and the silverat 9 t'V dollars the Spanish mark. Besides^ this, wemust add for contraband 322,620 dollars ; andthe total produce will then be 2,060,000. Accord-ing to liumboldt, the dollars imported into Chileand Peru in 1803 amounted to 11,500,000, andthe exports consisted of produce to the value of4,000,000 dollars, besides 8,000,000 dollars inspecie. The receipts of Chile, Guatemala, and Ca-racas, are consumed within the country. The re-mittances of gold and silver to Spain are usuallymade from Buenos Ayres ; the first being lessbulky, is carried by the monthly packets insums of 2 or 3000 ounces ; as to the second,it has, till within a very late period, been sent intwo convoy ships in the summer, by which con-veyances gold is also remitted. The copper whichis extracted from the mines is estimated from 8to 10,000 quintals. From these data it will notbe difficult to form a general estimate of all thatChile produces annually. A communication bywater, which greatly facilitates the progress ofcommerce, has been already commenced. In se-veral of the ports, barks are employed in the trans-portation of merchandize, which was before carriedby land upon mules. Several large ships havealso been built in the harbour of Concepcion andthe mouth of the river Maule. The external com-merce is carried on with Peru and Spain. In thefirst, 23 or 24 ships, of 5 or 600 tons each, are em-ployed, which are partly Chilian and partly Peru-vian. These usually make three voyages in ayear; they carry from Chile wheat, wine, pulse,almonds, nuts, cocoa-nuts, conserves, dried meat,tallow, lard, cheese, sole-leather, timber for build-ing, copper, and a variety of other articles, andbring back in return silver, sugar, rice and cotton.The Spanish ships receive in exchange for Euro-1

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dried flesh, hung up to preserve them from corrup-tion. Their garments are a shirt without sleeves,reaching down to the middle of their legs. Themarried people wear drawers of baize with colouredpuckers for festival days, and those who enjoyoffices of state wear a baize jacket : they neitheruse hatnorshoes, and no one of them ever goes outwithout slinging round his neck some medals and arosary. The hair is worn short until they marry,and when they become old they suffer it to growlong. The women wear close gowns which reachdown to the ground, and which they call tapoyes:they never swathe or bind themselves round thewaist, but carry on their necks, on gala-days, somethreads strung with glass intermixed with beadsmade of cacao nuts, and coloured beans ; thesethreads usually amount to 20 or SO rows ; on en-tering the church they always loosen their hair.The regulars of the company of the Jesuits taughtthem offices, in which they assisted most dexte-rously ; and it really excites admiration that In-dians, acquainted only with their own barbariandialect, should be able to manage the compass ofthe notes, understand their proportions and num-bers, and apply the rules of music to its execution.At certain times of the year they go a mdear, orto hunt for honey among the woods : from thencethey bring back wax of two sorts, one which iswhite and odoriferous, Jhe other of less substance,as the wax of Europe, manufactured by a speciesof bees without stings, called opernus; also an-other kind of wax, made by a still different sort ofbees, but which are all properly denominated wildwax. This wax is delivered to the curate, whopreserves it in his house to send to the provinces ofPeru ; and from the product of this article, andfrom that of the cotton, which is made into woofs,to the amount of two pounds weight yearly byeach Indian, he procures in 3xchange whatever isnecessary for the settlement, such as baizes, colouredwools, bags, iron and steel articles, choppingknives, wedges, hatchets, scissars, pocket-knives,needles, medals, bugles, and other articles of hard-ware and little necessaries, which, being stored upby him, is distributed amongst the natives accord-ing to their necessities, and in a manner that theymay want for nothing, but live happy and con-tented. The settlements are as follows :

San Xavier, San Joseph,

La Concepcion, Santiago,

San Miguel, San Juan,

San Ignacio, El Santo,

Santa Ana, Corazon.

San Rafael,

CHIQUIZA, a settlement of the corregimientoof Sachica in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. Itis of a cold temperature, and produces wheat,maize, barley, papaSy and the other fruits peculiarto its climate. Its ijihabitants are so few as scarcelyto amount to 30 housekeepers, and about the samenumber of Indians. Four leagues to the n. w. ofTunja, and somewhat less from Velez.

CHIRA, a settlement and seat of the silver minesof the province and corregimiento of Piura in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Paita.

Same name, another settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Nicoya in the kingdomof Guate-mala.

[CHIRAGOW. See Plein River.]

CHIRAMBIRA, an island situate in the largebay of St. Juan, on the coast of the province andgovernment of Choco in the S. sea, which gives itsname to a small creek formed by this island and thecontinent.

CHIRCA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Sicasica in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Chulumani.

CHIRE, Santa Rosa de a city of the govern-ment and province of Los Llanos in the NuevoReyno de Granada ; founded by the GovernorFrancisco Anciso. It is of a very hot and un-healthy temperature, but affords the same vegetableproductions as the rest of the province. It is somean and reduced as to contain hardly 100 house-keepers, and scarcely deserves the name of a city.This settlement lies the furthest to the n. w. extre-mity of any in this kingdom, and is bounded inthat quarter by the province and bishopric of Ca-racas.

Same name a river of the aboveprovince and government. It rises at the foot ofthe lomas del Viento, runs e. and enters the Meta,traversing the country of the Betoyes Indians.

CHIRGUA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela. It rises in the mountain of Ta-cazuruma on the s. runs s. and enters the Gamalo-tal, after having collected the waters of many otherrivers.

CHIRIBIQUI, Santa Fe de a settlement ofthe province and government of Cumana in thekingdom of Tierra Firme ; situate on the coast,between the rivers Mosina and Marecapana.

CHIRICOAS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe Nuevo Reyno de Granada, to the e. of themountains of Bogota, and at the entrance of thellanos or plains of Cazanare and Meta. Theylead a wandering life through the woods in com-pany with the Guaibas ; they are crafty and verydexterous thieves, but of a docile and pacific dis-position. In 16.64; some of them were reduced into

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CHOCOPE, San Pedro y San Pablo de,a small settlement of the province and corregi-miento of Truxillo in Peru ; situate in the valleyof Chicama, watered and fertilized by the river ofthis name. It produces in abundance grapes,sugar-canes, olives, and every kind of Europeanfruit of the most excellent flavour. It was formerlya large population, since that the few inhabitantswho had been lel't at Concepcion, and those ofLicapa in the same valley, have incorporatedthemselves here. It has a very large and handsomechurch, although this underwent some damagefrom an earthquake experienced in this provincein 1759; the settlement suffered much also in 17S6,as did all the other towns of the coast, as, verycontrary to the custom of the climate here, it rainedwithout cessation for a period of 40 days, fromfive o’clock in the evening to the same hour in thefollowing morning, so that the houses were almostall entirely destroyed. Itis 10 leagues from the capi-tal, in the royal road which leads to Lima, andwhich is called De Valles. Lat. 7° 52' s.

[CHOCORUA, a mountain in Grafton county,New Hampshire, on the n. line of Strafford county,n. of Tamworth.]

[CHOCUITO. See Chucuito.]

CHOGUY. See Laches.

[CHOISEUL Bay, on the n. w. coast of theislands of the Arsacides, w. of port Praslin. Theinhabitants of this bay, like those at port Praslin,have a custom of powdering their hair with lime,which burns it and gives it a red appearance.]

CHOIX, a port of the w. coast of the island ofNewfoundland.

CHOLCHOL, a settlement of the district ofRepocura in the kingdom of Chile ; situate at themouth of the river Rumulhue before it enters theCauten.

CHOLCO-COCHA, a great lake of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Castro Vireyna in Peru,upon the heights of the mountains of the Andes.It is navigated by rafts made by the Indians;fish it has none, from the excesisve cold of itswaters ; from it springs the river Caica-mayu.Mr. De la Martiniere confounds this lake, whichis called Chocolo-cocha, with the city of CastroVireyna, maintaining that the Indians call it bythe latter name, but which is erroneous.

CHOLI, a settlement and establishment of theEnglish in S. Carolina, and country of the Che-rokees Indians; situate at the source of the riverApalachicola.

CHOLIQUE, San Pablo de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Caxaraarca la Grande in Peru.

CHOLOAPA, San Bartolome de, a settlement of the head settlement of Huitepec, andalcaldia mayor of Cuernavaca, in Nueva Espana.It contains 84 families of Indians.

CHOLOSCOPO, San Mateo de, a settlementof the district, and alcaldia mayor of Mexilcaltzingo,in Nueva Espana, somewhat more thanhalf a league’s distance to the m. of ^his place.It contains 102 families of Indians, and has ahandsome convent of the strict observers of St.Francis, which is also a college for studies.

CHOLULA, a district and jurisdiction of analcaldia mayor in Nueva España. Its extent isvery limited, being only three leagues in length atthe widest part ; but it is nevertheless well filled withinhabitants ; its territory is level, and very fertilein wheat, maize, and pepper, which is here calledchile^ as also in other seeds, of which abundant cropsare gathered ; it formerly acquired agreat emolumentfrom the sale of cochineal, but this is laid asideand entirely abandoned. The Spaniards, Mustees^and Mulattoes, busy themselves in making clothsand woven stuffs of cotton, and they have manyworkshops, by which they supply with these articlesthe other provinces. Its population consists of 43settlements of Indians, which are,

San Juan Quantlazingo, Sta. Maria Quescomate,Santiago de Momospan, San Bernardino,

Santa Barbara, Sta. Clara Ocovica,

Todos Santos, Sta. Maria Malacatepe»

San Luis, que,

San Gregorio de Saca- Sta. Maria Coronango,pecpan, S. Miguel Coztla,

S. Francisco de Quapan, San Francisco Ocotlan

S. Diego Cuaucotla, San Antonio, ^

S. Sebastian, San Francisco,

S. Juan Cuautla, San Mateo,

Tonanchin, San Gabriel,

Santa MariaZacatepeque, San Lucas,

San Geronimo, San Martin,

San Pablo Zochimehua, San Lorenzo,

San Andres de Oiolula, TIantenango,

San Francisco Acate- Santa Isabel,peque, Los Santos Reyes,

San Bernardo Tlaxcal- S. Pablo Ahuatempa,zingo, S. Mateo, distinct from

S.AntonioCacalotepeque, the other,

Santa Ana, S. Miguel Papalotla,

San Martin TIanapa, S. Andres de Cholula.

[The district of Cholula contained in 1793 apopulation of 22,423 souls. The villages amount-ed to 42, and the farms to 45. Cholula, Tlax-clala, and Huetxocingo, are the three republicswhich resisted the Mexican yoke for so many cen-turies, although the pernicious aristocracy of theiff

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four or five times in the year ; which causes theground to be so parched, that it would be entirelyuninhabitable, were it not for the multitude ofstreams with which it is intersected, and whichrender the temperature mild and healthy. Thecountry for the most part consists of levels, coveredwith green shrubs and trees, forming shady woodsof three or four leagues in extent. In these arefound the Brazil-wood, ebony, &c. which serve asan asylum for wild beasts, leopards and wildboars, deer and rabbits, a variety of mountain cats,coyotes, serpents and vipers. In the valleys arefound a multitude of quails, turtle-doves, pheasants,cranes, parrots, macaws, much esteemed for thebeauty of their plumage, and with which the In-dians adorn themselves, and an infinite variety ofother birds. The rivers, all of which descend fromthe sierras of Topia, in the rainy season increase tosuch a degree as to inundate the country for thespace of three or four leagues ; and generally re-maining out for eight days at least, the Indians areunder the necessity of forming for themselves akind of terrace upon the branches of trees, by meansof planks and sods, where they make fires and dresstheir food. There are many salt ponds, also minesof silver, which are not worked for want of la-bourers. This province was peopled by severalnations of Indians, who had their villages and hutson the sides of rivers. They used to maintain them-selves on maize, which they cultivated, afso on ca-labashes, which are very sweet and savoury, Frenchbeans, and a species of wild caroh plant, called bythem mesqnites, and which being ground, theyused to drink in water, after the manner of choco-late. They had also another delicacy in the plantcalled mezcalj which resembles the savila ; of thisthere are several sorts, of which they make wine,sweets, and vinegar ; of its tendrils thread, and ofits prickles needles. This country also abounds innopales, pitahayas, and other plants, includingmany which are native to Europe. Alvar NunezCabeza de Vaca was the first who discovered thisextensive province in his perigrination, after he hadsuffered shipwreck in going from Florida toMexico ; and from his report of it, the viceroyBon Antonio de Mendoza was induced to send intoit some persons to discover more concerning it. In1590 it was visited by the regulars of the com-pany of Jesuits, who came hither to preach thegospel. They succeeded in making proselytesamongst the natives, and established a regularmission, which was patronized by the Queen DonaMargarita of Austria, wife of Philip III. ; shehaving sent, for the promotion of the interests of

this* great object, and for the decorations of thealtars, &c. several valuable presents of jewels,ornaments, and other precious articles. Thecapital is the town of San Felipe and Santiago,and the other settlements are,

Montes Claros, Toro,

Real de Alamos, Concepcion,

Bocaverito, Loreto,

Noguera, Navajoa,

Camoa, Tecia,

Guarabe, Tepehue,

Ocosconi, Real de los Fra-

Mocorito, yeles,

San Ignacio, Vaca,

Santa Ana, Toriz,

Achogoa, Cuytes,

Caurimpo, Temoris,

Mocoyaguy, Chinipas,

Chiguaguilla, Valle Umbroso,

Tegueco, Guazapares,

Sivirijoa, Jatebo,

Charay, Guadalupe,

Mochicarui, Mayo,

San Miguel, Canamoas,

Haome, Batacosa.

Santa Maria,

Same name, a river of this province (Cinaloa), which runs toenter the sea in the gulf of CaJiforna, or Mar Roxode 'Cortes, between the rivers Culiacan and DelFuerte.

CINAMIN, a river of the province and cap^tainship of Rio Grande in Brazil. It rises nearthe coast, and runs into the sea close to the capeof San Roque.

[CINCINNATI, a flourishing town in the ter-ritory of the United States, n. w. of the Ohio, andthe present seat of government. It stands on then. bank of the Ohio, opposite the mouth of Lick-ing river, two miles and a half s. w. of fort Wash-ington, and about eight miles w. of Columbia.Both these towns lie between Great and LittleMiami rivers. Cincinnati contains about 200houses ; and is 82 miles n. bye. of Frankfort;90 n. w. of Lexington, and 779 w. by s. ofPhiladelphia. Lat. 38° 42' n. Long. 84° IPw.']

[CINCINNATUS is the s. easternmost of themilitary townships of New York state. It has Vir-gil on the and Salem, in Herkemer county, on the

e. and lies on two branches of Tioughnioga river,a n. w. branch of the Chenango. The centre ofthe town lies 53 miles s. w. by w. of Cooperstown,and 39 s. e. by s. of the 5. e, end of Salt lake.Lat. 42° 27'

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of Atengo, and alcald'ia mayor of Chilapa, inNueva Espana. It contains 27 families of Indians,and is two leagues to the n. of its head settle-ment.

COMALA, another settlement, in the head settle-ment of Almololoyan, and alcald'ia mayor of Co-lima. It contains 67 families of Indians, who ex-ercise themselves in the cultivation of the lands.Two leagues to the n. e.- of its head settlement.

COMALAPA, a .settlement of the province andalcald'ia mayor of Chiapa in the kingdom of Guate-mala.

COMALTEPEC, a settlement and head settle-ments of the mayor of Villalta, of a hottemperature, with 310 families of Indians. Nineleagues between the e. and ??. of its capital.

COMALTEPEC, another, in the alcald'ia mayorof Tecocuilco. It contains 78 families of Indians,who cultivate nothing but cochineal and maize,and these only in as much as is nece.ssary for theirsustenance.

COMANJA, a settlement of the head settlementof Tirindaro, and alcald'ia mayor of Valladolid, inthe province and bishopric of Mechoacan. Itcontains 13 families of Indians, and is one leagueto the s. of its head settlement.

=COMANJA==, another settlement and real of minesin the alcald'ia mayor oi Lagos, of the kingdom andbishopric of Galicia ; the population of which con-sists of 30 families of Spaniards, Mustees, andMulattoes, and 50 of Indians, who live by thecommerce of and labour in the mines, which,although these inhabitants are little given to in-dustry, produce good emolument. This settle-ment is at the point of the boundary which dividesthe settlements of this kingdom from the king-dom of Nueva Espana. Seven leagues e. of itscapital.

COMAO, a province of the country of LasAmazonas, to the s. of this river, from the mouthof which it is 40 leagues distant, extending itselfalong the banks of the same; discovered in 1745by Francisco de Orellana. The territory is leveland fertile, and the climate moist and hot. Itabounds in maize, and has some plantations ofsugar-cane. It is watered by different rivers, allof which abound in fish, as do also its lakes ; andin these an infinite quantity of tortoises are caught.This province belongs to the Portuguese, and ispart of the province of Para.

(COMARGO, a town of New Leon in N.America ; situate on the s. side of Rio Bravo,which empties into tlie gulf of Mexico on the w.side.)

COMARU, or De los Angeles, a settle-

ment of the missions held by the Portuguese in thecountry of the Amazonas, on the shore of the riverNegro.

COMARU, another settlement in the provinceand captainship of Pará, and kingdom of Brazil ;situate on th.e s. shore of the river of Las Ama-zonas, on a point or long strip of land formed bythe mouth of the river Topayos.

COMAS, a settlement of the province and cor-regmiienio of Xauxa in Peru.

Comas, a lake of the province and governmentof Venezuela, of an oval figure, between the riverGuarico and the jurisdiction which divides thisgovernment from that of Cumana.

COMATLAN, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Chixila, and alcald'ia mayor of Villalti.It contains 32 families of Indians, and is fiveleagues to the n. of its capital.

COMATLAN, another settlement, the head set-tlement of the district of the alcald'ia mayor of Te-quepexpa ; of a hot temperature. It contains 20families of Indians, who live by cultivating thelands. Fifteen leagues to the s. of its capital.

COMAU, a settlement of the province and cap-tainship of Pará in Brazil ; situate at the mouth ofthe river Las Amazonas, to the n. n. e. of thetown of Macapa.

COMAUUINI, a river of the province andgovernment of Guayana, in the Dutch possessions,on the shores and at the mouth of which they haveconstructed the fort of Amsterdam. It runs n. andafterwards turning to the s. s. e. enters the Co-tica.

COMAYAGUA, or Valladolid, a city andcapital of the province of Honduras in the king-dom of Guatemala ; founded by the CaptainAlonzo de Caceres, by the order of Pedro de Al-varado. It was at first called Nuestra Senora dela Concepcion, and by this title there is still namedan hospital which is well endowed and served.Here are also some convents of the religious orderof La Merced, and a very good church, erectedinto a bishopric in 1539. One hundred and tenleagues from the capital Guatemala. Lat. 20° 58'n. Long. 87° 5 P

Bishops who have presided in Comayagua.

1. Don Fray Juan de Talavera, of the orderof St. Jerome, prior of his convent of NuestraSenora del Prado, near Valladolid : being nomi-nated first bishop, he refused the appointment.

2. Don Christoval de Pedraza, elected bishopfrom the renunciation of the former; at the sametime nominated protector of the Indies, and resi-dentiary judge to the conquerors Pedro Alvaredoand Francisco de Montejo, in 1539,

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and government of Neyba in the kingdom of Gra-nada. It rises in the paramo or mountain desertofQuindiu, traverses and waters the valleys ofLas Lanzas, and unites itself witli that of SanJuan, taking the name of Coello, from a Spaniardof this name having been drowned in it. It thenenters the Magdalena.

COMBEJU, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Rey in Brazil ; situate at the sourceof the river Curitaba.

COMBERUI, Bay of, on the coast of the pro-vince o.i\6. captainship of Rey in Brazil. It liesbetween the bay of Tasay and the island of Gallo.

COMBES, a settlement of the island of Bar-badoes, in the district of the parish of St. George.

COMBINCUMA, a spacious, and but littleknown country of the kingdom of Quito. It isfull of woods, in which there are many wild beastsand snakes of various kinds, and it is watered bymany rivers, all of which enter the s. side of theMaranon. Amongst the various nations whichinhabit it is that of the Tontones.

COMBITA, a settlement of the province andcorregirniento oi Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada. It is of a cold temperature, and pro-duces the fruits corresponding with its climate.It contains 100 house-keepers, and as many otherIndians, and is two leagues to the n. zo. of itscapital.

COMBLES, Los Cinco, a settlement andparish of the island of St. Christopher, one of theAntilles ; situate on the shore of the n. w. coast,and in the part formerly possessed by the Eng-lish.

COMBOY, a rocky shoal of the N. sea, to thes. of that of La Vivora.

COMEAPA, a settlement of the province andulcaldia mayor of Los Zoques in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

COMECUERO, a river of the province andgovernment of Honduras in the kingdom of Guate-mala. It runs into the gulf which has tlie nameof the province.

COMETA, PUNTA DE, a point or cape ofthe Caico Grande, or Del N. (of the N.) on the n. e.coast.

Cometa, a shoal of rocks, near upon the n. e.coast of the island of Caico Grande, or Del N.and by the former point, from whence it takes itsname.

(COMFORT Point is the s. easternmost partof Elizabeth City county in Virginia, formed byJames river at its mouth in Chesapeak bay. PointComfort lies 19 miles w. by n. of cape Henry.]Comfort Point, another point, which is also

of the same coast and province as the former, andwithin that bay, being one of the points which formthe entrance of the river York.

Comfort Point, another, on the s. coast ofHudson’s bay, in the province of this name.

COMICHIGELES, Sierra de, in the pro-vince and government of Tucumán, and boundedby the sierra of Cuyo, in the kingdom of Chile. Itruns from 5. s. e. on the shore of the Concara, andin fact follows the course of that river.

COMISARIO, Punta del, a long strip ofland which runs into the sea on the coast of theprovince and government of Cartagena, betweenthis city and the point of S. Bernardo.

COMISTAHUACAN, a settlement of the pro-vince and alcaldia mayor of Los Zoques in thekingdom ol' Guatemala.

COMITLAN, a settlement of the province and'alcaldia mayor of Chiapa in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

COMITLAN, another settlement, in the pro-vince and alcaldia mayor of Capanabastla in thesame kingdom.

(COMMANOES, one of the Small Virginisles, in the W. Indies, situate to the n. n. e. ofTortilla.)

COMOCAUTLA, San Pedro de, a settle-ment of the head settlement of Zapotitlan, andalcaldia mayor of Xacatlan, in Nueva Espana,three leagues distant from its head settlement.

COMO-LEWU, or Rio de los Sauces, call-ed also Gran Desaguadero. See Sauces.

COMONDU, San Joseph de, a settlementof the missions which were held by the regularsof the company of Jesuits in the province of Ca-lifornia ; situate near the sea-coast, between thesettlements of La Concepcion and San FranciscoXavier.

COMONDU, San Joseph de, a bay of this pro-vince, between the bay of Concepcion and theisland of Carmen.

COMOPORO, a settlement of the governmentof Maracaibo in the province of Venezuela;situate on the coast of the lake towards the e. part.

COMORI, Crique de, a creek and establish-ment of the French, in their possessions inGuayana.

COMORIPA, or Comoriopa, as some willhave it, a settlement of the province of Ostimuriin Nueva Espana; situate on the shore of the riverHiaqui, between the settlements of Cocoria andTecoriona.

COMPOSTELA, a province and alcaldiamayor of Nueva Galicia. Its jurisdiction extendsfrom the mouth of the large river San Pedro, as

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