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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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ABACU, a point of land on the S coast of the island of St. Domingo.

ABADES, a settlement of the province and government of Popayan, in the district and jurisdiction of San Juan de Pasto.

ABANCAY, a province and corregimiento of Peru, bounded on the E by the large city of Cuzco, (its jurisdiction beginning at the parish of Santa Ana of that city), and on the W by the province of Andahuailas; N by that of Calcaylares, forming, in this part, an extended chain of snowcovered mountains ; S by the provinces of Cotabamba and Aimaraez; S W by Chilques and Masques. It extends 26 leagues from E to W and is 14 broad. Its most considerable river is the Apurimac, which is separated from it at the N W and bends its course, united with other streams, towards the mountains of the Andes. This river is crossed by a wooden bridge of 80 yards long and 3 broad, which is in the high road from Lima to Cuzco, and other provinces of the sierra. The toll collected here is four rials of silver for every load of goods of the produce of the country, and twelve for those of the produce of Europe. The temperature of this province is mild, and for the most part salubrious, with the exception of a few vallies, where, on account of the excessive heat and humidity, tertian agues are not uncommon. It produces wheat, maize, and other grain in great abundance, and its breed of horned cattle is by no means inconsiderable; but its principal production is sugar, which they refine so well, that it may challenge the finest European sugars for whiteness : this is carried for sale to Cuzco and other provinces, and is held in great estimation. It also produces hemp, cloth manufactures of the country ; and in its territories mines of silver are not wanting, especially in the mountain which they call Jalcanta, although the natives avail themselves not of the advantages so liberally held out to them. Its jurisdiction comprehends 17 settlements. The repartimento, quota of tribute, amounted to 108,750 dollars, and it rendered yearly 870 for the alcabala. The following are the 17 settlements : The capital, Limatambo, Huanicapa, Mollepata, Curahuasi, Pantipata, Cachora, Pibil, Antilla, Chonta, Anta, Pocquiura, Ibin, Surite, Chachaypucquio, Huaracondo. Sumata,

Abancay, the capital of the above province, founded in a spacious valley, which gives it its title: it is also so called from a river, over which has been thrown one of the largest bridges in the kingdom, being the first that was built there, and looked upon as a monument of skill. In the above valley the jurisdiction of this province, and that of Andahuailas, becomes divided. It is also memorable for the victories gained in its vicinity by the king's troops against Gonzalo Pizarro, in the years 1542 and 1548. It has a convent of the religious order of St. Dominic ; this order being the first of those which established themselves in Peru. 20 leagues distant from the city of Cuzco. Lat. 13° 31' 30" S Long. 72° 26' W.7

Abancay, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Cuenca, in the kingdom of Quito, situate on the shore of the river Paute.

ABANES, a barbarous nation of Indians, of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, in the plains of San Juan, to the N of the Orinoco. They inhabit the woods on the shores of this river, as well as other small woods ; and are bounded, E by the Salivas, and W by the Caberres and Andaquies. They are docile, of good dispositions, and are easily converted to the Catholic faith.

ABANGOUI, a large settlement of the province and government of Paraguay. It is composed of Indians of the Guarani nation, and situate on the shore of the river Taquani. It was discovered by Alvar Nuñez Cabezade Vaca, in 1541.

ABARANQUEN, a small river of the province and government of Guayana, or Nueva Andalusia. It rises in the country of the Quiriquipas Indians, runs from S to N and enters the Aruy.

ABARY, a small river of Guayana, between the Berbice and the Demerary. See Mahaica.

ABBEVILLE County, in Ninetysix district, S. Carolina, bounded on the N E by the Saluda, and on the SW by the Savannah, is 35 miles in length and 21 in breadth ; contains 9197 inhabitants, including 1665 slaves.

ABBOTS, a small river of N. Carolina, which runs S W and enters the Pedi, at a little distance from the source of this river, in the territory of the Granville limits.

ABECOCHI, a settlement of Indians of S. Carolina, situate on the shore of the river Cousa. The English have a settlement here, with a fort for its defence.

ABEICAS, a nation of Indians of New France, bounded on the N by the Alibamis, and E by the Cheraquis. They live at a distance from the large rivers, and the only produce of their territory is some canes, which are not thicker than a finger, but of so hard a texture, that, when split, they cut exactly like a knife. These Indians speak the Tchicachan language, and with the other nations are in alliance against the Iroquees.

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ACARAI, a settlement of the province and government of Paraguay, founded near the river Paraná, and rather towards the W by the missionary Jesuits, in 1624, where they also built a fort to protect it against the incursions of the infidel Indians.

ACARAI, a river of the province and government of Paraguay. It runs S S E and enters the Paraná opposite the settlement of La Poblacion Nueva.

ACARAPU, a small river of the province and colony of Surinam, in the part of Guayana belonging to the Dutch. It is one of those which enter the Cuyuni.

ACARI, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Camaná, in Perú, situate in a beautiful and extensive valley, in which there is a very lofty mountain, which they call Sahuacario, composed of misshapen stones and sand, in which, at certain times of the year, especially in the months of December and January, is heard a loud and continued murmuring, which excites universal astonishment, and which, no doubt, is to be attributed to the air in some of its cavities. On its skirts are two fortresses, which were built in the time of the gentilism of the Indians. There is a port halfway between the town of St. Juan and the city of Arequipa, which is 8 leagues distant from the latter, and 11 from the former. It is very convenient, and has an excellent bottom, but is frequented only by small vessels. It is in lat. 15° 15'. S Long. 75° 8' 30" W

ACARI, a point or cape of the coast of the S. sea, of the same province, and of the corregimiento of Camaná.

ACARI, a river of the above province, which runs to the S E.

another river, of the province and capitainship of Pará in the kingdom of Brasil. It is small, runs N afterwards inclines to the N N W and enters the river of Las Amazonas, just where this empties itself into the sea.

ACARIGUA, a settlement of the province and government of Venezuela, situate on the shore of the river of its name, and close upon the E side of the town of Ararul.

ACARIGUA, a river of the above province and government, which rises near the town of Araure, and runs S to enter the river of La Portuguesa.

ACARRETO, a port of the coast of Tierra Firme, in the province and government of Darien, near cape Tiburon. [Lat. 8° 39' N Long. 77° 24' SO" W.]

ACARUACA, a small river of the province and country of the Amazonas, in the part belonging to the Portuguese. It runs from N to S forming a bow, and enters the Matari.

[ACASABASTIAN, a river in the province of Vera Paz in Mexico. It runs into the Golfo Dulce, and has a town situated on its banks of the same name. The source of this river is not far from the S.sea.]

ACASABASTLAN, a settlement of the kingdom of Guatemala, in the province and alcaldía mayor of Chiapa.

[ACASATHULA, a sea-port, situated on a point of land, in the province of Guatemala Proper, in Mexico, on a bay of the S. sea, about four leagues from Trinidad. It receives the greatest part of the treasures from Perú and Mexico. In its neighbourhood are three volcanoes.]

ACASSA, a river of the province and government of Guayana, in the part possessed by the French. It enters the sea between the Ayapoco and Cape Orange.

ACATEPEC, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Thehuacan, where there is a convent or vicarage of the order of St. Francis. It contains 860 Indian families (including those of the wards of its district) in a spacious valley, which begins at the end of the settlement and extends itself above a league. In this valley are 12 cultivated estates, on which live 40 Indian families. It is four leagues S S W of its capital.

another settlement in the head settlement and district of Chinantla, of the alcaldía mayor of Cozamaloapan. It is situate in a very pleasant plain, and surrounded by three lofty mountains. The number of its inhabitants is reduced. A very rapid and broad river passes near this settlement; and as this is the direct way to the city of Oaxaca and other jurisdictions, and as the travellers, who come here in great numbers, must necessarily cross the river in barks or canoes, the Indians, who are very expert in this sort of navigation, contrive by these means to procure themselves a decent livelihood. 10 leagues W of its head settlement.

another settlement of the alcaldía mayor of the same kingdom, situate between two high ridges. It contains 100 Indian families, and is annexed to the curacy of

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Rio Negro, on a great island formed by this riverand that of Pasimoni.

Carlos, San, a bay of the w. coast of Florida,45 leagues from the soundings of Tortuguilla.Lat. 27° 10'. Long. 284° 30'.

Carlos, San, a small island of the gulf of Cali-fornia, or Mar Roxo de Cortes, in the interior ofthe same, and very close upon the coast.

Carlos, San, a river of the island of Guada-lupe, which runs nearly due n. e. and enters thesea in the bay of the Great Cul de Sac.

Carlos, San, a settlement (with the surnameof Real) of the province and government of BuenosAyres ; situate on the shore of the river La Plata,near the colony of Sacramento, which belonged tothe Portuguese. In its vicinty, on the n. n. e. part,there is a lake of very good sweet water.

Carlos, San, an island of the straits of Magel-lan, between the mountain of the Pan de Azucarand cape Galand of the n. coast.

Carlos, San, a valley in the province and go-vernment of Tucumán, which is very fertile invines, wheat, maize, carob-trees, tar, and in birdsand animals of the chase. Its natives are thosewho most of all infested the Spaniards when theyconquered this province.

Carlos, San, a settlement and fort of the islandof St. Christopher, one of the Antilles.

Carlos, San, another, of the island of Cuba;situate on the n. coast, on the point of land calledthe Pan de Mantanzas.

Carlos, San, another, of the province and go-vernment of Maracaibo ; situate in the island Pax-ara, on the shore of the Gran Laguna, or Greatlake.

Carlos, San, another, of the province andcountry of Las Amazonas ; a reduccion of the mis-sions which were held there by the regulars of thesociety of Jesuits. It lies between the rivers Arau-caso and Shiquita, in the territory of the Cahu-maris Indians.

Carlos, San, another, of the province and go-vernment of Guatemala ; situate on the shore ofthe river of S. Juan, or Del Desaguadero.

Carlos, San, some sierras or mountains, calledDe Don Carlos, in the province and captainship ofRey in Brazil. They run parallel to the sierra ofLos Difuntos, in the extremity of the coast formedby the mouth of the river La Plata.

CARLOSAMA, a large settlement of Indians ofthe province and corregimiento of Pastes in thekingdom of Quito, on the 5. shore of the river ofits name. Its territory is most fertile, but the cli-mate is very cold, and the streets almost always

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Impassable. It is to the zo. n. zo. of the settlementof Ipialos, and e. n. e. of that of Cumbal.

CARLTON, a settlement of the island of Bar-badoes, in the district and parish of St. Thomas.

CARLUTAS, a river of the province and cap-tainship of Rio Grande in Brazil. It rises near thecoast, runs s. s. e. and enters the sea between theGenibabu and the Rio Grande.

CARMA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimienlo of Porco in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of Porco.

(CARMEL, a township in Dutchess county,New York. By the state census of 1796, 237 ofits inhabitants were electors.)

(CARMELO, a river on the coast of New Al-bion, s. e. of Francisco bay. A little n. from itis Sir Francis Drake’s harbour, where that navi-gator lay five weeks.)

Carmelo, Sierras del, a cordillera of verylofty mountains of the province of California ; theyrun to the sea-shore from the sierra of the Enfado,as far as the cape of San Lucas.

CARMEN, a river of the province and colony ofSurinam, in the part of Guayana possessed by theDutch. It rises in the sierra of Rinocote, runsfrom w. to e. and gathering the waters of manyothers, enters in a large body into the Mazar-roni.

Carmen, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Cartagena ; situate in the district ofthe mountains of Marca, between those of San Ja-cinto and San Francisco de Asis. It is one ofthose new settlements that were founded by the Go-vemor Don Juan Pimienta in 1776.

Carmen, another settlement, with the additionof Frayeles de el, which is the village of the pro-vince and captainship of Todos Santos in Brazil ;situate between the rivers Rans and Tucumbira.

Carmen, another, in the same kingdom ; situatenear a stream and on the shore of the river Tocan-tines, on the e. side, and not far from the Arrayalof San Feliz.

Carmen, a large island of the gulf of California,or Mar Roxo de Cortes, near the coast, betweenthe islands of San Ildefonso and Agua Verde.

Carmen, a town of the province and captain-ship of Espiritu Santo in Brazil ; situate on theshore and at the head of a river which gives it thisname.

CARMOT, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarca la Grande in Peru ;situate on the shore of the river Chicama.

CARNELAND, Islas de, islands near thecoast of the province and government of Honduras,

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CASONA, a river of the province of Guayana :it runs e. and enters the Esquivo,

CASPANA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Atacama, and of the archbishopricof Charcas, in Peru ; annexed to the curacy ofChiuchiu.

(CASPEAN, or Beautiful, a small lake inGreensborough, Vermont. It has Hazen block-house on its w. side. It is a head water of LaMoille river.)

CASPIYACU, a small river of the provinceand government of Mainas in the kingdom of Qui-to ; it runs from s. s. e, to n. n, w. and enters theYana at its sources.

(CASQUIPIBIAC, a river on the n. side of Cha-leur bay, about a league from Black cape, n. w.by n. in the bottom of Casquipibiac cove, at thedistance of about one league from which is thegreat river of Casquipibiac. It lies about w, fromthe former, and affords a small cod and salmonfishery.)

(CASSITAH, an Indian town in the w. part ofGeorgia; which, as well as the Coweta town, is60 miles below the Horse ford, on Chattahouseeriver.)

CASTA, San Pedro de, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Coquimbo in thekingdom of Chile : it runs n. n. e. and enters theMames near the sea-coast.

(CASTAHANA, Indians of N. America, whoresemble the Dotames, except that they tradeprincipally Avith the Crow Indians, and that theywould most probably prefer visiting an establish-ment on the Yellow Stone river, or at its mouth onthe Missouri.)

CASTEENS, a small river of the province ofSagadohook : it runs s. and enters the sea in thebay of Penobscot. On its shore and at its mouth isa settlement of Indians, where the English have afort and an establishment.

CASTELA, a large and navigable river of theprovince and government of Moxos in the king-dom of Quito, being formed from those of the Beniand Paravari ; it afterwards unites itself with thatoftheYtenes, and changes its name to Madera,which joins the Maranon on the s. side, in lat. 3°13' 18" s.

CASTELLANOS, Puerto, a port in the largeisland of San Sebastian, and near the coast of Bra-zil, and province and captainship of San Vin-cente.

CASTILLA, Santo Tomas de, a settlementof the province and government of Honduras in thekingdom of Guatemala. Its port is good, and wellfrequented with vessels.

CASTILLA DEL ORO. See Tierra Firme*

CASTILLO, a river of the province and districtof Quillota in the kingdom of Chile : it runs w-and joins the Pcrquilabquien to enter the Lon-gamilla.

Castillo, a port of the coast, in the same pro-vince and kingdom, between the former river andthe port Valparaiso.

Castillo, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, in the jurisdiction of thecity of Cordova ; situate on the shores of the riverTercero, near the mouth Avhere this enters the Sa-ladillo.

CASTILLOS Grandes, an island of the pro-vince and captainship of Rey in Brazil. It is verynear the coast, between the cape Santa Maria ofthe river La Plata and the cape of Las Yncas;the Portuguese have a fort in it.

Castillos Grandes, another island, withthe addition of Chicos, to distinguish it from theother in the same province and kingdom, and ata little distance from the above island.

Castillos Grandes, a point of land or ex-tremity of the island of Guadalupe, opposite thoseof Deseada and of Marigalante.- It is thus calledfrom two castles which it has in it.

(CASTINE, the shire town of Hancock county,district of Maine, is situate on Penobscot bay. Itwas taken from the town of Penobscot, and incor-porated in Feb. 1796. It is named after a Frenchgentleman who resided here ISO years ago, asalso)

(Castine River, which is about 14 mileslong, is navigable lor six miles, and has severalmills at the head of it. It empties into Penobscotbay.)

(CASTLE Island. See Crooked Island.)

(CASTLETOWN, a township in Richmondcounty, Stateti island, New York, which contains805 inhabitants, including 114 slaves; 114 of itsinhabitants are electors.)

(CASTLETON, a township and river in Rut-land county, Vermont, 20 miles s. e. of mount In-dependence at Ticonderoga. Lake Bombazon ischiefly in this town, and sends its waters into Cas-tleton river, which, rising in Pittsford, passesthrough this town in a s. westerley course, and failsinto Pultney river in the town of Fairhaven, a littlebelow Colonel Lyon’s iron Avorks. Fort War-ner stands in thistoAvn. Inhabitants 805.)

(CASTOR’S River, in Newfoundland island,empties in the harbour of St. John’s. Its size isconsiderable for 15 miles from the sea.)

(Castor, Estanque del, a lake of the pro-vince and colony of Virginia, on the shore of the

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vince and government, on the shore of the riverMasparro, between the cities of New and Old Ba-rinas.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of Venezuela, on theshore of the river Mosquitos, near where this riverenters the Orituco.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of Cartagena, in thekingdom of Tierra Firme.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of La Sonora in NuevaEspana ; situate in the country of the SobaipurisIndians, on the shore of a river which enters theGila, between the settlements of San Cosme andSan Angelo.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of Tucumán, in thejurisdiction of the city of Xuxuy, with four cha-pels of ease.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and alcaldia mayor of Los Zoques in thekingdom of Guatemala.

Catalina, Santa, another, of the provinceand alcaldia mayor of Chiapa in the same king-dom.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theisland of Barbadoes, in the parish and district of S.George.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theisland of Jamaica, which is a parish of the Eng-lish, situate in the s. part.

Catalina, Santa, some sierras or mountainsof the coast of Brazil, in the province and captain-ship of Rey, opposite the island of Santa Catalina,from which they take their name.

Catalina, Santa, a cape or point of land onthe coast of the province and government of Cos-tarica and kingdom of Guatemala, between theport of Las Velas and the town of Nicaragua.

Catalina, Santa, a small island close to thes. coast of the island of St. Domingo, between LaSaona and the bay of Caballo.

Catalina, Santa, another island of the coastof Florida to the n. of Georgia.

Catalina, Santa, another island of the coastof Georgia, between the islands Sapola and As-sabaw.

Catalina, Santa, a bay on the coast of thestraits of Magellan, between point St. Silvestre andpoint St. Antonio de Padua.

Catalina, Santa, a bay of the e. coast of theisland of Newfoundland, between the Saint’s capeand New cape.

Catalina, Santa, a river of the province andcolony of Maryland, in the county of Talbot. Itruns j. and enters the sea in the bay of Chesapeak.

Catalina, Santa, an island of the N. sea,near the coast of Tierra Firme, opposite the Escu-do de Veraguas. It is of a good temperature, fer-tile, and abounding in cattle and fruits. It had init a settlement defended by two castles, called San-tiago and Santa Teresa; which, together with thetown, were destroyed by an English pirate, JohnMorgan, who took the island in 1665 ; and al-though it was recovered in the same year by thepresident of Panama and Colonel Don J uan Perezde Guzman, it remained abandoned and desert.

Catalina, Santa, another small island nearthe coast of Brazil. See St. Catherine.

Catalina, Santa, a small island, situate tothe s. of St. Domingo, and close to it in the frontof the settlement of Higuey.

Catalina, Santa, a valley, in which there isalso a small settlement, in the Nuevo Reyno deLeon ; annexed to the curacy of its capital, fromwhence it lies three leagues to the w. It contains20 families in its neighbourhood, and producesonly some sorts of pulse and some goats.

Catalina, Santa, another valley of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Moquehua in Peru,bounded by a river and by the cordillera.

Catalina, Santa, a bay on the coast ofNova Scotia, between the port Carnero and thatof Ours or Oso.

CATAMAIU, a large and rapid river of theprovince and government of Loxa in the kingdomof Quito, also called Chira, at the part where itenters the sea. It rises in the paramo or desertmountain of Sabanilla ; and collecting the watersof several smaller rivers, runs from s. to n.until it unites itself with tlie Gonzanama, whichenters it on the s. side, in lat. S° 47' s. ; it thenturns its course to the xo. and afterwards to the5 . w. and receives the tributary streams of therivers Quiros, Macara, and Pelingara ; all ofwhich enter it on the s. side. Being swelled withthese, it takes the name of Amotape, from the settle-ment of this name, situate on its shore. Near itsmouth this river is called Colan, and it empties it-self into the sea in the corregimiento and provinceofPiura. The countries which it laves are fertileand beautiful, and its banks are covered with or-chards and plantations of sugar-canes of the terri-tory of Loxa. The climate here is very hot, andin the valleys formed by this river the inhabitantsare much afflicted with the tertian fever ; its wa-ters are generally very cold and unwliolesonic.

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certain seasons of tlie year it is so filled withfish, for seven leagues from its mouth, that theIndians are accustomed to harpoon them from theshores.

Cauten, a point of land, or cape, which is oneof those which form the entrance of the formerriver.

CAUTO, a settlement of the s. coast of the islandof Cuba; situate on the shore of a river whichbears the same name.

CAUX, Montanas de, mountains in the pro-vince and government of French Guinea, whichrun along the shore of a river of the same name, be-tween the rivers Orapu and Aprovaque.

(CAVALLO, as some erroneously spell it, asea-port town in the province of Venezuela, inTierra Firme. Lat. 10'’ 28'. Long. G8° 8'. SeeCabello Pderto and Cavello Puerto.)

(CAVAILLON, a town on the s. side of thes. peninsula of the island of St. Domingo, aboutthree leagues n. e. of Les Cayes, and five w. by s.of St. Louis. Lat. 18° 18' w.)

(CAVELLO, Puerto, Borburata. Oneleague e. of Puerto Cavello, was originally the onlyresort of vessels trading to this part of Venezuela.Puerto Cavello was merely frequented by smugglers,fishermen, and the outcasts of the interior. Theold town is surrounded by tlic sea, excepting aspace of a few fathoms to tlie w. ; through whichthey have now cut a canal communicating to thesea on the n. of the town to that on the s. ; thusforming an island, the egress being by a bridgewith a gate which is shut every evening, and atwhich is placed the principal guard. This islandbeing too small for the increasing population,houses were built on a tongue of land to the w. ofthe town, which was the only part free from inun-dation ; and this has now become the residence ofthe merchants, and the principal place. The totalpopulation of Puerto Cavello is 7600, of which,excepting the military and the officers of govern-ment, none are of the nobility. The whites aregenerally employed in trade and navigation ; thechief correspondence being with the ports of thecontinent or the neighbouring colonies ; for, al-though the port has been open from 1798 to thetrade of the metropolis, there is as yet but. littlecommunication with it. Of about 60 vessels trad-ing to this place, 20 at least are from Jamaica, and20 from Cura 9 oa, whilst only four or five are fromSpain. According to the custom-house books, thecargoes of these veesels are of little value ; but therevenue is defrauded, and the vessels discharge theirlading on the coast before entering the port. Thisplace supplies all the w. part of Venezuela,

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and the jurisdiction of Valencia, San Carlos, Bari-quisimeto, San Felipe, and a part of the valleys ofAragoa. About 20 Europeans engross the w holetrade. All vessels trading to the neighbourhoodresort here for repairs, and nothing but the un-wholsoraeness of the air prevents Puerto Cavellobecoming the most important port in America.This insalubrity arises from the exhalations fromthe rain water that accumulates in a clayey marshto the s. of the city. It is particularly fatal tothose who are not seasoned to the climate. In1793 a Spanish squadron anchored at Puerto Ca-vello ; but in six months of its stay, it lost one-thirdof the crew; and in 1802 a French squadron in20 days lost 16 i officers and men. It has beencomputed that 20,000 piastres fortes would be suf-ficient to drain this tatal marsh. The inhabitantsare supplied by conduits with water from a riverthat runs into the sea one- fourth of a league w. ofthe town. A military commander is also at thehead of the police, and is likewise the administra-tor of justice, his decisions being subject to an ap-peal to the royal audience. The people have de-manded the establishment of a cahildo, but withoutsuccess. They obtained in 1800 a single alcalde ywho is appointed annually ; but great inconveni-ences have been found to arise from this arrange-ment.

There is no convent, and but one church, inPuerto Cavello. The foundation of another churchwas begun, but for want of funds it has not beehcompleted. There is a military hospital, and an-other for the poor. The garrison consists of acompany of the regiment of Caracas in time ofpeace ; but daring war it is reinforced from themilitia and troops of the line. 'I'hcre arc from 300to 400 galley-slaves always employed onthepiiblicworks.

Puerto Cavello is 30 leagues from Caracas,in embarking for La Guaira, and 48 leaguesin the direction of Valencia, Maracay, Tulraero,La Victoria, atid San Pedro. Reaumur’s thermo-meter is generally in August at 26°, and in Janu-ary from 18° to 19°. Lat. 10° 20' «. Long. 70*30' w. of Paris. See Puerto Cabello.)

(CAVENDISH, a township in Windsor county,Vermont, w. of Wcathersfield, on Black river,having 491 inhabitants. Upon this river, andwithin this township, the channel has been worndown 100 feet, and rocks of very large dimensionshave been undermined and thrown down one uponanother. Holes are wrought in the rocks of va-rious dimensions and forms ; some cylindrical,from one to eight feet in diameter, and from one to15 feet in depth ; others are of a spherical form.

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DEL PUERTO, a city of the province and go-vernment of Antioquia in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; founded by Gaspar de Kodas, on thespot of the Matanza of Valdivia, in 1676. It haschanged its place several times, on account of thebadness of.its temperature : and, lastly, in the year1588, it was removed by Francisco Redondo tothe spot where it now stands : is one league fromthe river Cauca, on a very steep declivity, whichis also of an unhealthy temperature, althoughabounding greatly in gold mines, which are,however, but little worked. Jt is the nativeplace of,

Fr. Marcos Vetancur, provincial of St. Domingoin Santa Fe:

Fr. Lorenzo de Figueroa, of the province ofSan Francisco :

Don Andres de Vetancur, elected bishop ofLa Concepcion in Chile;

Fr. Diego de Figueroa, provincial of San Augus-tin in Santa Fe : and

Don Luis de Vetancur, precentor of Quito, in-quisitor of Lima, and bishop-elect of Popayan ;all brothers, and men of singular virtue andlearning.

CEAPA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chilques and Marques in Peru; an-nexed to the curacy of Pampacucho.

CEBACO, a settlement of the province andalcaldia major of Matagalpa in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CECIL, a county, being one of the ten whichcompose the colony and province of Maryland.

(Cecil, a township in Washington county,Pennsylvania.)

CECILIA, Dona, a settlement of the provinceand government of Santa Marta in the kingdomof Tierra Firme ; situate on the shore of the largeriver Magdalena, opposite the lake Zapatosa, threeleagues from the town of Mompox.

CECONTEPEC, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldia major of San Salvador in the king-dom of Guatemala.

(CEDAR Point, a port of entry in Charlescounty, Maryland, on the e. side of Potowmacriver, about 12 miles below port Tobacco, and 96s. by w. of Baltimore. Its exports are chiefly to-bacco and Indian corn, and in 1794 amounted invalue to 18,593 dollars.)

(Cedar Point, a cape on the w. side of Dela-ware bay, in St. Mary’s county, Maryland.)

(Cedar Lick, a salt spring in the state of Ten-nessee, 19 miles from Nashville, four from Bigspring, and six from Little spring.)

Cedar, a river of the province and colony of

C E N

Pennsylvania, which traverses New Jersey, andenters the sea.

Cedar, another small river of the province andcolony of Delaware, which runs e. and enters thesea in the bay of its name.

Cedar, a small island of South Carolina; situatewithin the strait of Parapticoe.

Cedar, another island of the province and co-lony of Maryland, between that of Chingoteagand that of Little Matompkin.

CEDAZOS, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Zapopan in Nueva Es-paña, in which dwell some Maslees, Mulattoes,and Indians, who live by cultivating seeds.

CEDROS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Paucartambo in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Challabamba.

Cedros, another settlement in the province andgovernment of Cinaloa ; situate on the shore of theriver Mayo, on the confines of the province ofAstimuri.

Cedros, a river of New France or Canada.It runs s. e. and enters the lake Erie near themouth of the strait of Misigagues.

CEGUEHUE, a small river of the provinceand government of Quijos y Macas in the king-dom of Quito. It enters, a little way from itssource, into the Azuela.

CELAYA, a town of the intendancy of Gua-naxuato in the kingdom of Nueva Espana.Sumptuous edifices have been recently constructedhere, as also at Queretaro and Guanaxuato. Thechurch of the Carmelites of Celaya has a fineappearance ; it is adorned with Corinthian andIonic columns. Its height is 1833 metres, or 6018feet.

CELEDIN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru.

CELLACACA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chichas and Tarija in Peru.

CENDRE, a cape or point of land of the coastof Acadia.

CENEGUANGA, a settlement of the provinceand government of Santa Marta in the kingdom ofTierra Firme; situate on the coast near the riverPiedras.

CENEGUETAS, a settlement of the provinceand government of Guayaquil in the kingdom ofQuito.

CENGUYO, San Pedro de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Yrimbo, and alcaldia mayorof Maravatio, in the bishopric of Mechoacan,and kingdom of Nueva Espaiia. It contains 60families of Indians, and is two leagues to the n. zo.of its head settlement.

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Black, Granville, Craven, and a half-moon; onthe n. a line, and in front of the river Ashley thebastion of Colliton, and the covered half-moon ofJohnson, with a draw-bridge to pass the line, andanother to pass the half-moon. Besides these worksof regular fortification, it has a fort erected upona point of land at the entrance of the river Ashley,which commands the channel and the vessels : butthe bastions, the palisade, and the ditch on theland-side, having suffered much damage in anhurricane, and it being thought by the GovernorNicholson, that they were of too great an extent todefend themselves, they were by his command de-stroyed. This city is, as it were, a continual fair,being the market for the fruits of the whole pro-vince : the streets are well projected, and the edi-fices are grand and of fine architecture, especiallythe church, which is magnificent, spacious, andone of the best in all N . America : there are severalother churches belonging to different sects, and theFrench protestants have a very fine one in the prin-cipal street. The town consists of 800 housesbuilt of wood as to the greater part, although thereare some of stone ; all of them having glass win-dows, and manifesting a degree of elegance and or-nament in their structure : is the residence of thegovernor of the province, and in it is held the ge-neral assembly and the tribunal of judicature.Here are many rich nobles and opulent merchants,and almost all its inhabitants exhibit a costly ap-pearance, and live in a state of consummate luxury.It has a public library, which owes its establishmentto Doctor Thomas Bray. The liberty of con-science enjoyed in this city, and which was grantedto its inhabitants a short time after its foundation,caused it to become very populous. This effectwas further heightened by the extensive commerceit enjoyed ; and thus has it, with many other qua-lities of pre-eminence, become one of the finest set-tlements in America.

[Charleston, the metropolis of S. Carolina,is the most considerable town in the state; situatein the district of the same name, and on the tongueof land formed by the confluent streams of Ashleyand Cowper, which are short rivers, but large andnavigable. These waters unite immediately belowthe city, and form a spacious and convenient har-bour, which communicates with the ocean just be-low Sullivan’s island, which it leaves on. the n. sevenmiles s, e. of Charleston. In these rivers the tiderises in common about six feet and a half; but uni-formly rises 10 or 12 inches more during a nighttide. The fact is certain ; the cause unknown.The continual agitation which the tides occasionin the waters which almost surround Charleston,

the refreshing sea-breezes which are regularly felt,and the smoke arising from so many chimneys,render this city more healthy than any part of thelow country in the s. states. On this account it isthe resort of great numbers of gentlemen invalidsfrom the W. India islands, and of the rich plantersfrom the country, who come here to spend thesickly months, as they are called, in quest of healthand of the social enjoyments whicli the city affords ;and in no part of America are the social blessingsenjoyed more rationally and liberally than here.The following statement exhibits the greatest andleast height of Fahrenheit’s thermometer for severalyears past in Charleston.

Years.

Highest.

Lowest.

Years.

Highest.

Lowest.

1750

96

23

1759

93

28

1751

94

18

1791

90

28

1752

101

32

1792

93

30

1753

91

28

1793

' 89

SO

1754

93

22

1794

91

34

1755

90

26

1795

92

29

1756

96

27

1796

89

17

1757

90

25

1797

88

22

1758

94

25

1798

88

31

State of the weather for 1807, ending Decem-ber 31.

Thermometer, highest~ ’ lowest

92^ SO'

24°

58° 15'

30° 1' to 30° 77'

1 to 13142 inches IfN.E. S.W,

67

28

2

Ditto

Ditto meanBarometerHygrometerFall of rainPrevailing windsDays of rain

Do. of thunderDo. of snow

Unaffected hospitality — affability — ease of man-ners and address — and a disposition to make theirguests welcome, easy, and pleased with themselves,are characteristics of the respectable people ofCharleston. In speaking of the capital, it oughtto be observed, for the honour of the people ofCarolina in general, that when, in common with theother colonies, in the contest with Britain, they re-solved against the use of certain luxuries, and evennecessaries of life, those articles which improve themind, enlarge the understanding, and correct thetaste, were excepted ; the importation of bookswas permitted as formerly. The land on whichthe town is built is flat and low, and the waterbrackish and unwholesome. The streets are prettyregularly cut, and open beautiful prospects, andhave subterranean drains to carry off’ filth and keep]

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America called New South Wales. Its territoryconsists of a white dry sand, and it is covered withsmall trees and shrubs. This island has a beauti-ful appearance in the spring to those Avho discoverit after a voyage of three or four months, and afterhaving seen nothing but a multitude of mountainscovered with frost, which lie in the bay, and in thestrait of Hudson, and which are rocks petrifiedwith eternal ice. This island appears at that sea-son as though it were one heap of verdure. Theair at the bottom of the bay, although in 51“ of hit.and nearer to the sun than London, is excessivelycold for nine months, and extremely hot the remain-ing three, save when the n. w. wind prevails. Thesoil on the e. <^s well as on the w. side produces allkinds of grain and fruits of fine qualities, whichare cultivated on the shore of the river Rupert.Lat. 52“ 12' n. Long. 80“ w.

CHARNACOCHA, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Pilaya and Paspaya inPeru,

CHARO, Matlazingo, the alcaldía mayorof the province and bishopric of Mechoacán inNueva España, of a mild and dry temperature,being the extremity of the sierra of Otzumatlan ;the heights of which are intersected with manyveins of metals, which manifest themselves veryplainly, although they have never yet been dugout ; and in the wet seasons the clay or mud pitsrender the roads impassable. It is watered by theriver which rises in the pool or lake of Valladolid,and by which the crops of wheat, maize, lentils, andthe fruits peculiar to the place, are rendered fertileand productive. This reduced jurisdiction belongsto the Marquises of Valle, and is subject to theDukes of Terranova. Its population is reduced tosome ranchos, or meetings for the purpose of labour,and to the capital, which has the same name, andwhich contains a convent of the religious order ofSt. Augustin, this being one of the first templesbuilt by the Spaniards in this kingdom, the presentdilapidated state of it bearing ample testimony toits great antiquity. It contains 430 families ofPirindas Indians, employed in labour and in thecultivation of the land, and in making bread, whichis carried for the supply' of Valladolid, the neigh-bouring ranchos and estates. It should also have45 or 50 families of Spaniards, Mustees^ and Mulat-toes. Is .50 leagues to the w. of Mexico, and twoto the e. of Valladolid. Long. 100° 44'. Lat.19“34'.

CHARON, a small river of Canada, which runse. and enters the lake Superior in the bay of Beau-harnois.

CHARPENTIER, Fond du, a bay of the n. e.

coast of the island of Martinique, between the townand parish of Marigot and the Pan de Azucar.

CHARPENTIER, a small river of the same islandwhich runs n. e. and enters the sea in the formerbay.

CHARQUEDA, a lake of the province andcaptainship of Rey in Brazil, near the coast whichlies between this lake and that of Los Patos.

CHARRUAS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofParaguay, who inhabit the parts lying between therivers Parana and Uruguay. These Indians arethe most idle of any in America, and it has beenattempted in vain to reduce them to any thing likea civilized state.

Charruas, a settlement of this province andgovernment.

Charruas, a river of the same province, whichruns s. s. w. and enters the Paraná.

CHARTIER, Bahia de, a bay on the s. coastof the straits of Magellan, between the bay of SanSimon and the point of Tunquichisgua.

Chartier, a settlement of Indians of the pro-vince and colony of Virginia ; situate on the shoreof a river of the same name. It runs s. and entersthe sea in the county of Hampshire.

(Chartier, a township in Washington county,Pennsylvania.)

(Chartier’s Creek. See Canonsburg andMorganza.)

(CHARTRES, a fort which was built bythe French, on the e. side of the Mississippi,three miles n. of La Prairie du Rocher, or theRock meadows, and 12 miles n. of St. Genevieve,on the w. side of that river. It was abandoned in1772, being untenable by the constant washings ofthe Mississippi in high floods. The village s. ofthe fort was very inconsiderable in 1778. A mileabove this is a village settled by 170 warriors of thePiorias and Mitchigamias tribes of Illinois Indians,who are idle and debauched.)

CHASPAIA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Aricá in Peru; annexed to thecuracy of Tarata.

CHASSES, a small river of N. Carolina, whichruns n. n. e. and enters that of Cutawba.

CHAT, Trou de, a settlement of the parish andisland of Martinique ; situate near the bay of theCul de Sac Royal, and to the n. e. of the capital.

Chat, a river of the island of Guadalupe, whichrises in the mountains of the e. coast, and runninge. enters the sea between the rivers Grand Bananierand Trou au Chien, or Hole of the Dog.

Chat, a cape or point of land on the coast ofthe river St. Lawrence, on the shore opposite tothe port of San Pacracio.

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(CHEGOMEGAN, a point of land about 60miles in length, on the s. side of lake Superior.About 100 miles w. of this cape, a considerableriver falls into the lake ; upon its banks abundanceof virgin copper is found.)

CHEGONOIS, a small river of the same pro-vince and colony as the former. It runs s. w, andenters the Basin des Mines.

CHEGUEHUE, a river of the province ofSucumbios in the kingdom of Quito. It runs s. w.and enters the Aguarico, in lat. 6' n.

CHEGUIQUILLA, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Coquimbo in the king-dom of Chile ; situate to the s. of the town ofCopiapo.

CHEJANI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Carabaya in Peru ; annexed totlie curacy of Para.

CHEKOUTIMI, a settlement of Indians ofCanada, in the country of the nation of its name,on the shore of the river Saguenay.

CHELEL, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Luya and Chillaos in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Cheto.

(CHELMSFORD, a township in Middlesexcounty, Massachusetts ; situated on the s. side ofMerrimack river, 26 miles n. w. from Boston, andcontains 1144 inhabitants. There is an ingeniouslyconstructed bridge over the river at Pawtucketfalls, which connects this town with Dracut. Theroute of the Middlesex canal, designed to connectthe waters of Merrimack with those of Bostonharbour, will be s. through the e. part of Chelms-ford.)

CHELQUE, a settlement of Indians of thedistrict of Guadalabquen in the kingdom of Chile;situate on the shore of the river Valdivia.

(CHELSEA, called by the ancient natives Win-nisimet, a town in Suffolk county, Massachusetts,containing 472 inhabitants. Before its incorpora-tion, in 1738, it was award of the town of Boston,It is situated n. e. of the metropolis, and separatedfrom it by the ferry across the harbour, calledWinnisimet.)

(Chelsea, a township in Orange county, Ver-mont, having 239 inhabitants.)

(Chelsea, the name of a parish in the city ofNorwich, (Connecticut), called the Landing, situ-ated at the head of the river Thames, 14 miles n.of New London, on a point of land formed bythe junction ofShetucket and Norwich, or Littlerivers, w hose united waters constitute the Thames.It is a busy, commercial, thriving, romantic, andagreeable place, of about 150 houses, ascending

one above another in tiers, on artificial founda-tions, on the 5. point of a high rocky hill,)

Chelsea, a settlement of the English in theprovince and colony of Massachusetts, one of thefour of New England, on the shore of the port ofBoston.

CHEMIN, Croix de la Molle De, a crossin Canada, standing in the middle of the road nearthe river W abache.

(CHEMUNG, The w. branch of Susquehannahriver is sometimes so called. See Tioga River.)

(CHEMUNG is a township in Tioga county,New York. By the state census of 1796, 81 ofits inhabitants were electors. It has Newton w.and Oswego e. about 160 miles n. w. fiom NewYork city, measuring in a straight line. Betweenthis place and Newton, General Sullivan, in his vic-torious expedition against the Indians in 1779, hadadesperate engagement with the Six Nations, whomhe defeated. The Indians werestrongly entrenched,and it required the utmost exertions of the Ame-rican army, with field pieces, to dislodge them ;although the former, including 250 tories, amount-ed only to 800 men, while the Americans were5000 in number, ami well appointed in every re-spect.)

CHENE, a river of Canada, which runs n. w,and enters the river St. Lawrence, opposite thesettlement of New Port.

(CHENENGO is a n. branch of Susquehan-nah river. Many of the military townships arewatered by the n. w. branch of this river. Thetowns of Fayette, Jerico, Greene, Clinton, andChenengo, in Tioga county, lie between this riverand the e. waters of Susquehannah.)

(Chenengo, a post town, and one of the chiefin Tioga county, New York. The settled partof the town lies about 40 miles w. e. from Tiogapoint, between Chenengo river and Susquehan-nah ; has the town of Jerico on the n. By thestate census of 1796, 169 of its inhabitants areelectors. It was taken off from Montgomerycounty, and in 1791 it had only 45 inhabitants.It is 375 miles n. n. w. of Philadelphia.)

(CHENESSEE or GENESSEE River rises in Penn-sylvania, near the spot, which is the highest groundin that state, where the eastern most water of Allegha-ny river, and Pine creek, a water of Susquehannah,and Tioga river, rise. Fifty miles from its sourcethere are falls of 40 feet, and five from its mouth of 75feet, and a little above that of 96 feet. These fallsfurnish excellent mill-seats, which arc improved bythe inhabitants. After a course of about 100 miles,mostly n, e. by n. it empties into lakeQntario, four

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empties into Chesapeak bay, at Love point. It formsan island at its mouth, and by acbannel on the e. sideof Kent island, communicates with. Eastern bay.It is proposed to cut a canal, about 1 1 miles long,from Andover creek, a mile and a half fromBridgetown to Salisbury, on Upper Duck creek,which falls into Delaware at Hook island.)

(Chester, a small town in Shannandoah county,Virginia, situate on the point of land formed bythe junction of Allen’s or North river and Southriver, which form the Shannandoah ; 16 miles s.by w. of Winchester. Lat. 39° 4' n. Long.78° 25' w.)

(Chester County, in Pinckney district, SouthCarolina, lies in the s.e. corner of the district, onW ateree river, and contains 6866 inhabitants ; ofwhom 5866 are whites, and 938 slaves. It sendstwo representatives, but no senator, to the statelegislature.)

(Chester, a town in Cumberland county, Vir-ginia ; situate on the s. w. bank of James river,15 miles n. of Blandford, and six s. of Rich-mond.)

(CHESTERFIELD, a township in Hampshirecounty, Massachusetts, 14 mites w. of Northamp-ton. It contains 180 houses, and 1183 inha-bitants.)

(Chesterfield, a township in Cheshire county.New Hampshire, on the e. bank of Connecticutriver, having Westmoreland n. and Hinsdale s.It was incorporated in 1752, and contains 1905 in-habitants. It lies about 25 miles s. by w. ofCharlestown, and about 90 or 100 w. of Ports-mouth. About the year 1730, the garrison offort Dummer was alarmed with frequent explosions,and with columns of fire and smoke, emitted fromW est River mountain in th is township , and four milesdistant from that fort. The like appearances havebeen observed at various times since ; particularly,one in 1752 was the most severe of any. Thereare two places where the rocks bear marks of hav-ing been heated and calcined.)

(Chesterfield County, in South Carolina, isin Cheraws district, on the North Carolina line. Itis about 30 mites long, and 29 broad.)

Chesterfield County, in Virginia, is betweenJames and Appamatox rivers. It is about 30miles long, and 25 broad ; and contains 14,214inhabitants, including 7487 slaves.)

(Chesterfield Inlet, on the w. side of Hud-son’s bay, in New South Wales, upwards of 200miles in length, and from 10 to 30 in breadth ; fullof islands.)

(CHESTERTOWN, a post-town and the capi-tal of Kent county, Maryland, on the w. side of

Chester river, 16 miles s.w. of Georgetown, 38e. by s. from Baltimore, and 81 s.w. of Philadel*phia. It contains about 140 houses, a church,college, court-house, and gaol. The college wasincorporated in 1782, by the name of Washing-ton. It is under the direction of 24 trustees, whoare empowered to supply vacancies and hold,estates, whose yearly value shall not exceed 6000/.currency. In 1787 it had a permanent fund of1250/. a year settled upon it by law. Lat. 39° 12'n. Long. 76° 10' cc;.)

CHETIMACHAS, a river of the province andgovernment of Louisiana. It is an arm of theMississippi, which runs s. e. and enters the sea onthe side of the bay of Asuncion or Ascension. [Onthe Chetiraachas, six leagues from the Mississippi,there is a settlement of Indians of the same name ;and thus far it is uniformly 100 yards broad, andfrom two to four fathoms cleep, vfhen the water islowest. Some drifted logs have formed a shoal atits mouth on the Mississippi ; but as the water isdeep under them they could be easily removed;and the Indians say there is nothing to impede na-vigation from their village to the gulf. The banksare more elevated than those of the Mississippi, andin some places are so high as never to be over-flowed. The natural productions are the same ason the Mississippi, but the soil, from the extraordi-nary size and compactness of the canes, is supe-rior. If measures were adopted and pursued witha view to improve this communication, there wouldsoon be on its banks the most prosperous and im-portant settlements in that colony.)

(Chetimachas, Grand Lake of, in Loui-.siana, near the mouth of the Mississippi, is 24miles long, and nine broad. Lake de Portage,which is 13 miles long, and If broad, commu-nicates with this lake at the n. end, by a straita quarter of a mile wide. The country bor-dering on these lakes is low and flat, timbered withcypress, live and other kinds of oak ; and on the€. side, the land between it and the Chafalaya riveris divided by innumerable streams, which occa-sion as many islands. Some of these streams are*navigable. A little distance from the s. e. short?of the lake Chetimachas, is an island where per-sons passing that way generally halt as a restingplace. Nearly opposite this island there is anopening which leads to the sea. It is about 150yards wide, and has 16 or 17 fathoms water.)

CHETO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Luya and Chillaos in Peru ; tothe curacy of which is annexed the extensive val-ley of Huaillabamba, in the province of Chncha-poyas.

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CHIMOR, a settlement of the province andforregimiento of Paucartambo in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Challabamba.

CHINA, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Santa Marta in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; one of those which enter the greatcienega, or quagmire, on the e.

Same name, a point of land of the coast of Peru, inthe province and corregimienlo of Cañete.

Same name, a settlement of Indians of the provinceand colony of Georgia ; situate on the shore of theriver Apalachicola.

CHINACATES, a settlement of the provinceof Tepeguana, and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya.

CHINACOTA, a small settlement of the jurisdiction and government of Pamplona in theNuevo Reyno de Granada. It is of a hot tempe-rature, produces sugar-cane, plantains, maize, andis extremely fertile in wheat ; but this not withoutcultivation. The natives amount to about 90 poorfamilies, and as many Indians. It is situate in anextensive valley, from whence it derives its title,and which is also called. Of Meer Ambrosio, fromthe Indians having killed here the GermanGeneral Ambrosio de Alfinger, by whom it w^as dis-covered in 1531. Four leagues n. e. of Pam-plona.

CHINANTLA, a settlement and head settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Cozamaloapan in Nueva Espaha. It contains 40 fami-lies of Chinantecas Indians, and is very fertile,and abounding in maize and cotton. Eightyleagues s. of Mexico.

CHINANTEPEC, Santa Catalina, asettlement and head settlement of the district ofthe alcaldia mayor of Guayacocotla in NuevaEspana. Its territory is somewhat extensive, andthe settlements or wards belonging to it are far re-moved from each other, the greater part of thembeing situate within the deep glens, or on theheights, so that the roads to them are very diffi-cult. It contains, in all, 1340 families of In-dians.

CHINAPA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of La Sonora ; situate on the shore ofthe river of its name, between the settlements ofArispo and Bacuachi.

CHINAS, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Popayan.

CHINATAGUAS, a barbarous nation ofIndians of Peru ; situate to the n. of the city of Gua-nuco. They are descendants of the Panataguas,of whom few remain at the present day, and ofwhom but little is known.

CHINATECA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reynode Granada ; situate on the skirt of a mountain.

CHINATOS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe Nuevo Reyno de Granada, who inhabit theforests to the n. e. 1 to the e. of the city of Pam-plona. They are relics of the Chitareros, whohave been always found very troublesome, fromtheir proximity to the aforesaid city.

CHINAUTLA, a settlement and head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Teuzitlan in Nueva Espana ; annexed to the curacy ofthis capital. It contains 108 families of Indians,and lies a league and an halPs distance from thesame capital.

CHINCHA, Santo Domingo, el Real de asettlement of the province and corregimiento ofCanete in Peru ; situate on the sea-coast.

Same name, an island of the S. sea, near the coast,in the same province and corregimiento, oppositethe port of Sangallo.

Same name, formerly the name of the provinceor district now called Chunchasuyu in Peru, tothe is. of Cuzco. Its natives were valorous, andresisted for eight months the Emperor Pachacutec,who subjected it to his controul. The country ispleasant, fertile, and abounding in cattle. Hereare to be seen vestiges and ruins of some magnifi-cent fabrics, which belonged to the Incas, andwhich strike the imagination with wonder and sur-prise, at viewing the immense stones used in theirarchitecture, and when it is considered that theIndians knew not the use of engines, whereby theymight raise them.

CHINCHAIPUCQUIO, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Abancay in Peru.

CHINCHAN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tarma in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Huariaca.

CHINCHAO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huanuco in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Santa Maria del Valle; situate onthe confines of the infidel Pataguas Indians.

CHINCHAYCOCHA, a large lake of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Tarma in Peru. It ismore than nine leagues in length and three inwidth ; and from it rises the river Pari or Paria,also called Xauxa, towards the n. side. Thisriver runs s. dividing the province of Xauxa, andgiving it its name, both in Xauxa Alta, or High,and Baxa, or Low ; it then turns e. and after run-ning for more than 40 leagues, flows back to the n.until it enters the Maranon on the s. side. M. Dela Martiniere, with his accustomed error, says that

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much incommoded by mosquitos ; so that its po-pulation is much reduced, and those that remainapply themselves to the cultivation of sugar-canes,maize, yucas^ and plantains.

COLONCHE, a small settlement of Indians,of the district and jurisdiction of Santa Elena,in the government of Guayaquil, and kingdomof Quito ; situate on the s. shore of a river,from whence it takes its name, in lat. 1° 56' s.The said river rises in the mountains of thedistrict, and enters the S. sea, opposite the islandof La Plata.

Colonche, a small island of the S. sea, nearthe coast of the province and government of Gua-yaquil.

COLONIES OF THE English. See thearticles Virginia, Carolina, New England,New York, Jersey, Massachusetts, RhodeIsland, Pennsylvania, Nova Scotia ; of theJ3utch, see Surinam, Berbice, Corentin,CuRAZAo ; of the Portuguese, San Gabriel;of the French, Cayenne, St. Domingo, Mar-tinique; of the Danes, St. Thomas. (See gene-ral Tables of Dominions, &c. in the introductorymatter.)

COLOPO, a large river of the province andgovernment of Esmeraldas in the kingdom ofQuito. It runs from s. e. to n. w. at an almostequal distance between the rivers Esmeraldas andVerde, and runs into the S. sea, in the bay of SanMateo, in lat. 58' n.

COLOR, Cabo de, a cape on the coast of theprovince and captainship of Sergipé in Brazil. Itlies between the rivers Real and Ponica.

COLORADA, Punta, a point on the coast ofthe N. sea, and in the province and governmentof Venezuela, to the e. of the cape San Roman.

COLORADA, a river of tlie jurisdiction andalcaldta mayor of Penonomé, in the governmentof Panama, and kingdom of Tierra Firme. It risesin the mountains to the s. and enters the Pacificnear the settlement of Anton.

COLORADO, a settlement of the provinceand government of Tucumán, in the district andjurisdiction of the city of Salta, and s. s. e. of thesame.

Colorado, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Santa Marta in the kingdom of TierraFirme; situate on the shore of the river of its name.

Colorado, a river of the province and corre-^imiento of Cuyo in the kingdom of Chile. Itrises in its cordillera, to the n. runs e. and spendsitself in various lakes, on account of the level oftlie country. The geographer Cruz errs in makingit enter the river Maipo.

Colorado, another, a large river of the pro-:vince and government of Sonora in NuevaEspana.

Colorado, another, a small river of the pro-vince and government of Santa Marta in thekingdom of Tierra Firme, which enters the greatriver Magdalena before you come to the townof Tamalameque.

Colorado, another, in the province and go-vernment of Louisiana, near the road wliich leadsto Mexico. It runs s. e. in a very large stream,and enters the sea in the bay of San Bernardo.

Colorado, a cape or point of land of the s.coast of St. Domingo, in the part possessed bythe French, between the bays of Tondo and Puer. .

Colorado, a mountain of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, on the shore of the riverSalado, and to the s. of the settlement of Nuestra'Sefiora de Buenas Costumbres. ;

COLORADOS, a barbarous nation of Indians,of the province and corregimiento of Tacunga inthe kingdom of Quito, who inhabit some moun-,tains of the same name, very craggy and rugged,abounding in animals and wild beasts, such asbears, lions, tigers, deer, squirrels, monkeys, andmarmosets. These Indians, although the greaterpart of them are reduced to the Catholic faith bythe extinguished company of the Jesuits, aregiven to superstition ; they are divided into twoparts, the one called the Colorados of Angamarca,since tlieir principal settlement bears this title, andthe other the Colorados of St. Domingo ; they now,belong to the province and government of Esme-raklas, and live retired in the woods, and upon thebanks of the rivers Toachi and Quininay, wherethe missionaries of the religion of St. Domingo ofQuito exercise their apostolical zeal. The princi-pal settlement of this place, being situate on the w.shore, is called St. Domingo. The commerce ofthese Indians, and by which they subsist, is incarrying to Guayaquil, the province by whichthey are bounded , w dod for making canoes and rafts,sugar-canes, achiote, and agi pepper, and bring-ing back in exchange cattle, fish, soap, and othernecessary eft'ects.

COLOSO, a settlement of the province andgovernment ©f Cartagena ; situate on the shore ofthe river Pechelin, to the s. s. w. of the townof Maria, to the jurisdiction^of which it apper-tains.

COLOTLAN, a settlement and head settlementof the alcaldia mayor of Mextitlan in Nueva Es-pana. It contains 240 families of Indians, and isthree leagues to the w. of its capital.

COLOTLIPAN, a settlement of the head set-

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21. Don Fray Pedro de Espineira ; elected in1762 ; he governed until his death, in 1778.

22. Don Francisco Joseph de Maran ; electedin 1779.

Concepcion de la Vega, another city, inthe island of St. Domingo, founded by the AdmiralChristopher Columbus, on a beautiful and spaciousplain, or Uanura^ celebrated for a conquest gainedon it by a numerous army of Indians. It has a goodparish church, erected into a bishopric, and wliichwas afterwards done away with in 1605, it beingthen embodied with the archbishopric of S. Do-mingo. it has also a convent of the religiousorder of St. Francis, in which is deposited andvenerated the first cross that the discoverer and con-queror of this country planted here ; which, al-though the Indians have endeavoured with all theirmight to break and destroy, has resisted all theireftbrts. Twenty-five leagues from the capital ofS. Domingo.

(Concepcion, a town of the province and go-vernment of Paraguay ; situate on the e. side ofthe river Paraguay, about SO leagues n. of Asun-cion. Lat. 23'^ 23' 8" s. Long. 57° 16" <®.)

(Concepcion del Pao, a city of the provinceand government of Caracas ; composed of the in-habitants of Trinity, of Margareta, and of Caracas,who owned the folds in the plains near the Ori-noco, to the s. of Barcelona ; they here succes-sively fixed their dwellings, for the purpose ofbeing in the centre of their property, and of super-intending it themselves. In 1744 the number ofthese houses were found considerable enough to ac-quire the name of village. There are only 2300people of all classes here, subsisting will] facilityby Ihe fertility of the soil. The air and water aregood, and the only inconveniences the inhabitantsexperience are an excessive lieat, and inundationsarising from the long and heavy rains. The produceof the land is merely the provisions common to theCQuntry. The wealth of the inhabitants consistsentirely in cattle, which they export to Trinity,liia Guarapiche or Orinoco, This village, nowa city, is distinguished from St.John the Baptistdel Pao, situate in the province of Venezuela, bythe title of Concepcion del Pao. Lat. 8° 42' n.Long. 65° 10' ra.)

Concepcion, a settlement, the capital of theprovince and corregiwicnlo of Xauja in Peru.

Concepcion, another, of tlie same province andcorregimiento, in which there is a convent of thereligious order of St. Francis.

Concepcion, another, of the province and cor-regimknto of Lucanas in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Otoca.

Concepcion, another, of the same province andkingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Paraisancos.

Concepcion, another, of the province and cor-regimiento of Chichas and Tarija in the same king-dom, and of the district of the former.

Concepcion, another, of the province and cor-regimienlo of Vilcas Huaiman in the same king-dom ; annexed to the curacy of Vizchongo.

Concepcion, another, of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Leon in Nueva Espana, andof the bishopric of Mechoacan ; annexed to thecuracy of Rincon. It contains 208 families of In-dians, 100 of Spaniards, and ^0 oi Mustees. Itproduces wheat, maize, and other seeds, and is aquarter of a league from its curacy, and fourleagues from the capital.

Concepcion, another small settlement or ward,united to that of Tequiszillan, of ihealcaldia mayorof Theotihuacan in the same kingdom.

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichare held by the religious order of St. Francis, inthe province of Texas and kingdom of Nueva Es-pana. It is 112 leagues to the e. n. e. of the pre-sidency of San Antonio de Bejar.

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province and government of Mainas,of the kingdom of Quito ; situate on the shore ofthe great river Maranon, on a point of land formedby the same, and where this river is entered by theApena and the Guallaga,

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province of Tepeguana, and kingdomof Nueva Vizcaya; situate on the bank of theriver Florido, near the settlement and real of themines of Parral.

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichbelong to the religion of St. Francis, in the pro-vince of Taraumara, and kingdom of Nueva Viz-caya, lying 17 leagues distant between the s. ands. w. of the real of the mines of San Felipe de Chi-guagua.

Concepcion, another, with the surname ofAchaguas, being composed of Indians of this na-tion, in the kingdom of Granada ; of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits in Orinoco; situate on the shore of theriver Meta.

Concepcion, another settlement, the capital ofthe province and captainship of Itamaraca in Bra-zil ; situate on the top of a mountain by the sea-side. It has a magnificeut parish church, and isgarrisoned by two companies of troops, it con-tains 300 housekeepers, and has three large sugar.

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York, wliicli falls into a bay at the s. side of theisland. It lies two miles to tlies. of Rockonkamapond.)

CONNESTIGUCUNE, an establisliment oftlie English, in the county of Albany, inthew. partand to the e. of Chenectady, or of (he river Mo-hawk, where it gives a fall from above 70 feet inlieiglit. See Arm any.

CONNETABLE, or CoN?)ESTABr^E, a smallisland of tire county of Cayenne, belonging to theFrench, between the city of Cayenne and capeOrange.

CONNETABLE, anotlier small island of tire sameprovince, witli the addition of Petite, to distin-guish it from the former.

CONOCOTO, a settlement of the kingdom ofQuito, in the corregimimto of the district of theCinco Leguasde la Ciudad, in the district of whichis a rising ground called A Halo, and upon theskirts of this are many warm-water mineral streams,much frequented as baths for the curing of in-firmities.

CONOMA, a lake of the province and countryof the Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions.It is formed from some waste water of the riverMadera, very near its shore, and at a small distancefrom the river of Las Amazonas.

CONOME, Cape of, a point of land of thecoast of Nova Scotia, in the bay of Fundy, and inthe most interior part of the same.

CONORIBO, a river of the province and cap-ainship of Seara in Brazil. It rises near the coast,runs n. and enters that of La Concepcion or S.Francisco, and that of La Cruz, and then entersthe sea.

CONOSTEE, a settlement of Indians of N.Carolina ; situate on the shore of the river Eu-phasee.

CONSAHATCHEE, a river of the provinceand colony of Georgia. It runs s. e. and enters thesea.

CONSATA, a settlement of the missions whichwere held by the religious order of St. Augustin,in the country of Paititi, of the province and cor-regimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

CONSETS, Point of, on the e, coast of theisland of Barbadoes, on the side of the point ofBele.

CONSOLACION, Nuestra Senora de, aset-tlement of the government of Neiba in the NuevoReyno de Granada ; annexed to the curacy of thetown of La Purificacion. It is situate on theshore of the river Pardo, is of a hot temperature,abounding in the vegetable productions of a similar

climate, and in troublesome and venomous in-sects. It contains more than 200 house-keepers.

CONSOLACION, a point or long strip of landcalled Possession, on the n. coast of the straits ofMagellan ; one of those which form Possessionbay, and where are to be seen the ruins of the fortnamed Jesus, which was founded by the AdmiralPedro de Sarin iento.

CONSTANCE, or Constancia, a small cityof the English, in the island of Barbadoes.

CONSTANTINO Perez, an island of theriver Valdivia, in tlie kingdom of Chile, oppositethe same city, with two other small islands, theone before, the other behind it, and which, together,form the celebrated port of this name. The pas-sage on both sides is navigable, but the channel onthe s. side being the most wide, is the course uni-formly taken by large ships and vessels, and in thesame manner the n. channel is mostly, as it isnarrower, entered by frigates and small craft.

CONTAS, Rio das, a river in the provinceand captainship of Ylheos in Brazil. It rises nearthe coast, runs e. and enters the sea in the Barraor Bar of Camamu, in the river of Ylheos.

CONTAS, a town of the above province andkingdom.

(CONTINENTAL Village was situated onNorth river, in New York state. Before its de-struction by Sir Henry Clinton, in October 1777,there were here barracks for 2000 men.)

CONTOOK, a settlement of the English, inthe province of Hampshire, one of the four ofNew England ; situate on the shore of the riverPenny cook.

Contook, a river of the above province. Itrises from a small lake, runs s. then turns e. andenters the Pennycook.

CONTOY, an island of the N. sea, near thecoast of the province and government of Yucatan,close to the cape Cotoche.

CONTRE-PASTURAGE, a river of the pro-vince and colony of Virginia. It runs n. e. andenters the head of the river James.

CONTRERAS, a small island of the S. sea,close to the coast of the province and governmentof Veragua in the kingdom of Tierra Firme.

CONTUMAZA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru.

CONUCO, a settlement ofthe province and cor-regimiento of Ytata in the kingdom of Chile ; situatenear the coast, opposite the island of Quiriquina.

CONUENTOS, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Rey in Brazil, at the source of theriver Curitaba.

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