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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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CRUZ, Santa, de la Sierra, a provinceand government of Peru, bounded n. by that ofMoxos, e. by tlie territory of the Chiquitos In-dians, s. by the infidel Chirigiianos and ChanaesIndians, s, w. by the province of Tomina, and w.by that of Mizqiie. it is an extensive plain, whichon the w. side is covered with Indian dwellingsand grazing farms, as far as the river called Grandeor Huapay. It extends 28 leagues s. as far as thesame river, 18 ra. as far as the foot of the cordillera,and 24 n. being altogether covered with various es-tates, as indeed arc the parts on the other side of thecordillera. It lies very low, and is free both fromthe extreme cold and parching heat of the serra-mas, altliough the other provinces of this bishop-ric, which lie close by this province, are muchinfested with the same variations of climate. Itis, however, of a hot aiul moist temperature, andthe country is mountainous ; on its plains arefound various kinds of wood, good for building,and amongst the rest, a sort of palm, the heart ofwhich is used for making the frame works to win-dows of temples and houses, and it is generallycut to the length of 1 1 feet ; there is another kindof palm, which is called montaqui, the leaves ofwhich serve for covering the houses of the poor,and the shoots or buds for making a very argree-able sallad ; the heart of the tree is reduced to aflour, of wliich sweet cakes are made, and eateninstead of bread, for in this province neitherwheat nor vines are cultivated, the climate beingunfavourable to both. It abounds in variousspecies of canes, which serve to bind together thetimbers of w hich the houses are constructed ; oneof these species is called huembe, with which bells,though of great w'eight, are hung. In this pro-vince are all kinds of fruits, various birds, tigers,bears, wild boars, deer, and other wild animals ;amongst the fruits of the wild trees are some w'hichgrow, not upon the branches, but upon the trunkitself; that which is called huaipuru resembles alarge cherry in colour and flavour, and this,as well as others which are equally well tasted,serve as food for an infinite variety of birds ; anequal abundance of fish is likewise found in theneighbouring rivers. Here is cultivated rice,also maize, sugar-cane, j/ucas, camotes, See. andsome wild wax is found in the trunks of trees ; be-ing furnished by various kinds of bees. At thedistazice of 20 leagues to the s. of the capital, arefour settlements of Chiriguanos Indians, governedby their own captains, but subject, in some mea-sure, to this government, from being in friendshipAvith it, and trading with the Spaniards in wax,cotton, and maize. Hitherto its natives have been

averse to embracing the Catholic religion, but inthe incursions that have been made against us bythe barbarians, they have beeiTdver ready to lendus their assistance, and in fact form for us an out-work of defence. In the aforesaid four settlementsare 500 Indians, ivho are skilled in the use of thearrow and the lance, and are divided from theother barbarians of the same nation by the riverGrande or Huapay. This river runs from Char-cas to thee, by the side of the province of Tomina,and which, after making a bend in the figure of anhalf-moon, on tlie e. side of the province of SantaCruz, enters the Marmore, first receiving anotherriver describing a similar course, and known bythe name of the Pirapiti. On the e. and on theopposite side, are some settlements of Chanaes In-dians, the territory of whom is called Isofo. Tothe s. andv. zso. towards the frontiers of Tarija, andstill further on, are very many settlements of theinfidel Chiriguanos Indians; and in the valley ofIngre alone, which is eight leagues long, we find26 ; and in some of these the religious Franciscanorder of the college of Tarija have succeeded inmaking converts, though as yet in no consider-able numbers. These Indians are the most va-lorous, perfidious, and inconstant of all the na-tions lying to the e, of the river Paraguay ; 4000of them once fled for fear of meeting chastisementfor their having traitorously put to death the Cap-tain Alexo Garcia, a Portuguese, in the time ofDon Juan III. king of Portugal; they werecannibals, and used to fatten their prisoners beforethey killed them for their banquets. Their trea-ties Avith the Spaniards, and the occasional visitsthese have been obliged to pay them in their ter-ritories, havm induced them nearly to forget thisabominable practice ; but their innate cruelty stillexists, and particularly against the neighbouringnations, upon Avhom they look down Avith thegreatest scorn ; they have increased much, and arenow one of the most numerous nations in America;they are extremely cleanly, so much so that theyAvill go down to the rivers to Avash themselves evenat midnight, and in the coldest season. The Avomenalso, immediately after parturition, plunge them-selves into the Avater, and coming home, lay them-selves down upon a liltle mound of sand, Avhich,for this purpose, they have in their houses. Theinhabitants of this province amount to 16,000, andbesides the capital, Avhich is San Lorenzo de laFrontera, there are only the following settle-ments :

Porongo, Chilon,

Samaipata, Desposorios,

Valle Grazidc, Santa Ro>a,

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Bishops who have presided in Santa Cruz de laSierra.

1. Don Antonio Calderon, native of Vilches,dean of the holy church of Santa Fe, bisliop ofPuertorico and Panama; first bishop in 1605;died at the advanced age of upwards of 100years.

2. Don Fray Fernando de Ocampo, of the re-ligious order of St. Francis, a native of Madrid.

3. Don Juan Zapata y Figueroa, native ofVelez-Malaga ; he was canon and inquisitor ofSeville ; presented to the brishopric of Santa Cruzin 1634.

Fray Juan de Arguinao, a religiousDominican, native of Lima, was prior and provin-cial in his religion, first professor of theology andwriting in that university, qualificator of the in-quisition ; presented to the bishopric of Santa Cruzin 1646, and promoted to the archbishopric ofSanta Fe in 1661.

5. Don Fray Bernardino de Cardenas, native ofLima, of the order of St. Francis ; promoted fromParaguay to this bishopric in 1666.

6. Don Fray Juan de Rivera, of the order ofSt. Augustin, native of Pisco in Peru ; first pro-fessor of theology.

7. Don Fray Juan de Esturrizaga, of the orderof preachers, native of Lima.

8. Don Pedro de Cardenas y Arbieto, native ofLima, collegian of the royal college of San Mar-tin, canon of its holy church.

9. Hon Fray Juan de los Rios, of the order ofSt. Dominic, a native of Lima, provincial of hisreligion in the province of San Juan Bautista delPeru.

10. Don Fray Miguel Alvarez de Toledo, ofthe order of Nuestra Sexiora de la Merced, electedin 1701.

11. Don Miguel Bernardo de la Fuente, deanof the holy church of Truxillo, elected in 1727.

12. Don Andres de Vergara and Uribe, electedin 1744 ; he died in 1745.

13. Don Juan Pablo de Olmedo, native of Tu-cuman, elected in 1745, died in 1757.

14. Don Fernando Perez de Obiitas, native ofArequipa, elected in the aforesaid year, died in1760.

15. Don Francisco Ramon de Herboso, nativeof Lima, elected in 1760, promoted to the arch-bishopric of Charcas in 1766.

16. Don Juan Domingo Gonzalez de la Ri-gucra, elected the aforesaid year, and promotedto the archbishopric of the holy metropolitanchurch of Lima in 1780.

17. Don Alexandro de Ochoa, elected in 1782.

Cruz, Santa, a city of the above province,which was once the capital ; founded by Nuno deChaves in 1557, after that he had passed along theshores of the river Paraguay to discover a commu-nication with the other provinces. Its inhabitants,however, not being able to stay in it through theincessant sallies of the Indians who surroundedthem, were under the necessity of changing theirsettlement ; but disagreeing in the choice of place,some of them united together, and founded the cityof Santiago del Puerto, and others that of SanLorenzo de la Frontcra, which is to-day the capi-tal, the former city being entirely abandoned.

Cruz, Santa, a settlement of the province andcorregimunto of Yauyos in Peru; annexed to thecuracy of the settlement of Pacaran in the provinceof Canete.

Cruz, Santa, another, a conversion of Indiansof the missions which were held by tlie regulars ofthe company of Jesuits, in the province and go-vernment of Mainas of the kingdom of Quito.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and go-vernment of Cumaná in the kingdom of TierraFirme, between the cities of Cumanagoto and Ca-riaco.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and go-vernment of Popayan ; situate to the s. of the cityof Almaguer, in the limits of the jurisdiction olQuito.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlementand alca’d'ia mayor of Jochimilco in Nueva Es-pana ; situate in a mountainous and cold country,containing 46 families of Indians, who live by cut-ting timber and making fuel. It is two leagues tothe cU. of its capital.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and cor-regimiento of Chancay in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Paccho.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlement ofSt. Francisco del Valle, and akaldia mayor ofZultepec, in Nueva Espana. It contains 28 fa-milies of Indians, dedicated to the cultivation ofthe land, and cutting bark from trees. Ten leaguesfrom its head settlement.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and cor-regimiento of Caxamarca in Peru.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andcorregimiento of Lucanas in the same kingdom ;annexed to the curacy of Pucquin.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andcorregimiento of Canta in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Pari.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlementof Huehuetlan, and alcaldia mayor oi Cuicalian, inNueva Espana; situate on the middle of a raoun-

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inin, and containing 72 families of Indians, dedi-cated to the commerce of saltpetre and cochineal.Three leagues to the s. of its head settlement.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the alcaldia mayorof the same kingdom. It contains 36 families ofIndians, and is in the boundaries of the jurisdictionof Xalapa.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the island of Cuba;situate bj a creek or bay formed by the sea, on thes. coast, between the settlement of Guanco and thebay of iflatanzas.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlementof Zultepec, and alcaldia mayor of the same name,in Nueva Espana. It contains 36 families of In-dians, and is six leagues to the s. of the capital.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Toluca in the same king-dom. It contains 51 families of Indians, and is ata small distance to the n. of its capital.

Cruz, Santa, another, a head settlement of thedistrict of the province and alceddia mayor ofTlaxcala in the same kingdom.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlementof Chapala, and alcaldia mayor of Zayula, in thesame kingdom ; situate on the shore of the greatlake or sea of Chapala. It contains 28 families ofIndians, who cultivate many seeds and fruits fromthe fertility and pleasantness of the country; oc-cupying tliemselves also in traffic and in fishingupon the lakes. It is tsvo leagues to the e. of itshead settlement.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province and government of Mainas ofthe kingdom of Quito ; situate on the shore of theriver Napo.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlementand edra’dia mayor of Caxititlan in Nueva Es-pana. Four leagues to the s. of its cajjital.

Cruz, Santa, another, of tlie head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Tlajomulco in the samekingdom, in which there is a convcul of the reli-gious order of St. Francis.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlementof Cacula, cmA alcaldia mayoral Zayula, in thesame kingdom. It contains 50 families of Indians,who employ themselves in agriculture, and in cut-ting wood upon the mountains of its district. Fourleagues between the w. and s. of its head settlement.

Cruz, Santa, another, of tlic missions whichW,ere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits in the province of Tepeguana, and kingdomof Nueva Vizcaya ; situate on the shore of theriver of Las Nasas.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the nrissions of the

VOL. 1.

religious order of St. Francis, in the province ofTaraumara, of the same kingdom as the former.Eighteen leagues to the s, e. of the real of the minesand town of San Felipe de Chiguagua.

Cruz, Santa, another, called Real de la Cruz,in the province and government of Cartagena, onthe shore of the large river Magdalena, and uponan island formed by this river and the w aters of theDique.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and go-vernment of Antioquía in the Nuevo Reyno dcGranada, on the shore of the river Cauca.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán in Peru, of the district andjurisdiction of the city of Cordoba.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the missions whichare held by the religious order of St. Francis, inthe kingdom of Nuevo Mexico.

Cruz, Santa, another, with the addition ofMayo, in the province and government of Cinaloa ;situate at the mouth of the river Mayo, whichgives it its name. It has a port convenient for trade.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the same kingdom ofNuevo Mexico ; situate on the shore of a riverwhich enters the large river Del Norte.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andgovernment of the river Hacha ; situate on thecoast, to the e. of tlie capital.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and go-vernment of Antioquía in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; founded on the shore of the river Sinu,with a good port, which serves as an entrepot forgoods to be carried to Choco, from whence it liesa three-days journey.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and go-vernment of Cinaloa in Nueva Espana ; situate atthe mouth of the river Mayo, where this entersthe California, or Mar Roxo de Cortes. Distinctfrom another, which is upon a shore of the sameriver.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and go-vernment of La Sonora in the same kingdom ;situate in the country of the Apaches Indians, onthe shore of a river which enters the Gila.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andalcaldia mayor of Zacapula in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andalcaldia mayor of Verapaz in the same kingdom.

(Cruz, a parish of tlie province and govern-ment of Buenos Ayres ; situate on a small riverrunning into the Plata, about five leagues n. of thetown of imxan, in lat. 31° 16' 22". Long. 59*23' SO" a'.)

(Cruz, La, a settlement of Indians of the pro-3 z

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vince and government of Buenos Ayres, foundedin ]629, in lat. 29° 29' 1" 5.]t])Cruz, Santa, an island oftheN. sea,^one of theAntilles, 22 leagues long and five wide. Its terri-tory is fertile, but the air unhealthy at certain sea-sons, from the low situation. It has many rivers,streams, and fountains, with three very good andconvenient ports. It was for a long while desert,until some English settled themselves in it, andbegan to cultivate it; afterwards the French pos-sessed themselves of it, in 1650, and sold it thefollowing year to the knights of Malta, from whomit was bought, in 1664, by the West India com-pany. In 1674, it was incorporated with the pos-sessions of the crown by the king of France. Itsinhabitants afterwards removed to the island of St.Domingo, demolished the forts, and sold it to acompany of Danes, of Copenhagen, who nowpossess it. It was the first of the Antilles whichwas occupied by the Spaniards ; is SO leagues

from the island of St. Christopher’s, eight fromPuertorico, six from that of Boriquen, and fivefrom that of St. Thomas. It abounds in sugarscane and tobacco, as also in fruits, which renderit very delightful. [It is said to produce SO, 000or 40,000 hhds. of sugar annually, and other W.India commodities, in tolerable plenty. It is ina high state of cultivation, and has about 3000white inhabitants and 30,000 slaves. A greatproportion of the Negroes of this island have em-braced Christianity, under the Moravian mission-aries, whose influence has been greatly promotiveof its prosperity.

The official value of the Imports and Exportsof Santa Cruz were, in

1809, imports ^^435,378, exports ^ig84,964.

1810, 422,033, 89,949.

And the quantities of the principal articles im--

ported into Great Britain were, in

Coffee.

Sugar.

Rum.

Cotton Wool.

Brit. Plant.

For. Plant.

Brit. Plant.

For. Plant.

Cwt.

Cwt.

Cwt.

Cwt.

Galls.

Lbs.

1809, 297

1479

280,211

374

181,594

610,903

1810, 31

290,933

236,307

174,294

Santa Cruz is in lat. 70° 44' n. Long. 64° 43' w.See West Indies.]

Cruz, Santa, a small island in the straits©f Magellan, opposite cape Monday. The Ad-miral Pedro Sarmiento took possession of it for thecrown of Spain, that making the tenth time of itsbeing captured.

Cruz, Santa, a small island of the coast ofBrazil, in the province and captainship of Rey,between that coast and the island of Santa Catalina.

Cruz, Santa, a sand -bank or islet near the n.coast of the island of Cuba, and close to the sand-bank of Cumplido.

Cruz, Santa, a point of the coast of the provinceand government of Honduras, called Triunfo dela Cruz, (Triumph of the Cross), between theport of La Sal and the river Tian, SO leagues fromthe gulf, in lat. 15° 40'.

Cruz, Santa, a port of the coast which lies be-tween the river La Plata and the straits of Magellan.On one side it has the Ensenada Grande, or LargeBay, and on the other the mountain of Santa Ines.Lat. 50° 10' s.

==Cruz, Santa, a river of the coastwhich lies be-tween the river La Plata and the straits of Magel-lan. It runs into the sea.

Q

Cruz, Santa, a small river of the provinceand captainship of Los Ilheos in Brazil. Itrises near the coast, runs e. and enters the sea be-tween the Grande and the Dulce, opposite theshoals ofS. Antonio.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andcaptainship of Seara in the same kingdom. It risesnear the coast, runs n. and enters the sea betweenthe point of Palmeras and that of Tortuga,

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andgovernment of Maracaybo. It rises in the sierraof Perija, runs e. and enters the great lake on thew. side.

Cruz, Santa, a lake of the province and countryof the Chiquitos Indians in Peru, formed from adrain issuing from the side of the river Para-guay, opposite the cordillera of San Fernando.

Cruz, Santa, a small island of the gulf of California, or Mar Roxo de Cortes; situate near thecoast, between the two islands of Catalana and SanJoseph.

Cruz, Santa, a small port of the island of Curacao, in the w. part, opposite the island of Oruba.

Cruz, Santa, a mountain on the coast of theMalvine or Falkland isles.

Cruz, Santa, a cape or point of the coast of thx

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island of Cuba, called Cruz del Principe (Cross ofthe Prince. )

CUA, Sahante de, a village and settlementof the Portuguese, in the kingdom of Brazil ;situate in the sierra of Los Corixes, between theriver of this name and that of Araguaya.

CUACHIMALCO, a settlenaent of the headsettlement of Olinala, and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa,in Nueva Espana. It contains 06 families of In-dians, and is two leagues to the n. e. of its headsettlement.

CUAITLAN, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Metlatlan, <x\\A. alcaldia mayor of [Papantla]],inNueva Espana. It contains 8i families of In-dians, and is three leagues from its head settle-ment, 16 s. w. of the capital.

CUALA, Santiago de, a settlement and headsettlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofTezcoco in Nueva Espana; annexed to the cu-racy of Capulalpa, and six leagues to the n. e. ofits capital.

CUALAQUE, a scttlerneut of the head settle-ment and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in NuevaEspana. It contains two families of Spaniards,eight of Mustees^ 140 of Indians, and a conventof the religious order of St. Augustin. It is of amild temperature, and its principal commerceconsists in making painted cups of fine manufac-ture. Four leagues w. of its capital.

CUAMILA, a small settlement or ward of thealcaldia mayor Guachinango in NuevaEspana ;annexed to the curacy of the settlement ofTIaola.

CUANALA, Santa Maria de, a settlementof the bead settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tezcoco in NuevaEspana ; situate on the shore ofthe pleasant valley of (3culma. It is surroundedby many small settlements or wards, in which thereare reckoned 212 families of Indians, and 10 ofMuslees and Mulattoes ;* all of whom are em-ployed as drovers or agriculturalists. Two leaguesn. of its capital.

CUAPALA, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Atlistac, and aluddia mayor of Tlapa, inNuevaEspana. It contains 42 families of In-dians.

CUATALPAN Santiago de, a settlement ofthe alcaldia mayor Tezcoco in NuevaEspana.it contains 36 families of Indians, and 27 of Spa-niards and Mustics.

CUATLAN, a settlement of the head settlementof Ixtlahuacan, and alcaldia mayor of Colima ;.situate on the margin of a river which fertilizesthe gardens lying on either of its banks, the sameabounding in ail kinds of fruits and herbs. It is

of a mild temperature, and its commerce consistsin maize, French beans, and in the making ofmats. In its precincts are six estates or groves ofcoco trees ; and in those dwell .nine families ofSpaniards and Miistees. In the settlement are 70families. It is three leagues e. of its head settle-ment.

CUAUCHINOLA, a settlement of the headsettlement of Xoxutla, and alcaldia mayor ofCuernavaca, in NuevaEspana.

CUAUCOTLA, S. Diego de, a settlement ofthe head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Cholulain NuevaEspana. It contains 27 families of In-dians, and is a quarter of a league from its capital.

CUAUTIPAC, a settlement of the head settle-ment and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in NuevaEspana. It contains 23 families of Indians, and isone league to the s. e. of its capital.

CUAUTLA, San Juan de, a settlement ofthe head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Cholulain NuevaEspana. It contains 16 families of In-dians, and is one league to the w. of its capital.

CUAUTLA, with the dedicatory title of SanMiguel, another settlement of the alcaldia mayorof Cuernavaca in the same kingdom ; situate in afertile and beautiful open plain near the settlementof Mazate.pec. It contains 23 families of Indians,and 11 of Spaniards and Mulattoes, who employthemselves in fishing for small but well-flavouredbagres, which are found in great abundance in ariver which runs near the town.

CUAUTOLOTITLAN, a settlement of thehead settlement of Atlistac, and alcaldia mayor ofTlapa, in NuevaEspana. It contains 42 familiesof Indians.

CUB, a small river of the province and colonyof Virginia. It runs and enters the Staunton.

CUBA, a large island of the N. sea, and thelargest of the Antilles ; situate at the mouth or en-trance of the bay of Mexico. It is 235 leagues inlength from c. to a', from the cape of St. Antonioto the point of Maizi, and 45 at its widest part,and 14 at the uarrow'est. To the n. it has Floridaand the ijiicayes isles ; to the c. the island of St.Domingo, and to the s. the island of Jamaica, andthe s. continent; and to the w. the gulf or hay ofMexico. It is betw een and 23°15'n. Int. and

from 74° 2' 3'^ to 84°55'tw. long It was discoveredby Admiral Cliristopher Columbus in 1492, in hisfirst voyage, before he discovered St. Domingo ;and he mistook it for the continent, and landedupon it. In tJie year 1494, it was found to be auisland by Nicholas do Obando. lie measured itscircumierence, and careened his ve.s.sel in the portof the Havana, which from that time has been

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canons in Salamatica, passed over to the Indies asvicar of the province of Santa Cruz in the Spapishisland, came to Spain at the general capitulation,and was elected bishop of Cuba in 1602 ; he at-tempted to translate the cathedral to the Havana,but did not succeed ; visited Florida, and waspromoted to the mitre of Guatemala in 1610.

12. Dm Fray Alonso Enriquez de Armendariz,of the order of Nuestra Senora de la Merced, na-tive of Navarra; was comendador of Granada,titular bishop of Sidonia, and nominated to Cubain 1610; he wrote, by order of the king, aspiritual and temporal relation of his bishopric,and w’as promoted to that of Mechoacan in 1624.

13. Don Fray Gregorio de Alarcon, of theorder of St. Augustin ; elected in the same year ;died in the voyage.

14. Don Leon de Cervantes, native of Mexico ;he studied in Salamanca, and was collegiate inthe university of Sigiienza, school-master in thechurch of Santa Fe, in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra-nada, bishop of Santa Marta, and promoted to thissee in 1625, and from this to that of Guadalaxara,in 1631.

15. Don Fray Geronimo Manrique de Lara,of the order of Nuestra Sefiora de la Merced, twicecomendador of Olmedo, difinidor of the provinceof Castille, and master in sacred theology ; electedbishop of Cuba in 1631 ; he died in 1645.

16. Don Martin de Zelaya Ocarriz, in 1645.

17. Don Nicolas de la Torre, native of Mexico,first professor of theology in its university, fourlimes rector of the same, canon of that metropo-litan church, first chaplain of the college ofNuestra Senora de la Caridad, examiner-generalof the archbishopric, and visitor-general of theconvents ; presented to the bishopric of Cuba in1646 ; died in 1652.

18. Don Juan de Montiel, until 1656.

19. Don Pedro de Reyna Maldonado, nativeof Lima, a celebrated writer, who governed un-til 1658.

20. Don Juan de Santa Matia Saenz de Ma-nosca, native of Mexico, inquisitor of that capi-tal ; elected in 1661, promoted to the church ofGuatemala in 1667.

21. Don Fray Bernardo Alonso de los Rios, ofthe order of La Trinidad Calzada, until 1670.

22. Don Gabriel Diaz Vara and Caldron, until1674.

23. Don Juan Garcia de Palacios, until 1680.

24. Don Fray Baltasar de Figueroa y Guinea,a Bernard ine monk, until 1683.

,25. Don Diego Ebelino dc Compostela, in 1685.

26. Don Fray Geronimo de Valdes, Basilicanmonk; elected, in 1703, bishop of Portorico, andpromoted to this in 1706.

27. Don Fray Francisco de Yzaguirre, of thereligious order of St. Augustin ; he governed until1730.

28. Don Fray Gaspar de Molina y Oviedo, ofthe order of St. Augustin ; elected in 1730, pro-moted before he took possession of the bishopricof Malaga to the government of the cogncil, andafterwards to the purple.

29. Don Fray J uan Laso de la Vega y Cansino.of the religious order of St. P'rancis ; elected in thesame year, 1730.

30. Don Pedro Agustin Morel de Santa Cruz ;he governed until 1753.

31. Don Santiago de Echavarria y Elquezaga,native of Cuba ; promoted to the bishopric of Ni-caragua in 1753.

Governors and Captains-general who have presidedin the island of Cuba.

1. Don Diego Velazquez, native of Cuellar,knight of the order of Santiago, a conqueror andsettler of this island, nominated by the AdmiralChristopher Columbus in 1511; he governedAvith great applause until his death, in 1524.

2. Manuel de Roxas, native of the same townas was his predecessor, on account of whose deathhe was nominated to the bishopric, and in remem-brance of the great credit he had acquired in theconquest of the island, receiving his appointmentat the hands of the audience of St. Domingo, andbeing confirmed in it by the emperor in 1525 ; hegoverned until 1538.

3. Hernando de Soto, who governed until1539.

4. The Licentiate Juan de Avila, until 1545.

5. The Licentiate Antonio de Chaves, until1547.

6. The Doctor Gonzalo Perez Angulo, until1549.

7. Diego Mazariegos, until 1554.

8. Garcia Osorio, until 1565.

9. Pedro Melendez de Aviles, until 1568.

10. Don Gabriel de Montalvo, until 1576.

11. The Captain Francisco Carreno, until1578.

12. The Licentiate Gaspar de Toro, until1580.

13. Gabriel de Lujan, until 1584.

14. The militia colonel Juan de Texeda, until1589.

15. Don Juan Maldonado Barrionuevo, until1596.

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country of Las Amazonas. It flows in the territoryof the Carigueres or Mutuanis Indians, runs c.and enters the Madera opposite the great cataract.

CUIAPAN, a settlement of the head settlementof Atoyaque, and alcaldia mayor of Zayula, inNueva Espana. It contains 70 families of In-dians, who live by agriculture and making coarsestuffs. It is one league to the s. of its head settle-ment.

CUIATAN, a settlement of the head settlementof the district and alcaldia mayor of Caxitlan,being a league and a half’s distance to the s. w.

CUIAUTEPEC, Santiago de, a settlementof the head settlement of Olinala, and alcaldiamayor of Tlapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains32 families of Indians, and is two leagues to then. c. of its head settlement.

CUIAUTEPEC, another settlement of the headsettlement of Ayotitlan, and alcaldia mayor ofAmola, in the same kingdom. It contains 13 fa-milies of Indians, who live by agriculture andbreeding cattle; is 10 leagues to the w, of itshead settlement.

CUICATLAN, the alcaldia mayor of the pro-vince and bishopric of Mechoacan. It is 19leagues in length from e. to w. and 1 1 in widthn. s. It is of a hot temperature, abounds in salt-petre, scarlet-dye, and cotton, of which beautifulornamental dresses are made ; these being the prin-cipal source of its commerce. The capital is thesettlement of the same name, inhabited by 125 fa-milies of Cuicatecos Indians, who cultivate greatquantities of maize, French beans, and cotton. Itis 70 leagues to the e. with a slight inclination tothe s. of Mexico. The other settlements of thisdistrict are,

Alpizagua==, ==Teponastla,

Cotahuiztla==, Teutitlan]],

Nacantepec==, Santa Ana]],

Quiotepeque==, ==San Lucas,

Coyula==, ==San Antonio,

Izcatlan==, ==San Mateo,

Papalotipac==, ==San Martin,

Santiago==, ==Casa Blanca,

San Lorenzo==, ==Nanahuatipac,

San Geronimo==, ==San Juan de los Cues,

Santa Cruz==, ==Thecomahuaca,

Santa Maria==, ==Teopuxco,

San Lorenzo==, ==Santiago,

Los Santos Reyes==, ==Huehuetlan,

Tepeuzila==, ==San Pedro,

San Pedro==, ==San Juan,

San Andres==, ==Huahutla,

Santa Maria==,==Chilchola.

==CUICEO=, (Of the lake), the alcaldia mayor of

the province and bishopric of Mechoacan ; boundedc. by the province of Acambaro ; n. by that ofZelaya; nc. by that of Pasquaro ; and s. by thatof Valladolid. It is in length eight leagues frome. to w. and five in width «. s. It is surroundedby a lake of wholesome water, which gives itsname to the jurisdiction, and which, towards then. part, becomes dry in the summer season, itswaters being supplied from certain drains fromanother large lake which lies on its s. side. Thetemperature here is, for the most part, mild anddry, and the place abounds with salutary waters,which bubble out from a fountain in an island ofthe above mentioned lake. Its commerce is verysmall, since it produces only maize, French beans,and Chile pepper, and a kind of fish found in greatabundance in both the lakes, called charaes.

The capital is the settlement of the samename ; situate in front of the island formed bythe lake.. It contains a convent of the religiousorder of St. Augustin, and 190 families of Indians,including those of the wards of its district, 72 ofSpaniards, 11 of Mulattoes, and 43 of Mustees.It is 50 leagues to the w, of Mexico. The othersettlements are,

San Marcos==, ==San Buena Ventura,

San Geronimo==, ==Cupandaro,

Sta. Ana Maya==, ==San Juan. (Mechoacan)

CUICOCHA, a large lake of the province andcorregimiento of Octavalo in the kingdom ofQuito, surrounded by living stone. To the e. ithas a rock, where it forms a streamlet, which after-wards enters the river Blanco. It does not appearto receive its waters from any source, and i«thought to be filled through subterraneous aque-ducts from the mountain of Cota-cacbe, which iscovered with eternal snow. In the middle of thislake rise two hills, which have the appearance oftwo beautiful isles, the one being covered withtrees, and filled with stags and mountain goats, andthe other being bedecked with a herb calledp^jow,amongst which thrive many Indian rabbits, which,in the language of the country, are called cuy^ andfrom thence the name of Cuy-cocha, which meansthe lake of Indian rabbits. The water which runsbetween the two islands, forms a channel of 3000fathoms. This lake belongs to the noble familyof the Chiribogas of Quito.

CUILAPA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Ygualapa in Nueva Espana,half a quarter of a league’s distance from its ca-pital.

CUILAPA, a town, the head settlement of thedistrict of the alcaldia mayor of Quatro Villas inNueva Espana ; situate at the skirt of a mountain.

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CUN

CUP

Ostimiiri in Nueva Espana ; situate 45 leaguesfrom the river Chico.

CUMPLIDA, an island of Paraguay, in theprovince and government of this name. It issuesfrom an arm thrown out on the w. side of the river,and forms the lake Jayba.

CUMPLIDA, another island, of the Itenes orGuapore, in the province and country of LasAmazonas.

CUMPLIDO, Cayo, an inlet of the N. sea,near the coast of the island of Cuba, the Cayo Ro-mano, and the Cayo de Cruz.

[CUNCHES, Indians of Chile. See index toadditional history respecting that country, chap.

CUNDAUE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Antioquia in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada.

CUNDINAMARCA. See Granada.

Cundurmarca|CUNDURMARCA]], a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Caxamarquilla in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of its capital.

CUNEN, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Zacapula in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CUNGAYO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Angaraez in Peru.

CUNGIES, a barbarous nation of Indians, whoinhabit the «. of the river Napo, between therivers Tambur to the e. and the Blanco, a smallriver, to the w. These infidels are bounded n. bythe Ancuteres, and dwell near to the Abijiras andthe Icahuates.

[Cuniue|CUNIUE]], a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cuenca in the kingdom of Quito ;in the district of which are many estates, as thoseof Pillachiquir, Guanacauri, Tianorte, Pugni,Tambo de Marivina, Alparupaccha, and Chi-nan.

CUNIUOS, a barbarous and ferocious nationof the province and country of Las Amazonas, tothe c. of the river Ucayale, and to the s. of theMaranon. It is very numerous, and extends asfar as the mountain of Guanuco, and the shore ofthe river Beni. These Indians are the friends andallies of the Piros, and were first converted by theregulars of the company of Jesuits, the mission-aries of the province of Maynas ; but in 1714 theyrose against these holy fathers, and put to deaththe Father Bicter, a German, and the LicentiateVazquez, a regular priest, who accompanied thesaid mission.

[Cuntuquita|CUNTUQUITA]], a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Carabaya ; annexed to thecuracy of Coaza.

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CUNUMAL, San Geronimo de, a settle-ment of the province and corregimiento of Luyaand Chillaos in Peru ; annexed to the curacy ofOlto.

[Cunuri|CUNURI]], a settlement of the province andgovernment of Guayana, one of those belongingto the missions held there by the Capuchin fathers.It is on the shore of the river Y uruario, near thesettlement of San Joseph de Leonisa.

CUNURIS, a river of the same province as theabove settlement (Guyana). It rises in the mountain of Oro,or of Parima, and runs s. until it enters the Mara-non, in lat. 2° SO' s. It takes its name from thebarbarous nation of Indians who live in the woodsbordering upon its shores.

CUPALEN, a river of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Ayres. It runs e. and entersthe Uruguay, between the rivers Gualeguay andSaspoy.

CUPANDARO, Santiago de, a settlementof the head settlement and alcaldia mayor ofCuiceo in Nueva Espana ; situate on the shore ofthe lake. It contains 33 families of Indians, whohave the peculiarity of being very white and goodlooking ; they live by fishing in the same lake.The settlement is two leagues from its capital.

CUPE, a large and abundant river of the pro-vince and government of Darien, and kingdom ofTierra Fir me. It rises in the mountains in theinterior, runs many leagues, collecting the watersof other rivers, and enters the Tuira.

CUPENAME, a river of the province andgovernment of Guayana, or country of the Ama-zonas, in the part of the Dutch colonies.

CUPl, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Chumbivilcas in the same kingdom ;annexed to the curacy of Toro.

[CUPICA, a bay or small port to the s. e. ofPanama, following the coast of the Pacific ocean,from cape S. Miguel to cape Corientes, Thename of this bay has acquired celebrity in thekingdom of New Granada, on account of a newplan of communication between the two seas. FromCupica we cross, for five or six marine leagues, asoil quite level and proper for a canal, whichwould terminate at the Embarcadero of theRio Naipi ; this last river is navigable, and flowsbelow the village of Zatara into the great RioAtrato, which itself enters the Atlantic sea. Avery intelligent Biscayan pilot, M. Gogueneche,was the first rvho had the merit of turning theattention of government to the bay of Cupica,which ought to be for the new continent whatSuez was formerly for Asia. M. Gogueneche pro-posed to transport the cacao of Guayaquil by the4 c

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